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MAY 2004

CHANTICLEER: AN ORCHESTRA

OF

VOICES


FROM THE NATIONAL PRESIDENT RICHARD A. CROSBY

Dear Brothers, Amid all the rush of activity in our personal and professional lives, I wanted to take a moment, if I may, and have another little fireside conference with you. So, for a moment at least, let’s put aside the noise of the world and consider the nature and the goals of our dear Sinfonia. In my last column I spoke about the importance of Brotherhood and of our goal of building better men. By restoring the Object we have put Brotherhood back in its primary place in our pantheon of values. But, lest we all forget, this is not enough. We are a brotherhood of men of music, not just a brotherhood such as our counterparts in other fraternities. What is the difference? Music! Music must be the beneficiary of the brotherhood that we build. All of us, whether a performer, composer, teacher, or someone who is simply interested in furthering the cause of music, must redouble our efforts to promote music as a powerful tool for the uplift of mankind. Since the ancient Greeks, from Orpheus through Pythagoras and Plato, much has been said about the power of music to affect the human condition. The ancients had the “Doctrine of Ethos” which held that certain musical modes or tunings could affect human morals and character. In fact, at the dawn of the 20th century, our own Father Mills, through his “Flower Missions,” with which he took musicians to hospitals in Boston, was on the cutting edge of what we now call music therapy. The Mills Music Mission is now the official philanthropy of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Fraternity, and I encourage all chapters, alumni associations, and any significant gathering of Sinfonians to take part in one of these moments of outreach. I will never forget the story of the Mills Music Mission to a hospital in Evansville by the CPRs’ Council several years ago: the CPRs sang to a young girl who had an erratic heartbeat that stabilized while they were singing to her, much to the amazement of her mother. Music has the power to focus our minds, to temporarily shut out not only the noise of the outside world, but also the sound of our own mental chatter. Most of you can probably think back to a time when, listening to a concert or a recording, you noticed that time seemed to stand still. You weren’t dwelling on the past or fretting about the future—you were totally caught up in the “now.” Art can do that, and art is one of the things that make us human: no other creatures on earth have art. And music is “the purest art.” My colleagues on the National Executive Committee and I are working with our Music Outreach Committee to suggest ways that we as a Brotherhood might use our talents on the local and national levels, and we are also exploring some exciting musical possibilities for our 2006 National Convention in Cleveland. In the meantime, it is my fervent hope that you will do your part, as Brothers united in the common vision of our Object, to share the gift of music, not only with each other, but with mankind. Without music, we are incomplete. And the world needs what we have to offer, Brothers. Let us fare onward. Affectionately, and Fraternally yours in ΦΜΑ,

VOLUME LII, ISSUE 2 First printed as the Sinfonia Year Book in 1901. Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia was founded October 6, 1898, at the New England Conservatory in Boston, Massachusetts. Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia has initiated over 140,000 members since 1898. The Object of this Fraternity shall be for the development of the best and truest fraternal spirit; the mutual welfare and brotherhood of musical students; the advancement of music in America and a loyalty to the Alma Mater.

REVERED FOUNDERS Ossian E. Mills (1856-1 1920) “Father of the Sinfonia” Robert T. Bayley, Frederick W. Briggs, George A. Burdich, Henry P. Dreyer, George S. Dunham, Archie M. Gardner, John F. Hartwell, William C. Holcomb, Albert J. Stephens, Frank Leslie Stone, Shirley F. Stupp, William E. Tanner, Delbert Webster

NATIONAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE National President Richard A. Crosby, Eta-O Omicron ‘75 president@sinfonia.org

National Vice President Robert N. Whitmoyer, Lambda Beta ‘77 vp@sinfonia.org Committeeman-At-Large John Mongiovi, Upsilon Psi ‘94 committeeman-jm@sinfonia.org Committeeman-At-Large Derek J. Danilson, Beta Nu ‘91 committeeman-dd@sinfonia.org National Collegiate Representative James T. Mann, Jr., Gamma Theta ‘99 ncr@sinfonia.org Chair, PGs’ Council Mark R. Lichtenberg, Delta Nu ‘93 pgchair@sinfonia.org Chair, CPRs’ Council Walter C. Riley, Zeta Iota ‘98 cprchair@sinfonia.org

