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Education

Watkins Gray International LLP


Contents

About WGI

6

Design for Education

10

Experience ▪ Primary Schools ▪ Secondary Schools

Allens Croft Primary School, Birmingham PPP2

St Botolphs C of E Primary School, Lincolnshire PFI

12 34

Published Articles

68

Awards

78

Client Feedback

82


About WGI Allerton High School, Leeds BSF


“to design to build”

Watkins Gray International LLP (WGI) is an award-winning architectural practice whose mission is to design and deliver buildings and places that make a positive difference to society. Our practice ethos is ‘to design to build’. Buildings must look good, function well and be technologically sound, and to accomplish this, we must understand how to build in order to design. It is important to generate innovative and exciting ideas at the early design stages of a project, but ultimately it will not change lives if it is not built. Renowned for our mastery of both the art and science of building, WGI enhances lives by designing projects and places that both delight users and perform well. Our team employs the latest thinking and best practice in designing and delivering the built environment, an approach which evolves with social, economic and cultural needs while avoiding fast-disappearing trends. A Brief History Watkins Gray International’s origins lie in a small Bristol architectural practice opened in 1900 by William Watkins. When the company started, we focused on domestic, commercial and healthcare projects. An office in London was later opened as our portfolio grew, and in 1939 Stuart Gray won a competition to design the new St Georges Teaching Hospital in London, so cementing our award-winning capabilities. Over the next several decades, in addition to our expanding work throughout the UK, the practice opened offices across the West Indies, Africa and the Middle East, mainly building commercial and industrial premises, as well as hospitals, schools, universities and sports stadia. WGI Today The focus of the practice today is in seven key market sectors internationally: Defence, Education, Healthcare, Housing, Lifestyle, Technology and Workplace. We serve clients from our offices in London and Leeds, as well as associated offices in Manchester, Belfast, Dublin, and several other international locations. A passion for designing to build through a mastery of both the art and science of building will ensure continued growth and success for the practice, and has enabled us to receive over 25 awards in the past ten years alone, as well as a very high rate of client satisfaction and repeat work.

Benfield School, Newcastle BSF




Core Values

Respect for the individual and the community: To value each and everyone’s contributions, whilst acknowledging our responsibility to the wider society

Client focus: To recognise clients as individuals by listening to their needs, striving to exceed their expectations and sharing in their success

Professionalism and integrity: To engender confidence in and respect for our people and our skills by acting honestly, fairly and truthfully

▪ ▪

Teamwork: To believe that no one is as good as all of us

A sustainable future: To plan for our own sustainable future, whilst also raising awareness that sustainability encompasses the social, economic and environmental aspects of our life, and it is therefore central to our work and our conduct

Enjoyment through hard work: To approach our business with energy and enthusiasm and the desire to enjoy the working relationships with those around us

High quality design: To employ a robust and manageable “best practices” approach to ensure that great ideas are nurtured and delivered

Temple Moor High School, Leeds BSF

International Reach WGI is one of the top architectural practices based in the UK, currently about 100 people strong. As an organisation of this size, we have considerable flexibility in meeting the demands of large projects by managing our resource capacity across the whole practice. We have further flexibility and capacity through our network of associated offices as well as collaborative relationships with several other architectural practices internationally where our work together has been based on the demands of specific projects. Our approach is to be ‘one practice with many front doors’, thus ensuring our clients receive consistently high quality design, delivery and service from all our locations. We believe this strategy of in-house staff, associate offices and collaborative arrangements is key to our future influence and reach in an industry of limited resources and often unpredictable programmes, while enabling us to maintain the quality in design, delivery and service expected by our clients worldwide.

St Botolphs C of E Primary School, Lincolnshire PFI




Design for Education St Botolphs C of E Primary School, Lincolnshire PFI


Design for Education

WGI has extensive experience of the educational sector gained over the last 40 years, on over 200 schools. WGI’s design objective has always been to produce stimulating, comfortable and effective environments in which teaching and learning will be able to flourish; and is based on a clear understanding of educational objectives and the need to provide flexible accommodation that facilitates an ever changing curriculum. WGI has developed a specialist team of architects with an intimate knowledge of school design requirements of all types and at all levels focused on providing the facilities required for the challenges facing schools of the future. The quality of service derives therefore from the knowledge and confidence that we know how to meet the client’s aspirations both in design and delivery of educational buildings. These objectives include: ▪ Effective teaching and learning spaces ▪ Well defined circulation ▪ Accessible community facilities ▪ Integration of resource base learning ▪ Appropriate social spaces ▪ Intelligent flexible teaching and learning accommodation ▪ Sustainable buildings (social, economic and environmental) ▪ Low maintenance, best value solutions Rapid changes in education vision and pedagogy, allied to almost exponential development of information technology, mean that there is an ever-widening gap between the life expectancy of the building fabric of schools and the teaching and learning theories around which they are built. The need to completely rebuild or significantly modify schools built only twenty years ago is testament to that rate of change – and it is increasing. In this environment of rapid change, the time between approval of design proposals and the opening of new facilities can result in inadvertently built-in obsolescence. Innovations in teaching and learning arise in a number of ways: from experience, from research, from government policy - and from educational fashion. All of these will generate new ways of planning buildings, but they may not all have the same authority either at the time they were formulated or in their likely longevity. If the buildings are to outlast the particular pedagogical approach that generated them, attention to flexibility and adaptability is crucial. New school designs need to be carefully considered to respond to the changing dynamics of teaching and learning styles and more specifically to the transformational vision promoted by education providers (Children’s Services, Education Trusts, Academies etc) However, such innovation in teaching and learning may need time to evolve at a pace suitable for individual schools and teaching pedagogy. In support of the vision we will develop a ‘language of learning’ that is understood by those engaged in communicating the space need and those responsible for creating the environments to support such needs.

Allerton Grange & Allerton High School, Leeds BSF

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With clear communication established, we will direct an inside - out design approach, where the activity drives the design solution for the learning and teaching environment. This bespoke yet flexible approach will lead to a more appropriate personalising of learning in direct response to individual learner needs. WGI has been involved with BSF since the beginning, winning Leeds BSF, which was a Wave 1 project. As a result we understand and have considerable experience with the funding arrangements of BSF such as Building Schools for the Future Investments (BSFI), the central investment business for BSF and the role that such processes as the Funding Allocation Model (FAM), Outline Business Case (OBC) and Final Business Case (FBC) have in getting formal approval to fund the project from PfS and DCSF. The Academies Programme aims to establish 400 Academies in England. Academies are publicly-funded independent schools, for pupils of all abilities, established by sponsors from business, faith or voluntary groups working in partnership with central Government and local education partners. WGI are involved in the Academies programme as part of the team of a number of the framework contractors. Our belief is that architecture brings together the art and science of building. At WGI we combine these professional skills with those of our various sector specialisms and through this we believe we can bring added value to the process of designing and delivering sustainable development and regeneration.

