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Singh Center for Nanotechnology Annual Report 2016-2017

Member National Nanotechnology Coordinated Infrastructure

University of Pennsylvania


2016-2017 Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Annual Report


Foreword 6 Facilities Updates | Usage 8 Facilities Process Development 18 Singh Center Initiatives 26 Events | News | Graduates 54 Research 63 Research Achievements 65 Patents & Statistics 64 Awards & Honors 66 Publications 68


2015-16 Annual 2016-2017 Annual Report Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology


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2016-2017 Singh Center for Nanotechnology .


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

A Message from the Director Since our building was dedicated in 2013, the Singh Center for Nanotechnology has made it a priority to not only be a cornerstone for nanotechnology-related research for the University of Pennsylvania, but also to be a shared resource to our intellectual, regional, and national community. By creating a community hub for nanotechnology research, the Singh Center encourages collaboration between researchers from academia, industry and government, becoming a key enabler for scientific breakthroughs and society-relevant innovation. This effort was bolstered in 2015, when the Singh Center was chosen as one of the nation’s sixteen nodes of the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) National Nanotechnology Coordinated Infrastructure (NNCI) program. Our site has been designated the Mid-Atlantic Nanotechnology Hub (MANTH). Through outreach efforts to the nanotechnology-rich region, coupled with leveraging valuable programs such as the NNCI, and together with the outstanding user support provided by the Singh Center staff, our center has increased its number of users for the third straight year. Looking forward into the coming year, our goal is to continue this trend by further diversification of the Singh Center’s external user base, while at the same time welcoming several new nanotechnology-relevant faculty hires at Penn. Along with supporting the area’s academic institutions and larger corporations, the Singh Center has made significant strides to encourage new nanotechnology-based startup companies in our region. Last year was the debut of our "Big Ideas through Small Technology” Seed Grant Competition. By leveraging Singh and NSF funds, we were able to assist five small companies with grants for use at the Singh Center to develop their technologies. This year we are proud to say that we have more than doubled the program. Of course, as with last year we will have an opportunity for a sneak peek in October during the yearly Singh Nano Conference. At that conference, we will not only have a venue for our academic and large industry researchers to showcase their work to the community, but we will also host both a pitch competition for our small companies to other members of the Philadelphia entrepreneurial and to the venture funding community.


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As a proud part of the University of Pennsylvania, the Singh Center has continued and expanded its substantial roles in undergraduate and graduate nanotechnology education, as well as outreach and educational support. At the undergraduate level, and with the assistance of the NSF, the Singh Center hosted its second group of Research Experiences for Undergraduates this summer. New laboratory opportunities for graduate students were also implemented at the Singh Center, including a laboratory course in nanofabrication and nanocharacterization, as well as fellows programs for graduate students to become engaged in experimental nanotechnology. Further, we have expanded our Cleanroom Summer School program, comprising a series of seminars on relevant nanotech topics and open to the internal Penn and external research community. This program provides an excellent opportunity for Singh users to learn new skills and for new researchers to learn more about the Singh Center and how we can assist them with their research needs both now and in the future. The Singh Center also hosts year-round activities in nanotechnology educational K-12 outreach, hosting multiple tours for groups ranging from school field trips to education-oriented service organizations. Tours are tailored to the educational level of the group, and not only allow us to show the physical infrastructure of the Center to these potential nanotechnologists, but also enable us to explain why nanotechnology is important and how it affects our daily lives. Last Fall, as we do every year, we took this outreach one step further with our annual NanoDay activities and invited a number of high school classes from around the Greater Philadelphia Region to come to the University of Pennsylvania for a day of science demonstrations and tours of the various facilities around the campus, including the Singh Center itself. I would like to thank everyone at the Singh Center for their tremendous work in bringing us to where we are today, and for their continuing efforts as we contemplate further growth. As you look through this report, I hope you will feel the same sense of pride that I do in our users’ accomplishments, and that the Singh Center for Nanotechnology is becoming a catalytic force for nanotechnology research and innovation in our region, nation, and worldwide.

Sincerely,

Mark G. Allen Director, Singh Center for Nanotechnology University of Pennsylvania


2015-16 Annual Report 2016-2017 Annual Report Singh SinghCenter Centerfor forNanotechnology Nanotechnology


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Facilities Updates and Usage


2016-2017 Facilities Highlights

Quattrone Nanofabrication Facility (QNF)

Scanning and Local Probe Facility

The QNF supports nanoelectronics, nanomaterials development and integration, soft matter, and MEMS/NEMS. In addition, a complimentary facility for soft materials and laser micromachining is maintained by QNF for diverse materials processing, microfluidics, and lab-on-chip activities.

The facility contains multiple atomic force microscopes for measuring the size, shape, and electro-mechanical properties of materials, devices, and structures with nanometer precision. Two of these AFMs work with a confocal Raman microscope for combined force and optical measurements while another is paired with a fluorescence microscope.

Soft Lithography Microfluidics Biomedical (Bio Sensors) Medical Fundamental Materials Physics Research 2-D Research

Material Characterization 2-D Materials (Graphene, M0S2) Tribology Chemical Characterization Bio-Medical (In Vivo/Cell Tissues)

Property Measurement Facility

Nanoscale Characterization

Capabilities include magnetometry, thermal and electrical transport, heat transfer capacity and UV-vis-IR optics.

Nanoscale Characterization supports equipment for electron and ion beam analyses for university and industry users. The facility includes an integrated sample preparation laboratory with complete sample coating and plasma cleaning capabilities, as well as cryogenic TEM sample preparation equipment.

Temperature Characterization Magnetic Electronic Thermal Properties

High Resolution Electron Microscopy Ion Scattering Laboratory


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Facilities Highlights EQUIPMENT ACQUISITION Acquiring, improving, and replacing equipment are vital to the Singh Center mission to provide state-of-the-art equipment and know-how to academic and industry users. In 2016-2017, the Singh Center spent over $1 million on equipment purchases and upgrades. This new equipment provides new capabilities to our researchers in the fields of biology, medicine, electronics, and energy storage to name a few. Along with these acquisitions, the staff develops and presents new process recipes and training sessions to our users in the form of workshops and one-on-one interactions.

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2015-16 Annual Report 2016-2017 SinghEquipment Center for Nanotechnology New

Ultratech Fiji 200 Gen 2 Plasma ALD An Ultratech plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition system was installed this past winter in the Quattrone Nanofabrication Facility and is used to deposit thin films such as metals, metal-insulator-metal structures and Li-ion battery materials.

The new Ultratech PEALD tool with drybox installed in the Quattrone Nanofabrication Facility.

The Ultratech/CNT Fiji plasma enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition System (ALD) (PEALD) is coupled to an MBRAUN glovebox to ensure a non-reactive ambient atmosphere for the processing of samples which are sensitive to water and oxygen. This system features optimized reactor, heater, and trap geometries and can accommodate samples ranging from pieces to 150 mm substrates. It is capable of operating in Continuous Mode (Traditional Thermal ALD), Exposure Mode (high aspect ratio ALD), and Plasma Mode (PlasmaEnhanced ALD). The system is currently configured with precursors supporting the following films: Al2O3, ZnO, SnO2, LiPON, LiMnO4, and NiO. It is plumbed with Ar, O2, N2, and H2 as process gases for the remote plasma source. This new system allows users to deposit materials to support investigations ranging from battery research to biological applications.

The Oxford PlasmaPro etcher installed in the Quattrone Nanofabrication Facility.


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Oxford Instruments RIE

Scanning Probe Facility

The Oxford Instruments PlasmaPro 100 Cobra, recently installed in the Quattrone Nanofabrication Facility, is a load locked, inductively-coupled plasma etch system, currently configured for 4 inch substrates. It is outfitted with the following gases: CF4, CHF3, SF6, O2, Ar, Cl2, and BCl3, and is expandable to a total capacity of 12 process gases. The wafer chuck is equipped with both a liquid heat exchanger capable of operating between -5°C and 80°C and a heater capable of operating up to 350°C.

Five additions have been made to our existing scanning probe tools in the Scanning Probe Facility to improve their utility or to make them more efficient. An improved cryogenic system has been installed for the high vacuum electrical probe station. Simpler connections reduce wasted LN2. A fluid tip holder has been added to the Bruker Icon AFM, which permits imaging of biological and wet samples.

This system can etch high aspect ratio structures in SiO2, Si3N4, Si, Al, Al2O3, W, Ta, Mo, Ti, TiO2, and III-V materials such as GaAs and InP with high selectivity to both photolithography and electron beam lithography resists. The Oxford Cobra system enhances our center’s capability to fabricate new photonic and electronic devices.

The environmental sample stage for the Asylum AFM was rehabbed and returned into service. This improvement provides temperature control to reach 98° F for biological specimens.

Nanoscribe Lithography System

A cooling stage has been added to the Pico Plus AFM which allows cooling of samples from 40° - 150°C range.

An improved epi-illumination system has been installed in the TIRF-AFM allowing better sample viewing options.

In March 2017, the Quattrone Nanofabrication Facility received a NanoScribe Photonic Professional GT, a nano-micro 3-D laser printer. The system employs a two-photon absorption process to generate structures as small as 600 nm over a volume that spans the millimeter scale. The system enhances life science research in the areas of cell/extracellular matrix interaction, targeted drug delivery, cell migration, tissue engineering, and 3-D cell culture. We also expect use of this tool in photonic and plasmonic nanostructures, mechanical systems and scaffolding, and high aspect ratio nanolithography. The new Nanoscribe Lithography System in the Quattrone Nanofabrication Facility.

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2016-17 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology Arizona Tempe Tucson

July 2016- June 2017 | External Academic Users and Corporate Users

California San Diego San Francisco San Jose Santa Barbara Santa Clara

TX

Connecticut Storrs Mansfield TX

Washington, D.C.

TX

Delaware Newark Wilmington

TX TX

Georgia Atlanta Thomasville Illinois Waukegan

the Center has served

Indiana Marion

585 users

Iowa Des Moines Maryland Baltimore College Park Silver Spring Towson

Canada Germany

Massachusetts Billerica Cambridge Watertown

France

Michigan Ann Arbor

USA

International External Academic Users and Corporate Users include

Canada | Ecuador Ecuador

France | Germany

Montana Missoula

New Jersey Annandale Absecon Avenel Basking Ridge Cherry Hill Cranberry Glassboro Highstown Moorestown New Brunswick Newark Piscataway Princeton South Plainfield Teaneck New York Armonk Brooklyn Ithaca New York Rochester North Carolina Chapel Hill Charlotte Huntersville Rolesville Pennsylvania Bala Cynwyd Bethlehem Blawnox Bristol Bryn Mawr Chester Collegeville Essington Exton Haverford Ithan Millersville North Wales Philadelphia Pittsburgh State College Swarthmore West Chester Texas Dallas Houston San Antonio Virginia Charlottesville Lexington


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Research Highlights SITE RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS Provided are multiple examples of research highlights from Penn Internal Users, External Academic Users and Corporate Users of the Singh Center for Nanotechnology. This small cross section of user research spans diverse topics from bioengineering to nanophotonics. While our users are located primarily in the mid-Atlantic region, our domestic and global reach has expanded to Canada, Europe, and South America.

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2016-2017 Singh Center for Nanotechnology Users

Affiliation Breakdown of

Disciplinary Breakdown of

Singh Users

Singh Users Materials Life Science and Medicine

Local Site Academic

Physics

Other Academic

MEMS

Large Corporation

Process Optics

Small Corporation

Other

users by disc

usage aff hours

July 2016- June 2017 | USAGE BY USER AFFILIATION AND DISCIPLINE

Affiliation Breakdown of

Disciplinary Breakdown of

Singh Users

Singh Users Materials Life Science and Medicine

Local Site Academic

Physics

Other Academic

MEMS

Large Corporation

Process Optics

Small Corporation

Other

hours usage by user affiliation and discipline

hours by user affiliation

July 2016- June 2017 | USAGE BY LAB HOURS

Affiliation Breakdown of

Disciplinary Breakdown of

Singh Users

Singh Users Materials Life Science and Medicine

Local Site Academic

Physics

Other Academic

MEMS

Large Corporation

Process Optics

Small Corporation

usage by user fees

July 2016- June 2017 | USAGE BY USER FEES

Other

usage by user fees


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Usage Highlights SITE USAGE HIGHLIGHTS The site metrics in each section are associated with Singh Center for Nanotechnology users, laboratory hours and revenue collected during the fiscal period of July 1, 2016 through June 30, 2017. The graphs in each category (users, laboratory hours, and user fees) are categorized by affiliation and disciplinary breakdown. The total number of lab users during this period were 585, with lab usage totaling 44,335 hours.

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2015-16 Annual 2016-2017 Annual Report Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology


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Facilities Process Development


2016-2017 Process Development

Medical Applications of Nanoscale Plates Each year, the Mack Institute for Innovation, Penn Engineering, Penn Wharton Entrepreneurship, and the Penn Center for Innovation come together for the invention competition known as the Y-Prize. This year’s Grand Prize winner was VisiPlate, which seeks to use nanoscale plates (fabricated and characterized at the Singh Center for Nanotechnology) as part of a treatment for open angle glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness. The plates, developed in the lab of Igor Bargatin, Class of 1965 Term Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, are the thinnest that can be picked up and manipulated by hand. Despite being hundreds of times thinner than household cling wrap or aluminum foil, the corrugated plates of aluminum oxide can spring back to their original shape after being bent or twisted.

This unique combination of strength and thinness made them intriguing to juniors Brandon Kao of Engineering and Rui Jing Jiang and Adarsh Battu of Wharton. With assistance from Richard Stone and Eydie Miller, ophthalmologists at the Perelman School of Medicine, they envisioned a new way of fighting blindness. “Some of us personally know people who suffer from this disease, and we are motivated to help them and others by using this nanotechnology in a life-changing product,” Battu said. In open angle glaucoma, aqueous fluid in the eye builds up, putting damaging pressure on the optic nerve. Non-invasive treatments, such as eyedrops, have low levels of compliance, and surgical interventions, such as shunts that drain the fluid into the muscles surrounding the eye, have high rates of failure. Because the Bargatin lab’s plates are so thin, they can be implanted just under the surface in the front of the eye. Diffusing the shunted fluid over a wide area, they would allow that fluid to be reabsorbed at a manageable rate.

Corrugations in the nanoscale plates allow them to bend and twist without tearing. VisiPlate’s concept involves bringing the drainage plate to the front of the eye, making for a less invasive surgery and less risk to patients.


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Nanolaminated Ferromagnetic Cores One of the challenges of nanotechnology is to achieve macroscale devices and systems with materials/structures with desired nanoscale dimensions. Members of Mark Allen’s MicroSensors/MicroActuators (MSMA) group combine electrodeposition and MEMS/ micromachining to address such challenges. Based on our technology, we have demonstrated nanolaminated cores comprising hundreds of submicron-thick ferromagnetic layers that are electrically-insulated from the neighboring layers by ~100 nm-thick fluoroacrylic polymer layers.

a

Superior magnetic energy densities, surpassing that of conventional ferrite materials, are achieved even at high operating frequencies up to 10 MHz, while the eddy current losses within the magnetic layers are suppressed. Micromachined inductors with millimeter-thick nanolaminations are developed to achieve inductive devices with reduced sizes. Such inductive devices based on thick laminations are promising solutions for the miniaturization of DC-DC power conversion systems in multifunctional portable systems such as cell phones, and laptop computers.

b

c Clockwise from upper left to right: Figure. (a) Nanolaminated core comprising alternating layers of CoNiFe and fluoroacrylic polymer, (b),(c) Scanning electron microscope images of a cross-sectioned nanolaminated core. A cut was manually made to reveal the cross-section of a single layer of CoNiFe (c), of which both sides are coated with 100 nm-thick fluoroacrylic polymer.

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2016-2017 Process Development

Nanomechanics of the Pericellular Matrix of Cartilage Understanding of the nanomechanics of cartilage is essential to improve treatment of degenerative joint diseases and/or joint trauma. Daphney Chery and Lin Han at the School of Biomedical Engineering, Drexel University are using the specialized scanning probe facilities at the Singh Center to gain this understanding, with a particular focus on the pericellular matrix (PCM). The PCM of cartilage is a 3 to 5 µm-thick layer of tissue surrounding each chondrocyte (cell that produces and maintains collagen), regulating the biomechanical microenvironment of the chondrocytes and protecting the chondrocytes from overloading. The PCM is composed of localized collagen VI in the form of beaded filaments and perlecan. Recent studies at the Singh Center discovered the indispensable roles of decorin, a class I small leucine-rich proteoglycan, in the properties of the articular extracellular matrix (ECM); however decorin’s role in the PCM mechanics is unclear. Using Kawamoto’s tape method, 5 µm- thick, unfixed femoral condyle sections were obtained from male wildtype (WT) and decorin-null (Dcn-/-) mice and stained by immunofluorescent antibodies specific to collagen VI. Using the Singh Center Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF)-AFM, we performed nano-indentation force mapping with the guidance of type VI collagen fluorescence imaging to distinguish the PCM versus ECM. IF images detected distinctive rings of collagen VI-localized PCM surrounding each chondrocyte in both WT and Dcn-/- murine cartilage. Force maps show a significant decrease in moduli in Dcn-/- mice as compared to WT for both the PCM and T/IT-ECM. Overall, the PCM has significantly lower moduli than the ECM regardless of genotype and age. This study enabled the discovery of an important role of decorin in cartilage PCM mechanical properties.

Structural-Functional Analysis of Engineered Protein-Nanoparticle Assemblies using Graphene Microelectrodes The characterization of protein-nanoparticle assemblies in solution remains a challenge. The researchers in this study demonstrate a technique based on a graphene microelectrode for structural-functional analysis of model systems composed of nanoparticles enclosed in open-pore and closed-pore ferritin molecules. The method readily resolves the difference in accessibility of the enclosed nanoparticle for charge transfer and offers the prospect for quantitative analysis of pore-mediated transport, while shedding light on the spatial orientation of the protein subunits on the nanoparticle surface, faster and with higher sensitivity than conventional catalysis methods. The interdisciplinary project involved Penn researchers in the groups of A.T. Charlie Johnson, Physics and Astronomy, and Ivan Dmochowski, Chemistry, who leveraged their expertise in twodimensional materials and protein engineering along with the state-of-the-art facilities of the QNF. The lead author on the paper was Jinglei Ping, a postdoctoral fellow in Johnson’s group.


2015-2016 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

3-D Advanced Nanostructured Materials for Energy Applications Eric Detsi, Stephenson Term Chair Assistant Professor in Materials Science & Engineering, joined Penn Engineering in the fall of 2016. Current research in his lab focuses on fabrication, characterization and testing of a broad range of 3-D nanostructured materials. Detsi’s research thrusts span three principal areas: • 3-D Nano Heterojunctions, making use of solidsolid interfaces in the bulk of 3-D nanoporous metal scaffolds, as well as metal/dielectric based 3-D nanocomposites. • 3-D Earth Abundant Metals for Energy Storage, for air-free non-aqueous synthesis routes to non-precious nanoporous metals as well as the integration into chemical and electrochemical energy storage systems.

