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Defining connectivity at sea

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ENABLING THE MARITIME ECOSYSTEM_ SAFER, SMARTER SHIPPING Inmarsat offers your ship a highly evolved maritime communications ecosystem which makes every trip or voyage more efficient, safer and more productive. In short, just a lot smarter. Visit inmarsat.com


Introduction

Contents 2 3 6 8 10

Life At Sea Owners Survey Future Of Shipping Services Global Coverage

An ASM publication Editorial Director: Sam Chambers sam@asiashippingmedia.com Associate Editors: Jason Jiang jason@asiashippingmedia.com Katherine Si katherine@asiashippingmedia.com Correspondents: Athens: Ionnis Nikolaou Bogota: Richard McColl Cairo: Camelia Ewiss Cape Town: Joe Cunliffe Dubai: Yousra Shaikh Genoa: Nicola Capuzzo Hong Kong: Alfred Romann London: Holly Birkett Mumbai: Shirish Nadkarni New York: Suzanne Smith Oslo: Hans Thaulow San Francisco: Donal Scully Shanghai: Colin Quek Singapore: V Subramanian Sydney: Ross White-Chinnery Taipei: David Green Tokyo: Masanori Kikuchi Contributors: Nick Berriff, Andrew CraigBennett, Charles De Trenck, Paul French, Chris Garman, Lars Jensen, Jeffrey Landsberg, Peter Sand, Siddhartha Sanyal, Eytan Uliel Editorial material should be sent to sam@asiashippingmedia.com or mailed to Office 701, 9 Renmin Lu, Zhongshan District, Dalian, China 116001 Commercial Director: Grant Rowles grant@asiashippingmedia.com Sales Director: Helen Ong helen@asiashippingmedia.com Maritime ceo advertising agents are also based in Japan, Korea, Scandinavia and Greece — to contact a local agent email grant@asiashippingmedia.com for details MEDIA KITS ARE AVAILABLE TO DOWNLOAD AT: www.maritime- ceo.com All commercial material should be sent to grant@asiashippingmedia.com or mailed to Asia Shipping Media, 30 Cecil Street, #19-08 Prudential Tower, Singapore 049712 Design: Tigersoft Design Printers: Allion Printing, Hong Kong

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CEO Interview Solutions Travel MarPoll

‘Big data, big muddle’

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elcome to this magazine that takes a look at what the future of shipping holds and how the industry must learn that communications ultimately are not a cost, but a saving. One of the trends currently under much discussion at industry events is big data, a term I must admit I hate, but since everyone uses it, I will so that we are on the same page. What is clear is that big data will revolutionise shipping, and perhaps make commercial decisions less of a gut feel. It’s more a question of how long it will take the industry to handle this step change – and whether all companies will be able to. Hans Ottosen, ceo of Danish voyage data recorder firm Danelec Marine, reckons shipping is behind on collecting data as to date it has been difficult to collect data and it is perceived to be difficult to transfer the data, that is one of the big bottlenecks for shipping. Dr Martin Stopford, president of Clarkson Research, says ownership of data will be a key issue and the unwillingness of companies to share it is very common. He relates how he heard on a recent trip to Long Beach that shippers are increasingly bitter about the quality of data container carriers are providing. “Big data, big muddle,” the Clarkson analyst quips. He also questions how shipowners with 10 ships or less who make up 85% of world

shipping will handle all this data. These types of companies do not employ tech officers, Stopford notes. Stopford’s thoughts are echoed by Peter Hinchcliffe, secretary-general of the International Chamber of Shipping. “The next battle is to persuade stakeholders to share data for mutual benefit,” he says, adding: “I am not convinced we are in place to fully analyse all this data.” 90% of the data in the world today has been created in the last two years alone, according to Professor Richard Clegg from Lloyd’s Register Foundation. Roger Adamson, chief executive of Futurenautics, says the industry needs more data analysts ashore, ideally millennials without much preconceptions of shipping, so that they are unlikely to adopt the gut feel commercial nature of the sector which has led to such a cyclical industry. All good points, now can someone please come up with a better term than big data please.

Sam Chambers Editor Maritime ceo

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Life At Sea

The connectivity debate Should broadband be available to all at sea?