Highgate Wood School, Haringey BSF

11


Experience: Primary Schools Allerton Grange Secondary School, Leeds BSF


Birmingham PPP2

Between 2004 and 2007 WGI were contracted under the Birmingham Schools PPP2 to design twelve new build schools: Allens Croft Children Centre, Allens Croft Primary School, Arden Primary School, Blakesley Primary School, Chilcote Primary School, Hobmoor Primary School, Kingsland Primary School, St James Primary School, Wheelers Lane Primary School, Yarnfield Primary School, Arthur Terry Secondary School, and Wheelers Lane Technology College. The delivery of education is changing and is becoming dependent on a flexible approach to both design and operation of the traditional teaching spaces. Our designs for all the school’s took a fresh look at the way in which the traditional classroom can be designed in an attempt to resolve the council’s desire to provide additional teaching spaces within the overall area provision set by the stated design guide. The outcome of this approach has enabled each school to develop an arrangement that best suits the needs of the individual school. In conjunction with a flexible approach to the classroom design, we also considered the desire to establish ‘full service schools’ whereby the use of the facility can be adaptable to respond to the full working day. This key principle brings into reality the role of the school in the community and the future proofing of the school terms extending into the summer months. The reason being that the integration of a child and adult learning centre can help to build communities and establish a sense of place and identity. Hobmoor Primary School, Birmingham PPP2

The schools are, therefore, far from traditional education establishments, but allow for a more holistic view of life-long learning with a community spirit that reinforces a sense of place and local business integration. Our design solutions aim to enrich the experience for users and to become expressions of full social inclusion. Throughout the design development period, the framework for good design, outlined by the Commission for Architecture & the Built Environment (CABE), has been utilised as a constant reference. By adoption of the 10 key points for good design of a school as outlined in ‘Client Guide - Achieving well designed schools through PFI’ published by CABE we are confident that we have achieved schools for the children of today as well as the future. All the school designs have adopted a clear and defined rationale of internal circulation. The result has been to establish a hierarchy of movement around the buildings, developed to enable the spaces between classrooms to become an integral part of the learning experience. Within all the primary schools additional ‘activity’ areas have been provided as part of the innovative arrangement of the classroom. These areas fulfil a range of learning and resource functions and with the provision of high level glazing at these junctions, the result has been the creation of light and texture spaces reflecting each schools individual identity. Light voids have been introduced in the circulation areas as part of the ventilation strategy for teaching spaces. This provides for a natural stack effect within the teaching wings, with the added benefit of ducted fresh air into these areas meaning the resultant circulation spaces are light and airy. This significantly enhances the spatial quality and improves the opportunity for social interaction and display activities.

Arthur Terry Secondary School, Birmingham PPP2

Client:

Transform Schools (Balfour Beatty Construction) for Birmingham City Council

Value:

£56m (total PPP2)

Completion Date:

2007

Services provided:

Full Architectural services

Awards: 14

Hobmoor Primary School: 2007 Winner of the Built in Quality Awards Allens Croft Children’s Centre: 2008 Guardian Headteacher of the Year


Arthur Terry Secondary School

Yarnfield Primary School

Wheelers Lane Primary School

Allens Croft Primary School

Arden Primary School

Hobmoor Primary School

St james Primary School

Wheelers Lane Technology College

Yarnfield Primary School

15


Hobmoor Primary School Birmingham PPP2

Hobmoor primary school is situated to the southern side of the site creating an ideal orientation for the classrooms and thus providing an excellent opportunity for a controlled internal environment based on sustainable principles. The new build is a compact design which in turn maximises the available external space which is extremely beneficial given the small available site area and the school’s preference to encouraging greater opportunities for learning through landscape. The new building benefits from a clear simple legible form, which expresses a light and bright circulation zone that contains several activity areas with well-proportioned spaces. Beyond the main entrance lobby is a striking ICT space and library which lie at the heart of the school, top lit by a feature lantern light and observable from the gallery. These spaces are immediately accessible to the community. To one side of the library and ICT area is located the main hall and studio. These rooms are linked together to enable a suite of rooms to be created for performances, parents evenings and a range of activities. A clear and well-defined circulation system is essential to the success of any education building and the school design has adopted a clear and defi ned rationale of both internal and external circulation. The result has been to establish a hierarchy of movement around the building, developed to enable the spaces between classrooms to become an integral part of the learning experience. ‘Activity’ areas have been provided as part of the innovative arrangement of the classroom which will fulfil a range of learning and resource functions and with the provision of high level glazing at these junctions, the result will be the creation of light and texture spaces reflecting each schools individual identity. Client:

Transform Schools (Balfour Beatty Construction) for Birmingham City Council

Value:

£3.9m

Completion Date:

2007

Services provided:

Full Architectural services

Size:

3000m2

Awards:

2007 Winner of the Built in Quality Awards

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Allens Croft Primary School & Children’s Centre Birmingham PPP2

The designs of the new schools set out to achieve our objective to build schools for the future, today. The basis of the design approach has also been focused on our commitment to provide fully integrated, modern schools. The new proposal has two main functional elements. The Primary school is single storey and the Children’s Centre is a two storey building, housing the integrated Early Years and Nursery School on the ground floor and the PCT administration support spaces on the first floor. This presents a two storey façade to Allens Croft Road, as the focus of the Centre and as a balance to the double height forms of the primary halls. The Children’s Centre has an independent entrance and reception area which is managed separately from the education realm of the EYC. A welcoming entrance foyer and open waiting area provide parents and children with a friendly atmosphere while they await appointments with the development specialist. The new building addresses a ‘learning landscape’ featuring bright, open and flexible spaces. Internally however, instead of the usual wall separation, our design for the Children’s Centre addresses the need for space being divided using glazed screens and careful furniture arrangements. In this way, visual control can be maintained but the scale of individual areas can be more responsive to smaller children. Light voids have been introduced in the circulation area as part of the ventilation strategy for teaching spaces. This provides for a natural stack effect within the teaching wings with the added benefit of ducted fresh air into these areas, the circulation spaces will be very light and airy. This significantly enhances the spatial quality and improves the opportunity for social interaction and display activities. The theme is continued internally also with a covered ‘open’ plan area off the reception class. This provision can be shared with the nursery children and is an attractive way to manage early years integration. This space is evident from the central hub of the school and is visually open from first entering the school. The new primary school addresses a ‘learning landscape’ featuring bright, open and flexible spaces. The classrooms incorporate the flexible arrangement of ‘group rooms’ with one group room for every two classrooms. As a result, a variety of spaces, with different capacity and use, can be achieved.

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Each infant classroom will have direct access to a terraced area for outdoor teaching and socialising at break and lunchtimes. A canopy over the reception pupil’s area will also provide shelter. The early years centre secure play area is adjacent and we envisage part of this being a shared space to encourage interaction between children of different ages. Both spaces are accessed directly from their classrooms and accommodate a variety of activities such as high and low sand and grass areas, a garden, adventure, areas for bikes and sensory play. Client:

Transform Schools (Balfour Beatty Construction) for Birmingham City Council

Value:

ÂŁ4m

Completion Date:

2007

Services provided:

Full Architectural services

Size:

4000m2

Awards:

2008 Guardian Head Teacher of the Year

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Arden Primary School Birmingham PPP2

The Arden School site posed a significant design challenge to create a new school on a very congested site, whilst maintaining the existing primary and nursery schools during the works. The design solution was further influenced by the desire to separate the nursery and primary school buildings as well as to create a buff er between the school and the busy road adjacent to it. The result is a new building which wraps itself around an existing building and the existing open play area, providing a new internal courtyard. This arrangement also allowed the hall and associated spaces to be centred at the heart of the new school. All classrooms incorporate group rooms with moveable sliding partitions to create a series of flexible spaces between every group of two classrooms. As a result, a variety of spaces with different capacity and uses can be achieved. Each of the group rooms will be capable of becoming specialist teaching rooms with the provision of mobile specialist units. The circulation areas also benefit from natural lighting and ventilation through central clerestory roof lights. Client:

Transform Schools (Balfour Beatty Construction) for Birmingham City Council

Value:

ÂŁ3.5m

Completion Date:

2007

Services provided:

Full Architectural services

Size:

3,500m2

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Kingsland Primary School Birmingham PPP2

All teaching within Kingsland Primary School takes place on one level and the classrooms incorporate a flexible arrangement of group rooms, with one group room for every two classrooms. All classrooms are equipped with wet areas and the infant classrooms have toilets immediately adjacent and accessible from the playgrounds. The scheme incorporates external teaching areas giving sheltered play, and consists of reading areas fitted out with seats together with sun screening. We have developed a site layout which seeks to make efficient use of the space and creates opportunities for new features. The new frontage links the green space at the centre of Brandywood Crescent to the school, the surrounding housing and to the city beyond. Within the school site there is a series of informal social/play areas to the south and north of the school building. Each infant classroom will have direct access to a terraced area, which will act as an outdoor classroom. A canopy over the reception pupil’s area will also provide sheltered play/teaching areas. Client:

Transform Schools (Balfour Beatty Construction) for Birmingham City Council

Value:

ÂŁ2.2m

Completion Date:

2007

Services provided:

Full Architectural services

Size:

1,800m2

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Yarnfield Primary School Birmingham PPP2