LYRECREST STAFF

Executive Director Ryan T. Ripperton, Alpha Rho ‘95 ripperton@sinfonia.org • Ext.24

Director of Programs and Services Terrell L. Weatherford, Eta Alpha ‘98 weatherford@sinfonia.org • Ext.26

Retreat Coordinator Sean N. Leno, Phi Omega ‘00 leno@sinfonia.org • Ext.28

Administrative Coordinator Cheri F. Spicer (ΚΚΙ) spicer@sinfonia.org • Ext.23

Financial Clerk Tami L. Kleiman kleiman@sinfonia.org • Ext.27

Richard A. Crosby, Eta-Omicron ‘75 National President

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Programs and Services Assistant Becky L. Kamp kamp@sinfonia.org • Ext.30


TABLE OF CONTENTS SINFONIAN MAGAZINE - MAY 2004

PROVINCE GOVERNORS AND C O L L E G I AT E P R O V I N C E R E P R E S E N TAT I V E S 1

New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Connecticut PG Dr. J. Craig Davis CPR James V. Bilodeau

2

Michigan, Northern Ohio PG Vacant CPR Christopher M. Baumgartner

3

Central and Southern Ohio PG J. Wesley Flinn

CPR

Ryan P. Allen

4

Arkansas PG

CPR

Peter Bazzano

Brent A. Shires

FROM THE NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

SINFONIA SONGS RECORDING FESTIVAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

CHANTICLEER: AN ORCHESTRA

OF

VOICES

AND

SO MUCH MORE . . . . 6

5

Southern Illinois, Southeastern Missouri, Southwestern Indiana PG Mark R. Lichtenberg CPR Aaron E. Sisson

6

Nebraska, Western Iowa PG Dr. Daniel L. Schmidt

CPR

Brett A. Lyon

7

Kansas, Colorado PG Dr. Bruce E. Gbur

CPR

Jeremy L. Albright

8

Oklahoma PG

CPR

Kyle M. Winn

9

Southern Texas PG Dr. Robert Whalin

CPR

Brian D. Foley

10

Idaho, Oregon, Washington PG Douglas Evans

CPR

Robin S. Bruce-Aijian

11

Northern California PG Dr. Graydon McGrannahan III CPR Aldie Lopez

PERCY JEWETT BURRELL : A LIFE LIVED FOR OTHERS . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

12

Eastern Tennessee PG Ashley E. Glenn

CPR

Aaron W. Smith

13

Southern and Central Florida PG Joe Ritchie

REMEMBERING OUR NEIGHBOR: FRED ROGERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

CPR

Rafael Ramirez, Jr.

14

Louisiana PG

CPR

Eric T. Engelhardt

15

Middle, West Tennessee and Western Kentucky PG Dr. R. Wayne Pope CPR

Joshua R. Baldwin

David W. Campo

Brian M. Stratton

16

Northern Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota, Northern South Dakota PG Dr. Alan D. LaFave CPR Rex A. Batie

17

Upstate New York, Northern Pennsylvania PG Angus C. Godwin CPR

J. Michael Spencer

18

Virginia PG

David L. Davis

CPR

Matthew R. Garber

19

Missouri PG

Brandon L. Henson

CPR

John M. Israel

CPR

Travis D. Tester

A CONVERSATION

WITH

DAVID A. KLINGSHIRN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

ASPIRING TO EXCEL : A NEW BOOK

BY

DR. KENNETH R. RAESSLER. . . 15

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 On the cover: Chanticleer; photo by Lisa Kohler.