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oor connectivity is the single largest factor disincentivising the best and brightest youth from espousing seafaring as a career.” That was the view of one seafarer in a poll carried by this title earlier this year. Similarly a survey carried last year by Futurenautics Research found 60% of seafarer respondents indicated that having broadband onboard ships affects their decision to join a company. The problem is that seafarers’ bosses often to do not agree with this sentiment. Maritime CEO holds regular lunches around the world with top shipowners. These behind-closeddoors events are a chance for owners to let off steam and speak freely; it’s all off the record. We regularly ask our guests of their views on broadband connectivity for all onboard and roughly 80% of attendees are against it, citing distraction, cost, and how it leads to greater loneliness, not less, for those out at sea. This is not a view held by the majority in the industry – see the pie chart below from a recent poll we carried, open to all in shipping. Maritime CEO interviewed seafarers from three different countries

Should all ships have proper connectivity for all seafarers?* Yes 87% No 13%

Yes 87% No 13%

* Survey carried out to all Maritime CEO readers in April this year

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for their thoughts on the matter. “In a world of modern gadgets and technology,” says Nikhil Salunke, a second officer for the past two years, “we seafarers are still deprived of certain things.” Most ships, he says, are still without internet connections and this is something that has to change. “In the era of Skype and Facebook it is very difficult to live in isolation,” Salunke observes. Quite so, agrees Dipyan Dutta, a third officer, and fellow Indian, who has been at sea for the past three years. He urges broadband on all ships so seafarers can stay in touch with their families. Arthur Malapit, a Filipino second officer with four years experience at sea, argues that to be deprived what he calls “this basic human right” of being in touch with loved ones is patently wrong in the 21st century and is part of the reason for the constant concerns about a shortage of seafarers and officers to service the world’s commercial fleets. Another third officer, also from

the Philippines, Jan Ellin Palomar, who is soon approaching his second anniversary at sea, admits to great bouts of loneliness onboard ship, something that could be helped by being connected to the internet. “In a ship, there must be more recreation for seafarers,” says Palomar, “as we consider loneliness our greatest foe.” All those interviewed called for a greater spend by owners and managers on recreational activities at sea. This, says Dutta, should include the latest movies, table tennis and gym equipment. These opinions are all from ‘millenials’ – people who have grown up with the internet at their fingertips 24/7. Not all seafarers are of this age range however and the one dissenting voice comes from Hong Kong. “In the old days we used to play cards, mess together, and so on. There was a lot of contact between crew. There is less contact nowadays because people tend to go directly to their cabins when not working,” says one senior officer from shipping line Wah Kwong. ● maritime ceo


Owners Survey

Divided industry Unsurprisingly owners and managers have different needs from maritime communication suppliers than seafarers

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price/total cost of ownership was with some of the criteria listed. aritime communications not the single most important aspect For instance, Charlie Kocherla, spent a long time being owners and managers sought when chief technical officer at Pacific of little interest to most selecting their communications sysBasin, Hong Kong’s largest owner, people. Beyond safety requirements, tems onboard. Global coverage stood says global coverage is assumed. it took the dotcom boom to generate out as the most vital selling point. Similarly, Josko Jurin, head a significant uptick in activity, as Interestingly, not a single of operations at John Fredriksen’s software entrepreneurs discovered respondent selected either ease of Frontline questioned the need for this ‘untapped’ market. installation or reputation as imporus putting value added services as a That ended with the dotcoms tant criteria. criterion. going belly up, but the Rubicon had “Support is what actually creates been crossed. There was now a clear added value,” he says. realisation that connectivity held Respondents were split on the the key to better productivity and Support is what actually importance of access to movies, TV perhaps even a more efficient supply creates added value and sport to crew welfare, recruitchain. ment and retention. Once again, the market was “We find that most seafarers overtaken by events – namely the really want the connection to home best earnings many had ever seen ‘A totally fungible commodity’ and they want news,” says Vroon’s – and suddenly no-one cared about Grool. saving fuel or improving efficiency, Rob Grool, a director at Belgium A leading Asian tanker player because rates were through the roof. owner Vroon, says, “Communications Another crash followed and are a totally fungible commodity like disagreed, however, saying: “This is something that needs to be regusuddenly we are back to the future. H&M insurance: you go for the most lated – you cannot have this tap on This time, the recession looks longer, cost-efficient solution for your fleet.” all the time as it is distracting and deeper and likely to claim more Some respondents took issue scalps. The answer? Better connectivity for increased efficiency and Rank your top three most important considerations improved crew retention. There is a definite increase in when choosing satellite communications for your fleet activity and the adoption criteria is expanding. Prices are cheaper, applications are becoming more Usability 1% Value added services 3% sophisticated and the number Integration with existing IT infrastructure 5% of vessels as good candidates for IT upgrades is increasing. With Global coverage 27% increased demolition of older ships Support and service 12% the newer, better-wired ones are looking for efficiencies. For this magazine we interviewed 150 top owners and managers for their views on maritime commuReliability13% nications – most of the results can be found on the back page. The lead Price 25% question, however, is carried on this page. Performance (speed / bandwidth) 14% Despite cost conscious times,