The Yarnfield School site is bounded by residential properties on nearly all sides and a railway line at the rear. It’s design is based on a three-spoke wheel and includes a two storey ICT/library facility at it’s hub, over which is a glazed lantern. One arm is for administration and assembly halls, while the other two arms are used as two-storey teaching wings. The main entrance, administration area and assembly halls form a striking curved façade with feature canopy over the main entrance door to announce it’s location to visitors. The central corridors have been designed with clerestory windows which give light directly over the activity bays in the corridor. This facility also contributes to the natural ventilation of the classrooms. The classrooms incorporate group rooms with moveable sliding partitions to create a series of flexible spaces between every group of two classrooms. As a result, a variety of spaces with different capacity and uses can be achieved. Each of the group rooms are capable of becoming specialist teaching rooms with the provision of mobile specialist units. The main hall and second hall are linked together with a dividing moveable wall to enable a suite of rooms to be created for performances, parents evenings and a range of school and extra curricular activities. Within the school site there is a series of formal and informal social/play areas surrounding the school. Because of the demand for the formal sports facilities all play surfaces need to be clustered closely around the school premises where they can contribute to opportunities for alfresco teaching. Client:

Transform Schools (Balfour Beatty Construction) for Birmingham City Council

Value:

£4.1m

Completion Date:

2007

Services provided:

Full Architectural services

Size:

3000m2

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Wheelers Lane Primary School Birmingham PPP2

The overall site is shared with Wheelers Lane Technology College, a boy’s school of similar pupil numbers. This relationship brings several interesting challenges and it has been our prime objective to design a new school that responds to the idea of a ‘leaning campus’, whilst retaining the independence and identity of both schools. The new primary school is a two storey building containing the nursery class, which fully integrates with the reception classes to facilitate an ‘Early Years centre’ situated in close proximity to the main entrance. This provides parents with good access and a bespoke waiting area without interfering with other school areas or activities. A good impression on arrival is central to maintaining the stature of the school and we have sought to emphasise this by designing an impressive main entrance space that visually unites both buildings through a shared entrance plaza. Client:

Transform Schools (Balfour Beatty Construction) for Birmingham City Council

Value:

£4.2m

Completion Date:

2007

Services provided:

Full Architectural services

Size:

3,300m2

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St James Primary School Birmingham PPP2

This new build solution enabled a compact design for the school to be delivered which in turn maximised the available external space. This objective has been extremely beneficial given the small available site area and the school’s preference to encouraging greater opportunities for learning through landscape. The teaching wing is two storey with Key Stage 2 pupils positioned on the first floor. At this level the clerestory windows within the central corridor give light to the activity bays in the corridor. This facility also contributes to the natural ventilation of the scheme to ensure that the classrooms and the corridor/activity areas have not only adequate daylight but ventilation. The school includes an early years’ unit with nursery and two reception spaces. The reception area is currently open plan between the two teaching areas and we have designed a folding screen between them so that each can have its own identity if required. The nursery can be shared with reception and a large play room together with toy store. We have provided a large covered play area to the nursery play room which can be shared with the reception classrooms so that outdoor teaching and play can take place. We believe that the spaces will be able to evolve easily to the demands of the time. Client:

Transform Schools (Balfour Beatty Construction) for Birmingham City Council

Value:

£2.9m

Completion Date:

2007

Services provided:

Full Architectural services

Size:

2,300m2

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St Botolphs Church of England School Lincolnshire PFI

The Lincolnshire PFI programme consists of seven new build schools including: 3 Primary schools, 1 EBD Primary and 3 EBD Secondary schools. These schools incorporate all of the features essential to delivery of the full curriculum as required for mainstream pupils. The core teaching and learning spaces are therefore the same as for typical main stream schools but on a smaller scale. Equal opportunity and access to the curriculum have been the central consideration in the BESD School’s designs linked to a concept of raising standards for this unique group of pupils. In addition, these schools incorporate full inclusion requirements, including wheelchair access, visual and auditory impairment considerations and flexibility to build in special equipment such as separated learning bays, basic skills computer bays and interview rooms. Special consideration was given to an active curriculum, which increasingly focused on more “work” related activities and appropriate studies. These areas included:

Elements include outside activity areas for robust but supervised sports and play, with the option of a ‘jungle gym’, a fully equipped sports hall and gymnasium

The primary school has the option of a soft play room to support the special activity needs of this group. An area within each of the grounds is dedicated to the development of a wildlife, conservation, or vegetable garden to be built and managed by the pupils.

The outside areas include an external space attached to each classroom, which is separate, safe, easy to supervise and allows for flexible breadth in the curriculum such as small animal husbandry, growing plants, weather stations, safe, small group outside play, or just the opportunity to work in the fresh air.

Performing arts, composing, recording, filming and editing facilities are also provided in the “technical” wings for each school which will allow pupils to gain skills through their natural fascination with technology and equipment.

Interactive classroom technology will also lead towards private communication between teacher and pupil, which will support learning and behaviour management. It will allow for specialist led lessons to be delivered from another school.

A resource base and library is centrally placed at the heart of the school. This is to facilitate supervision, allow independent study, provide a quiet heart to the building and give a strong message regarding the educational nature of the provision. The attractiveness of the design will naturally help pupils to feel valued and take a pride in their school and its central purpose. Client:

Focus Education (Bovis Lend Lease) for Lincolnshire County Council

Value:

£15m

Completion Date:

January 2001

Services provided:

Full Architectural services

Size:

2300m2

Awards:

2001 Civic Trust Award

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31


Bonner Primary School Tower Hamlets PFI

Overall 42 Schools, of which WGI have been responsible for 9, consisting of new build, reconfiguration and refurbishment. Bonner school is a 2FE Primary school which was part of the wider Tower Hamlets PFI project that consisted of 20 new and remodelled / refurbished schools for the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. This particular school was completed in 2007 and was designed to be extremely compact in plan form due to the existing site constraints posed by a tight inner London Site. The new school needed to be constructed on the hard play area which was surrounded on 3 sides by residential roads serving medium density housing. In order to prevent overlooking from the class bases, we rotated them 45 degrees which resulted in incorporation of internal breakout spaces and small triangular outdoor classrooms areas. Client:

Tower Hamlets Schools Ltd (Ballast Wiltshire/Balfour Beatty) for London Borough of Tower Hamlets

Value:

ÂŁ42m

Completion Date:

2005

Services provided:

Full Architectural services

Size:

2300m2

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Experience: Secondary Schools Highgate Wood Secondary School, Haringey BSF


Highgate Wood Secondary School Haringey BSF

The design included construction of a new two storey “Learning Resource Centre” extension which will provide four new classrooms on the first floor and a new larger library on the ground floor and is the centrepiece of a series of improvements implemented. The additional new construction includes a new double height extension to the dining hall linking the school’s two main teaching blocks, and a new multimedia studies mezzanine and “control cabin” designed to enhance the performance of the school hall space. Extensive refurbishment has also been undertaken on the stage area of the school hall, while refurbishments to the existing school facilities have created sixth form study rooms and music practice rooms. External playing areas have also been enhanced, and covered external areas have been created. Client:

London Borough of Haringey

Value:

£3.5m

Completion date:

2010

Services provided:

Full Architectural Services

Size:

New Build: 850 m2 Refurbishment: 700 m2

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Allerton High School, Leeds BSF

Allerton High School was officially opened by Gordon Brown, Prime Minister, on 28th November 2008 Opening the School the Prime Minister said, “This school is conceived as a 21st century school, one that will lift the ambitions and aspirations of young people in this area…I believe it will be a model for other schools around the country in years to come.” One of three new high schools in Leeds built under the BSF scheme - Allerton High completed on schedule and symbolises the first, critical part of Leeds’ £260 million Building Schools for the Future (BSF) programme. The works to Allerton High School involved the creation of state-of-the-art accommodation, built in a striking, geometric triangular plan on the existing school site. The new building incorporates a range of uses, including a specialist inclusive learning centre (SILC) and a multi-faith centre, to further develop the school’s links with the community. Allerton High School is a community school which specialises in Business and Enterprise, serving 1120 pupils aged 11-18 in the Alwoodley area of North Leeds. The stunning new range of learning spaces will transform learning for young people at Allerton High, replacing a building originally opened in 1939 as a selective girls’ grammar school. The new building is organised around a wide street, with the main entrance opening into an atrium space around which the multi-faith centre, library and business studies classrooms are grouped. Two wings house the general teaching activities, set in a triangular plan which creates a striking diagonal geometry. The school hall and dining open off the west side of the street and this whole area produces varied spaces for circulation, socialising, ICT, private study and dining. Sports facilities are at the south end of the building giving good direct access to the playing fields and also the potential for direct entrance from the adjacent public car park. Client:

E4L (Interserve Project Services Ltd) for Leeds City Council

Value:

£18m

Completion Date:

September 2008

Services provided:

Full Architectural services and interior design

Size:

12000m2

Awards:

Leeds BSF: Best Operational LEP, Partnership for Schools Awards 2008

Leeds BSF: Innovation in ICT, Partnership for Schools Awards

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Allerton Grange High School Leeds BSF

Allerton Grange High School is the second school we have designed for the first wave of the Leeds BSF programme. This project replaces an existing school, originating in 1954, and remains on the same site which meant a careful process of decantation was involved. Fundamental to the design of the new school have been the needs of the stakeholders, i.e. students, staff , ‘Education Leeds’ and the community. The building has become a significant community facility and this consideration has been an important factor in the spatial arrangements of the building. The new building includes community resource areas (with some out of hours use) plus a specialist unit for students with hearing impairment. The design of the new school has achieved the following ambitions:

▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪

The main entrance as a focal point, providing a real sense of arrival which immediately engages learners and visitors with a sense of pride and curiosity. Shortened journey times within the school without sacrificing wide circulation and social spaces. Dedicated art facilities adjacent to the main entrance which “showcase” the school’s art specialism and enhance the partnership with other providers and the community. A secure site, not only when the school is closed but also during the day. Outdoor learning in natural habitats, learning walks and classrooms in the open. New car and cycle parking facilities as well as attractive pedestrian links to the surrounding roads A building which can easily change, with inbuilt immediate flexibility. The way in which young people learn will change over time, and the building will be able to achieve many forms of transformation over its expected life span. The proposed building and landscape have also been designed to be fully accessible to all members of the community.

The school is two storeys in height with a theme of white rendered facades set on a plinth of split faced buff blockwork. The facades are punctuated with features such as deep inset or projecting windows, copper coloured metal cladding panels, cedar panels and large curtain walled areas around the main entrance and Learning Resource Centre; which allows the outside to mingle with internal spaces before bursting into the main street of the school. The strong horizontal line of the eaves is broken by events such as the Assembly Hall and expressed roof top lantern lights. This architectural vocabulary extends to the southern façade which steps down the hillside with wings that express their faculty ownership. The selection of materials is intended to create a “School of the Future” but it is also intended to be sympathetic to the surrounding context using a durable, domestic pallet of materials whose colouring is intended to complement the predominantly rendered brick of the adjacent housing.

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The main social spaces take advantage of the sheltered microclimates created by the building and use a mixture of hard and soft materials to make spaces for formal teaching and informal gathering. Several habitat areas have been put in place, to develop into a semi-natural wildlife zone. Client:

E4L (Interserve Project Services Ltd) for Leeds City Council

Value:

ÂŁ23m

Completion date:

2009

Services provided:

Full architectural services

Size:

13,528m2

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Temple Moor High School Leeds BSF

Chris Edwards, Chief Executive of Education Leeds recently stated: “The scale of the building, the light, colour and space is great, and it is going to be a hugely impressive building when it is finished. The last two phases of the work will finish the transformation of a sad and worn out school into a simply brilliant learning place. Anyone who thinks the remodelled elements of Building Schools for the Future is a second best option should look at Temple Moor and be prepared to be amazed; because I was!” Temple Moor is a refurbished Community School for 11-18 year olds, which includes a “High Care Partnership” provision for 30 children with Physical Difficulty (PD). The remodelling of the school will provide a new learning environment designed for 1220 students, with specialist provision for 30 students with high care needs that will allow all children to benefit from learning opportunities at the school and to develop and nurture a climate of inclusivity and mutual understanding. The design team has transformed a disparate series of predominantly 1950’s buildings designed for 500 students into a bright, open and inspiring learning environment which every one of the 1220 young people knows belongs to them. The transformation of the original school has been phenomenal. The design’s use of light and space will enable students to navigate the whole building internally, reducing transfer times and making movement more pleasurable. Corridors are replaced with wide learning zones in which students and staff openly work together, stimulating enthusiasm and enhancing collaborative learning. This project is broken down into phased elements, with students and staff already enjoying the new facilities handed over in September 2008. These include new build science, technology and sports areas. Reaction from staff and students has been excellent with users enjoying more space, well lit rooms, and fit for purpose furniture. All these new areas are flooded with wireless access points and new ICT hardware options. A major phased building programme in a live school environment is a difficult project for all stakeholders. This has been achieved by a strong partnership approach and robust team relationships. Client:

E4L (Interserve Project Services Ltd) for Leeds City Council

Value:

£20m

Completion Date:

2009

Services provided:

Full Architectural services and interior design

Size:

13000m2

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43


Wheelers Lane Technical College Birmingham PPP2

The overall site is shared with Wheelers Lane Primary School and it has therefore been our prime objective throughout to design a new school that responds to the idea of a ‘learning campus’ whilst retaining the independence and identity of both schools. The new school is positioned in the heart of the site in a prominent and elevated position. The main building is arranged around the concept of an open atrium space with classrooms and specialist spaces collected around this feature. Large open stair wells and light voids at the first and second floor levels allow sunlight and daylight to permeate the heart of the school. The new building benefits from a clear simple legible form, which expresses a light and bright circulation zone. This contains several activity areas and well proportioned resource and support spaces so that the feel of the ‘typical’ corridor is avoided and instead the circulation areas are vibrant and full of interesting learning opportunities. Internally, the central atrium space is a multi functional space providing overspill for the café area, hall and technology spaces, for impromptu meetings, informal study and general social interaction. The atrium is a vibrant heart of the school and all circulation areas are easy to control and supervise. The school contains different types of classrooms catering to the varying subjects on its curriculum, including state-of-the-art food technology units. Client:

Transform Schools (Balfour Beatty Construction) for Birmingham City Council

Value:

£7.3m

Completion Date:

2008

Services provided:

Full Architectural services

Size:

6000m2

44


45


Arthur Terry Secondary School Birmingham PP2

Arthur Terry Secondary School is composed of an academic village of two 3-storey buildings, which are linked together to ensure that the scale of the development does not dwarf the pupils. The buildings are arranged in an academic hierarchy with the administration centre being at the heart of the school across three floors, and the ground floor concentrating on secure visitor reception, meeting rooms, interview rooms and offices. Behind the administration area is a broad unheated piazza open on the south elevation with balconies on two upper levels, the purpose of which is to ensure easy linkage under cover by pupils and staff to all the teaching elements. This concourse is covered with a large roof with glazed sections and has been designed to ensure that it naturally ventilates and has solar control set out in the engineering proposal. The piazza is a mixture of landscape and hard paving and is an area for break times, lunch, wet play, drama, music, performances, exhibitions, assembly, indeed the possibilities are endless. The school has been designed to ensure easy access by the community to specific areas of the school i.e. assembly hall, dining, bistro, café, open learning centre, IT, technology and sports facilities. Direct access can be given to each faculty of the school and each will have separate security, heating, ventilation etc, so that the remainder of the school can be closed as required after school hours. The school’s arts and performance specialism has been catered for by an enlarged assembly hall together with extendable stage, changing facilities, drama storage, drama rehearsal suites, control rooms, integrated music suite including recording studio, eight practice rooms, and media studies centre, all of which are immediately adjacent to the main entrance of the school and which is supported by an adjacent dining provision on two levels to form a suite of accommodation to suit multiple activities. The wide corridors are a feature within all the facilities with open corefloors to allow natural ventilation to occur throughout each of the departments. Within the site there are a series of formal and informal social/play areas surrounding the school which operate at all levels. Because of the demand for formal sports facilities on the rest of the site, all these surfaces are clustered fairly closely around the school premises where they contribute to opportunities for alfesco teaching and good supervision. The shapes of the school spaces are imaginative and stimulating environments of varying scales, offering natural seating/ amphitheatres, outdoor teaching spaces etc. Paved areas are more generous in the vicinity of the school because these will essentially function as large ‘milling’ spaces. Client:

Transform Schools (Balfour Beatty Construction) for Birmingham City Council

Value:

£14m

Completion Date:

2008

Services provided:

Full Architectural services

Size:

6000m2

Awards:

2009 Built in Quality Awards

46


47


Octagon Centre Haringey BSF

This project is part of the Haringey Building Schools for the Future programme. The Pupil Support Centre is a Pupil Referral Unit (PRU) providing education for 50 students who have been temporarily excluded from main stream education. The London Borough of Haringey has proposed to increase the centre’s capacity to 80 Pupils. Watkins Gray International was appointed Design Team Partner to develop proposals and designs for the newly named Young People’s Centre in November 2007. The design Team has developed a scheme that improves and enhances the existing centre’s facilities, providing:

Specialist Teaching and assessment/therapy areas.

Specialist vocational facilities.

Adequate provision to maintain a maximum group size of 8 pupils in general teaching areas.

Greatly enhanced ICT Provision.

The proposed design: The original school building built during the sixties, whilst typical of its time, is of little architectural merit, but its strong geometrical plan of an octagon inside an irregular hexagon dictates how it can be used and extended. The Design Team concluded that an option which integrated all extensions much more closely to the existing might produce a new and more sophisticated design and building with a strong overall geometry and image of its own. The final scheme proposes a new build Hall on the east side of the existing building and locates the new classroom accommodation in a wedge-shaped two storey wing attached to the west flank. Circulation has been simplified for good supervision by forming a diagonal spine that links the two extensions through the centre of the existing building. An extended programme of remodel and refurbishment is planned inside the existing structure to accommodate specialist teaching and therapy rooms, offices, dining and social areas. Client:

London Borough of Haringey

Value:

£4m

Completion Date:

2010

Services provided:

RIBA Stages A-K

Size:

2000m2

48


49


Deptford Green School Lewisham BSF

Deptford Green School is part of the second phase of the Lewisham BSF programme. The redevelopment proposal is for a school to accommodate 1300 pupil places, inclusive of specialist accommodation for 25 children with dyslexia. The Education Vision is distinctive and particular to Deptford Green School, the design features are as follows: General teaching in significantly larger-than-standard classrooms to provide flexibility in use including ‘horseshoe’ and ‘circle’ layouts. Organisation of the majority of teaching spaces in four learning zones, Endeavour, Discovery, Endurance and Challenger, with other teaching and ancillary spaces grouped together as Enterprise. Years 7 and 8 (Endeavour) have all teaching within their learning area with the exception of Technology and Sport. Years 9, 10 and 11 are each based in one of the other learning areas, each of which has a different complement of subject teaching spaces. A dining area that is part of the social and circulation space rather than a dedicated dining hall. At the heart of the school is to be a Hall/Conference Centre/ Auditorium symbolising and facilitating the key role that the student voice plays in the school Central to the school’s ethos is its place in the community and its relationship to Fordham Park and Goldsmiths College, both physically and spiritually. The division of the teaching accommodation into the separate learning areas meets the curriculum need and the school vision. The simplicity of the circulation and regular structure will enable the teaching layout to be easily re-arranged – for example into faculties - should a future school management require. Sustainability and the development of energy-efficient systems and installations are central to the development of the school’s engineering design. From the beginning of the process the ideas of passive energy-efficiency have informed the layout, both by making use of the north-south aspect, and reducing the building’s external envelope by means of double corridors, etc. Client:

London Borough of Lewisham

Value:

£27m

Completion Date:

2012

Services provided:

Full architectural services

Size:

11,600m2

50


51


Bonus Pastor Catholic College Lewisham BSF

Bonus Pastor Catholic College is a 5 form entry (750 pupils) secondary school for girls divided across two separate sites; Churchdown and Winlaton campuses, originally operating as Lower and Upper Schools respectively. Central to the College’s vision and the design solution is a requirement to reorganise the layouts of the two sites to enable greater cohesion across the year groups with a new organisational model based on whole departments on one site or the other. The reorganised layouts therefore reduce movement, enable the college to organise curriculum and timetabling more efficiently, improve pastoral care and create an environment for sustained improvement in teaching and learning. Client:

Lewisham Schools for the Future LEP (Costain Construction) for the London Borough of Lewisham

Value:

ÂŁ15.6m

Completion Date:

Under construction

Services Provided:

Full Architectural services (RIBA Stages A-L)

52


National Enterprise Academy Aylesbury

The National Enterprise Academy (NEA) has selected a core location for its HQ in Aylesbury. It is intending to relocate its Amersham base to the HQ and to use the location for the management of the NEA as a whole. As this is a ‘ground-breaking’ project, much of the internal space will be driven by the function and aims of the NEA. The guiding statement to the design team, being, ‘bringing the boardroom to the classroom’. It is also important to the NEA to use the HQ as a showcase for their vision and values which will bring the academic world and the corporate world closer together. Client:

NEA

Value:

£12m

Completion Date:

Summer 2012

Services provided:

Full Architectural services (RIBA Stages D to L) Interior Design services (RIBA Stages A to L)

Size:

3,900m2

53


Dixons Allerton Academy Bradford, UK

A specialist school in Health and Science, Dixons Allerton will promote traditional values of respect, caring for each other and self-discipline, while celebrating the academy’s diverse talents, abilities and cultures. The academy is built on the philosophy that the learner should be at the heart of all their thinking and should experience excellent teaching and learning in a safe and caring environment. Their core purpose is to ensure that every student achieves highly in a range of academic and vocational subjects, gains exam success that will give them every opportunity to be successful and healthy citizens and independent life-long learners. Client:

Educo (joint venture between Costain and Ferrovial Agroman)

Value:

ÂŁ29m

Completion Date:

2009

Services Provided:

Conceptual Design

54


Harris Academies Framework London, UK

WGI was selected to the Harris Academies Framework in 2006 based on our design for the proposed Peckham Boys Academy, a sport and enterprise specialist school. Client:

Harris Federation

Value:

n/a

Completion Date:

2006

Services Provided:

Conceptual Design

55


New River College, Young People’s Centre Islington BSF

The new building, which replaces a late Victorian Board School that is no longer fi t for purpose, provides fully-accessible purpose-designed accommodation for three groups of students currently in separate buildings around the borough. Following extensive discussions with the planning department of Islington Council, the accommodation is in a single three storey building along the front of the site facing Paradise Park. This location gives the building prominence and a strong image, helps to define the urban backdrop to the park and maximises the space within the site for secluded external play. Entrance, administration and communal facilities are on the ground floor along with a vocational teaching area that can have a public interface, with the majority of the teaching on the upper floors – Key Stage 3 on the first floor and Key Stage 4 on the second floor. The multi-purpose two-storey Hall at the northern end of the building is well located for ease of access by the community out of hours. The south facing external play area is divided into two separate areas of differing character: a fenced ball court area and a quieter landscaped area for informal play. In developing the elevation treatment of the building, the regular rhythms of the traditional terrace housing are combined with the contemporary forms of the modern housing, social care and academic buildings locally. The College has the following features: ▪ Ensures the highest possible achievement for the students, providing a wide range of academic and vocational opportunities ▪ A place of opportunity opening doors to education, employment and training, with opportunities for accreditation ▪ Structured in a way that supports students to access mainstream provision ▪ Will, where necessary, commit to supporting students and their families in the long term ▪ Offers students and their families a personalised, coherent and integrated package of care, guidance and support from a multi-agency team ▪ A practical resource for students and their families ▪ A source of expertise and advice for secondary schools ▪ A high quality resource for young people ▪ Another important feature of the design is that staff areas are divided between all floors not only for general supervision, but to be quickly available wherever incidents might occur. The building is designed on a simple grid with all 12 teaching spaces on the first and second floors being the same size; rooms can be easily reallocated in the future to suit curriculum changes. Finishings throughout the building will be robust and capable of withstanding higher than average wear and tear.