Detsi’s research group constructs nanoporous scaffolds through several techniques. Primarily, his team codeposits two metals, X and Y (e.g., with a composition of 30% X and 70% Y), followed by selective removal of Y (selective wet etching) and annealing, thus leaving behind a nanoporous framework of X. In the figures below, nanoporous structures of both Sn and Au are shown. All thin film deposition work was completed in the Quattrone Nanofabrication cleanroom facility, along with dielectric capping of Au structures with ALD (atomic layer deposition) of Al2O3. Devices were imaged in the Singh Center as well.

• 3-D Dual Microscopic Length Scale Structures for Energy Applications, developing nanoporous materials with bimodal porosity (macro pores and mesopores), with an emphasis on high-capacity alloy-type battery anodes for lithium, sodium or magnesium.

Scanning electron microscope images of nano-structured Sn.

Transmission electron images of ALD Al2O3 coated, nano-structured Au.

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2016-2017 Process Development

High-Strength Magnetically Switchable Plasmonic Nanorods Assembled from a Binary Nanocrystal Mixture

Self-Assembled Supraparticles Characterized by FIB and TEM

In the 2016 November edition of Nature Nanotechnology, Mingliang Zhang, postdoctoral researcher in Cherie Kagan’s group, reported the fabrication of multifunctional "smart" nanoparticle systems by combining top-down fabrication and bottom-up self-assembly methods. The process consists of templating nanorods from amixture of super-paramagnetic Zn0.2Fe2.8O4 and plasmonic Au nanocrystals. Nanocrystal-derived superparamagnetism prevents these nanorods from spontaneous magneticdipole-induced aggregation, while their magnetic anisotropy makes them responsive to an external field. Ligand exchange drives Au nanocrystal fusion and forms a porous network, imparting the nanorods with high mechanical strength and polarization-dependent, infrared surface plasmon resonances. The combined superparamagnetic and plasmonic functions enable switching of the infrared transmission of a hybrid nanorod suspension using an external magnetic field. Research groups contributing to the publication were Nader Engheta, Electrical and Systems Engineering, Dan Gianola, Materials Science, Jay Kikkawa, Physics, and Christopher Murray, Chemistry.

Supraballs are micron-sized spherical shells, formed by micelle-assisted colloidal self-assembly of nanoparticles. These supraballs combine multi-scale properties of the single nanoparticles such as quantum confinement, with collective effects resulting from being arranged on a 3-D lattice. The combination of focused ion beam (FIB) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) enables us to characterize the inner structure of a supraball. The micrometer-scale supraballs are synthesized through the self-assembly of 6 nm PbSe nanocrystals in a droplet confinement configuration. Members of Christopher Murray’s group use FIB to lift out a part of the supraball, slice it into a thin film, and characterize the superlattice by TEM. The last two TEM images show a close-packed nanocrystal superlattice lifted out by FIB. Quantum dot superlattice supraballs prepared and imaged with the Singh Center for Nanotechnology FIB and TEM tools.


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Varying and Unchanging Whiteness on the Wings of Dusk-Active and Shade-Inhabiting Carystoides escalantei Butterflies Whiteness, although frequently apparent on the wings, legs, antennae, or bodies of many species of moths and butterflies, along with other colors and shades, has often escaped our attention. Here, we investigate the nanostructure and microstructure of white spots on the wings of Carystoides escalantei, a dusk-active and shade-inhabiting Costa Rican rain forest butterfly (Hesperiidae). On both males and females, two types of whiteness occur: angle dependent (dull or bright) and angle independent, which differ in the microstructure, orientation, and associated properties of their scales. Some spots on the male wings are absent from the female wings. Whether the angle-dependent whiteness is bright or dull depends on the observation directions. The angle-dependent scales also show enhanced retroreflection. We speculate that the biological functions and evolution of Carystoides spot patterns, scale structures, and their varying whiteness are adaptations to butterflys' low light habitat and to airflow experienced on the wing base vs. wing tip.

Shu Yang, a professor of materials science and engineering in the School of Engineering and Applied Science, has been conducting research to mimic the color, reflectance and texture of butterfly wings. Daniel Janzen, a professor of biodiversity biology in the Department of Biology in Penn's Schools of Arts & Sciences, who studies tropical butterfly biodiversity for its many uses, reached out to strike up a collaboration following Yang's curiosity about Janzen's work with Swedish researchers on the causes of colors of wasp wings. The new research, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, was conducted by Yang, Janzen, postdoc Dengteng Ge, alumnus Gaoxiang Wu, graduate student Hye-Na Kim and Penn biologist Winnie Hallwachs. John Burns, a butterfly taxonomist and curator of lepidoptera at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., provided names for the tropical butterflies and storing them so that they could generate this kind of study.

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2015-16 Annual 2016-2017 Annual Report Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology


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2016-2017 Initiatives

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2016-2017 Initiatives

Mid-Atlantic Cleanroom Managers Meeting The second Mid-Atlantic Cleanroom Managers meeting was held in mid-October 2016, at the Singh Center for Nanotechnology. This is a semi-annual event created by the Singh Center staff to disseminate knowledge, best laboratory practices and equipment sharing within the Mid-Atlantic Region. This meeting attracted approximately 50 attendees from Brookhaven National Lab to Carnegie Mellon and from Columbia University to NIST. During this event, two representatives from the Department of Homeland Security visited to provide an overview of CFATS (Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards). This spurred a lively conversation within the group and the DHS representatives agreed to make an ongoing presence at future meetings. The cleanroom managers in attendance found this topic very helpful since each of their respective facilities must be in CFATS compliance.


2016-2017 Annual Report

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Singh Center for Nanotechnology

21

universities and government laboratories were in attendance

Singh Center of Nanotechnology University of Pennsylvania

TX TX

Below is a list of attending institutions:

University of Maryland

Rutgers University

Brookhaven National Laboratory

Army Research Laboratory

Princeton University

Columbia University

National Institutes of Standards & Technology

Drexel University

City University of New York

Carnegie Mellon University

New Jersey Institute of Technology

Lehigh University

Stevens Institute of Technology

Johns Hopkins University Howard University George Washington University Georgetown University Naval Research Laboratory

Pennsylvania State University University of Delaware University of Pennsylvania


2016-2017 Initiatives

Nanoscribe Training Workshop

Wednesday Open Process Sessions

A three-day training workshop was organized by the Singh staff to introduce users to the potential of the newly installed Nanoscribe Lithography tool. The first and second days provided a lecture on operation and theory to over 20 participants. More than half of these participants received additional hands-on training in the Quattrone Nanofabrication Facility.

As an ongoing initiative, staff members hold an open forum every Wednesday for users in the Mid-Atlantic community. The primary purpose of the event is to bring together Singh Center Staff with researchers to discuss solutions to fabrication problems – ranging from simple devices to complex multi-level process integration issues. It also allows researchers with limited backgrounds in fabrication to learn how staff and their community peers design devices and work through the challenges of device fabrication.


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Cleanroom Summer School For the second year, the staff of the Quattrone Nanofabrication Facility at the Singh Center for Nanotechnology has run a cleanroom summer program to facilitate the effective use of the tools in the facility. Lectures include instruction on direct write software training for beginners, SPC, DOE, ANOVA, lithography, deposition, and etch processing. The classwork is supplemented with workshop in the cleanroom on lithography, deposition, etch processing, and metrology. Of the over 100 attendees who participated in the Cleanroom Summer School Sessions, about 20% were outside academic or local industry, and 18% were not current users.

Date

Class Description

6/19-22 7/31 – 8/3 11 am – 2 pm

2-Day QNF Nanofabrication Boot Camp

6/15 8/9 11am – 5pm

2-Day Soft Lithography Boot Camp

8/2 10am – 12pm

From a Lab-on-a-Chip to a Chip in a Lab: Solving Problems in Microfluidics

7/13 11:30am-1pm

Statistical Process Control

8/7 11:30am-1pm

Design of Experiments

8/24 11:30am-1pm

Analysis of Variation

6/19, 7/26, 8/16

Elionix BEAMER Training

6/27, 7/25, 8/29 2pm-5pm

Heidelberg BEAMER Training

6/13, 7/18, 8/15 2pm-4pm

LayoutEditor Training

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2016-2017 Initiatives

Site Innovation and Regional Awareness Activities A significant portion of our activities continues to be a campaign to continue development of regional awareness and promotion of nanotechnology innovation. This effort has focused on (1) increasing outreach to other universities around the region; (2) encouraging use by nontraditional users within the University of Pennsylvania community; and (3) becoming an innovation hub for nanotech-based startups within the Mid-Atlantic.

2016 Seed Grant Class Follow up In Spring of 2016, we kicked off the first “Big Ideas through Small Technology” Seed Grant Competition which offered grants of $3,000 - $5,000 per company in waived equipment usage fees at the Singh Center for Nanotechnology to the Mid-Atlantic Startup Community. In addition, we also gave each winner a chance to present in front of a group of investors during our fall Annual User Meeting, in an effort to assist them in getting additional funding streams to further their work. Also, as part of the City of Philadelphia’s efforts to promote the Mid-Atlantic Region’s growing Tech Sector, all of the 2016 Seed Grant Winner were provided time slots to demonstrate their inventions at the Singh Center for Nanotechnology’s booth during the SXSW Conference, allowing the companies to get their ideas viewed by an even broader audience. At the end of April 2016, five companies were selected for the 2016 cohort with projects ranging from brewing beer faster using microfluidics to using graphene to analyze a person’s sweat for medical applications. Of the five companies that were funded, two of the companies were student startups, and three companies were startups from the local community. When evaluating which companies to fund, we used a number of criteria, including but not limited to: technical feasibility, diversity of applicants both in company type and product type, and business plan feasibility. Two of the most successful of the companies of the 2016 cohort include Biorealize and Graphwear.

The Big Ideas through Small Technology

Seed Grant Competition offered grants of $3,000 - $5,000 per company in waived equipment usage fees


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

2016 Innovation Seed Grant Competition Winners Biorealize

GraphWear

Biorealize is a company working to develop an automated and networked biolab to design, culture, and test genetically modified organisms. They have currently created a working prototype of their design utilizing the Quattrone Nanofabricaton’s Soft Lithography Lab and Laser Micromachining Facility to create the required microfluidic chips and interfaces for the device’s liquid handling and control system. The current device is patent pending and the company is currently seeking partners for either license or co-development opportunities. As part of this effort, Biorealize traveled to Austin, Texas this past Spring to pitch their product at the Singh Center for Nanotechnology/Penn Center for Innovation booth, where they launched their Beta Lab Test Program to put their devices directly into the hands of interested researchers.

GraphWear is developing a graphene-based sweat sensor patch that will track dehydration, glucose, and lactic acid levels in athletes. After analyzing the information, the graphene patch then pairs with a smartphone to readout the information to the user. GraphWear primarily utilized the Local and Scanning Probe facility for Raman spectroscopy, along with various pieces of equipment in the fabrication facility. GraphWear has piloted their device with athletes from University of Pennsylvania, Drexel University and Lehigh University, and is currently in talks to do trials with some of the professional sports teams in Philadelphia. After receiving additional funding resources from Dreamit and being part of the University City Science Center’s Digital Health Accelerator (DHA) program, GraphWear will now be relocating to California where they have received additional funding from the larger investment community.

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2016-2017 Initiatives

Big Ideas through Small Technology

2017 Seed Grant Class After reviewing the applications for the 2017 Seed Grant competition, we were pleased to discover that not only did we receive 50% more applicants than in 2016, but that the applicants themselves were more diverse and covered a greater geographic region. This year, in addition to completing the basic application process, we had a number of applicants come in for face-to-face interviews, so that the Singh Center Staff could get a better understanding of how each group intended to use the Center’s resources. This process enabled us to better adjust the amount of each Seed Grant to the needs of the company, allowing us to provide resources to a total of twelve different companies, more than twice the amount from 2016. The successful competitors are described below.

2017 Innovation Seed Grant Competition Winners TruSmoke Dr. Ping Wang

Folia Water Dr. Theresa Dankovich and Dr. Jonathan Levine

The goal of TruSmoke is to develop a low cost, accurate and instrument-free device that can be used by both medical professionals and general consumers to rapidly and objectively determine a person’s smoking status. TruSmoke will be utilizing multiple facilities at the Singh Center, but will be primarily utilizing the Nanofabrication and Soft Lithography Facilities.

Folia Water has created the world's first consumer goods water filter: Folia Filters™. Their vision is to reach the 1.8 billion people who consume microbiologically contaminated drinking water as well as the 2 billion people who pay the poverty penalty: overpaying in time, energy, or money to obtain safe drinking water. Folia Water intends to primarily use the Nanoscale’s Characterization equipment to determine aggregation/nanoparticle morphology and effective pore size of their water filter papers.


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Therapeutic Articulations Dr. Dawn Gulick and Mr. Zack Pelli Joint mobilizations angles are used to address pain and limited mobility related to musculoskeletal injury. Therapeutic Articulations is developing a device to more accurately quantify joint mobilizations, and thereby better assist therapists in diagnosing and treating their patients. Therapeutic Articulations intends to use the Center’s Nanoscale Characterization equipment to measure the accuracy of their device. VisiPlate Mr. Brandon Kao, Ms. Rui Jing Jiang, and Mr. Adarsh Battu VisiPlate is a nano-scale drainage implant to defend against blindness from open-angle glaucoma by reducing intraocular pressure. It consists of a tube connected to a curved, ultrathin alumina nanoplate that is thinner, stronger, and more reliable than existing lines of defense. VisiPlate intends to utilize multiple facilities at the Singh Center, but will be primarily utilizing the Nanofabrication and Soft Lithography Facilities. Group K Diagnostics Ms. Brianna Wronko, Mr. Eric Tepper, Mr. Ghassan Kara, and Dr. Amelia Keaton Group K has developed a MultiDiagnostic microfluidic device and intends to utilize the Quattrone Nanofabrication Facility to further develop and test their design. NanoSink Technologies Mr. Alexander David, Mr. Pavel Gurevitch, and Mr. John Bridstrup NanoSink Technologies has developed a design utilizing the ultrathin plates technology as fins from Dr. Bargatin's lab for thermal management in next-generation heat sinks. NanoSink intends to utilize the Nanofabrication Facility for further development of their device, along with Characterization Facilities for testing purposes. BonBouton Dr. Linh Le, Dr. Malcolm Nason, Mr. Campbell Weaver Bonbouton plans to use the Singh Center for Nanotechnology’s equipment to perform further research and characterization of a graphene-based conformal sensor to use as a medical monitoring device.

Wireless EEG Device Dr. Arjun Ramakrishnan, Dr. Michael Platt, Mr. Miguel Hernandez, Mr. Naz Belkaya, Ms. Dilara Berkay This group is working to develop a low cost, mobile, wearable EEG device with high quality nanowire sensors. They intend to primarily utilize the Nanofabrication Facility for their work. Amsterdam Fluidics Ms. Niyathi Chakrapani, Mr. Anirudh Kaushik, and Mr. Enrique Lin Shiao Amsterdam Fluidics aims to develop an innovative parallel microfluidics chip that allows for efficient synthesis of liposomal drugs. Amsterdam Fluidics will be primarily using the Nanofabrication Facility to further develop their design. Sanguis Mr. Daniel Zhang, Mr. Divyansh Agarwal, Mr. Prateek Agarwal Sanguis is an inexpensive, hand-held blood cell count measuring device that patients can use at home to monitor their health, identify dangerous situations, and prevent complications. Sanguis will be using the Nanofabrication Facility to develop and test their designs. Bone-on-a-Chip Mr. Rohit Shinde, Dr. Chamith Rajapakse , Mr. Abu-Bakr Ahmed, Mr. Arbab Khalid The Bone-on-a-Chip is a small, patient-specific device containing a MRI-generated porous bone structure that emulates bone microarchitecture and function in vitro. This device will essentially serve as a non-invasive alternative to traditional approaches of studying the efficacy of drug treatment on bones. The Bone-on-a-Chip team intends to use the Nanoscale Characterization Facilities to test and evaluate their device. Daedalus Diagnostics Mr. Omar Khan, Ms. Cassidy Blundell and Dr. Josephine Giles Daedalus Diagnostics is creating a microfluidic diagnostic platform for early cancer detection. Daedalus Diagnostics will be using the Nanofabrication Facility to develop and test their designs.

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2016-2017 Initiatives Research Outreach

The Latest Advances in Microscopy and Analytical Techniques Workshop The Nanoscale Characterization Facility co-hosted, with JEOL, a workshop entitled "Latest Advances in Microscopy and Analytical Techniques" in February of this year. The workshop included talks by JEOL applications specialists in SEM and TEM, as well as specialists from Gatan and Oxford Instruments. Coinciding with this workshop, JEOL installed a demonstration JEOL 7200F SEM, a high-resolution field-emission gun microscope on site. Singh’s Nanoscale Characterization Facility provided the space and utilities to demonstrate this tool. The instrument included an Oxford EDS detector and a TMC active electromagnetic interference cancellation system. A number of demonstrations were conducted for both Penn scientists and potential customers from surrounding universities and companies. The instrument was available to the community for four weeks.


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Microfluidics Congress 2016

Microfluidics Workshops

In July of 2016, the organizers of the Microfluidics Congress chose to move their event from the West Coast to Philadelphia. Noah Clay, Director of the Singh Center for Nanotechology’s Quattrone Nanofabrication Facility, chaired the opening session of the conference and introduced the keynote speaker. Due to the growing interest in microfluidics-based technology by new users of the Singh Center, the event provided a wonderful opportunity for the entire Mid-Atlantic Community to gather together to discuss breakthroughs and further research. The event was such a success that the conference organizers have decided to host the 2017 Microfluidics Congress again in Philadelphia, and are partnering directly with the Singh Center to better showcase the region’s capabilities and infrastructure.

Singh Center of Nanotechnology staff host monthly Microfluidic Workshops as a form of outreach to local university medical schools (Penn, Drexel, Temple, Jefferson and Cooper) as well as to other researchers in the region. The center continues outreach to MD/PhD (researchdriven) programs, and have added more and more industrial researchers. Researchers enroll in a six-hour session that consists of lectures and hands-on device fabrication, and have access to a library of device options to fabricate for the workshop that will be built into a functioning device by the end of the day. We continue to find researchers making use of our library of device designs for particle sorting, gradient generation, fluid mixing, etc. In this reporting period, close to 70 individuals have participated in this program from June 2016 to March 2017, with about 20% of the workshop participants becoming users of the Singh Center for Nanotechnology.

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2016-2017 Initiatives

Singh Center for Nanotechnology Staff conference and Panel Leadership Our staff members have been active in contributing to local and national technical conferences and panels. Below is a list of highlights of these activities.

Noah Clay Director of the Quattrone Nanofabrication Facility • Chaired plenary and opening sessions of the Microfluidics World Congress USA Conference, held in Philadelphia, July 2016. • Served as a panelist for Philadelphia’s Chamber of Commerce Medical Device & Technology panel, held in Philadelphia, October 2016 • Served as a panelist for the New Jersey Technology Council’s Nanotechnology panel, held in Philadelphia, November 2016. • Chaired the Chemical Heritage Foundation’s Joseph Priestley Society’s Nano-Innovation panel, held in Philadelphia, March 2017. Gerald Lopez Senior Manager for Lithography and Process Engineering • Hosted the Mid-Atlantic Electron Beam Lithography (MAEBL) meeting at the Singh Center for Nanotechnology.