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Owners Survey

unnecessarily expensive.” A majority of respondents did however agree that access to social media was important in today’s modern age in terms of crew welfare, recruitment and retention. “It’s how the world communicates nowadays, so to deny this at sea is to sever ties with loved ones,” an American containerline executive says.

“It is their emotional lifeline to their family,” says a leading European shipmanager. There were some who dissented from this viewpoint. Tim Huxley, CEO of Wah Kwong Maritime Transport, reckons that social isolation on vessels could be on the rise as shipowners provide more and more internet access to seafarers. He worries too about the

Social media onboard is a double-edged sword

effect of increased access to social media on vessels, which potentially allow seafarers to discover upsetting news from families and friends while at sea while leaving them powerless to take any action. “It really is a double-edged sword,” says Huxley. “Whilst connectivity and being in touch with loved ones and friends sounds a great thing, if you do have a family problem and you learn about it while you’re at sea there is not a lot you can do about it aside from worry”.

Leave MLC2006 alone No single question posed in our survey elicited more response yet was so one sided as our wondering if MLC2006 should be updated to include mandatory internet access for all onboard. Fully 91% of the 150 companies surveyed thought this was an unnecessary extra piece of legislation for an industry already mired in reams of red tape. One Asian tanker owner comments: “I think a strong recommendation is enough at the moment. Still the prices are high and service providers are few, hence probably this can be considered mandatory in the coming years.” “It is not necessary to amend the regulatory framework,” maintains Gaurav Bansal, CEO of SE Shipping Lines. “It is a part of being competitive to attract the best talent onboard,” he reckons. Christopher Kirton, managing director at Norstar Ship Management, was one of the few who felt MLC2006 should be updated. “It would stop the arguments of owners who don’t want to provide,” is his own argument why it is necessary. We also asked how owners and managers would like to see maritime safety services delivered in the future. More than half replied over the web. Email, podcasts,

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Owners Challenges Survey

webinars were some of the alternative suggestions. Peter Schellenberger, a procurement director at shipmanagement giant V.Ships, suggests via VPN or an app. One Asian dry bulk owner says that in the future broadband internet will become automatically a necessity onboard. For example, he says, once ECDIS is on all vessels globally, these ships will require large data for corrections and updates. “Other safety data, weather updates, safety training, trouble shooting by video, etc can only be available once unlimited broadband is available onboard,” he points out. Quite so, agrees Arnold Lipinski, a senior director at German containerline, Hapag Lloyd. “Safety services like tele

medicine, technical support, navigation advice via internet or satellite will be essential in the future,” Lipinski says.

Is shipping ready for apps? The industry seemed divided on the need to develop applications to improve communication between the engine room, control room, bridge and shore staff, according to our poll. Nevertheless, shipping is entering a future where a bewildering number of applications are on the market or under development. Maritime has been moving from a capacity constrained market to one of rich applications driven by user demand. Many felt though that these apps are missing the point.