56


The main College entrance is a ‘window to the College’, welcoming, exciting and fully accessible, thus demonstrating New River College’s core values. The facilities provided are multi-purpose to maximise their use by a wide variety of different users at differing times, in line with the College’s commitment to the local community. The Authority requires the College to be designed and built with due attention to environmental impacts, to achieve a BREEAM Excellent rating and achieve the 60% carbon reduction target and associated funding. Client:

London Borough of Islington

Value:

£5m

Completion Date:

2011

Services provided:

Full architectural services

Size:

1700m2

57


Heaton Manor High School Newcastle PFI

Newcastle PFI includes six projects running concurrently, each using a common vocabulary of external finishes and landscape details; consisting of 2 Primary, 3 Middle and 1 Secondary. Student numbers vary from 330 to 1900 including a sixth form centre. The buildings have been thermally modelled and designed for passive ventilation generated from thermal stacking in a central atrium. The school has an established reputation as a centre of excellence in the heart of the community and Focus Education’s proposal acknowledges the aspirations of the school by providing a landmark building that reflects a contemporary institution in a cutting edge facility. The design takes careful account of the site as a whole; with new gateways that announce the school properly and then lead via paths, cycle way and access drive to staff /visitor car parking, cycle sheds, pupil drop off areas and bus lay-bys to an impressive welcoming main entrance for the school. The school has been designed to ensure easy access by the community to areas of the school that they would be interested in i.e. assembly hall, dining/bistro/café, open learning centre, I.T. and sports facilities. Indeed direct access can be given to each faculty of the school and each will be dealt with separately with regards to security, heating, ventilation etc. Focus Education recognizes that the educational administration and the pastural systems of the school is an outcome of the internal management of the school. The site has been designed in accordance with the ITN, while providing flexibility and potential for variability to suit future change and development. Focus Education has ensured that the design, construction and maintenance arrangements reflect projected and planned class sizes, possible changes in teaching methods and the curriculum practice as well as developments in relation to aspects of community and post-compulsory education. We believe our design philosophy will create a building of educational distinction, which will lead the way in projects of this size for years to come. Client:

Focus Education (Bovis Lend Lease) for Newcastle City Council

Value:

£45m

Completion Date:

2001

Services provided:

Full Architectural services

Size:

14000m2

58


59


Oaks Park High School Redbridge PFI

The design for Oaks Park was conceived to accommodate a staggered intake of pupils over a 5 year period. The result is a flexible arrangement of ‘faculty wings’ with internal modular layouts to respond to the change of pupil numbers over time. The new 1450 place secondary school (8 forms of entry) and sixth form block with a separate sports building, includes a sports hall and gymnasium. The secondary school is comprised of the following facilities: administration, assembly, drama, music facilities, learning resource centre, library, dining facilities, science block, art and technology block, general teaching blocks, ICT facilities, special education needs (SEN), staff facilities, and a stand alone 6th form block. Client:

NUPPP (Skanska) for London Borough of Redbridge

Value:

£12m

Completion Date:

2000

Services provided:

Full Architectural services

Size:

14000m2

60


61


St Paul’s Community High School Tower Hamlets BSF

One of two sample schools, the site of St Paul’s Community School adjoins the neighbouring Leopold Estate. The school is a mixed comprehensive secondary visual arts specialist school, designed to accommodate 1200 pupils at the heart of the community. In considering both sites together, the mixed use development integrates a number of community uses along with the school and the housing estate, as well as providing a landmark building which was considered an important opportunity to add positively to the local urban form. Furthermore, by combining the sites as one design solution, a more effective layout was achieved, including the use of a potential ransom strip. By introducing more housing into the combined scheme, a substantial financial crosssubsidy was brought into the feasibility study. This, along with non-educational functioning streams, enabled facilities such as a library, art gallery, theatre space, cafe and PCT facilities to be included in the design. In doing so the school facility became redefined, not only as a place for transformational education, but also a hub at the heart of the local community. Client:

Balfour Beatty Construction for London Borough of Tower Hamlets

Value:

£40m

Completion Date:

2008 (ITN)

Services provided:

Full Architectural Services

Size:

School: 12000m2 Resi/mixed use: 5000m2 Total area: 17000m2

62


Trinity Church of England School Lewisham BSF

A new build Church of England secondary school for 600 students, as part of the Lewisham BSF programme which completely replaces the previous building opened in 1957. The new building incorporates a two storey atrium space and a striking coloured-glass entrance, intended to create a local landmark building. The attractive design features very few straight lines, generally incorporating “curves within curves“. The school also features extensive sedum roofs and water harvesting from the roof for landscape irrigation, and is expected to achieve a BREEAM Excellent rating. Trinity was assessed as the third most improved school in the UK last year, and maintains close links with the Church of England, offering a strong Christian ethos. Client:

Costain Ltd.

Value:

£15.6m

Completion date:

2011

Services provided:

Full architectural services

Size:

6,310 m2

63


Education Experience Summary Allerton High School, Leeds BSF


Education Experience School

Type

Client

Project

Secondary

Name

New

Middle

Refurb

Cornwall PFI

4

Kirklees PFI

3

New

Primary

Refurb

1

Tower Hamlets PFI

New

Special

Refurb

New

Refurb

1

Cornwall County Council

Focus Education

Bovis

30.00

Aug 1999

ITN

1

6

Kirklees Metropolitan Borough Council

Kirklees Schools Services Ltd

Jarvis Construction

35.00

Feb 1999

Complete

1

7

London Borough of Tower Hamlets

Tower Hamlets Schools Ltd

Ballast Wiltshire / Balfour Beatty

42.00

May 1999

Complete

Ballast Wiltshire

0.25

June 2001

Complete

London Borough of Tower Hamlets Conwy County Borough Council

Focus Education

Bovis Lend Lease

38.00

Nov 1999

ITN

Liverpool City Council

Focus Education

Bovis Lend Lease

55.00

July 2000

BAFO

London Borough of Redbridge

NUPPP

Skanska

12.00

Aug 2000

Complete

Lincolnshire County Council

Focus Education

Bovis Lend Lease

15.00

Jan 2001

Complete

Department of Education & Science

Focus Education

Bovis Lend Lease

36.50

Feb 2001

Complete

1

Newcastle City Council

Focus Education

Bovis Lend Lease

45.00

April 2001

Complete

1

Northamptonshire County Council

IIC

Skanska

22.00

May 2002

ITN

London Borough of Bexley

Focus Education

Bovis Lend Lease

36.00

Oct 2001

PB

London Boroughs of Enfield & Newham

IIC

Skanska

45.00

Jan 2003

ITN

London Borough of Barking & Dagenham

IIC

Skanska

40.00

Feb 2003

ITN

Sheffield City Council

Pinnacle Schools

Sir Robert McAlpine

45.00

July 2003

ITN

Salford City Council

Focus Education

Bovis Lend Lease

35.00

Sep 2002

ITN

Birmingham City Council

Transform Schools

Balfour Beatty Construction

56.00

Current

Complete

Bouygues

Bouygues

60.00

June 2004

ITN

Mowlem

45.00

Dec 2004

ITN

2

12

1

Lincolnshire PFI

3

Ireland PPP

6

Newcastle PFI

1

Northampton CfL PFI

1

Bexley PFI

1

1

Enfield & Newham PFI

1

1

Barking & Dagenham PFI

1

1

Sheffield PFI

1

3

Contractor

Refurb

3 4

SPV (LEP Investor)

4

2

2

Salford PFI

4

Birmingham PPP2

2

9

Ealing PFI

2

4

London Borough of Ealing

Gateshead

1

3

Gateshead Council

Lewisham PFI

2

Bradford BSF

3

Slough PFI

1

Leeds BSF (Phase 1 & 2)

3

Knowsley BSF

8

Newcastle BSF

2

Doncaster PFI

2

Hackney BSF Tower Hamlets BSF

1

1

Haringey BSF

Status

29

1

Liverpool PFI Redbridge PFI

New

End User

Date

1

Beatrice Tate Conwy PFI

Other

Value (ÂŁm)

4

1

1

London Borough of Lewisham

IIC

Wates

50.00

Dec 2004

ITN

Bradford City Council

E4L

Interserve

70.00

Sep 2005

ITN

Slough Borough Council

Kajima Partnerships

Kajima Construction

46.00

Aug 2005

ITN

Leeds City Council

E4L

Interserve

90.00

Nov 2005

In constr.