Meredith Metzler Senior Manager for Thin Films and Equipment Engineering • Served as session chair for the American Vacuum Society’s “Optomechanics, Photonics, and Quantum Nanosystems”, held in Nashville, November 2016. • Chaired the Fall Meeting of the Mid-Atlantic Nanofabrication Manager’s Meeting, held in Philadelphia, October 2016. Douglas Yates Director of the Nanoscale Characterization Facility • Hosted the “Latest Advances in Microscopy” workshop with JEOL, Oxford and Gatan companies at the Singh Center for Nanotechnology.


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

79 Total Papers | Over 15,000 Downloads per Year

Network Information Dissemination The Singh Center for Nanotechnology has published approximately 79 documents in the Penn Library System through Scholarly Commons (http://repository.upenn.edu/qnf/). As of this publication there have been over 15,000 downloads of these documents, covering a spectrum of nanofab related topics.

• The Measurement of Residual Film Stress in Deposited Thin Films Using the KLA-Tencor 2D/3D P7 Surface Profilometer • Optimization of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Amorphous Silicon (a-Si) Using Oxford Instruments System 100 with Taguchi L9 Based Design of Experiments (DOE)

Example submissions from 2017 include: • Inkjet Printing of Ag Nanoparticles using Dimatix Inkjet Printer • Examination of the Stoney Equation and a Practical Determination of the Error in Residual Film Stress Measurements

Downloads are worldwide and have increased to a cumulative total of over 15,000 and currently occur at a rate of over 10,000 downloads per year.

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2016-2017 Initiatives

Leadership of NNCI Working Group Meredith Metzler, a Quattrone Nanofabrication senior manager and an expert in thin film processing, is currently the chair of the Equipment, Maintenance and Training Working group (EMT). The working group is tasked with identifying and addressing issues that affect member sites in the areas of equipment, maintenance, and training. Early conversations focused on cost-saving measures related to equipment operations and upkeep. As an example, each facility faces financial constraints that require aging equipment to be kept operational rather than being replaced. Many facilities in the network have fleets of aging tools and systems that are becoming more resource intensive to maintain. By leveraging our experience and relationships, both within the network and with equipment vendors, we feel there is an opportunity to collectively address these challenges. Each of the member sites possesses in-depth knowledge encompassing many years of experience with respect to equipment manufacturers and service providers. To capitalize on this asset, the group seeks to identify a confidential means for sites to communicate and facilitate sharing this knowledge within the network. The availability of this information would aid facility staff in the decision making process with respect to the selection and acquisition of new equipment, as well as in the selection of service providers for tasks such as: vacuum pump rebuilds, RF component repairs, third-party on-site equipment service, and even the replacement of complete control systems for aging equipment.


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

The long-term cost of ownership is not only affected by the cost of repairs but also impacted by the cost of routine utilities (electrical, nitrogen, process gas, etc.) and by the cost of preventative measures. To this end, we seek to compile and make public the information related to other cost saving investments made by individual sites including: • migration of aging computers to solid state hard drives, • use of compressed air in place of nitrogen for pump-purge applications where applicable, and • methods devised for idling process equipment and older model vacuum pumps when not in use. The sharing of these cost saving methods has enabled network member sites to benefit and broaden the impact of their funding. One method to leverage our relationships with key suppliers is to obtain financial support in the form of discounts on service and parts for cleanroom equipment at NNCI member sites. With the end of the current fiscal year approaching, discussions are currently in progress with several vendors common to the NNCI to secure long-term reductions in both the cost of annual service contracts and spare parts. We plan to pursue similar arrangements with other major vendors and also seek to include regional providers for repair services to help save on time and freight expenses. The group has held quarterly web teleconference meetings. We also plan to hold concurrent meetings with other NNCI functions and workshops to economize on travel costs. We see this as a first step in fulfilling one of the intended missions of the working group. Preliminary efforts have yielded service contract cost reductions with two major plasma processing equipment suppliers, whose equipment is heavily used across the NNCI sites. The technical working group conducted several discussions via email/phone and met face to face at the NNCI ALD/MOCVD workshop hosted at Stanford University. We are working to establish a set of initial ground rules for an internal network supported emergency backup processing plan. In an effort to help control the costs associated with long-term maintenance and service, the group is attempting to leverage our existing relationships with equipment manufacturers. The group secured a commitment from a major equipment manufacturer to provide discounted service support to NNCI sites for the duration of the NSF Grant for NNCI.

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2016-2017 Initiatives Educational Outreach

Singh Center for Nanotechnology Education and Outreach Programs Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) The Singh Center hosted six REU students for a 10-week summer research program. Students are hosted in labs and worked on projects that use the Singh Center’s Facilities (Quattrone Nanofabrication, Nanoscale Characterization, Scanning and Local Probe). They participate in weekly brown bags and lectures series and complete assignments leading to a final oral presentation and written paper based on their summer research. The 2017 program ran from May 30 – August 4, 2017.

2017 NNCI REU Cohort The group included three rising seniors and three rising juniors from the following mid-Atlantic institutions: Rowan University, Ursinus College, Cornell University, Princeton University, Rochester Institute of Technology and Temple University. The average GPA for the cohort was 3.86 on a 4.0 scale. The academic majors represented in the cohort are: Biomedical Engineering, Bioengineering (double major Chemistry), Chemical Engineering, Electrical Engineering with Robotics Option, Mechanical Engineering, and Physics (double major Chemistry).

All of the Singh Center REU students elected to participate in optional opportunity at the NNCI-wide REU Convocation at Georgia Institute of Technology from August 6 – 8 where they presented their research. During their 10 weeks at Penn, the Singh 2017 REU students’ programming included interactions with six French visiting summer students (1 PhD-level, 4 master-level and 1 undergraduate) who visited Penn to work in NSF PIRE-funded labs. Combining these two groups of students created a larger cohort for the brown bags, final presentations and other programming. It also allowed both groups of students to benefit from sustained interactions with peers from another country. Students completed general lab safety and responsible conduct of research training, and any additional lab safety and equipment training appropriate for their specific projects. The weekly brown bags, two field trips, and the mentor-mentee picnic provide opportunities for the students to develop relationships with each other through the program that will build their networks.

Singh Center REU students 2017


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

2017 Projects and Host Labs To host an REU student, Penn faculty were required to propose summer projects that involved the student’s use of the Singh Center facilities. Students were matched to projects based on their project preferences and the preferences for specific backgrounds and skills requested by the hosting labs.

Name

Project Title

PI Department

Kelsey DeFrates

Synthesis and Characterization of` Protein-Dextran Nanogels for Drug Delivery Applications

D. Eckmann; R. Composto

Bioengineering/Anesthesiology; Materials Science

Lilia Escobedo

Fabrication and characterization of Ti3C2 MXene electrodes for studying neural circuits

B. Litt

Bioengineering/Neurology

Christian Franco

Optimal Resolution of Two-Photon Lithography: A Voxel Study

G. Lopez

Singh Center – Quattrone Nanofabrication Facility

Jason Mulderrig

Atomic Force Microscopy-based Mechanical Testing Reveals the Mechanisms of Plasticity in Disordered Nanoparticle Packings

R. Carpick

Mechanical Engineering

Katrina Raichle

Decreasing the Defects in Free-Standing Nickel Inverse Opal Cellular Solids

J. Pikul

MEAM

Sanjana Subramaniam

Constructing Three-Dimensional Microstructures for Enhanced Adhesion

K. Turner

Mechanical Engineering

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2016-2017 Initiatives Educational Outreach

High School Outreach | NanoDay@Penn For Nanoday@Penn 2016 (October 26), The Singh Center for Nanotechnology hosted approximately 175 9th – 12th graders from seven Philadelphia schools (Bodine HS for International Affairs, Boys' Latin of Philadelphia Charter School, Constitution, Julia R Masterman Laboratory and Demonstration School, Parkway Northwest High School for Peace and Social Justice, Thomas Edison High School, West Philadelphia High School) and four schools from New Jersey (Camden Academy Charter High School, Gloucester County Institute of Technology, Morristown High School, Princeton High School).

Nanoday@Penn 2016 :

175 students

from 7 Philadelphia schools


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

The students and their teachers attended a day of tours, demos and activities run by more than 150 Penn School of Engineering students, postdocs and staff. Teachers who participated were selected from a total of 33 teachers who applied to participate. Teachers from underserved schools (or schools where STEM resources are less abundant) were given priority when possible. Of the 98 students who returned a feedback form at the end of the day, 59.2% reported that the event increased their interest in STEM and 85.7% reported that the visit was “good” or “highly exciting and enjoyable”. The 14 teachers or chaperones who responded to our survey ranked the visit for the students on average as a 4.2 on a 5.0 scale. Of these adults, 7 of the 8 who identified themselves as teachers indicated that that they agreed with or strongly agreed with the statement, “NanoDay positively stimulated my ideas and thinking about teaching STEM topics.” In addition to the classes, 29 Delaware Valley Science Fair winners attended NanoDay@Penn with their parents to present their science fair research projects. These projects were judged in a NanoDay competition by graduate student and postdoc judges.

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2016-2017 Initiatives Educational Outreach

Nanotechnology Technicians Training Program The Community College of Philadelphia (CCP) and the Singh Center have partnered to develop a training program for nanotechnology technicians. As we are continuing our needs-analysis for the program, we will be investigating a single course on Applied Nanotechnology to be offered at CCP. This course would introduce CCP students to standard micro- and nano-scale concepts and widely used methodologies and leverage the expertise and equipment at our center. The development of a new course of nanotechnology has the support of the CCP Dean for the Division of Math, Science and Health Careers.

League of United Latin American Citizens' National Educational Service Centers Upward Bound Program Fieldtrip Site LNESC's Upward Bound program specifically provides opportunities for participants to succeed in their precollege performance and ultimately in their higher education pursuits. Upward Bound serves high school students from low-income families; and high school students from families in which neither parent holds a bachelor's degree. The goal is to increase the rate at which participants complete secondary education and enroll in and graduate from institutions of postsecondary education. During the academic year, The Singh Center for Nanotechnology coordinates monthly after-school programming in Penn labs and facilities for LNESC Upward Bound students.


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Makers Meetup Philadelphia

SEI: Participation in NNCI-ASU Workshop on Responsible Innovation

Throughout 2016 the Singh Center for Nanotechnology supported multiple Makers Meetups held in the City of Philadelphia. Philadelphia has been developing a very strong Tech Entrepreneurship and Makerspace community over the last few years, and the Singh Center in turn has worked hard to embrace the community both as group of potential users and as a way to better support our current user base. For example, through interactions at Makers Meetups, we have been able to build relationships in the local community to provide our users with resources to package the products they create at the Singh Center, using technologies such as additive manufacturing. Similarly, the Makerspace community has been very supportive of our users and Seed Grant companies. In February of 2017, a special Makers Meetup was held to specifically showcase the 2016 Seed Grant companies. These individuals ranged from other makers to larger companies and investors. Through these partnerships we are able to provide extra support to all of our users, allowing them to be more successful.

Sam Nicaise, a postdoctoral researcher from Penn Engineering and a frequent facility user, attended the NNCI-ASU Winter School in January on the Responsible Innovation and Social Studies of Emerging Technologies. The school provided him with an engaged and diverse experience in the study of technology through the social sciences, including practical tools such socio-Technical integration research, the use of research lenses such as standards and patents, scenario planning, bibliometrics, and engagement activities. Nicaise, as a day-to-day manager in his research group, an engaged user of the facility, and future nanotechnology leader, will continue to leverage these crucial skills for developing and implementing responsible future research. In the short time since the workshop, he has started an informal collaboration with other workshop attendees investigating the social and political landscape of nanosilver use.

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2016-2017 Initiatives

Site Curricular Education

ESE 536 – Nanofabrication and Nanocharacterization A new course in Nanofabrication and Nanocharacterization was developed and offered for the first time in Spring 2017. This course is intended for first year graduate students interested in the experimental practice of nanotechnology. In the context of a hands-on laboratory experience, students gain familiarity with both top-down and bottom-up fabrication and characterization technologies to complement their theoretical knowledge of nanoscience and nanotechnology. This is achieved through the realization of a variety of micro- and nanoscale structures and devices that can exhibit either classical or quantum effects at the small scale. Although concepts relevant to the laboratories are emphasized in lecture, it is expected that students will already have been exposed to many of the underlying theoretical concepts of nanotechnology in previous courses. It is our intention to offer this course on a yearly, ongoing basis. Topics include optical and electron-beam lithography, physical vapor deposition, chemical and plasma etching, self-assembly, quantum dots, electron microscope and scanning probe characterization techniques. These technologies will be exploited to fabricate and characterize micro- and nanodevices and systems including graphene-based electronic transistors, phaseseparated block copolymers, quantum dot systems, microelectromechanical systems, and microfluidic devices. Major objectives include giving students a working understanding of: 1. The unit processes utilized in the fabrication of micro- and nanostructures; 2. Process synthesis techniques enabling the combination of unit processes to produce complex micro- and nanostructures; 3. Characterization techniques used to understand the behavior of micro- and nanostructures; and 4. The correlations between observed behavior of micro- and nanostructures and their theoretical underpinnings.


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Other Penn Courses The Singh Center for Nanotechnology continues to host a variety of courses in its core laboratories that support undergraduate and graduate students. Below is a list and a description of each course.

ESE 218 Electronic, Photonic, and Electromechanical Devices This first course in electronic, photonic and electromechanical devices introduces students to the design, physics and operation of physical devices found in today's applications. The course describes semiconductor electronic and optoelectronic devices, including light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, photovoltaics, transistors and memory; optical and electromagnetic devices, such as waveguides, fibers, transmission lines, antennas, gratings and imaging devices; electromechanical actuators, sensors, transducers, machines and systems.

ESE 460/574 Semiconductor Microfabrication This is a laboratory-based course on fabricating microelectronic and micromechanical devices using photolithographic processing and related fabrication technologies. Lectures discuss: clean room procedures; microelectronic and microstructural materials; photolithography; diffusion, oxidation; materials deposition; etching and plasma processes. Basic laboratory processes are covered for the first two thirds of the course with students completing structures appropriate to their major in the final third. A term paper and an additional project are required for students registering for ESE 574.

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2016-2017 Initiatives

MEAM 537 Nanomechanics and Nanotribology Engineering is progressing to ever-smaller scales, enabling new technologies, materials, devices, and applications. This course provides an introduction to nano-scale tribology and the critical role it plays in the developing areas of nanoscience and nanotechnology. We discuss how contact, adhesion, friction, lubrication, and wear at interfaces originate, using an integrated approach that combines concepts of mechanics, materials science, chemistry, and physics. We cover a range of concepts and applications, drawing connections to both established and new approaches. We discuss the limits of continuum mechanics and present newly developed theories and experiments tailored to describe micro- and nano-scale phenomena. We emphasize specific applications throughout the course. Reading of scientific literature, critical peer discussion, individual and team problem assignments, and a peer-reviewed literature research project is assigned as part of the course.

MSE 250 Nanoscale Materials Laboratory The course provides an in-depth experimental introduction to key concepts in materials and the relationships between nanoscale structure, the properties and performance. The use of laboratory methods to examine the structure of materials, to measure the important properties, and to investigate the relationship between structure and properties is covered. Emphasis is placed on a complete exposure of Nano-and Materials science as a field. Most experiments require multiple laboratory sessions, with priority given to experiments in which students explore the entire range of materials science, from the synthesis of materials and the characterization of structure, thermodynamics and composition, to the measurement of properties and discussion of applications. Students are able to realize working devices as an end product of the key laboratories in this course. Practice in oral and written communication is realized through course assignments.


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

MSE 465/565 Fabrication and Characterization of Nanodevices

MSE 500 Experimental Methods in Materials Science

This course surveys various processes that are used to produce materials structured at the micron and nanometer scales for electronic, optical and chemical applications. Basic principles of chemistry, physics, thermodynamics and surface/interfacial science are applied to solid state, liquid, and colloidal approaches to making materials. The approaches to nano- and microfabrication: photolithography, soft lithography, nanoimprint lithography, 3-D printing and selfassembly, are covered. The course is heavily lab based, with 25% of class time and 30% of the homework devoted to hands-on experiences. Lab assignments are a series of structured individual/group projects. Evaluation is based on 3-4 lab reports, 4 problem sets with journal paper reading assignment, and a final project design.

This laboratory course introduces students to a variety of experimental methods used in materials science and engineering. Hands-on training will be provided for atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction and scattering, mechanical testing with image capture, Rutherford backscattering, and dynamic light scattering. Students will use numerous software packages for data collection and analysis, as well as being introduced to LabVIEW as a method for customizing experiments. In addition, students will see demonstrations of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electron diffraction and analyze data from these methods.

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2016-2017 Initiatives

Graduate Student Fellows Program

Introduction The Graduate Student Fellow (GSF) program provides hands-on opportunities for Penn Engineering Master’s students in the nanotechnology program. Students receive practical experience in the Singh facilities, obtaining valuable insight to process development, cleanroom hygiene and teamwork principles. GSFs are encouraged to be independent problem solvers and to leverage one another to acquire new skill sets on the available tools in our facilities. The goal of the GSF program is two-fold. First, the participants are afforded a unique cleanroom experience that is tailored to their interest and strengths. As a team, they build a community and relationships that extend beyond the lab. Second, the Singh Center assumes the overhead cost to train aspiring process engineers and scientists, removing the burden from hiring industry managers or research faculty in the nanotech space that are actively looking for talent with minimal cleanroom experience. The program mentors 15 students annually and plans to hire additional new students in the near future.

Project Focus Students work on a variety of projects for up to 7 hours per week. Projects fall into one of four categories: advanced process integration, thin film engineering, lithography engineering and soft lithography engineering. Advanced process engineering includes, but is not limited to directed self-assembly, SU-8 to SU-8 wafer bonding or micro-patterning of silver nanoparticle ink. Thin film engineering involves etch and deposition characterization of the various evaporator, sputter or etch tools that are available. Lithography engineering projects develop advanced turnkey processes for electron beam lithography, laser lithography, 3-D printing and nanoimprint lithography. Finally, soft lithography engineering pushes the limits on microfluidic fabrication capabilities using advanced tools like laser micromachining and laser direct write lithography.

Project Performance, Documentation and Professional Development During the summer, each student provides a weekly update in a short 5-minute presentation. The aim is to develop each participant so that they can effectively communicate their project to others while documenting their progress. In their report, they are required to discuss issues they have encountered and teachable moments they discovered. As newcomers to a cleanroom, mistakes are recognized as opportunities for improvement. For selected projects, unit processes are documented further and posted to Scholarly Commons (http://repository.upenn.edu), the University of Pennsylvania's open access institutional repository for gathering, indexing, storing, and making widely available the scholarly output of the Penn community.


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Algorithms for Lithography Simulation Our computational activities in the past year have consisted of enhanced simulation of electron beam lithography processes. Gerald Lopez, Senior Manager from the Quattrone Nanofabrication Facility, has worked a great deal on enhancing the pattern fidelity of device designs that are written with electron beam lithography systems. Lopez has worked on tolerancing studies that capture sources of drift in these processes, whether they emanate from the ambient, positional accuracy of the electron beam, or thermal effects, etc. A great deal of work was accomplished by varying the electron beam writing order on standard 100 nm metalized structures of varying duty cycle and pitch, as well as quantifying and modeling shape positional accuracies. This work was developed in collaboration with GenISys GmbH, a leading lithography simulation company based in Munich, Germany and resulted in an AVS publication in late 2016. Software from this company is deployed at nearly all NNCI sites.