What we need to work on is a general willingness to communicate between everyone onboard

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“Internal communication should be verbal or by email. With shore staff we can use existing applications,” says one Japanese bulker player. Quite right, agreed a spokesperson from a leading Asia-based containerline. “With the current communication technology and maritime safety services available to us, we find it quite sufficient for the needs of our modern fleet today,” says the boxline source. “What we need to work on is a general willingness to communicate between everyone onboard,” argues Vroon’s Grool, “and get rid of the still existing deck/engine division.” Kevin Grant Leach-Smith, vice president at Singapore’s Masterbulk, agrees with Grool’s sentiment. “We already have the equipment and the software,” he says. “It is important to encourage more communication face to face or on the telephone, not via applications.” For the full results of the survey, check page 16. ●

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Future Of REGULAR Shipping

Would a Google Ship be beta? Will shipping ever catch up with its automotive and airline counterparts in terms of harnessing information technology?

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hipping is years behind its automotive and airline cousins in harnessing information technology and urgent investment is required, especially as the pool of well qualified seafarers gets ever tighter, according to one of the industry’s most famous analysts. Dr Martin Stopford, president of Clarkson Research Services, goes so far as to suggest shipping needs to mirror the self-driving Google Car (pictured). “We are so old fashioned we don't even realise just how far behind we are with the latest technology,” Stopford says. The lack of qualified crew is one of the most pressing issues facing the industry, he notes. “You’ve got 58,000 deepsea ships, that’s 58,000 qualified chief engineers, it’s tough to get them today and there’s a feeling that in 10 years time you are on a real loser there,” he says. What he proposes is to look at how owners can “deskill” onboard jobs. “If you can lay your hands on some expertise it is much better to have it in the office and be doing the difficult, technical stuff from the office, not on the ship,” he says, noting that this is exactly what the car industry has done. “Take your BMW into the garage,” he says, “and they don't get out a spanner, they plug it into the computer, download all the information and the computer tells them what circuit board to plug in.” Stopford hits out at owners for failing to invest properly in technical expertise. “I think there is a lot to be done

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on the technical side in rebuilding the expertise which in 50 years of cutting costs most companies have taken out,” he says, pointing out just how few shipping firms have technical directors these days. As far as the navigation of the ship goes, Stopford says shipping should look at the advent of the Google Car, which has only had just two accidents and they were both when people were driving them. The 64 lasers on top of the car don't make mistakes, he stresses. In a rallying call to owners, Stopford urges: “It’s time for a reappraisal about what our strategy is in shipping and time to think whether that $180bn of investments last year in new ships needs to be matched by perhaps a much smaller but significant investment in increasing the industry’s technical capability to use this great new revolution we have, information technology.” Commenting on Stopford’s thoughts, Simon Doughty, ceo of Hong Kong’s Wallem Group, says any serious push for automation will come down to supply and demand and perhaps a unified shipping industry to tackle the innovation. For unmanned flight, much of the development has been due to innovations from the world’s defence forces investing in drone technology, Doughty notes. “There is a huge step from unmanned military aircraft, or perhaps commercial cargo planes, to passenger flights – how would you feel boarding a flight and knowing that nobody was upfront should it be required in the case of an emergency,” he says. The airplane and car industries

have proven anything is possible, Doughty reckons, with a bit of pull from demand and creative thinkers leading the way. “Shipping can do the same in its own way,” he asserts. “Technology is an enabler. We should use it to enable a whole new way of moving goods by sea.” Richard Sadler, ceo of British classification society, Lloyd’s Register, bemoans shipping’s conservative nature, which has, he agrees with Stopford, left it way behind other modes of transport. “If we can use autonomy with all the risks and uncertainties of taking a car around a town, then surely we can use the technology to drive ships,” Sadler says, adding, “Not necessarily to berth them, but certainly from outer buoy to outer buoy across the ocean.” Not everyone has jumped on the autonomous bandwagon however. Independent maritime communications commentator Neville Smith, for

In 10 years time what will be the mandated minimum number of seafarers required onboard oceangoing commercial ships?* 0 1% 20+ 13% 1-5 14%