Knowsley Metropolitan Borough Council

Key Stage Solutions

Alfred McAlpine / Shepherd Construction

150.00

Sep 2004

ITN

Newcastle City Council

Transform Schools

Balfour Beatty Construction

80.00

July 2005

BAFO

Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council

E4L

Interserve

50.00

July 2006

ITN

1

London Borough of Hackney

Bouygues Partnerships

Bouygues Construction

13.00

July 2007

BAFO

1

London Borough of Tower Hamlets

BBeP

Balfour Beatty Construction

40.00

Dec 2007

ITCD

London Borough of Haringey

n/a

London Borough of Haringey

12.00

Current

Framework

London Borough of Southwark

Vinci PLC

Norwest Holst Construction

170.00

Apr 2008

ITCD

1

1

1

3

1

4

2

1

Southwark BSF

1

Islington BSF (Phase 2 and 3)

3

4

1

London Borough of Islington

Transform Schools

Balfour Beatty Construction

15.90

Current

Stage 2

Lewisham BSF

3

2

1

London Borough of Lewisham

Learning 21

Costain

65.00

Current

Stage 1 & 2

Wolverhampton Borough Council

E4L

Interserve

22.00

Sep 2009

IPD2

1

Wolverhampton BSF

TOTALS

42

TYPE TOTALS

74

TOTAL NEW

96

TOTAL REFURB

91

OVERALL TOTAL

32

1

4 5

1

36 91

55

12 13

1

2 4

187

66

2

1,573.15


Special Needs Experience Project

Individual School

Facilities and Features

Kirklees PFI

Carlinghow Primary School

Junior, infant and nursery school for 420 children with physical difficulties (PD)

Kirklees PFI

Rawthorp School

Junior (x2), infant and nursery school for children with physical difficulties (PD)

Beatrice Tate

Beatrice Tate School

Secondary school for 90 children with profound and multiple learning difficulties (PMLD)

Lincolnshire PFI

St Botolphs C of E School, The Phoenix School, Claypole School & Sincil School

3 secondary schools and 1 primary school for children with Behavioural Emotional and Social Difficulties (BESD)

Salford PFI

Oakwood School, Irwell School & Newcroft School

3 secondary schools, 2 for children with Profound and Multiple Learning Difficulty (PMLD) and 1 for children with Behavioural Emotional and Social Difficulty (BESD)

Bradford BSF

High Royds School, Monston, Bradford

Three secondary schools, 2 for children with Profound and Multiple Learning Difficulty (PMLD) and 1 for children with Behavioural Emotional and Social Difficulty (BESD)

The Ritmat, York

The Ritmat School, York

Two schools for children with special needs ranging from Moderate Learning Difficulty (MLD) to Profound and Multiple Learning Difficulty (PMLD)

St Patricks R.C Primary School

St Patricks R.C Primary School

Extensive alterations internally and extension to a school for children with Profound and Multiple Learning Difficulty (PMLD)

Slough Schools PFI

Arbour Vale School

An “all-through” Sports Specialist school for 100 children with special needs ranging from Moderate Learning Difficulty (MLD) to Profound and Multiple Learning Difficulty (PMLD) part of an integrated campus with Beechwood Secondary School. Arbour Vale School also contained a separate residential unit for 10 children with severe autism, complete with staff and visitor accommodation.

Lewisham Schools PFI

Greenvale School

A secondary school for 90 children with Profound and Multiple Learning Difficulty (PMLD)

Leeds BSF

Temple Moor School & Allerton High School

A mainstream secondary school which includes a “High Care Partnership” provision for 30 children with Physical Difficulty (PD) and a specialist unit for students with Autistic Spectrum Disorder

Southwark BSF

Tuke School

90 children with profound and multiple learning difficulties (PMLD) with severe and complex needs. This school explores the complexity of the building itself providing the multisensory experiences needed for individual pupil needs.

Haringay BSF

Young Peoples Centre

The PupilSupport Centre is a Pupil Referral Unit (PRU) providing education for 50 students who have been temporarily excluded from main stream education

Wolverhampton

Tettenhall Wood School

Centre of Excellence for 90 students with severe and complex Autistic Spectrum Disorder.

Islington BSF

New River College

Purpose-designed accommodation for three groups of students currently in separate buildings around the borough. Offers students and their families a personalised, coherent and integrated package of care, guidance and support from a multi-agency team

Tuke School, Southwark BSF

67


Published Articles St Botolphs C of E Primary School, Lincolnshire PFI


Published Articles

Allerton High School, Leeds BSF

2010

“BSF review pushes prefab schools”, Architects Journal, October

2010

“My Digital Life - Richard Nelson”, Building, October

2010

“Trinity School, London”, Education Design & Build”, September

2010

“Deptford Green School”, WCN, September

2010

“Deptford Green School”, Architect News, September

2010

“Deptford Green School”, WAN, September

2010

“Deptford Green School”, Building, August

2010

“Deptford Green School”, South London Post, August

2010

“Cork Cardiac & Renal Unit”, Building Better Healthcare, August

2010

“Cork Cardiac & Renal Unit”, Architect News, August

2010

“Cork Cardiac & Renal Unit”, Europe Real Estate, August

2010

“Cork Cardiac & Renal Unit, Hospital Bulletin, August

2010

“Trinity School, London”, Top Box Design, August

2010

“Trinity School, London”, WCN, July

2010

“Trinity School, London”, Architect News, July

2010

“Trinity School, London”, World Architecture News, July

2010

“Trinity School, London”, WIDN, July

2010

“Johnson Community Hospital”, Top Box Design, June

2010

“Southwark Leisure Facilities”, Building for Leisure, June

2010

“Colindale - Fairview Homes”, Planning, June

2010

“Colindale - Fairview Homes”, Architect News, June

2010

“Colindale - Fairview Homes”, World Architecture News, June

2010

“Cancer Care Unit” Cork University Hospital”, Health Estate, June

2010

“Highgate Wood School” , Education Design & Build, June

2010

“Highgate Wood School” , World Architecture News, May

2010

“Highgate Wood School”, World Interior Design Network , May

70


2010

“Cancer Care Unit, Cork University Hospital”, Building Better Healthcare, April

2010

“Aztec West planning submitted”, Property Week, February

2010

“Aztec West planning submitted”, Property Magazine, February

2010

“Aztec West planning submitted”, Europe Real Estate, February

2009

“Johnson Community Hospital Opens”, Building Better Healthcare, December

2009

“Johnson Community Hospital Opens”, World Architecture News, December

2009

“Johnson Community Hospital Opens”, AJ Online December

2009

“Camberwell Baths revamp plans approved”, Leisure Architecture, November

2009

“Camberwell Baths revamp plans approved”, Leisure Management, November

2009

“Camberwell Baths revamp plans approved”, Leisure Opportunities, November

2009

“Camberwell Baths Planning Permission Secured”, Planning, November

2009

“Going Public” Education Design & Build, September

2009

“Elderly Care: Designed to Last”, World Health Design, September 2009

2009

“Fewer projects left on the shelf”, Architects Journal, August

2009

“Architects brace themselves for NHS cuts”, Architects Journal, June

2009

“STROITELSTVO”, June

2009

“Infotourism” , May

2009

“From shelving to nurse stations” Health Estate, May

2009

“Highest 1st time entrant in AJ100” Architects Journal, May

2009

“Central London office space development completed”, Official Space, May

2009

“City Corporation completes Tottenham Court Road office redevelopment”, May

2009

“Anyone fancy a G and T?” Building, 8th May

2009 “Bringing Teaching out into the open” , Education Design & Build, April 2009 “An olympic legacy for Southwark”, Local Government News, April

Allens Croft Primary School, Birmingham PP2

2009

“Where there’s muck there’s sustainability”, MIPIM daily news, March

2009

“Market Estate is a winner” Southern Housing Group newsletter, March

71


Building August 2010

72


Education Design & Build June 2010

73


Education Design & Build September 2009

74


Education Design & Build September 2009

75


Education Design & Build April 2009

76


Education Design & Build April 2009

77


Awards Allens Croft Children’s Centre, Birmingham PPP2


Awards

Awards and accolades are important to us, as they provide validation of the quality of our ideas and projects. However, it is not just about being judged by our peers, but, perhaps more importantly, society as a whole. We aim to be recognised by a range of awards that look beyond the purely fashionable and trendy, and which reinforce the importance of meeting the needs of our clients while making valuable contributions to society, the economy and the environment. WGI has had the good fortune of winning over 20 awards in the last decade, providing further evidence of our quality in design and delivery.