Instrument Reservation & Interlocking System Enhancements We continue to develop our web-based application, IRIS (Instrument Reservation & Interlocking System), which enables (codeless) agile development and is based on the widely deployed Mendix platform. In 2014, Penn was the first university in the United States (second in the world) to deploy an application with Mendix and since then, roughly 25 other U.S. universities have followed suit. As the platform’s features are enhanced, we’re able to take quick advantage of the latest security upgrades, widgets, techniques, efficiencies, and modernize our user interface. Beginning in January 2017, we partnered with Mendix to transform our UI/UX (user interface/user experience) and rolled out changes in April 2017.

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2015-16 Annual Report 2016-17 Singh Center for Nanotechnology


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2016-2017 Events News Graduates


2016-2017 Events

2016 Annual User Meeting

Mid-Atlantic Electron Beam Lithography

This conference brought together individuals from academia, government, industry and investors around the Mid-Atlantic Region to discuss and showcase the current work being produced at the Center, along with the latest in nanotechnology innovation in medicine, consumer products, industrial products and green technology. Key speakers included: J. Alexander Liddle, Group Leader of the CNST Nanofabrication Research Group at NIST, Piotr Grodzinski, Director of the Office of Nanotechnology Research at the National Cancer Institute, and Linh Le, Founder and CEO of Flextrapower.

In April, 2017 the Singh Center hosted the meeting of the Mid-Atlantic Electron Beam Lithography Society (MAEBL). Approximately 70 individuals registered for the conference, which focused on best practices, computational efforts and the latest techniques for fine feature patterning in electron beam lithography. The program consisted of speakers from Argonne National Laboratory, Ohio State University, Pennsylvania State University (University Park), NIST-Gaithersburg, University of Delaware and IBM Research (Yorktown Heights).


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Delaware Valley Industrial Resource Center (DVIRC) Manufacturing Summit The Delaware Valley Industrial Resource Center (DVIRC) is an advocacy group that focuses exclusively on the region’s manufacturing community by helping to grow businesses through activities involving training, education and networking. Every year the DVIRC hosts a summit to allow those in the area’s manufacturing community to network and discuss technical breakthroughs. As nanotechnology and microfluidics are key components of emerging technical trends in manufacturing, the Singh Center for Nanotechnology has worked to form a relationship with DVIRC and others in the manufacturing community. In addition to supporting activities like the Manufacturing Summit, we have also hosted members of the DVIRC here at the Singh Center for Nanotechnology to discuss the future on employment for not only PhDs, but also for trade school technician level positions with the burgeoning nanotechnology employment sector.

South by Southwest (SXSW) 2017 Over the past few years, Greater Philadelphia, along with the region’s many colleges and universities, have been involved in efforts to better showcase the cuttingedge technology and world class resources available in the Mid-Atlantic Region. Leveraging this opportunity, a delegation from the Philadelphia city government, the University of Pennsylvania, and Temple University, traveled to South by Southwest (SXSW) to promote a wide range of technologies, including nanotechnologyrelated innovations by Singh Center for Nanotechnology users. While a number of the Singh Center users who are trying to launch products went to the event, a special effort was made to create material to showcase all interested Singh Facility users, even those who could not be physically present. By doing events like this and others around the country, the Singh Center for Nanotechnology is working to provide as many opportunities as possible for our users to gain exposure for their work, especially those companies or individuals in the start-up space.

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2016-2017 News

PhD Degree Graduates

Name

Dissertation Title

Advisor

Department

RYAN JAMIOLKOWSKI

Single-Molecule Studies of tRNA Dynamics During Ongoing Translation

YALE GOLDMAN

BE

ANKIT KUMAR

Understanding Flow-Induced Phase Inversion of Emulsions Using Microfluidics

DAEYEON LEE

CBE

NINGWEI LI

Colloids on Lipid Bilayers: Deformations, Interactions and Migration

TOBIAS BAUMGART KATHLEEN STEBE

CBE

YICHEN LU

Multiscale Modelling of Platelet Aggregation

SCOTT DIAMOND TALID SINNO

CBE

SHU ZHU

A Microfluidic Approach for Evaluating Novel Antithrombotic Targets

SCOTT DIAMOND

CBE

BROCK PETERSON

Geometrically-Complex Magnetic Field Distributions Enabled by Bulk, LaserMicromachined Permanent Magnets at the Submillimeter Scale

MARK ALLEN

ESE

Experimental Investigation of Polymer Adhesion Mechanics Using a Blister Contact Test

KEVIN TURNER

MEAM

NATHAN IP


2016-2017 Annual Report

59

Singh Center for Nanotechnology

PhD Degree Graduates

Name

Dissertation Title

Advisor

Department

YIJIE JIANG

Adhesion and Wear of Nanoscale Polymer Contacts

KEVIN TURNER

MEAM

HELEN MINSKY

Composite Posts for Enhanced and Tunable Adhesion

KEVIN TURNER

MEAM

NICHOLAS GREYBUSH

Engineering Plasmonic Nanocrystal Coupling through Template-Assisted Self-Assembly

CHRISTOPHER MURRAY

MSE

WENJING LIU

Manipulating Light-Matter Interactions in Two-Dimensional Semiconductors Coupled with Plasmonic Lattices

RITESH AGARWAL

MSE

Development and Characterization of Next-Generation Contact Materials for Nanoelectromechanical Switches

ROBERT CARPICK

MSE

Reconfigurable Periodic Porous Membranes and Nanoparticle Assemblies

SHU YANG

MSE

FRANK STRELLER

GAOXIANG WU


2016-2017 News

Master's Degree Graduates

Name

Program

ALEXANER DAVID

BE

SAMUEL VINCENTDELUCCIA

BE

JIN KO

BE

MU-HUAN LEE

BE

DANIELLE FAE SOBERMAN

BE

JOSEPH SONG

BE

JIA TIAN

BE

HAILEY EDELSTEIN

BIOT

CHRISTOPHER PORTER

CBE

YANG LU

EE

MOHSEN AZADI

MEAM

SAURAV BOSE

MEAM

ANIRUDH VENKATESH KAUSHIK

MEAM

ROMAN GREGORY MAYS

MEAM

JIKEN KETANBHAI PATEL

MEAM

JUHANNA ROBBERTS

MEAM

CHUNXU CHEN

MSE

HUSEYIN KAYA

MSE

ZIXUAN LI

MSE

JINGSONG MENG

MSE

GAURAV MODI

MSE

PHILIP WYATT NEGA

MSE


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Master's Degree Graduates

Name

Program

RAJ NANALAL PATEL

MSE

JAMES TOWNLEY

MSE

AMAL MOHAMMED ABBAS

NANO

INAYAT BAJWA

NANO

SUPRABHAT BHAGAVATHULA

NANO

DAVID NELSON COAR

NANO

RUISI GE

NANO

GEORGIA GRIGGS

NANO

MRIDULA GUNTURI

NANO

XIAOJING LI

NANO

YUVRAJ MOHAN

NANO

ALEX PARKER

NANO

VIJAYA RANA

NANO

LAUREN SCHWARTZ

NANO

KARTHICK SIVALINGAM ANBAZHAGAN

NANO

MENGGUANG WANG

NANO

HAOPENG YANG

NANO

LE-SHENG-NICHOLAS YIU

NANO

TIANYUN ZHANG

NANO

SHUANG WU

MSE

61


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology


63

2016-2017 Research


2016-2017 Researchers

2016– 2017

30

Confidential Disclosure Agreements

31

Invention Disclosures

13

Provisional Patents Filed

23

9

Non Provisional Patents Filed

Sponsored Research Agreements

18

Patents Issued

LEAD INVENTOR

PATENTS

Haim Bau

Integrated PCR reactor for cell lysis, nucleic acid isolation and purification, and nucleic acid amplification related applications. Isothermal nucleic acid amplification reactor with integrated solid state membrane

Jason Burdick

Infarction treatment compositions and methods

Rob Carpick

Use of SiO-containing hydrogenated amorphous carbon for heat-assisted magnetic recording

I-Wei Chen

Non-volatile resistance-switching Al- and Si-based thin film devices pH sensitive peptides and their nanoparticles for drug delivery

Peter Davies

Semiconductor ferroelectrics for robust and efficient oxide photovoltaics

Dennis Discher

Novel peptides that inhibit phagocytic activity

Ivan Dmochowski

Transcriptome In Vivo Analysis

Nader Engheta

Optical device using double-groove grating

Yale Goldman

Catheter systems for measuring electrical properties of tissue and methods of use Fluorescent labelling of transfer RNA and study of protein synthesis

Charlie ATC Johnson

Biomimetic chemical sensors using nanoelectronic readout of olfactory receptors

Daeyeon Lee

Anisotripic and amphiphilic particles and methods for producing and using the same Imprinted biomimetic catalysts for cellulose hydrolysis

Virgil Percec

Amphiphilic Janus-dendrimers

Karen Winey

Drug containing implants and methods of use thereof

2

License Agreements


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Research Achievements SITE RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS The essential need for nano-science research continues to accelerate with technological advances and a growing world population. Our research achievements continue to play a vital role in contributing and shaping the world of nano-science development of technologies in the fields of electronics, magnetics, optics, information technology, materials development and biomedicine. Through our shared vision and collaborative culture, the following pages demonstrate the success and contributions our researchers have provided in the field in academics and industry.

65


2016-2017 Researchers

Honors and Awards

Nader Engheta

George Pappas

Nader Engheta, H. Nedwill Ramsey Professor in Electrical and Systems Engineering, was awarded an honorary doctorate from the University of Stuttgart in Germany in recognition of his achievements “In the field of plasmonics, metamaterials and nanooptics.”

George Pappas, Joseph Moore Professor and Chair of Electrical and Systems Engineering, was a recipient of the Provost’s Distinguished PhD Teaching and Mentoring Award. This award is presented by the University of Pennsylvania to standing faculty members for their distinguished teaching and mentoring of doctoral students.

Dan Huh Dan Huh, Wilf Family Term Assistant Professor in Bioengineering, was named a recipient of the 2016 Analytical Chemistry Young Innovator Award, which is given in recognition of the contributions of an individual who has demonstrated exceptional technical advancement and innovation in the field of microor nanofluidics in his or her early career.

Vivek Shenoy Vivek Shenoy, Professor in Materials Science and Engineering, and Yale Goldman, Professor in Physiology and in Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics in Penn Medicine and Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics in Penn Engineering, have been awarded a $24 million, five-year grant from The National Science Foundation (NSF) to establish a Science and Technology Center (STC) focused on engineering mechanobiology, or the way cells exert and are influenced by the physical forces in their environment.

Brian Chow Brian Chow, Assistant Professor in Bioengineering, was a recipient of an NSF CAREER Award for his proposal, “Establishing Novel Signaling Transmission Modes of LOV Photoreceptors.” This award is the NSF’s most prestigious award in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research.


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

In the News

Ritesh Agarwal is featured in Newsweek's “Holographic Messages: Sci-Fi Staple Edges Closer To Reality With Multi-Layered Holograms,” June 2017, http://www.en-cphi. cn/news/show-36404.html Dave Meaney is featured in Philly.com's “Microsoft co-founder gives Penn $9.25M grant to study concussions” May 2017, http:// www.philly.com/philly/health/health-news/ microsoft-co-founder-paul-allen-givesuniversity-of-pennsylvania-9m-grant-tostudy-concussions-20170522.html Penn’s Singh Center for Nanotechnology wants your tiny, tiny projects, Technical.ly, March 2017, https:// technical.ly/philly/2017/03/01/pennssingh-center-nanotechnology-wantstiny-tiny-projects/?utm_source=ap&utm_ campaign=rr&utm_medium=related ‘Ageing’ phenomenon causes powerful earthquakes, report Penn researchers, Penn Current, March 2017, https://penncurrent. upenn.edu/features/ageing-phenomenoncauses-powerful-earthquakes-report-pennresearchers Researchers Gain Insight into a Physical Phenomenon That Leads to Earthquakes, University of Pennsylvania Almanac, March 2017, http://www.upenn.edu/almanac/ volumes/v63/n26/research-roundup.html Microfluidic system mimics 28-day female reproductive cycle, C&EN, March 2017, http:// cen.acs.org/articles/95/i14/Microfluidicsystem-mimics-28-day.html Engineers' 'photonic doping' makes class of metamaterials easier to fabricate, Science Daily, March 2017, https://www.sciencedaily. com/releases/2017/03/170309142133.htm Penn researchers are first to study how 2-D nanopores react to light, Penn Current, March 2017, https://penncurrent.upenn.edu/ features/penn-researchers-are-first-tostudy-how-2-d-nanopores-react-to-light Robert Carpick is featured in Business Insider’s “A phenomenon is helping scientists predict where earthquakes will strike," March 2017 http://www.businessinsider.com/whatcauses-earthquakes-2017-2 Penn researchers work to improve HIV care in low-resource settings, Penn Current, February 2017, https://penncurrent.upenn.edu/news/ penn-researchers-work-to-improve-hiv-carein-low-resource-settings

Engineering Academy students present at Philly Materials Day at Drexel University, The Knight Crier, February 2017, http:// www.knightcrier.org/news/2017/02/07/ engineering-academy-students-present-atphilly-materials-day-at-drexel-university/ Penn Researchers Are Among the First to Grow a Versatile Two-dimensional Material, Penn News, February 2017, https://news. upenn.edu/news/penn-researchers-areamong-first-grow-versatile-two-dimensionalmaterial Penn researchers among first to grow versatile 2-D material tungsten ditelluride, Phys.org, February 2017 , https://phys.org/ news/2017-02-penn-versatile-d-materialtungsten.html The Krisha P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology is highlighted in Urbanland’s “10 Feats of Engineering" January 2017, https://urbanland.uli.org/developmentbusiness/ulx-10-feats-engineering/ Penn Engineers Contribute to New Understanding of Friction on Graphene, Penn News, November 2016, https://news.upenn. edu/news/penn-engineers-contribute-newunderstanding-friction-graphene Penn Engineers and Chemists Make Nanoscale ‘Muscles’ Powered by DNA, Penn News, November 2016, https://news.upenn. edu/news/penn-engineers-make-nanoscalemuscles-powered-dna The science of friction on graphene, MIT NEWS, November 2016, http://news.mit. edu/2016/sliding-flexible-graphenesurfaces-1123 Next week: 4 whole days on innovations in nanotech, Technical.ly, October 2016, https:// technical.ly/philly/2016/10/21/singh-nanoweek Weiss/Manfredi’s Marion Weiss on “surface presence” in facades, The Architects Newspaper, October 2016, https://archpaper. com/2016/10/marion-weiss-surfacepresence-facades/ Researchers improve computer modeling for designing drug-delivery nanocarriers, Phys. org, August 2016, https://phys.org/news/201608-drug-delivery-nanocarriers.html NanoToothpaste And Nano-Mouthwash? Rat Study Suggests Maybe, WBUR, August 2016, http:// www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2016/08/01/ nano-toothpaste-nano-mouthwash

New Nanotechnology Could Make Dentist Visits Thing Of The Past, Vocativ, August 2016, http://www.vocativ.com/346012/newnanotechnology-could-make-dentist-visitsthing-of-the-past/ Not your momma's microbe lab: a new genetic engineering machine takes microbial design to the masses, Philly.com, August 2016, http://www.philly.com/philly/ business/20160809_Not_your_momma_s_ microbe_lab__a_new_genetic_engineering_ machine_takes_microbial_design_to_the_ masses.html Penn Engineers Create Groundbreaking $2 Portable Zika Test, Biz Philly, July 2016, http:// www.phillymag.com/business/2016/07/07/ penn-engineers-portable-zika-test/ Placenta-on-a-chip models what is "arguably the least understood organ in the human body", News Atlas, July 2016, http://newatlas. com/placenta-on-a-chip/44565/ Penn Researchers Develop Placenta-on-achip, Penn News, July 2016, https://news. upenn.edu/news/penn-researchers-developplacenta-chip Placenta-on-a-chip, Science Daily, July 2016, https://www.sciencedaily.com/ releases/2016/07/160725151159.htm Penn researchers create placenta-on-a-chip to study preterm birth, Philly Voice, July 2016, http://www.phillyvoice.com/pennresearchers-create-placenta-chip-studypreterm-birth/ Penn Team Uses Nanoparticles to Break Up Plaque and Prevent Cavities, Penn News, July 2016, https://news.upenn.edu/news/pennteam-uses-nanoparticles-break-plaque-andprevent-cavities Nanotech garment will gather health information through sweat, Penn Current, July 2016, https://penncurrent.upenn.edu/ features/nanotech-garment-will-gatherhealth-information-through-sweat What to see and do in Philadelphia during the DNC, Philly.com, July 2016, http://www.philly. com/philly/blogs/real-time/What-to-see-anddo-in-Philadelphia-during-the-DNC.html

67


2016-2017 Publications

Selected Publications from Singh Center for Nanotechnology Researchers

Ritesh Agarwal

Mark Allen

Igor Bargatin

S Kumar, S Dhara, R Agarwal, R Singh, “Study of photoconduction properties of CVD grown -Ga2O3 nanowires,” Journal of Alloys and Compounds, 683, 143-148, 2016.

J Kim, Y-K Yoon, MG Allen, “Computer numerical control (CNC) lithography: Light-motion synchronized UV-LED lithography for 3D microfabrication,” Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, 26(3), 27, January 2016.

K Davami, Y Jiang, J Cortes, C Lin, M Shaygan, KT Turner, I Bargatin, “Tuning the mechanical properties of vertical graphene sheets through atomic layer deposition,” Nanotechnology 27 (15), 155701,2, 2016.

H Yun, J Kim, T Paik, L Meng, PS Jo, JM Kikkawa, CR Kagan, MG Allen, CB Murray, “Alternate current magnetic property characterization of nonstoichiometric zinc ferrite nanocrystals for inductor fabrication via a solution based process,” Journal of Applied Physics: 119(11),113901, 21, March 2016.

K Davami, Y Jiang, C Lin, J Cortes, JT Robinson, KT Turner, I Bargatin, ”Modification of mechanical properties of vertical graphene sheets via fluorination,” RSC Advances 6 (14), 11161-11166,1, 2016.