11-20 38% 6-10 34%

* Survey carried out to all Maritime CEO readers in April this year

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Future REGULAR Of Shipping

As the complexity of computer-based safety systems grows, the real concern is whether the humans which operate them have the right skills one, is less than convinced. “We read and hear so much about unmanned or autonomous ships that I think people are beginning to believe we will be seeing them very soon,” he says. “Even leaving aside the regulatory changes that would be required, the attitude of the industry’s major stakeholders suggests that this is an interesting piece of disruptive thinking rather than an imminent impact on the shipping industry.” Advocates of autonomous vessels often cite the airline industry as the model to follow thanks to its impressive safety record, Smith observes. But it also provides sobering parallels of what happens when things go wrong. “As the complexity of computer-based safety systems grows, the real concern is whether the humans which operate them have the skills they need and an organisational structure that understands the implications for loss prevention,

Satellite Communications Special

insurance and environmental protection,” Smith warns. One man well placed to comment on the issues raised by Stopford is Mika Vehviläinen, who prior to taking up his current role as president of Finnish equipment supplier, Cargotec, was the head of Finnair. He admits shipping is well behind airlines. He does however see less and less need for seafarers onboard ships going forward. “The role of the crew in ships will be more focused on maintenance and monitoring of the operations,” he says. The problem, according to Nicholas Fisher, ceo of Masterbulk, is that it is still possible to trade profitably with the minimum of technological advances, if any. Nevertheless, he is adamant unmanned ships are not a matter of if, but when. It won’t be for a while, argues Sergey Popravko, managing director of Unicom Management Services, at

least two to three decades. “There would be so many issues that would need to be legislated before such a huge change such as legal, union issues, safety and security - an unmanned ship may well become an easy target for terrorists and pirates,” Popravko warns. Rahul Choudhuri from Veritas Petroleum Services is not convinced unmanned ships will happen in our lifetime or ever. “Shipping economics tend to distort the deep value of seamanship knowledge,” he says, adding: “Technology has numbed seafarers to believe that the ship can run on its own. This is a fallacy and significant non-compliance is a result.” Caroline Huot, managing director of lube supplier Unimarine is of a similar opinion pointing out that legislators have mandated Google Cars have a wheel and a brake, acknowledging the possible need for human intervention and initiative. Moreover, if there’s a problem with a Google Car, it simply parks on the side of the road and waits for assistance, something, she says, that will definitely not be the case in the middle of the ocean. ●

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Services REGULAR

FleetBroadband

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nmarsat’s flagship maritime service provides dependable, seamless voice and broadband data coverage across the world's oceans. Choose from a range of capabilities and antenna sizes to suit your vessel needs. Whether you select the FB150, FB250 or FB500 terminal, you can rely on FleetBroadband for cost-effective operational and crew communications. Inmarsat FleetBroadband answers the maritime industry’s demand for broadband voice and data services for office applications like email and report logging.

Fleet Xpress

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leet Xpress, Inmarsat’s next-generation hybrid Ka-band / L-band maritime service redefines what’s possible in maritime communications – offering consistent high-speed communications from a single operator in response to the growing demand for higher volume data services to boost operational efficiency. Fleet Xpress delivers the high bandwidth data speeds enabled by Ka-band technology and the proven reliability of FleetBroadband as back-up. Purposely designed for mobility, it provides a continuous, consistent service as traffic is handed seamlessly across each spot beam and from one satellite to another. Because Inmarsat owns and manages the entire global network, it can make more effective use of satellite resources to achieve significant cost savings. With the more efficient use of bandwidth in the Ka-band combined with the resilience of the L-band network, which delivers 99.9 per cent overall network availability, the net result is more affordable, more reliable mobile broadband. And with one flat monthly fee for customers to pay from a wide choice of service plans, there’s no risk of bill shock.

FleetPhone

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nmarsat’s low-cost, maritime satellite phone service is designed for use when you're beyond the range of land-based networks. FleetPhone is a global, fixed solution for vessels where the primary requirement is for voice communication or where additional voice lines are needed. There are two models of FleetPhone on the market. Oceana 400 is a slimline terminal where the simplest access to reliable voice and data communications services is required. The Oceana 800 is an all-in-one maritime communications terminal designed with an IP54 rating enclosure.

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Services

Fleet One

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deal for leisure yachts and near-shore fishing boats, Fleet One is an Inmarsat service tailored to deliver dependable voice and broadband data to smaller vessels. Fleet One offers affordable pricing plans that take into account seasonal variations and occasional use, and comes with a specially designed compact and easy-to-install antenna. Fleet One offers small vessels the same access to the robust and reliable technologies previously only available on much larger vessels, providing access to the same advantages of online connectivity and the benefits this brings to onboard operations, comfort and safety.