St James Primary School, Birmingham PPP2

2010

Winner of Best Workplace, Great Places to Work Awards, Centrica Leicester

2010

Built in Quality Award, Arthur Terry School, Birmingham PPP2

2009

Winner of Best Workplace, Great Places to Work Awards, Centrica Leicester

2009

Short-listed for Best Interior Design Award, Building Better Healthcare Awards, Somers Clinical Research Facility, Great Ormond Street Hospital

2009

Short-listed for the Best Project Team Award, Building Better Healthcare Awards, Johnson Community Hospital

2009

Short-listed for BCO Award, Leeds City Office Park

2008

Winner of Design Award, Southern Housing Group Awards, Market Estate

2008

Winner of Best Operational LEP, Partnership for Schools Awards, Leeds BSF

2008

Winner of Innovation in ICT, Partnership for Schools Awards, Leeds BSF

2008

Winner of Best Workplace, Great Places to Work Awards, Centrica Leicester

2007

Winner of Financial Times UK Best Workplace Award, Centrica Leicester

2007

Winner of the Built in Quality Awards, Hobmoor School (Birmingham PPP2)

2007

Winner of Best Community Regeneration Project, Regenerate Awards, Market Estate

2006

Winner of Financial Times UK Best Workplace Award, Centrica Leicester

2006

Winner of design competition, ÂŁ100m residential and mixed-use project, GQ2, Gateshead

2006

Winner of Best Community/User Involvement in a Project Award, Shropshire Care Homes

2006

Short listed for the Best Public Housing Development, Brick Awards, Millennium Plus at the Nightingale Estate

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Wheelers Lane Primary School, Birmingham PPP2

2005

Winner of Financial Times UK Best Workplace Award, Centrica Leicester

2005

Winner of 3 awards at the Building Sustainability Awards, Job Centre Plus

2005

Winner of 3 awards at the Green Apple Awards, Job Centre Plus

2005

Winner of Best Workplace in Europe, Centrica Leicester

2005

Winner of Disability Excellence Awards, Centrica Leicester

2004

Winner of CABE Building for Life Gold Standard Award, Gainsborough Studios

2004

Winner of RIBA Award, Gainsborough Studios

2004

Winner of Best Scheme, Southern Housing Group Awards, Millennium Plus at the Nightingale Estate

2003

Winner of construction project of the Year, Swiss Med Hospital, Poland

2003

Winner of Civic Trust Award, Lincolnshire Schools PFI - St Botolph’s C of E Primary School

2003

Winner of Gold Award, Royal Mail First Class Supplier Programme

2003

Winner of What Housing Gold Medal Award, Millennium Plus at the Nightingale Estate

2003

Winner of Building Homes Award for Partnership Housing, Millennium Plus at the Nightingale Estate

2002

Winner of Project for Innovation, DTR Housing Forum Demonstration, Millennium Plus at the Nightingale Estate

2002

Winner of The Building Homes Quality Awards, Millennium Plus at the Nightingale Estate

2002 2002

Winner of Home Builder of the Year Competition, Millennium Plus at the Nightingale Estate

2001

Winner of Building Homes Award for Tenant Choice, Millennium Plus at the Nightingale Estate

2001

Winner of Build in Quality Award in commercial category, ‘Cyber Centre’, Thurrock Council

2000

Winner of Best Hospital Building in Northern Ireland, Belfast Children’s Hospital

1999

Winner of Best Building in Ireland, The Liam McCormick Prize for Architecture, Belfast Children’s Hospital

Winner of Gold Award for Partnership Homes, Millennium Plus at the Nightingale Estate

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Client Feedback Redbridge Oaks Park, Redbridge PFI


Client Feedback

Allerton High School, Leeds BSF “This school is conceived as a 21st century school, one that will lift the ambitions and aspirations of young people in this area…I believe it will be a model for other schools around the country in years to come.” Gordon Brown, Prime Minister “It was an honour to have our brilliant new school officially opened by the Prime Minister and the Children’s Secretary. The facilities we have and the environment our young people are learning in are some of the best in the country. I am very proud of the school and know that Gordon Brown and Ed Balls were very impressed by what they saw.” Elaine Silson, Head teacher

Allerton High School, Leeds BSF

“Just a brief note to say thank you so very much for our fantastic building! I know that the many hours we spent in design meetings, consultations and reviews have paid off hugely. Everyone has commented on the fact that this doesn’t look like a school, that it is a business centre – which means that we have achieved our aim, to create a stunning-state-of-the-art business and enterprise specialist school, where you know our specialism from the moment you walk in. Thank you- you’ve been brilliant.” Heather Scott, Deputy Head teacher Temple Moor High School, Leeds BSF “The scale of the building, the light, colour and space is great, and it is going to be a hugely impressive building when it is finished. The last two phases of the work will finish the transformation of a sad and worn out school into a simply brilliant learning place. Anyone who thinks the remodelled elements of Building Schools for the Future is a second best option should look at Temple Moor and be prepared to be amazed; because I was!” Chris Edwards, Chief Executive, Education Leeds

Temple Moor High School, Leeds BSF

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Allens Croft Primary School, Birmingham PPP2 “After visiting the new school I just wanted to write and say how amazing it is ... and that it worked! So just thank you, you have made a difference to a community and the children.” Sandra Walton, Head teacher Newcastle Schools PFI

Allens Croft Primary School, Birmingham PPP2

“I am writing this letter to personally thank you and your colleagues at Watkins Gray International for the architectural services provided on the Newcastle schools PFI Project. The commitment and effort demonstrated by yourselves played a major part in the successful delivery of the project. We can all be rightly proud of the end product, when measured by the positive reaction received from the respective schools head-teachers, their staff, pupils and parents, all of whom are delighted with the new facilities…. I honestly hope that the experience gained by our Newcastle ‘team’, will be utilised on another Schools Project in the near future.” Alan Wilson, Project Manager Bovis Lend Lease (Scotland) Ltd Bellerbys College “I would like to take this opportunity, on behalf of Study Group, to formally thank you for your contribution to making this project work for us, meeting serious financial and time constraints. It ha been a pleasure and a joy working with the team from WGI. I would also like to thank you personally for making my task so much more enjoyable and easier and wish everyone well with future projects.” Elizabeth Webb, Property Projects Manager UK Study Group International Ltd

Heaton Manor High School, Newcastle PFI

Bellerbys College

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Watkins Gray International LLP Colechurch House 1 London Bridge Walk London SE1 2SX T. 020 7940 8400 F. 020 7940 8444 E. mail@wgi.co.uk

Watkins Gray International LLP The Engine House 1 Foundry Square, Leeds LS11 5DL T. 0113 389 5050 F. 0113 243 6872 E. mail@wgi-leeds.co.uk WGI / Halliday Meecham 111 Piccadilly Manchester M1 2HY T. 0161 661 5566 F. 0161 661 5567 E. mail@wgi.co.uk www.wgi.co.uk

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