B Lee, W Liu, CH Naylor, J Park, S Malek, J Berger, ATC Johnson, R Agarwal, “Electrical tuning of exciton-plasmon polariton coupling in monolayer MoS2 integrated with plasmonic nanoantenna lattice,” arXiv preprint arXiv:1608.06901, 2016. M-L Ren, R Agarwal, P Nukala, W Liu, Ritesh Agarwal, “Nanotwin detection and domain polarity determination via optical second harmonic generation polarimetry,” Nano Letters 16 (7), 4404-4409, 2016. F Yi, M-L Ren, H Zhu, W Liu, R Agarwal, E Cubukcu, “Electromechanically reconfigurable CdS nanoplate based nonlinear optical device,” Optics Express 24 (12), 13459-13466, 2016. H-S Ee, R Agarwal, “Tunable metasurface and flat optical zoom lens on a stretchable substrate,” Nano Letters, 16 (4), 2818-2823, 2016. MH Jang, R Agarwal, P Nukala, D Choi, ATC Johnson, I-W Chen, R Agarwal, “Observing oxygen vacancy driven electroforming in Pt–TiO2–Pt device via strong metal support interaction,” Nano Letters 16 (4), 2139-2144, 2016. F Yi, M-L Ren, JC Reed, H Zhu, J Hou, CH Naylor, ATC Johnson, R Agarwal, E Cubukcu, “Optomechanical enhancement of doubly resonant 2D optical nonlinearity,” Nano Letters 16 (3), 1631-1636, 2016. W Liu, B Lee, CH Naylor, H-S Ee, J Park, ATC Johnson, R Agarwal, “Strong exciton–plasmon coupling in MoS2 coupled with plasmonic lattice,” Nano Letters 16 (2), 1262-1269, 2016. P Nukala, C-C Lin, R Composto, R Agarwal, “Ultralow-power switching via defect engineering in germanium telluride phase-change memory devices,” Nature Communications 7, 2016. Q Wang, L Sun, J Lu, M-L Ren, T Zhang, Y Huang, X Zhou, Y Sun, B Zhang, C Chen, X Shen, R Agarwal, W Lu, “Emission energy, exciton dynamics and lasing properties of buckled CdS nanoribbons,” Scientific Reports 6, 2016. S Dhara, EJ Mele, R Agarwal, “Circular photogalvanic effect in silicon nanowires,” APS Meeting Abstracts, 2016.

Y Li, J Kim, M Kim, A Armutlulu, MG Allen, “Thick multilayered micromachined permanent magnets with preserved magnetic properties,” Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems, IEEE, 25(3), 498-507, June 2016. BS Klosterhoff, M Tsang, D She, KG Ong, MG Allen, NJ Willett, RE Guldberg, “Implantable sensors for regenerative medicine,” Journal of Biomechanical Engineering, 139(2), 021009, 17 December 2016. J Kim, YK Yoon, MG Allen, “Computer numerical control (CNC) lithography: Light-motion synchronized UV-LED lithography for 3D microfabrication,” Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, 2016. T Zhang, M Tsang, MG Allen, “Biodegradable electrical interconnects for transient implantable systems,” A Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems Workshop (Hilton Head Workshop 2016), pp. 328-331, June 2016. W Shen, L Struzyna, D Cullen, MG Allen, “Fabrication of neural microelectrode arrays from extracellular matrix protein substrates,” A Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems Workshop (Hilton Head Workshop 2016), pp. 24-27, June 2016. M Kim, J Kim, MG Allen, “Multilayer electrodeposition from micromachined templates: A controllable, scalable route to hierarchical superhydrophobic surfaces,” A Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems Workshop (Hilton Head Workshop 2016), pp. 72-75, Jun. 2016.

K Davami, J Cortes, N Hong, I Bargatin, “Vertical graphene sheets as a lightweight light absorber,” (2016) Materials Research Bulletin, 74, pp. 226-233. Haim Bau C Liu, S-C Liao, J Song, MG Mauk, X Li, G Wu, D Ge, RM Greenberg, S Yang, HH Bau, “A highefficiency superhydrophobic plasma separator,” Lab on a chip, Royal Society of Chemistry, (16) 3 553-560, 2016. Tobias Baumgart Q Luo, Z Shi, Y Zhang, XJ Chen, SY Han, T Baumgart, DM Chenoweth, SJ Park, “DNA Island formation on binary block copolymer vesicles,” Journal of the American Chemical Society, 19, July 2016. N Li, N Sharifi-Mood, F Tu, D Lee, R Radhakrishnan, T Baumgart, KJ Stebe, “Curvature -driven migration of colloids on lipid bilayers,” Phil. Trans. R. Soc. v 374, 2016. Q Xiao, JD Rubien, Z Wang, EH Reed, DA Hammer, D Sahoo, PA Heiney, SS Yadavalli, M Goulian, SE Wilner, T Baumgart, SA Vinogradov, ML Klein, V Percec, ”Self-sorting and coassembly of fluorinated, hydrogenated, and hybrid janus dendrimers into dendrimersomes,” Journal of the American Chemical Society 138 (38), 12655, 4, 2016. Dawn Bonnell SJ Hong, JA Rodríguez-Manzo, KH Kim, M Park, SJ Baek, DI Kholin, M Lee, ES Choi, DH Jeong, DA Bonnell, EJ Mele, M Drndić, ATC Johnson, YW Park, “Magnetoresistance (MR) of twisted bilayer graphene on electron transparent substrate,” Synthetic Metals, 216, 65–71, (2016).


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Jason Burdick

Robert Carpick

I-Wei Chen

LL Wang, JN Sloand, AC Gaffey, CM Venkataraman, Z Wang, A Trubelja, DA Hammer, P Atluri, JA Burdick, ”Injectable, guest-host assembled polyethylenimine hydrogel for siRNA delivery,” Biomacromolecules, 2016.

C Oh, F Streller, WR Ashurst, RW Carpick, MP de Boer, “In situ oxygen plasma cleaning of microswitch surfaces—comparison of Ti and graphite electrodes,” Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, 26 (11) 115020, 2016.

Y Lu, I-W Chen, “Probing Intrinsic Material Conductivity in two-terminal devices: A resistance-difference method,” arXiv preprint arXiv:1610.07666, 2016.

YC Yeh, CB Highley, L Ouyang, JA Burdick, “3D printing of photocurable poly (glycerol sebacate) elastomers,” Biofabrication 8 (4), 045004, 2, 2016. CB Rodell, NN Dusaj, CB Highley, JA Burdick, ”Injectable and cytocompatible tough double-network hydrogels through tandem supramolecular and covalent crosslinking,” Advanced Materials 28 (38), 8419-8424, 6, 2016. CB Highley, GD Prestwich, JA Burdick, ”Recent advances in hyaluronic acid hydrogels for biomedical applications,” Current Opinion in Biotechnology 40, 35-40, 22, 2016. BD Cosgrove, KL Mui, TP Driscoll, SR Caliari, KD Mehta, RK Assoian, JA Burdick, RL Mauck, ”N-cadherin adhesive interactions modulate matrix mechanosensing and fate commitment of mesenchymal stem cells,” Nature Materials, 6, 2016. L Ouyang, CB Highley, CB Rodell, W Sun, JA Burdick, ”3D Printing of shear-thinning hyaluronic acid hydrogels with secondary cross-linking,” ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering 2 (10), 1743-1751, 9, 2016. CB Highley, M Kim, D Lee, JA Burdick, ”Nearinfrared light triggered release of molecules from supramolecular hydrogel-nanorod composites,” Nanomedicine 11 (12), 1579-1590, 3, 2016. CB Rodell, CB Highley, MH Chen, NN Dusaj, C Wang, L Han, JA Burdick, ”Evolution of hierarchical porous structures in supramolecular guest–host hydrogels,” Soft Matter 12 (37), 7839-7847, 1, 2016. SR Caliari, M Perepelyuk, BD Cosgrove, SJ Tsai, GY Lee, RL Mauck, RG Wells, JA Burdick, “Stiffening hydrogels for investigating the dynamics of hepatic stellate cell mechanotransduction during myofibroblast activation,” Scientific Reports 6, 15, 2016.

Z Gao, H Kang, CH Naylor, F Streller, P Ducos, MD Serrano, J Ping, J Zauberman, RW Carpick, Y-J Wang, YW Park, Z Luo, L Ren, ATC Johnson, “Scalable production of sensor arrays based on high-mobility hybrid graphene field effect transistors,” ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces 8 (41) 27546-27552, 2016. F Streller, Y Qi, J Yang, F Mangolini, AM Rappe, RW Carpick, “Valence band control of metal silicide films via stoichiometry,” The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, 7 (13) 2573-2578, 2016. CH Naylor, WM Parkin, J Ping, Z Gao, YR Zhou, Y Kim, F Streller, RW Carpick, AM Rappe, M Drndic, JM Kikkawa, ATC Johnson, “Monolayer single-crystal 1T′-MoTe2 grown by chemical vapor deposition exhibits weak antilocalization effect,” Nano Letters 16 (7) 4297-4304, 2016. Z Ye, P Egberts, GHee Han, ATC Johnson, RW Carpick, A Martini, “Load-dependent friction hysteresis on graphene,” ACS Nano, 10 (5) 51615168, 2016. JA Lefever, TDB Jacobs, Q Tam, JL Hor, Y-R Huang, D Lee, RW Carpick, “Heterogeneity in the small-scale deformation behavior of disordered nanoparticle packings,” Nano Letters 16 (4) 2455-2462 2016.

Y Dong, I-W Chen, “Thermal runaway in mold-assisted flash sintering,” Journal of the American Ceramic Society, (99) 9 2889-2894, 2016. MH Jang, R Agarwal, P Nukala, D Choi, ATC Johnson, I-W Chen, R Agarwal, “Observing oxygen vacancy driven electroforming in Pt–TiO2–Pt device via strong metal support interaction,” Nano Letters, American Chemical Society, (16) 4 2139-2144, 2016. X Yang, Y Lu, J Lee, I-W Chen, “Tuning resistance states by thickness control in an electroforming-free nanometallic complementary resistance random access memory,” Applied Physics Letters, AIP Publishing, (108)1 013506, 2016. Z Zhang, M Tsang, I-W Chen, “Biodegradable resistive switching memory based on magnesium difluoride,” Nanoscale, Royal Society of Chemistry, (8) 32 15048-15055, 2016. Y Lu, JH Lee, X Yang, I-W Chen, “Distinguishing uniform switching from filamentary switching in resistance memory using a fracture test,” Nanoscale, Royal Society of Chemistry, (8) 42 18113-18120, 2016. Brian Chow MS Magaraci, JG Bermudez, D Yogish, DH Pak, V Mollov, J Tycko, D Issadore, SG Mannickarottu, BY Chow, “Toolbox for exploring modular gene regulation in synthetic biology training,” ACS Synthetic Biology 5 (7), 781-785, 2016.


2016-2017 Publications

Selected Publications from Singh Center for Nanotechnology Researchers

Russell Composto PJ Griffin, V Bocharova, LR Middleton, RJ Composto, N Clarke, KS Schweizer, KI Winey, “Influence of the bound polymer layer on nanoparticle diffusion in polymer melts,” ACS Macro Letters, 2016, 5 (10), pp 1141–1145. ME Grady, RJ Composto, DM Eckmann, “Cell elasticity with altered cytoskeletal architectures across multiple cell types,” J Mech Behav Biomed Mater, (2016), 16, 197-207. C-C Lin, E Parrish, RJ Composto, “Macromolecule and particle dynamics in confined media,” Macromolecules, (2016), 49 (16), pp 5755–5772. W-S Tung, PJ Griffin, JS Meth, N Clarke, RJ Composto, KI Winey, “Temperature-dependent suppression of polymer diffusion in polymer nanocomposites,” ACS Macro Lett., (2016), 5 (6), pp 735–739. MA Caporizzo, P Robison, A Bogush, BL Prosser, DM Eckmann, RJ Composto, “Understanding viscoelasticity changes in single cells using variable indentation-rate viscoelastic analysis,” Biophys. J. (2016), 110 (3), 366a. E Lee, Y Xia, RC Ferrier, H-N Kim, MA Gharbi, KJ Stebe, RD Kamien, RJ Composto, S Yang, “Fine golden rings: Tunable surface plasmon resonance from assembled nanorods in topological defects of liquid crystals,” Adv. Mater., (2016), 28 (14), 2731-2736. P Nukala, C-C Lin, R Composto, R Agarwal, “Ultralow-power switching via defect engineering in germanium telluride phase-change memory devices,” Nature Communications 7, 2016. RC Ferrier Jr., J Koski, RA Riggleman, RJ Composto, “Engineering the assembly of gold nanorods in polymer matrices,” Macromolecules, (2016), 49 (3), pp 1002–1015. RC Ferrier, Y Huang, K Ohno, RJ Composto, “Dispersion of PMMA-grafted, mesoscopic ironoxide rods in polymer films,” Soft Matter, (2016), 12, 2550-2556. B Rasin, H Chao, G Jiang, D Wang, RA Riggleman, RJ. Composto, “Dispersion and alignment of nanorods in cylindrical block copolymer thin films,” Soft Matter, 2016, 12, 2177-2185.

A Karatrantos, N Clarke, RJ Composto, KI Winey, “Entanglements in polymer nanocomposites containing spherical nanoparticles,” Soft Matter, (2016), 12, 2567-2574. Conferences N Krook, J Meth, CB Murray, R Riggleman, RJ Composto, “Vertically aligned nanoplate particles directed by block copolymer domains for anisotropic properties,” APS March Meeting 2016. R Ferrier, J Koski, R Riggleman, R Composto, “Dispersion of mixed brush gold nanorods in polymer matrices,” APS March Meeting 2016. P Griffin, W-S Tung, J Meth, N Clarke, R Composto, Karen Winey, “Role of entropic barriers in controlling polymer diffusion in polystyrene nanocomposites,” APS March Meeting 2016. E Glor, R Ferrier, R Composto, Z Fakhraai, “A novel method to characterize nanorod orientation and aggregation in polymer nanocomposites,” APS March Meeting 2016. B Lindsay, J Meth, R Composto, R Riggleman, “Tuning the interactions between nanoparticles in block copolymer domains,” APS March Meeting 2016. P Griffin, N Clarke, R Composto, K Winey, “Effects of attractive interactions on nanoparticle diffusion in entangled polymer melts,” APS March Meeting 2016.

Scott Diamond S Zhu, Y Lu, T Sinno, SL Diamond, “Dynamics of thrombin generation and flux from clots during whole human blood flow over collagen/tissue factor surfaces,” Journal of Biological Chemistry, American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, (291) 44 23027-23035, 2016. Y Lu, MY Lee, S Zhu, T Sinno, SL Diamond, “Multiscale simulation of thrombus growth and vessel occlusion triggered by collagen/ tissue factor using a data-driven model of combinatorial platelet signaling,” Mathematical Medicine and Biology, Oxford University Press, dqw015, 2016. S Zhu, JD Welsh, LF Brass, SL Diamond, “Platelet-targeting thiol reduction sensor detects thiol isomerase activity on activated platelets in mouse and human blood under flow,” Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, 14 (5):1070-81, 2016. S Zhu, M Tomaiuolo, SL Diamond, “Minimum wound size for clotting: Flowing blood coagulates on a single collagen fiber presenting tissue factor and von Willebrand factor,” Integrative Biology, Royal Society of Chemistry, (8) 8 813-820, 2016. Marija Drndic JT Mlack, A Rahman, G Danda, N Drichko, S Friedensen, M Drndic, N Markovic, “Patterning superconductivity in a topological insulator,” arXiv preprint arXiv:1610.08642, 2016. AG Vieira, C Luz-Lima, GS Pinheiro, Z Lin, JA Rodríguez-Manzo, N Perea-López, AL Elías, M Drndić, M Terrones, H Terrones, BC Viana, “Temperature-and power-dependent phonon properties of suspended continuous WS 2 monolayer films,” Vibrational Spectroscopy, Elsevier, (86) 270-276, 2016. S Shekar, DJ Niedzwiecki, C-C Chien, P Ong, DA Fleischer, J Lin, JK Rosenstein, M Drndić, KL Shepard, “Measurement of DNA translocation dynamics in a solid-state nanopore at 100-ns temporal resolution,” Nano Letters, NIH Public Access, (16) 7 4483, 2016. CH Naylor, WM Parkin, J Ping, Z Gao, YR Zhou, Y Kim, F Streller, RW Carpick, AM Rappe, M Drndic, JM Kikkawa, ATC Johnson, “Monolayer single-crystal 1T′-MoTe2 grown by chemical vapor deposition exhibits weak antilocalization effect,” Nano Letters 16 (7) 4297-4304, 2016.


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

SJ Hong, JA Rodríguez-Manzo, KH Kim, M Park, SJ Baek, DI Kholin, M Lee, ES Choi, DH Jeong, DA Bonnell, EJ Mele, M Drndić, ATC Johnson, YW Park, “Magnetoresistance (MR) of twisted bilayer graphene on electron transparent substrate,” Synthetic Metals, 216, 65–71, (2016). PM Das, G Danda, A Cupo, WM Parkin, L Liang, N Kharche, X Ling, S Huang, MS Dresselhaus, V Meunier, M Drndić, “Controlled sculpture of black phosphorus nanoribbons,” ACS Nano, American Chemical Society, (10) 6 5687-5695, 2016.

C-C Chien, A Balan, R Engelke, M Drndic, “Suspended solid-state membranes on glasschips with Sub 1-pF capacitance for biomolecule sensing applications,” APS March Meeting Abstracts, 2016. G Danda, PM Das, Y-C Chou, J Mlack, CH Naylor, N Perea-Lopez, Z Lin, LB Fulton, M Terrones, ATC Johnson, M Drndic, “Nanopores in suspended WS2 membranes for DNA sequencing,” APS March Meeting Abstracts, 2016. David Eckmann

JA Rodríguez-Manzo, ZJ Qi, A Crook, J-H Ahn, ATC Johnson, M Drndić, “In situ transmission electron microscopy modulation of transport in graphene nanoribbons,” ACS Nano, American Chemical Society, (10) 4 4004, 2016.

JW Myerson, AC. Anselmo, Y Liu, S Mitragotri, DM Eckmann, VR Muzykantov. "Non-affinity factors modulating vascular targeting of nanoand microcarriers," Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews, 99, 97-112. 2016.

WM Parkin, A Balan, L Liang, PM Das, M Lamparski, CH Naylor, JA Rodríguez-Manzo, ATC Johnson, V Meunier, M Drndic, “Raman shifts in electron-irradiated monolayer MoS2,” ACS Nano, American Chemical Society, (10) 4 4134-4142, 2016.

J. Kandel, AA Angelin, DC Wallace, DM Eckmann, "Mitochondrial respiration is sensitive to cytoarchitectural breakdown," Integrative Biology 8, no. 11 (2016): 1170-1182.

X Ling, S Huang, EH Hasdeo, L Liang, WM Parkin, Y Tatsumi, ART Nugraha, AA Puretzky, PM Das, BG Sumpter, DB Geohegan, J Kong, R Saito, M Drndic, V Meunier, MS Dresselhaus, “Anisotropic electron-photon and electronphonon interactions in black phosphorus,” Nano Letters, NIH Public Access, (16) 4 2206-2267, 2016. Conferences PM Das, G Danda, W Parkin, A Cupo N Kharche, X Ling, S Huang, MS Dresselhaus, V Meunier, M Drndic, “Fabrication of suspended few-layer black phosphorus nanopores and nanoribbons via electron beam nanosculpting,” APS Meeting Abstracts, 2016. S Huang, X Ling, E Hasdeo, L Liang, W Parkin, Y Tatsumi, A Nugraha, A Puretzky, PM Das, B Sumpter, D Geohegan, J Kong, R Saito, M Drndic, V Meunier, M Dresselhaus, “Angleresolved light-matter interaction in anisotropic layered black phosphorus,” APS March Meeting Abstracts, 2016.