Fleet Media

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hose on commercial shipping vessels no longer have to wait until they reach dry land to catch-up on the latest films, sports and news as Inmarsat’s service, Fleet Media, brings the most recent viewing content to those at sea. An agreement with NT Digital Partners, a joint venture between global content agency Spafax and the world’s largest non-theatrical distributor Swank Motion Pictures, has enabled Inmarsat to bring Hollywood to the high seas with its Fleet Media service. A comprehensive catalogue of Hollywood and international blockbusters and television programming, along with sports and news content is available to crew over the Inmarsat network for on-demand, offline viewing. Watching films, sports and news on tablets, laptops and smartphones brings much more than simple viewing pleasure. It helps keep seafarers connected to the outside world and their world at home, improving their quality of life while aboard a vessel.

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Global Coverage

Global Xpress coverage 90° 80° 70° 60° 50° 40° 30° 20° 10° 0° 10° 20° 30° 40° 50° 60° 70° 80° 90° 180°

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Global Coverage

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Extendable Global Xpress coverage via steerable beams

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s map depicts Inmarsat’s expectations of coverage, but does not represent a guarantee of service. The availability of rious conditions. Global Xpress coverage June 2015.


CEO Interview

‘Apps will change the landscape of shipping dramatically’ Ronald Spithout, boss of Inmarsat Maritime, discusses how the industry is set to be transformed thanks to a growing use of communications, data and applications

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onald Spithout, as his name might suggest, is a plain speaker – someone who does not mince words, with a clear vision of where he sees maritime communications heading. The president of Inmarsat Maritime reckons a giant shift in the landscape of shipping is on the horizon thanks to the development of new communications and applications. He has short-, medium- and long-term goals mapped out for Inmarsat Maritime and by extension the shipping community. First immediate priority is the roll out of Fleet Xpress, Inmarsat’s maritime Global Xpress solution. A hybrid Ka-band/L-band service offering seamless connectivity, that delivers the world’s first globally available, high-speed broadband service from a single network operator. “All owners are talking about big data, apps, connectivity and so on,” he relays, “but no one has cracked a global satellite solution.” A Maritime CEO survey of 150 owners and managers carried out for this magazine put global coverage above even pricing in terms of maritime communications priorities, something Inmarsat and Spithout have clearly heeded. The Inmarsat boss’s medium-term goals are far more overwhelming. “We want to change the landscape and role of the distribution of satellite communications,”

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The reason apps have not worked so far in maritime is because owners did not know the cost of having them, bandwidth-wise

Spithout says. The way this former electrical engineer sees it is that everything onboard will get apps and the data derived will then be sent to shore. Inmarsat is working with software giant Cisco on this project. Apps are yet to truly get a foothold in shipping – a fact backed up by our survey (see page 16). This will change however, says Spithout. “The reason apps have not worked so far in maritime is because owners did not know the cost of having them, bandwidth-wise,” he says. Spithout is convinced there will be a big market onshore keen

to develop maritime apps. As an example, he cites engine manufacturers, who could sell a service app for a flat fee. “This move for apps might take a couple of years,” he concedes, “but once done it will change the landscape of shipping dramatically.” To harness this change, looking long-term Inmarsat will head out to maritime universities, seed small companies, and build test labs to get start-ups to innovate their applications. “We will move to where innovation is,” Spithout concludes. ● maritime ceo


Solutions

Communications as an enabler A ship’s outlay on satellite communications is typically just 0.3% of its total operating costs, yet this investment can bring savings of up to 10%

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hipping has come a long way from the boom years of the past decade. Back then, so long as the thing floated, ships and the technology onboard were almost irrelevant as owners ladled in cash in near record levels. Fast-forward to today’s straightened times and the smartest shipowners and managers are doing all they can to trim costs, whether it be from hull modifications to using the latest software. Marketing of technology in the maritime sphere has completely changed – it is all about saving costs. Owners are increasingly willing to pay for technology that in the long run can palpably then save them operating costs. This is a trend that will likely stay with the industry. This has not been lost on Inmarsat, the world’s number one provider of maritime satellite communications. As the images provided by the UK-headquartered tech giant on this page and overleaf show, satellite communications account for typically just 0.3% of a vessel’s operating costs and yet with good, judicious use can help owners’ save up to 10% of their ship operating costs.

Efficiency drive Having the right communications package can enable savings from just about every facet of the vessel and its journey whether it be fuel, port

Satellite Communications Special

or insurance costs and much more besides. “There’s much more intelligent debate on telecoms these days,” observes Ronald Spithout, President of Inmarsat Maritime. “There is a mind shift to treating communications as an enabler.” With FleetBroadband and Fleet Xpress masters and superintendents can stay in constant touch with head office, clients and ports. They can transmit estimated times of arrival and departure so schedules can be kept up to date, order supplies en route and send cargo reports back to headquarters.

Crew documentation, such as customs and immigration information and other port and regulatory reports, can be dealt with ahead of arrival, using quick and reliable internet access or fax. Masters can also log-on securely to their company intranet or take part in video conferences with head office. On land, shipmanagement companies can track their assets and monitor equipment remotely, alerting onshore experts to any problems and using Inmarsat’s services to help prevent situations where defective machinery causes delays or wastes money.

Satellite communications help with crew retention Typical vessel running costs

Communication as a fraction of operating cost Other 3.7%

Satellite communications 0.3%

Personnel costs 10%

Maintenance and repair 10% Fuel costs 46% Insurance 9%

Port charges 21%

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Solutions

Dawn of a revolution Spithout sees maritime communications in flux, at the dawn of a revolution brought about by the development of a myriad of applications for the shipping industry. The future of shipping - the ‘Google Ship’ as espoused on page 6 – might be years away, but never before has the industry been so willing to harness technology to slash costs. In the future it is not too difficult to imagine a shipmanager as just a network operating centre with a bank of screens with sensors and videos onboard reporting everything. Whereas previously vessels were often seen as separate units of an IT network, today IT and communications are much more integrated, to the extent one can think of vessels sailing at sea as remote offices that are part of a globally connected network. Maritime communications will be the enabler for the tech revolution likely to wash over shipping in the

coming 10 years. “Owners are asking us what they can do with all these new communication channels and apps to help them reduce costs,” Spithout relates. “By adding data to a vessel we can show the savings clearly across that ship.”

There’s much more intelligent debate on telecoms these days

Crew retention tool

All Inmarsat’s maritime offerings have three key tenets at the heart of their development – safety, efficiency and crew welfare, the latter of which Spithout has plenty of opinions. It seems the industry is split on how much internet access there should be onboard, judging by our survey (see page 16). The split is between seafarers and their

employers, the shipowners and managers. Yet, for Spithout at least, he thinks there should be no debate on the matter. He describes internet access at sea as “almost a human right” and points to a recent seafarer survey carried out by global shipowner association BIMCO, which found that satellite communications form a major part of the decision process for crews choosing ships. “Satellite communications help with crew retention,” he says adamantly. “Recruiting and training people is so expensive and time consuming. If you can help retain them by providing internet access to connect them to their family and life ashore and by providing additional services like showing movies and sport, that’s great for all concerned and brings a wealth of benefits to the owner for the long term. Our Fleet Media service is already significantly enriching life onboard and as more services are added we see huge potential for both owners and crew alike.” ●

Communication is a value Optimise performance Improve crew morale

Internet café and affordable crew calling, email, and access to social networks

Improve monitoring of hull, propeller, bunker comsumption, and engine performance

Reduce repair costs

Remote access to on-board PC’s and other equipment reduces need for on-site support calls

Reduce insurance costs

Improved safety training and access to CCTV provides managers the ability to mitigate insurance claims

Good satellite communications can help save

10% on vessel expenses

Reduce fuel costs and emissions

Real-time access to weather, currents, and sea condition data means better voyage planning while reducing greenhouse gas emissions

Reduce port charges

Improve accuracy of timing arrival to berth, carge, and pilot availability

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Travel

In and around EC1 Londoner Oli Wadeson provides readers with a unique snapshot of what to see and do around Inmarsat’s HQ