Nader Engheta M Zhang, DJ Magagnosc, I Liberal, Y Yu, H Yun, H Yang, Y Wu, J Guo, W Chen, YJ Shin, A Stein, JM Kikkawa, N Engheta, DS Gianola, CB Murray, CR Kagan “High-strength magnetically switchable plasmonic nanorods assembled from a binary nanocrystal mixture," Nature Nano, 12 228-232 (2016). AM Urbas, Z Jacob, LD Negro, N Engheta, AD Boardman, P Egan, AB Khanikaev, V Menon, M Ferrera, N Kinsey, C DeVault, J Kim, V Shalaev, A Boltasseva, J Valentine, C Pfeiffer, A Grbic, E Narimanov, L Zhu, S Fan, A Alù, E Poutrina, NM Litchinitser, MA Noginov, KF MacDonald, E Plum, X Liu, PF Nealey, CR Kagan, CB Murray, DA Pawlak, II Smolyaninov, VN Smolyaninova, D Chanda, "Roadmap on optical metamaterials," Journal of Optics, 18 (9) (2016). Zahra Fakhraai Conferences

ME Grady, RJ Composto, DM Eckmann, “Cell elasticity with altered cytoskeletal architectures across multiple cell types,” J Mech Behav Biomed Mater, (2016), 16, 197-207.

E Glor, R Ferrier, R Composto, Z Fakhraai, “A novel method to characterize nanorod orientation and aggregation in polymer nanocomposites,” APS Meeting Abstracts.

N Ramakrishnan, RW Tourdot, DM Eckmann, PS Ayyaswamy, VR Muzykantov, and R Radhakrishnan, "Biophysically inspired model for functionalized nanocarrier adhesion to cell surface: Roles of protein expression and mechanical factors," Royal Society Open Science 3, no. 6 (2016): 160260.

T Liu, A Exarhos, K Cheng, T Jia, P Walsh, J Kikkawa, Z Fakhraai, “Birefringence and enhanced stability in stable organic glasses,” APS Meeting Abstracts.

MA Caporizzo, P Robison, A Bogush, BL Prosser, DM Eckmann, RJ Composto, “Understanding viscoelasticity changes in single cells using variable indentation-rate viscoelastic analysis,” Biophys. J. (2016), 110 (3), 366a.


2016-2017 Publications

Selected Publications from Singh Center for Nanotechnology Researchers

Feng Gai

Yale Goldman

Daniel Hammer

RM Abaskharon, F Gai, “Meandering Down the Energy Landscape of protein folding: Are we there yet?,” Biophysical Journal, Cell Press, (110) 9 1924-1932, 2016.

LG Lippert, JT Hallock, T Dadosh, BT Diroll, CB Murray, YE. Goldman, “NeutrAvidin functionalization of CdSe/CdS quantum nanorods and quantification of biotin binding sites using biotin-4-fluorescein fluorescence quenching,” Bioconjugate Chemistry 27 (3), 562-568 2016.

Q Xiao, Z Wang, D Williams, P Leowanawat, M Peterca, SE Sherman, S Zhang, DA Hammer, PA Heiney, SR King, DM Markovitz, S André, HJ Gabius, ML Klein, V Percec, “Why do membranes of some unhealthy cells adopt a cubic architecture?,” ACS Central Science 2 (12), 943, 2, 2016.

LG Lippert, T Dadosh, BT Diroll, CB. Murray, ELF Holzbaur, SL Reck-Peterson, YE Goldman. "Combined poltirf and sub-pixel particle tracking of cytoplasmic dynein supports a winch-like stepping mechanism," Biophysical Journal 110 (3) 457a-458a, 2016.

LL Wang, JN Sloand, AC Gaffey, CM Venkataraman, Z Wang, A Trubelja, DA Hammer, P Atluri, JA Burdick, “Injectable, guest-host assembled polyethylenimine hydrogel for siRNA delivery,” Biomacromolecules, 2016.

JM Rodgers, W Zhang, CG Bazewicz, J Chen, SH Brewer, F Gai, “Kinetic isotope effect provides insight into the vibrational relaxation mechanism of aromatic molecules: Application to Cyano-phenylalanine,” The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, American Chemical Society, (7)7 1281-1287, 2016. BN Markiewicz, D Mukherjee, T Troxler, F Gai, “Utility of 5-cyanotryptophan fluorescence as a sensitive probe of protein hydration,” The Journal of Physical Chemistry B, American Chemical Society, (120) 5 936-944, 2016. BN Markiewicz, T Lemmin, W Zhang, IA Ahmed, H Jo, G Fiorin, T Troxler, WF DeGrado, F Gai, “Infrared and fluorescence assessment of the hydration status of the tryptophan gate in the influenza A M2 proton channel,” Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, Royal Society of Chemistry, (18) 41 28939-28950, 2016. RM Abaskharon, F Gai, “Direct measurement of the tryptophan-mediated photocleavage kinetics of a protein disulfide bond,” Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, Royal Society of Chemistry, (18) 14 9602-9607, 2016. W Zhang, BN Markiewicz, RS Doerksen, AB Smith III, F Gai, “C [triple bond, length as m-dash] N stretching vibration of 5-cyanotryptophan as an infrared probe of protein local environment: What determines its frequency?,” Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, Royal Society of Chemistry, (18) 10 7027-7034, 2016.

MA Caporizzo, CE Fishman, O Sato, M Ikebe, YE Goldman. "Comparing the motility of myosin X with parallel and anti-parallel dimerization domains," Biophysical Journal 110 (3) 616a, 2016. Raymond Gorte J Luo, JD Lee, H Yun, C Wang, M Monai, CB Murray, P Fornasiero, RJ Gorte, “Base metal-Pt alloys: A general route to high selectivity and stability in the production of biofuels from HMF,” Applied Catalysis B: Environmental, 199, 439–446, (2016). TM Onn, L Arroyo-Ramirez, M Monai, T-S Oh, M Talati, P Fornasiero, RJ Gorte, MM Khader, “Modification of Pd/CeO2 catalyst by atomic layer deposition of ZrO2,” Applied Catalysis B: Environmental, 197, 280-285, (2016). S Zhang, TM Onn, RJ Gorte, GW Graham, X Pan, “Ex-situ and in-situ microscopy study of ZrO 2-stabilized Pd/Al 2 O 3 Catalysts,” Microscopy and Microanalysis, 22(S3), 782-783, (2016). J Luo, H Yun, AV Mironenko, K Goulas, JD Lee, M Monai, C Wang, V Vorotnikov, CB Murray, DG Vlachos, P Fornasiero, RJ Gorte, “Mechanisms for high selectivity in the hydrodeoxygenation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural over PtCo nanocrystals,” ACS Catalysis, 6 (7), pp 4095– 4104, (2016). Y Zhao, T-S Oh, Y Li, JM Vohs, RJ Gorte, “Fabrication of MnCo2O4-YSZ composite cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells by electrodeposition,” Journal of Electrochemical Society, 163 (8), F863-F866, (2016). Y Cheng, SY Anthony, X Li, T-S Oh, JM Vohs, RJ Gorte, “Preparation of SOFC cathodes by infiltration into LSF-YSZ composite scaffolds,” Journal of Electrochemical Society, 163(2), F54-F58, (2016).

Q Xiao, JD Rubien, Z Wang, EH Reed, DA Hammer, D Sahoo, PA Heiney, SS Yadavalli, M Goulian, SE Wilner, T Baumgart, SA Vinogradov, ML Klein, V Percec, ”Self-sorting and coassembly of fluorinated, hydrogenated, and hybrid Janus dendrimers into dendrimersomes,” Journal of the American Chemical Society 138 (38), 12655, 4, 2016. Q Xiao, SS Yadavalli, S Zhang, SE Sherman, E Fiorin, L da Silva, DA Wilson, DA Hammer, S André, HJ Gabius, ML Klein, M Goulian, V Percec, “Bioactive cell-like hybrids coassembled from (glyco) dendrimersomes with bacterial membranes,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 113 (9), E1134-E1141, 7, 2016. Y Jang, WS Jang, C Gao, TS Shim, JC Crocker, DA Hammer, D Lee,”Tuning the mechanical properties of recombinant protein-stabilized gas bubbles using triblock copolymers,” ACS Macro Letters 5 (3), 371-376, 2, 2016. Q Xiao, S Zhang, Z Wang, SE Sherman, RO Moussodia, M Peterca, A Muncan, DR Williams, DA Hammer, S Vértesy, S André, HJ Gabius, ML Klein, V Percec, “Onion-like glycodendrimersomes from sequencedefined Janus glycodendrimers and influence of architecture on reactivity to a lectin,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 113 (5), 1162-1167,13, 2016. WS Jang, SC Park, EH Reed, KP Dooley, SF Wheeler, D Lee, DA Hammer, ”Enzymatically triggered rupture of polymersomes,” Soft matter 12 (4), 1014-1020,4, 2016. Conferences Conferences D Hammer, ”Functional, responsive materials assembled from recombinant Oleosin,” APS March Meeting Abstracts, 2016.


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

David Issadore H-Ho Jeong, D Issadore, D Lee, “Recent developments in scale-up of microfluidic emulsion generation via parallelization,” Korean Journal of Chemical Engineering 33 (6) 17571766, 2016.

MH Jang, R Agarwal, P Nukala, D Choi, ATC Johnson, I-W Chen, R Agarwal, “Observing oxygen vacancy driven electroforming in Pt–TiO2–Pt device via strong metal support interaction,” Nano Letters 16 (4), pp 2139–2144, (2016).

MS Magaraci, JG Bermudez, D Yogish, DH Pak, V Mollov, J Tycko, D Issadore, SG Mannickarottu, BY Chow, “Toolbox for exploring modular gene regulation in synthetic biology training,” ACS Synthetic Biology 5 (7), 781-785, 2016.

WM Parkin, A Balan, L Liang, PM Das, M Lamparski, C Naylor, JA Rodriguez-Manzo, ATC Johnson, V Meunier, M Drndic, “Raman shifts and in situ TEM electrical degradation of electron-irradiated monolayer MoS2,” APS March Meeting Abstracts, 2016.

J Ko, MA Hemphill, D Gabrieli, L Wu, V Yelleswarapu, G Lawrence, W Pennycooke, A Singh, DF Meaney, D Issadore, “Smartphoneenabled optofluidic exosome diagnostic for concussion recovery,” Scientific Reports 6, 2016.

JA Rodríguez-Manzo, ZJ Qi, A Crook, J-H Ahn, ATC Johnson, M Drndić, “In situ transmission electron microscopy modulation of transport in graphene nanoribbons,” ACS Nano, American Chemical Society, (10) 4 4004, 2016.

J Ko, V Yelleswarapu, A Singh, N Shah, D Issadore, “Magnetic nickel iron electroformed trap (MagNET): a master/replica fabrication strategy for ultra-high throughput (> 100 mL h− 1) immunomagnetic sorting,” Lab on a Chip 16 (16), 3049-3057, 2016.

D Pierucci, H Henck, J Avila, A Balan, CH Naylor, G Patriarche, YJ Dappe, MG Silly, F Sirotti, ATC Johnson, MC Asensio, A Ouerghi, “Band alignment and minigaps in monolayer MoS2graphene van der Waals heterostructures,” Nano Letters, 16 (7), pp 4054–4061, (2016).

J Ko, E Carpenter, D Issadore, “Detection and isolation of circulating exosomes and microvesicles for cancer monitoring and diagnostics using micro-/nano-based devices,” Analyst 141 (2), 450-460, 2016.

CH Naylor, NJ Kybert, C Schneier, J Xi, G Romero, JG Saven, R Liu, ATC Johnson, “Scalable production of molybdenum disulfide based biosensors,” ACS Nano, 10(6), 6173–6179, (2016).

Charlie Johnson B Lee, W Liu, CH Naylor, J Park, S Malek, J Berger, ATC Johnson, R Agarwal, “Electrical tuning of exciton-plasmon polariton coupling in monolayer MoS2 integrated with plasmonic nanoantenna lattice,” arXiv preprint arXiv:1608.06901, 2016. F Yi, M-L Ren, JC Reed, H Zhu, J Hou, CH Naylor, ATC Johnson, R Agarwal, E Cubukcu, “Optomechanical enhancement of doubly resonant 2D optical nonlinearity,” Nano Letters 16 (3), 1631-1636, 2016. W Liu, B Lee, CH Naylor, H-S Ee, J Park, ATC Johnson, R Agarwal, “Strong exciton–plasmon coupling in MoS2 coupled with plasmonic lattice,” Nano Letters 16 (2), 1262-1269, 2016. D Pierucci, H Henck, CH Naylor, HSE Lhuillier, A Balan, JE Rault, YJ Dappe, F Bertran, P Le Fèvre, ATC Johnson, A Ouerghi, “Large area molybdenum disulphide-epitaxial graphene vertical Van der Waals heterostructures,” Sci Rep., 6, 26656, (2016).

SJ Hong, JA Rodríguez-Manzo, KH Kim, M Park, SJ Baek, DI Kholin, M Lee, ES Choi, DH Jeong, DA Bonnell, EJ Mele, M Drndić, ATC Johnson, YW Park, “Magnetoresistance (MR) of twisted bilayer graphene on electron transparent substrate,” Synthetic Metals, 216, 65–71, (2016). S Choi, J Park, J Kang, ATC Johnson, Y-C Kang, “Surface characterization of PZT thin films obtained at various O2 gas ratios,” Vacuum, 128, 234–239, (2016). CH Naylor, WM Parkin, J Ping, Z Gao, YR Zhou, Y Kim, F Streller, RW Carpick, AM Rappe, M Drndic, JM Kikkawa, ATC Johnson, “Monolayer singlecrystal 1T′-MoTe2 grown by chemical vapor deposition exhibits weak antilocalization effect,” Nano Letters 16 (7) 4297-4304, 2016. J Ping, ATC Johnson, “Quantifying the intrinsic surface charge density and chargetransfer resistance of the graphene-solution interface through bias-free low-level charge measurement,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 109,013103 (2016). J Ping, R Vishnubhotla, A Vrudhula, ATC Johnson, “Scalable production of high-sensitivity, labelfree DNA biosensors based on back-gated graphene field effect transistors,” ACS Nano, 10 (9), 8700–8704, (2016).

H Henck, D Pierucci, J Chaste, CH Naylor, J Avila, A Balan, MG Silly, MC Asensio, F Sirotti, ATC Johnson, E Lhuillier, A Ouerghi, “Electrolytic phototransistor based on graphene-MoS2 van der Waals pn heterojunction with tunable photoresponse,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 109, 113103 (2016). Z Gao, H Kang, CH Naylor, F Streller, P Ducos, MD Serrano, J Ping, J Zauberman, RW Carpick, Y-J Wang, YW Park, Z Luo, L Ren, ATC Johnson, “Scalable production of sensor arrays based on high-mobility hybrid graphene field effect transistors,” ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces 8 (41) 27546-27552, 2016. JC Reed, SC Malek, F Yi, CH Naylor, ATC Johnson, E Cubukcu, “Photothermal characterization of MoS2 emission coupled to a microdisk cavity,” Appl. Phys. Lett., 109,193109 (2016). LM Martinez, NJ Pinto, CH Naylor, ATC Johnson, “MoS2 based dual input logic and gate,” AIP Advances, 6, 125041 (2016). S-Yu Chen, CH Naylor, T Goldstein, ATC Johnson, J Yan, “Intrinsic Phonon Bands in High-Quality Monolayer T'Molybdenum Ditelluride,” arXiv preprint arXiv:1612.04027, (2016). ZB Aziza, H Henck, D Di Felice, D Pierucci, J Chaste, CH Naylor, A Balan, YJ Dappe, ATC Johnson, A Ouerghi, “Bandgap inhomogeneity of MoS 2 monolayer on epitaxial graphene bilayer in van der Waals pn junction,” Carbon, 110, 396–403, (2016). DN Ortiz, J Vedrine, NJ Pinto, CH Naylor, ATC Johnson, “Monolayer WS 2 crossed with an electro-spun PEDOT-PSS nano-ribbon: Fabricating a Schottky diode,” Mater. Sci. Eng. B, 214, 68–73, (2016). Conferences P Sepulveda, I Ramos, CH Naylor, ATC Johnson, N Pinto, “Electrical response of monolayer MoS2 to vapors of aliphatic alcohols,” APS March Meeting Abstracts, (2016). D Ortiz, N Pinto, CH Naylor, ATC Johnson, “Schottky diode based on WS2 crossed with PEDOT/PSSA,” APS March Meeting Abstracts, (2016). G Danda, PM Das, Y-C Chou, J Mlack, CH Naylor, N Perea-Lopez, Z Lin, LB Fulton, M Terrones, ATC Johnson, M Drndic, “Nanopores in suspended WS2 membranes for DNA sequencing,” APS March Meeting Abstracts, 2016.


2016-2017 Publications

Selected Publications from Singh Center for Nanotechnology Researchers

Cherie Kagan

Conferences

Jay Kikkawa

DB Straus, SH Parra, N Iotov, J Gebhardt, AM Rappe, JE Subotnik, JM Kikkawa, CR Kagan, "Direct observation of electron–phonon coupling and slow vibrational relaxation in organic–inorganic hybrid perovskites," J. Am. Chem. Soc. 138, 13798-13801, 5, 2016.

CR Kagan, "Designer Nanocrystal Materials for Photovoltaics," APS Meeting Abstracts, 2016.

D Li, H Yun, BT Diroll, VVT Doan-Nguyen, JM Kikkawa, CB Murray, “Synthesis and size-selective precipitation of monodisperse nonstoichiometric M x Fe3–x O4 (M= Mn, Co) nanocrystals and their DC and AC magnetic properties,” Chem. Mater., 28 (2), pp 480–489, (2016).

AM Urbas, Z Jacob, LD Negro, N Engheta, AD Boardman, P Egan, AB Khanikaev, V Menon, M Ferrera, N Kinsey, C DeVault, J Kim, V Shalaev, A Boltasseva, J Valentine, C Pfeiffer, A Grbic, E Narimanov, L Zhu, S Fan, A Alù, E Poutrina, NM Litchinitser, MA Noginov, KF MacDonald, E Plum, X Liu, PF Nealey, CR Kagan, CB Murray, DA Pawlak, II Smolyaninov, VN Smolyaninova, D Chanda, "Roadmap on optical metamaterials," Journal of Optics, 18 (9) (2016). T Zhao, ED Goodwin, J Guo, H Wang, BT Diroll, CB Murray, CR Kagan, "Advanced architecture for colloidal PbS quantum dot solar cells exploiting a CdSe quantum dot buffer layer," ACS Nano 10 (10), 9267-9273, 3, 2016. OE Semonin, GA Elbaz, DB Straus, TD Hull, DW Paley, AM van der Zande, JC Hone, I Kymissis, CR Kagan, X Roy, JS Owen, "Limits of carrier diffusion in n-type and p-Type CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite single crystals," The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters 7 (17), 3510-3518, 5, 2016.

Randall Kamien Y Luo, F Serra, DA Beller, MA Gharbi, N Li, S Yang, RD. Kamien, KJ Stebe, “Around the corner: Colloidal assembly and wiring in groovy nematic cells,” Phys. Rev. E, American Physical Society, 93, 032705, 2016. E Lee, Y Xia, RC Ferrier, H-N Kim, MA Gharbi, KJ Stebe, RD Kamien, RJ Composto, S Yang, “Fine golden rings: Tunable surface plasmon resonance from assembled nanorods in topological defects of liquid crystals,” Adv. Mater., (2016), 28 (14), 2731-2736. MO Lavrentovich, EM Horsley, A Radja, AM Sweeney, RD Kamien, “First-order patterning transitions on a sphere as a route to cell morphology,” PNAS, 2016. L Tran, MO Lavrentovich, DA Beller, N Li, KJ Stebe, RD Kamien, “Lassoing saddle splay and the geometrical control of topological defects,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, vol. 113, issue 26, pp.7106-7111, 2016.