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ondon is booming -- you can barely blink before a new luxury residential development appears and no more so than in the east. Post Olympics, Stratford is now a major hub, Canary Wharf continues to grow... the list goes on. But the kind of vitality transforming this end of England's capital is nothing new in the postcode EC1. EC1 is increasingly the UK’s answer to Silicon Valley, a growing tech hub with Inmarsat at the heart of this revolution. EC1 is the British byword for technology, innovation, business and fresh tech talent. The area, which comprises Clerkenwell, Finsbury and Barbican, has been thriving for centuries and tourists to London should make it their first stop. Bustling Clerkenwell was the setting for Fagin's pickpockets in Oliver Twist and while you probably don't need to watch your wallet so much these days, you can't fail to be swept up by the energy there. Look no further than the Barbican Centre for cinema, art exhibitions and theatre while Sadler's Wells is the capital's go-to destination for contemporary dance. And if you want to learn more about Dickens' days, head to the Islington Museum in St John Street. EC1 is also home to Smithfield market, the UK's largest meat market where trade has been going strong for 800 years. Located in three listed buildings, but equipped with stateof-the-art modern facilities, no scene can encapsulate quite so neatly London's ability to combine history with a relentless drive into the future. With so much to see it will come as no surprise to learn some

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of London's finest restaurants are queuing up here to snap up your trade in EC1. Cuisine doesn't come much more traditionally English than Fergus Henderson's award-winning St John in Clerkenwell where offal and sweetbreads delight the staunchly non-vegetarian among us. Non-meat eaters should not despair, however. Just further up St John Street they'll find The Gate, London's top vegetarian restaurant, where the mushroom risotto has a reputation to match the cuts of flesh on offer at St John. If seafood is your bag go to Gow's on Old Broad Street. They have been

No scene can encapsulate quite so neatly London’s ability to combine history with a relentless drive into the future

serving oysters and the like since 1884 here. Forget reviews, that's what you call staying power. Culture and food done, no trip to London is complete without a pint of beer and a late-night snack of fish and chips. The capital is now awash with so-called 'gastropubs' (pubs that serve upmarket food). But I would steer clear and head for a traditional old boozer. You might not find yourself standing next to a modern-day reincarnation of the Kray twins at the Artillery Arms on Bunhill Row but this is a gaff where real Londoners quench their thirst -- and if you want to fit in with the crowd don't forget to sample the pork scatchings with your pint of bitter. And finally, for those fish and chips doused in vinegar and sprinkled with salt. Kerbisher on Rosebery Avenue has the deep fryer on the go until not much shy of pub closing time most nights of the week -- and, boy, their cod in batter sure beats a greasy kebab. ●

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MarPoll

Communicating your opinion We asked 150 top owners and managers for their thoughts on the future of maritime communications. Results plus key comments below

How important is access to movies, TV and sport to crew welfare, recruitment and retention?

Should MLC2006 be updated to include mandatory internet access for all onboard?

Without this there’s going to be a lot of disused ships Very important

Very important

4%

Important

55%

Not important

41%

4%

Important

55%

Not important

41%

How important is access to social media to crew welfare, recruitment and retention?

We’ve got enough regulations to handle already

Yes

9%

No

91%

34%

Important

58%

Not important

8%

34%

Very important

16%

Important

58%

Important

53%

Not important

31%

8%

www.splash247.com Splash - for incisive, exclusive maritime news and views 24/7.

91%

This seems to be the natural evolution of where ships are headed

Very important Not important

9%

No

How important is it to see applications developed to improve communication between the engine room, control room, bridge and shore staff?

It’s time shipping realised how millenials live their daily lives Very important

Yes

Very important

16%

Important

53%

Not important

31%


Safety is not just one piece of equipment on a ship – it’s a whole service. At Inmarsat, we’re not only the sole provider of GMDSS, but we also offer a range of flexible, customisable safety and regulatory services to make your fleet as safe and secure as possible – paving the way for ship and crew safety enhancements that are carefully tailored to your needs.

ENHANCED SAFETY SERVICES SAFER, SMARTER SHIPPING Inmarsat offers your ship a highly evolved maritime communications ecosystem which makes every trip or voyage more efficient, safer and more productive. In short, just a lot smarter. Visit inmarsat.com/safety

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12/07/2015 18:49


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