CH Naylor, WM Parkin, J Ping, Z Gao, YR Zhou, Y Kim, F Streller, RW Carpick, AM Rappe, M Drndic, JM Kikkawa, ATC Johnson, “Monolayer Single-Crystal 1T′-MoTe2 Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition Exhibits Weak Antilocalization Effect,” Nano Letters 16 (7) 4297-4304, 2016. BT Diroll, ME Turk, N Gogotsi, CB Murray, JM Kikkawa, “Ultrafast Photoluminescence from the Core and the Shell in CdSe/CdS Dot-in-Rod Heterostructures,” Chemphyschem., 17(5), 75965 (2016). H Yun, J Kim, T Paik, L Meng, PS Jo, JM Kikkawa, CR Kagan, MG Allen, CB Murray, "Alternate current magnetic property characterization of nonstoichiometric zinc ferrite nanocrystals for inductor fabrication via a solution based process," Journal of Applied Physics 119 (11), 113901, 2, 2016. DB Straus, SH Parra, N Iotov, J Gebhardt, AM Rappe, JE Subotnik, JM Kikkawa, CR Kagan, "Direct observation of electron–phonon coupling and slow vibrational relaxation in organic–inorganic hybrid perovskites," J. Am. Chem. Soc. 138, 13798-13801, 5, 2016.

ED Goodwin, DB Straus, EA Gaulding, CB Murray, CR Kagan, "The effects of inorganic surface treatments on photogenerated carrier mobility and lifetime in PbSe quantum dot thin films," Chemical Physics 471, 81-88, 9, 2016.

Y Xia, E Lee, H Hu, MA Gharbi, DA Beller, E-K Fleischmann, RD Kamien, R Zentel, S Yang, “Better Actuation Through Chemistry: Using Surface Coatings to Create Uniform Director Fields in Nematic Liquid Crystal Elastomers,” ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces, 2016, 8 (19), pp 12466–12472, 2016.

JH Choi, H Wang, SJ Oh, T Paik, P Sung, J Sung, X Ye, T Zhao, BT Diroll, CB Murray, CR Kagan, "Exploiting the colloidal nanocrystal library to construct electronic devices," Science 352 (6282), 205-208, 29, 2016.

Y Xia, G Cedillo-Servin, RD Kamien, S Yang, “Guided Folding of Nematic Liquid Crystal Elastomer Sheets into 3D via Patterned 1D Microchannels,” Advanced Material, (28) 43 9637-9643, 2016.

M Zhang, DJ Magagnosc, I Liberal, Y Yu, H Yun, H Yang, Y Wu, J Guo, W Chen, YJ Shin, A Stein, JM Kikkawa, N Engheta, DS Gianola, CB Murray, CR Kagan “High-strength magnetically switchable plasmonic nanorods assembled from a binary nanocrystal mixture," Nature Nano, 12 228-232 (2016).

H Yun, J Kim, T Paik, L Meng, PS Jo, JM Kikkawa, CR Kagan, MG Allen, CB Murray, "Alternate current magnetic property characterization of nonstoichiometric zinc ferrite nanocrystals for inductor fabrication via a solution based process," Journal of Applied Physics 119 (11), 113901, 21, March 2016.

Conferences

Conferences

A Rja, M Lavrentovich, E Horsley, RD Kamien, A Sweeney, “Patterns for Fluid Management: The Mechanical Origins of Microarchitectures,” APS March Meeting Abstracts #B37.007, 2016.

T Liu, A Exarhos, K Cheng, T Jia, P Walsh, J Kikkawa, Z Fakhraai, ”Birefringence and enhanced stability in stable organic glasses,” APS Meeting Abstracts, 2016.

M Zhang, DJ Magagnosc, I Liberal, Y Yu, H Yun, H Yang, Y Wu, J Guo, W Chen, YJ Shin, A Stein, JM Kikkawa, N Engheta, DS Gianola, CB Murray, CR Kagan “High-strength magnetically switchable plasmonic nanorods assembled from a binary nanocrystal mixture," Nature Nano, 12 228-232 (2016).

M Lavrentovich, E Horsley, A Radja, A Sweeney, RD Kamien, “Pollen Patterning as a Brazovskii Phase Transition on a Sphere,” APS March Meeting Abstracts, #B37.008, 2016. F Serra, Y Luo, S Yang, RD Kamien, KJ Stebe, “Particles and curvatures in nematic liquid crystals,” APS March Meeting Abstracts, #X37.013, 2016.


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Daeyeon Lee N Li, N Sharifi-Mood, F Tu, D Lee, R Radhakrishnan, T Baumgart, KJ Stebe, “Curvature- driven migration of colloids on tense lipid bilayers,” Langmuir, American Chemical Society, 2016. TS Shim, ZG Estephan, Z Qian, JH Prosser, SY Lee, DM Chenoweth, D Lee, S-J Park, JC Crocker, “Shape changing thin films powered by DNA hybridization,” Nature Nanotechnology, Nature Research, 2016. TS Shim, D Lee, S-J Park, JC Crocker, “Stimuliresponsive self-folding of polymeric bilayers toward programmable microactuator,” Proceedings of the Korean Society of Polymer Science Conference, (41) 2 190-190, 2016. THR Niepa, L Hou, H Jiang, M Goulian, H Koo, KJ Stebe, D Lee, “Microbial nanoculture as an artificial microniche,” Scientific Reports, 6: 30578 2016.

JA Lefever, TDB Jacobs, Q Tam, JL Hor, Y-R Huang, D Lee, R W Carpick, “Heterogeneity in the small-scale deformation behavior of disordered nanoparticle packings,” Nano Letters, American Chemical Society, (16) 4 24552462, 2016. Y Jang, WS Jang, C Gao, TS Shim, JC Crocker, DA Hammer, D Lee, ”Tuning the mechanical properties of recombinant protein-stabilized gas bubbles using triblock copolymers,” ACS Macro Letters 5 (3), 371-376,2, 2016. A Kumar, S Li, C-M Cheng, D Lee, “Flow-induced phase inversion of emulsions in tapered microchannels,” Lab on a Chip, Royal Society of Chemistry, (16) 21 4173-4180, 2016. B Han, DR Chery, J Yin, XL Lu, D Lee, L Han, “Nanomechanics of layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte complexes: a manifestation of ionic cross-links and fixed charges,” Soft Matter, Royal Society of Chemistry, (12)4 1158-1169, 2016.

SD Hann, THR Niepa, KJ Stebe, D Lee, “One-Step generation of cell-encapsulating compartments via polyelectrolyte complexation in an aqueous two phase system,” ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, American Chemical Society, (8) 38 25603-25611, 2016.

WS Jang, SC Park, EH Reed, KP Dooley, SF Wheeler, D Lee, DA Hammer, ”Enzymatically triggered rupture of polymersomes,” Soft Matter 12 (4), 1014-1020,4,2016

LC Bradley, KJ Stebe, D Lee, “Clickable janus particles,” Journal of the American Chemical Society, (138) 36 11437-11440, 2016.

A Kumar, S Li, C-M Cheng, D Lee, “Single dropletlevel understanding of flow-induced phase inversion of emulsions,” APS Meeting Abstracts, 2016.

CB Highley, M Kim, D Lee, JA Burdick, ”Nearinfrared light triggered release of molecules from supramolecular hydrogel-nanorod composites,” Nanomedicine 11 (12), 1579-1590, 3, 2016. H-Ho Jeong, D Issadore, D Lee, “Recent developments in scale-up of microfluidic emulsion generation via parallelization,” Korean Journal of Chemical Engineering 33 (6) 17571766, 2016. MF Haase, N Sharifi-Mood, D Lee, KJ Stebe, “In Situ mechanical testing of nanostructured bijel fibers,” ACS Nano, American Chemical Society, (10) 6 6338-6344, 2016. B Mohanraj, M Kim, F Tu, D Lee, RL Mauck, GR Dodge, “Loading induced ‘on-demand’ delivery from mechanically activated microcapsules,” Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, Elsevier, (24) S166-S167, 2016.

Conferences

D Strickland, JL Hor, C Ortiz, D Lee, D Gianola, “Localized plastic deformation in colloidal micropillars,” APS Meeting Abstracts, 2016. B Han, T Ma, D Lee, V Shenoy, L Han, “Distinctive viscoelastic and viscoplastic nanomechanics of ionically cross-linked polyelectrolyte complexes under intermittent relaxation and creep,” APS Meeting Abstracts, 2016. JL Hor, Y Jiang, KT Turner, D Lee, “Thermally induced infiltration of polymer into nanoparticle packings,” APS Meeting Abstracts, 2016. T Ma, B Han, D Lee, L Han, “Tuning nanoscale viscoelasticity of polyelectrolyte complexes with multiple types of cross-links,” APS Meeting Abstracts, 2016. D Ring, A Shavit, R Riggleman, D Lee, “Effect of polymer-nanoparticle interactions on the capillary rise infiltration of polymers into nanoporous media,” APS Meeting Abstracts, 2016.

Thomas Lubensky W-S Wei, MA Gharbi, MA Lohr, T Still, MD Gratale, TC Lubensky, KJ Stebe, AG Yodh, “Dynamics of ordered colloidal particle monolayers at nematic liquid crystal interfaces," Soft Matter 12 4715-4724, 2016. Susan Marguiles N Yehya, GG Lawrence, SS Margulies, “PERK inhibition improves permeability In mechanical stretch-induced epithelial Injury,” A40. Epithelial Regulation of inflammation, American Thoracic Society, A1460-A1460, 2016. T Dolinay, NJ Thomas, JA Howrylak, SS Margulies, N Yehya, “Biomarkers Of Endothelial And Epithelial Dysfunction In Adult And Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome,” B104. Respiratory Failure: Lung Regional and Translational Mechanisms in Ards, American Thoracic Society, A4418-A4418, 2016. Eugene Mele SJ Hong, JA Rodríguez-Manzo, KH Kim, M Park, SJ Baek, DI Kholin, M Lee, ES Choi, DH Jeong, DA Bonnell, EJ Mele, M Drndić, ATC Johnson, YW Park, “Magnetoresistance (MR) of twisted bilayer graphene on electron transparent substrate,” Synthetic Metals, 216, 65–71, (2016).


2016-2017 Publications

Selected Publications from Singh Center for Nanotechnology Researchers

Christopher Murray L Malassis, R Dreyfus, RJ Murphy, LA Hough, B Donnio, CB Murray, “One-step green synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles with ascorbic acid and their versatile surface postfunctionalization,” RSC Adv.,6, 33092-33100, (2016). L Malassis, D Jishkariani, CB Murray, B Donnio, “Dendronization-induced phase-transfer, stabilization and self-assembly of large colloidal Au nanoparticles,” Nanoscale, 8, 13192-13198, (2016). CL Poyser, T Czerniuk, A Akimov, BT Diroll, EA Gaulding, AS Salasyuk, AJ Kent, DR Yakovlev, M Bayer, CB Murray, “Coherent acoustic phonons in colloidal semiconductor nanocrystal superlattices,” ACS Nano, 10 (1), pp 1163–1169, (2016). D Li, H Yun, BT Diroll, VVT Doan-Nguyen, JM Kikkawa, CB Murray, “Synthesis and size-selective precipitation of monodisperse nonstoichiometric M x Fe3–x O4 (M= Mn, Co) Nanocrystals and their DC and AC magnetic properties,” Chem. Mater., 28 (2), pp 480–489, (2016). M Zhang, DJ Magagnosc, I Liberal, Y Yu, H Yun, H Yang, Y Wu, J Guo, W Chen, YJ Shin, A Stein, JM Kikkawa, N Engheta, DS Gianola, CB Murray, CR Kagan, “High-strength magnetically switchable plasmonic nanorods assembled from a binary nanocrystal mixture," Nature Nano, 12 228-232 (2016). AM Urbas, Z Jacob, LD Negro, N Engheta, AD Boardman, P Egan, AB Khanikaev, V Menon, M Ferrera, N Kinsey, C DeVault, J Kim, V Shalaev, A Boltasseva, J Valentine, C Pfeiffer, A Grbic, E Narimanov, L Zhu, S Fan, A Alù, E Poutrina, NM Litchinitser, MA Noginov, KF MacDonald, E Plum, X Liu, PF Nealey, CR Kagan, CB Murray, DA Pawlak, II Smolyaninov, VN Smolyaninova, D Chanda, "Roadmap on optical metamaterials," Journal of Optics, 18 (9) (2016). M Cargnello, VVT Doan Nguyen, CB Murray, “Engineering uniform nanocrystals: Mechanism of formation and self-assembly into bimetallic nanocrystal superlattices,” AIChE Journal, 6(2), 392–398.

LG Lippert, T Dadosh, BT Diroll, CB. Murray, ELF Holzbaur, SL Reck-Peterson, YE Goldman. "Combined poltirf and sub-pixel particle tracking of cytoplasmic dynein supports a winch-like stepping mechanism," Biophysical Journal 110 (3) 457a-458a, 2016.

K He, S Zhang, J Li, X Yu, Q Meng, Y Zhu, E Hu, K Sun, H Yun, X-Q Yang, Y Zhu, H Gan, Y Mo, EA Stach, CB Murray, D Su, “Visualizing nonequilibrium lithiation of spinel oxide via in situ transmission electron microscopy,” Nature Communications, 7, 11441 (2016).

S O'brien, S Jones, A Broomfield, F White, CB Murray, A Fagbemi, D Bonney, R Wynn, “The efficacy of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in modifying disease phenotype in glycogen storage disease type 1b,” Bone Marrow Transplantation, 51:S500, (2016).

J Luo, H Yun, AV Mironenko, K Goulas, JD Lee, M Monai, C Wang, V Vorotnikov, CB Murray, DG Vlachos, P Fornasiero, RJ Gorte, “Mechanisms for high selectivity in the hydrodeoxygenation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural over PtCo nanocrystals,” ACS Catalysis, 6 (7), pp 4095– 4104, (2016).

BT Diroll, ME Turk, N Gogotsi, CB Murray, JM Kikkawa, “Ultrafast photoluminescence from the core and the shell in CdSe/CdS dot-in-rod heterostructures,” Chemphyschem., 17(5), 759-65 (2016). LG Lippert, JT Hallock, T Dadosh, BT Diroll, CB Murray, YE Goldman, “NeutrAvidin functionalization of CdSe/CdS quantum nanorods and quantification of biotin binding sites using biotin-4-fluorescein fluorescence quenching,” Bioconjugate Chemistry 27 (3), 562-568 2016. H Yun, J Kim, T Paik, L Meng, PS Jo, JM Kikkawa, CR Kagan, MG Allen, CB Murray, "Alternate current magnetic property characterization of nonstoichiometric zinc ferrite nanocrystals for inductor fabrication via a solution based process," Journal of Applied Physics 119 (11), 113901, 21, March 2016. JH Choi, H Wang, SJ Oh, T Paik, P Sung, J Sung, X Ye, T Zhao, BT Diroll, CB Murray, CR Kagan, "Exploiting the colloidal nanocrystal library to construct electronic devices," Science 352 (6282), 205-208, 29, 2016. M Cargnello, T Montini, SY Smolin, JB Priebe, JJ Delgado Jaén, VVT Doan-Nguyen, IS McKay, JA Schwalbe, M-M Pohl, TR Gordon, Y Lu, JB Baxter, A Brückner, P Fornasiero, CB Murray, “Engineering titania nanostructure to tune and improve its photocatalytic activity,” PNAS, 113(15), 3966-3971, (2016). BT Diroll, N Gogotsi, CB Murray, “Statistical description of CdSe/CdS dot-in-rod heterostructures using scanning transmission electron microscopy,” Chem. Mater., 28 (10), pp 3345–3351, (2016).

ED Goodwin, DB Straus, EA Gaulding, CB Murray, CR Kagan, "The effects of inorganic surface treatments on photogenerated carrier mobility and lifetime in PbSe quantum dot thin films," Chemical Physics 471, 81-88, 9, 2016. HJ Yun, T Paik, B Diroll, ME Edley, JB Baxter, CB Murray, “Nanocrystal size-dependent efficiency of quantum dot sensitized solar cells in the strongly coupled CdSe nanocrystals/TiO2 system,” ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces, 8 (23), 14692–14700, (2016). BT Diroll, D Jishkariani, M Cargnello, CB Murray, B Donnio, “Polycatenar ligand control of the synthesis and self-assembly of colloidal nanocrystals,” J. Am. Chem. Soc., 138 (33), pp 10508–10515, (2016). T Zhao, ED Goodwin, J Guo, H Wang, BT Diroll, CB Murray, CR Kagan, "Advanced architecture for colloidal PbS quantum dot solar cells exploiting a CdSe quantum dot buffer layer," ACS nano 10 (10), 9267-9273, 3, 2016. J Luo, JD Lee, H Yun, C Wang, M Monai, CB Murray, P Fornasiero, RJ Gorte, “Base metalPt alloys: A general route to high selectivity and stability in the production of biofuels from HMF,” Applied Catalysis B: Environmental, 199, 439-446, (2016).


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Conferences

Virgil Percec

S Li, G Guglietta, Y Wu, N Gogotsi, CB Murray, J Baxter, “Lifetime, mobility, and diffusion of photoexcited carriers in ligand-exchanged PbSe nanocrystal films measured by timeresolved terahertz spectroscopy,” APS Meeting Abstracts, (2016).

Q Xiao, Z Wang, D Williams, P Leowanawat, M Peterca, SE Sherman, S Zhang, DA Hammer, PA Heiney, SR King, DM Markovitz, S André, HJ Gabius, ML Klein, V Percec, ”Why do membranes of some unhealthy cells adopt a cubic architecture?,” ACS Central Science 2 (12), 943,2, 2016.

N Krook, J Meth, CB Murray, R Riggleman, R Composto, “Vertically aligned nanoplate particles directed by block copolymer domains for anisotropic properties,” APS March Meeting Abstracts, (2016). K He, S Zhang, J Li, X Yu, Q Meng, Y Mo, X-Q Yang, Y Zhu, EA Stach, CB Murray, D Su, “Structural evolution of spinel iron oxide during nonequilibrium lithiation,” ECS Meeting Abstracts, (2016). D Wang, B de Nijs, N Tasios, S Dussi, F Smallenburg, L Filion, Y Liu, T Altantzis, D Zanaga, Y Wu, S Najmr, E Gaulding, J Meeldijk, D Groenendijk, CB Murray, S Bals, MA. van Huis, A Imhof, M Dijkstra, A van Blaaderen, “Self-assembled supraparticles by spherical confinement,” European Microscopy Congress 2016: Proceedings, (2016). Phillip Nelson Conferences P Nelson, ”Old and new news about singlephoton sensitivity in human vision, APS Meeting Abstracts". P Nelson, ”Light, Imaging, Vision: An interdisciplinary undergraduate course,” APS March Meeting Abstracts.

MN Holerca, D Sahoo, M Peterca, BE Partridge, PA Heiney, V Percec, “A tetragonal phase self-organized from unimolecular spheres assembled from a substituted poly (2-oxazoline),” Macromolecules, American Chemical Society, 2016. M Peterca, MR Imam, SD Hudson, BE Partridge, D Sahoo, PA Heiney, ML Klein, V Percec, “Complex arrangement of orthogonal nanoscale columns via a supramolecular orientational memory effect,” ACS Nano, American Chemical Society, (10) 11 10480-10488, 2016. M-S Ho, BE Partridge, H-Jan Sun, D Sahoo, P Leowanawat, M Peterca, R Graf, HW Spiess, X Zeng, G Ungar, PA Heiney, C-Shu Hsu, V Percec, “Screening libraries of semifluorinated arylene bisimides to discover and predict thermodynamically controlled helical crystallization,” ACS Combinatorial Science, American Chemical Society, (18) 12 723-739, 2016. D Sahoo, M Peterca, E Aqad, BE Partridge, PA Heiney, R Graf, HW Spiess, X Zeng, V Percec, “Hierarchical self-organization of perylene bisimides into supramolecular spheres and periodic arrays thereof,” Journal of the American Chemical Society, American Chemical Society, (138) 44 14798-14807, 2016. Q Xiao, JD Rubien, Z Wang, EH Reed, DA Hammer, D Sahoo, PA Heiney, SS Yadavalli, M Goulian, SE Wilner, T Baumgart, SA Vinogradov, ML Klein, V Percec, “Selfsorting and co-assembly of fluorinated, hydrogenated, and hybrid janus dendrimers into dendrimersomes,” Journal of the American Chemical Society 138 (38), 12655,4, 2016.

Q Xiao, SS Yadavalli, S Zhang, SE Sherman, E Fiorin, L da Silva, DA Wilson, DA Hammer, S André, HJ Gabius, ML Klein, M Goulian, V Percec, “Bioactive cell-like hybrids coassembled from (glyco) dendrimersomes with bacterial membranes,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 113 (9), E1134-E1141,7, 2016. Q Xiao, S Zhang, Z Wang, SE Sherman, RO Moussodia, M Peterca, A Muncan, DR Williams, DA Hammer, S Vértesy, S André, HJ Gabius, ML Klein, V Percec, “Onion-like glycodendrimersomes from sequencedefined Janus glycodendrimers and influence of architecture on reactivity to a lectin,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 113 (5), 1162-1167,13, 2016. Cécile Roche, Hao-Jan Sun, Pawaret Leowanawat, Fumito Araoka, Benjamin E Partridge, Mihai Peterca, Daniela A Wilson, Margaret E Prendergast, Paul A Heiney, Robert Graf, Hans W Spiess, Xiangbing Zeng, Goran Ungar, Virgil Percec, “A supramolecular helix that disregards chirality,” Nature Chemistry, Nature Publishing Group, (8) 1 80-89, 2016. Conferences R Aav, P Nielsen, E Balskus, P-O Norrby, I Čikotienė, V Percec, S Dalby, S Reisman, S Ding, T Remarchuk, R Shenvi, F Glorius, S Schunk, N Maulide, B Stoltz, J Sutherland, D Nicewicz, M Turks, V Snieckus, E Butkus, J Pesti, “BOS2016,” Balticum Organicum Syntheticum, 2016.


2016-2017 Publications

Selected Publications from Singh Center for Nanotechnology Researchers

Kathleen Stebe SD Hann, THR Niepa, KJ Stebe, D Lee, “One-step generation of cell-encapsulating compartments via polyelectrolyte complexation in an aqueous two phase system,” ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, American Chemical Society, (8) 38 25603-25611, 2016. LC Bradley, KJ Stebe, D Lee, “Clickable janus particles,” Journal of the American Chemical Society, (138) 36 11437-11440, 2016. IB Liu, N Sharifi-Mood, KJ Stebe. “Curvaturedriven assembly in soft matter,” Philosophical Transaction Royal Society A, 374 (2072), 20150133, (2016) MF Haase, N Sharifi-Mood, D Lee, KJ Stebe, “In Situ Mechanical Testing of Nanostructured Bijel Fibers,” ACS nano, American Chemical Society, (10) 6 6338-6344, 2016. Y Luo, F Serra, DA Beller, MA Gharbi, N Li, S Yang, RD. Kamien, KJ Stebe, “Around the corner: Colloidal assembly and wiring in groovy nematic cells,” Phys. Rev. E, American Physical Society, 93, 032705, 2016. N Li, N Sharifi-Mood, F Tu, D Lee, R Radhakrishnan, T Baumgart, KJ Stebe, “Curvature-driven migration of colloids on tense lipid bilayers,” Langmuir, American Chemical Society, 2016. E Lee, Y Xia, RC Ferrier, H-N Kim, MA Gharbi, KJ Stebe, RD Kamien, RJ Composto, S Yang, “Fine golden rings: Tunable surface plasmon resonance from assembled nanorods in topological defects of liquid crystals,” Adv. Mater., (2016), 28 (14), 2731-2736. L Tran, MO Lavrentovich, DA. Beller, N Li, KJ Stebe3, RD Kamien, “Lassoing saddle-splay: topological control of topological defects,” arXiv preprint arXiv:1602.06992(2016). THR Niepa, L Hou, H Jiang, M Goulian, H Koo, KJ Stebe, D Lee, “Microbial nanoculture as an artificial microniche,” Scientific Reports, 6: 30578 2016. W-S Wei, MA Gharbi, MA Lohr, T Still, MD Gratale, TC Lubensky, KJ Stebe, AG Yodh, “Dynamics of ordered colloidal particle monolayers at nematic liquid crystal interfaces," Soft Matter 12 4715-4724, 2016.

Y Luo, F Serra, KJ Stebe, “Experimental realization of the 'lock-and-key' mechanism in liquid crystals,” Soft Matter 12 (28), 6027-6032, (2016). MF Haase, KJ Stebe, D Lee, “Continuous fabrication of hierarchical and asymmetric bijel microparticles, fibers, and membranes by solvent transfer-induced phase separation (STRIPS),” Advanced Materials, 27, 7065–7071, (2016). Conferences D Wong, IB. Liu, EB Steager, KJ Stebe, V Kumar, “Directed micro assembly of passive particles at fluid interfaces using magnetic robots,” Manipulation, Automation and Robotics at Small Scales (MARSS), International International Conference on 18-22 July 2016. L Tran, MO Lavrentovich, DA Beller, N Li, KJ Stebe, RD Kamien, “Lassoing saddle splay and the geometrical control of topological defects,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, vol. 113, issue 26, pp.7106-7111, 2016. F Serra, Y Luo, S Yang, RD Kamien, KJ Stebe, “Particles and curvatures in nematic liquid crystals,” APS Meeting Abstracts, (2016). Books N Sharifi-Mood, IB Liu, KJ Stebe, “Capillary interactions on fluid interfaces: Opportunities for directed assembly,” Soft Matter SelfAssembly 193, 165, (2016).

Kevin Turner Y Jiang, KT Turner, “Measurement of the strength and range of adhesion using atomic force microscopy,” Extreme Mechanics Letters 9, 119-126, 2016. DS Grierson, FS Flack, MG Lagally, KT Turner, “Rolling-based direct-transfer printing: A process for large-area transfer of micro-and nanostructures onto flexible substrates,” Journal of Applied Physics 120 (9), 093103,1, 2016. CH Pi, KT Turner, ”Design, analysis, and characterization of stress-engineered 3D microstructures comprised of PECVD silicon oxide and nitride,” Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering 26 (6), 065010, 2016. KT Turner, P Vukkadala, JK Sinha, ”Models to relate wafer geometry measurements to inplane distortion of wafers,” Journal of Micro/ Nanolithography, MEMS, and MOEMS 15 (2), 021404-021404, 2016. K Davami, Y Jiang, J Cortes, C Lin, M Shaygan, KT Turner, I Bargatin, ”Tuning the mechanical properties of vertical graphene sheets through atomic layer deposition,” Nanotechnology 27 (15), 155701,2, 2016. K Davami, Y Jiang, C Lin, J Cortes, JT Robinson, KT Turner, I Bargatin, “Modification of mechanical properties of vertical graphene sheets via fluorination,” RSC Advances 6 (14), 11161-11166,1, 2016. J Considine, F Pierron, KT Turner, ”Use of VFM for heterogeneity evaluation of materials under uniaxial tensile stress,“ Experimental and Applied Mechanics, Volume 4, 61-66, 2016. Conferences JL Hor, Y Jiang, KT Turner, D Lee, ”Thermally induced infiltration of polymer into nanoparticle packings,” APS Meeting Abstracts, 2016.


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

John Vohs DA Bennett, M Cargnello, BT Diroll, CB Murray, JM Vohs, “Shape-dependence of the thermal and photochemical reactions of methanol on nanocrystalline anatase TiO2,” Surface Science, North-Holland, (654) 1-7, 2016. Y Zhao, T-S Oh, Y Li, JM Vohs, RJ Gorte, “Fabrication of MnCo2O4-YSZ Composite cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells by electrodeposition,” Journal of Electrochemical Society, 163 (8), F863-F866, (2016). Y Cheng, SY Anthony, X Li, T-S Oh, JM Vohs, RJ Gorte, “Preparation of SOFC cathodes by infiltration into LSF-YSZ composite scaffolds,” Journal of Electrochemical Society, 163(2), F54-F58, (2016). Karen Winey TW Gaines, EB Trigg, KI Winey, KB Wagener, “High melting precision sulfone polyethylenes synthesized by ADMET chemistry,” Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics 217 (21), 2351-2359,1, 2016. LR Middleton, EB Trigg, E Schwartz, KL Opper, TW Baughman, KB Wagener, KI Winey, “Role of periodicity and acid chemistry on the morphological evolution and strength in precise polyethylenes,” Macromolecules 49 (21), 82098218,1, 2016. W-S Tung, PJ Griffin, JS Meth, N Clarke, RJ Composto, KI Winey, “Temperaturedependent suppression of polymer diffusion in polymer nanocomposites,” ACS Macro Lett., (2016), 5 (6), pp 735–739. PJ Griffin, V Bocharova, LR Middleton, RJ Composto, N Clarke, KS Schweizer, KI Winey, “Influence of the bound polymer layer on nanoparticle diffusion in polymer melts,” ACS Macro Lett., 2016, 5 (10), pp 1141–1145 . KC Bustillo, O Panova, C Gammer, EB Trigg, XC Chen, L Yan, NP Balsara, KI Winey, AM Minor, ”Development of diffraction scanning techniques for beam sensitive polymers,” Microscopy and Microanalysis 22 (S3), 492-493. S Sharick, J Koski, RA Riggleman, KI Winey, ”Isolating the effect of molecular weight on ion transport of non-ionic diblock copolymer/ionic liquid mixtures,” Macromolecules 49 (6), 22452256,2, 2016.

PJ Griffin, GB Salmon, J Ford, KI Winey, ”Predicting the solution morphology of a sulfonated pentablock copolymer in binary solvent mixtures,” Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics 54 (2), 254-262,3, 2016. A Karatrantos, N Clarke, RJ Composto, KI Winey, “Entanglements in polymer nanocomposites containing spherical nanoparticles,” Soft Matter, (2016), 12, 2567-2574. JR Nykaza, Y Ye, RL Nelson, AC Jackson, FL Beyer, EM Davis, K Page, S Sharick, KI Winey, YA Elabd, “Polymerized ionic liquid diblock copolymers: impact of water/ion clustering on ion conductivity,“ Soft matter 12 (4), 11331144,5,2016

Shu Yang F Serra, S Yang, "Liquid crystals: Material defect lines," Nature Materials 15,10–11 (2016). V Kunin, S Yang, Y Cho, P Deymier, DJ Srolovitz, "Static and dynamic elastic properties of fractalcut materials," Extreme Mechanics Letters 6, 103–114,1, 2016. C Liu, S-C Liao, J Song, MG Mauk, X Li, G Wu, D Ge, RM Greenberg, S Yang, HH Bau, “A high-efficiency superhydrophobic plasma separator,” Lab on a Chip, Royal Society of Chemistry, (16)3 553-560, 2016.

TW Gaines, EB Trigg, KI Winey, KB Wagener, “High melting precision sulfone polyethylenes synthesized by ADMET chemistry,” Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics, 217 (21), 2345-2345.

Y Xia, E Lee, H Hu, MA Gharbi, DA Beller, E-K Fleischmann, RD. Kamien, R Zentel, S Yang, “Better actuation through chemistry: using surface coatings to create uniform director fields in nematic liquid crystal elastomers,” ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces, 2016, 8 (19), pp 12466–12472, 2016.

J Pressly, R Riggleman, K Winey, “Structure and dynamics of polymers in cylindrical nanoconfinement: A molecular dynamics study,” APS March Meeting Abstracts, 2016.

S Yang, IS Choi, RD Kamien, "Design of superconformable, foldable materials via fractal cuts and lattice kirigami," MRS Bulletin 41 (2), 130-138,4, 2016.

P Griffin, WS Tung, J Meth, N Clarke, R Composto, K Winey, “Role of entropic barriers in controlling polymer diffusion in polystyrene nanocomposites,” APS March Meeting Abstracts, 2016.

E Lee, Y Xia, RC Ferrier, H-N Kim, MA Gharbi, KJ Stebe, RD Kamien, RJ Composto, S Yang, “Fine golden rings: Tunable surface plasmon resonance from assembled nanorods in topological defects of liquid crystals,” Adv. Mater., (2016), 28 (14), 2731-2736.

EB Trigg, MJ Stevens, KI Winey, “Crystal structures of precise functional copolymers: atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and comparisons with experiments,” APS Meeting Abstracts, 2016.

Y Cho, TS Shim, S Yang, "Spatially selective nucleation and growth of water droplets on hierarchically patterned polymer surfaces," Advanced Materials 7 (17), 1433–1439,6, 2016.

P Griffin, N Clarke, R Composto, K Winey, “Effects of attractive interactions on nanoparticle diffusion in entangled polymer melts,” APS Meeting Abstracts, 2016.

Y Luo, F Serra, DA Beller, MA Gharbi, N Li, S Yang, RD Kamien, KJ Stebe, "Around the corner: Colloidal assembly and wiring in groovy nematic cells," Physical Review E 93 (3), 032705,4, 2016.

K Winey, “Polymer melt diffusion inside nanoscale cylindrical pores,” APS March Meeting Abstracts, 2016.

B Cao, G Wu, Y Xia, S Yang, "Buckling into singlehanded chiral structures from pH-sensitive hydrogel membranes," Extreme Mechanics Letters 7, 49–54,1, 2016.

EB Trigg, LR Middleton, BS Aitken, J Azoulay, D Murtagh, KB Wagener, J Cordaro, KI Winey, “Morphological evolution during tensile deformation in semi-crystalline precise functional copolymers via fitting of in situ xray scattering,” APS March Meeting Abstracts, 2016.

X Yang, D Ge, G Wu, Z Liao, S Yang, "Production of structural colors with high contrast and wide viewing angles from assemblies of polypyrrole black coated polystyrene nanoparticles," ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces 8 (25), 16289– 16295,1, 2016.

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2016-2017 Publications

Selected Publications from Singh Center for Nanotechnology Researchers

Y Xia, G Cedillo-Servin, RD Kamien, S Yang, “Guided folding of nematic liquid crystal elastomer sheets into 3D via patterned 1D microchannels,” Advanced Material, (28) 43 9637-9643, 2016. BM Jun, F Serra, Y Xia, HS Kang, S Yang, "Fabrication of free-standing, self-aligned, highaspect-ratio synthetic ommatidia," ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces 8 (45), 30671–30676, 2016. F Serra, Y Luo, S Yang, RD Kamien, KJ Stebe, "Particles and curvatures in nematic liquid crystals," APS Meeting Abstracts, 2016. A Darafsheh, G Wu, S Yang, JC Finlay, "Super-resolution optical microscopy by using dielectric microwires," SPIE BiOS, 97130U-97130U-5,5, 2016.

Arjun Yodh MD Gratale, X Ma, ZS Davidson, T Still, P Habdas, AG Yodh, “Vibrational properties of quasi-twodimensional colloidal glasses with varying interparticle attraction,” Physical Review E, American Physical Society, (94) 4 042606, 2016. MD Gratale, T Still, C Matyas, ZS Davidson, S Lobel, PJ Collings, AG Yodh, “Tunable depletion potentials driven by shape variation of surfactant micelles,” Physical Review E, American Physical Society, (93) 5 050601, 2016. W-S Wei, MA Gharbi, MA Lohr, T Still, MD Gratale, TC Lubensky, KJ Stebe, AG Yodh, “Dynamics of ordered colloidal particle monolayers at nematic liquid crystal interfaces," Soft Matter 12 4715-4724, 2016. P Habdas, M Gratale, Z Davidson, T Still, AG Yodh, “Particle dynamics and vibrational properties of disordered colloidal packings with varying interparticle attraction strength,” APS Meeting Abstracts, 2016. A Gross, ZS Davidson, Y Huang, T Still, C Zhou, AG Yodh, “Drying, phase separation, and deposition in droplets of sunset yellow chromonic liquid crystal,” APS Meeting Abstracts, 2016. W-S Wei, Y Xia, S Yang, AG Yodh, “Thermoresponsive cross-linked liquid crystal bowlshaped colloids,” APS Meeting Abstracts, 2016. ZS Davidson, T Still, MD Gratale, X Ma, SS Schoenholz, DM Sussman, AJ Liu, AG Yodh, “Rearrangement dynamics in colloidal particle packings identified through local structure and machine-learning,” APS Meeting Abstracts, 2016. B Machielse, MD Gratale, ZS Davidson, A Yodh, “Transitions in colloidal crystals induced by changes in interparticle interactions,” APS Meeting Abstracts, 2016. A Martinez, PJ Collings, AG Yodh, “Brownian dynamics of colloidal particles in lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals,” APS Meeting Abstracts, 2016.


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The Singh Center Key Personnel Mark G. Allen Scientific Director Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology Noah Clay Director, Quattrone Nanofabrication Facility Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology nclay@seas.upenn.edu Matthew Brukman Director, Scanning and Local Probe Facility Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology mbrukman@seas.upenn.edu Douglas M. Yates Director, Nanoscale Characterization Facility Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology dmyates@seas.upenn.edu

John Russell Program Coordinator Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology jrussell@seas.upenn.edu Pat Watson Director of User Programs Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology gewatson@seas.upenn.edu Shannon Migdal Marketing Director Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology smigdal@seas.upenn.edu Christopher Montowski Building Administrator Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology montowsk@seas.upenn.edu Kristin L. Field Director of Programs Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology kfield@seas.upenn.edu

Credits Photos by John Carlano Photos by John Russell Photos by Albert Vecerka/Esto All rights reserved. Photos by Felice Macera Design by Group M


2016-2017 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology


Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology University of Pennsylvania 3205 Walnut Street Philadelphia, PA 19104 Website: www.nano.upenn.edu Email: info@nano.upenn.edu Visit us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/singhcenternano/ Follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/UPennSinghNano

2016 2017 Singh Center for Nanotechnology Annual Report  
2016 2017 Singh Center for Nanotechnology Annual Report  

The 2016-2017 Singh Center for Nanotechnology at the University of Pennsylvania Annual Report, chronicling the research accomplishments and...