20

North Carolina PG K. Dean Shatley II

21

Northeast Ohio, Central and Western Pennsylvania PG Robert N. Whitmoyer CPR Robert M. Babick

22

Southern California PG Bincins C. Garcia

CPR

Peter H. Tupou

23

Northwestern Texas, Eastern New Mexico PG Dr. Robert J. Krause CPR

Benjamin Torres

24

Mississippi PG

CPR

Matthew S. Hillman

25

Central and Eastern Kentucky PG Dr. Richard A. Crosby

CPR

Russell A. Kahmann

26

Iowa, Northwestern Illinois, Southern Minnesota PG Calvin Van Niewaal CPR Jeffrey N. Lyden

27

Northern Virginia, West Virginia, Southeast Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, District of Columbia PG Derek J. Danilson CPR Matthew J. Williams

28

Northern Illinois, Northern and Central Indiana PG Brian L. Swart CPR

29

Southeastern Minnesota, Wisconsin, Northern Michigan PG Dr. Barry L. Ellis CPR Charles R. Kunz

30

South Carolina, Eastern Georgia PG Dr. Bruce A. Thompson

CPR

Jesse Robert Cooper

32

North Central, Northeast Texas PG Kevin L. McNerney

CPR

Jason D. Baker

Northern and Central Georgia PG Jay Davis

PHI MU ALPHA SINFONIA FRATERNITY NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS

CPR

Isaac Wimberly

10600 OLD STATE ROAD • EVANSVILLE, INDIANA 47711-1399

Alabama PG

CPR

Steven W. Estell

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Dr. Rolland H. Shaw

Tony Cowan

Bill J. White

36

Northern Florida, Southern Georgia PG Christopher H. Lawrence CPR

Joshua T. McCormill

37

Northern and Central Illinois PG Brian S. Martin

John A. Ferguson

CPR

The Sinfonian is the official publication of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Fraternity of America, Inc. Current months for publication are December and May. The submission of articles and pictures from alumni and chapters is strongly urged and gratefully accepted. Please submit original, clear photographs - either black and white or color - and articles that are clearly typed. All written materials may be sent via the USPS or other postal services to the National Headquarters, Attention: Contributing Editor. Written materials may also be sent via email in Word format to editor@sinfonia.org. Photographs may also be sent via email to editor@sinfonia.org preferably as a .tif file or a high-resolution .jpg file. Deadlines for all submissions are: May Issue - March 1; December Issue October 1. The Sinfonian reserves the right to edit all submissions for length and content.

Editor-In-Chief: Managing Editor / Design: Contributing Editor:

Ryan T. Ripperton, Alpha Rho ‘95 Jeremy A. Korba, Epsilon Upsilon ‘96 Cheri F. Spicer, KKI

PHI MU ALPHA SINFONIA IS A MEMBER OF THE COLLEGE FRATERNITY EDITORS ASSOCIATION

TOLL-FREE: (800) 473-2649 FAX: (812) 867-0633 WWW.SINFONIA .ORG

WWW.LYRECREST.NET

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FROM THE NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS 10600 OLD STATE ROAD

WORK WEEKEND: MAY 14-16

KORBA LEAVES HEADQUARTERS STAFF

The annual Lyrecrest Work Weekend will be held on the weekend of May 14-16, 2004. Each year, collegiate and alumni brothers from all over the country gather at Lyrecrest to volunteer their time to beautify the buildings and grounds. Participation in this volunteer event enables the National Headquarters to maintain this “Home For All Sinfonians” on its very limited resources. Participants need only get themselves to Evansville - all meals and accommodations will be provided. Can you attend? Please contact Sean Leno, Retreat Coordinator, at (800) 473-2649, ext. 28, to inform him of the time of your arrival and the number of brothers you can bring with you!

Jeremy A. Korba, Director of Finance and Marketing, left the National Headquarters staff on April 8, 2004. Jeremy served on the Lyrecrest Staff for five years, during which time he helped the Fraternity’s marketing and merchandising programs flourish. Look for more information on Jeremy’s future plans in the December 2004 issue. Jeremy may be contacted at jkorba@regentpromotions.com.

POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: DIRECTOR OF ALUMNI AFFAIRS APPLICATIONS DUE MAY 15 Title: Responsibilities:

Director of Alumni Affairs The Director of Alumni Affairs shall administer the Fraternity's alumnifocused programs and services. Eligibility: Must be a Sinfonian in good standing possessing a Bachelor's degree in any field (marketing and/or public relations a plus). Experience with Microsoft Office a must. Must have a vehicle and be able to lift at least 50 pounds. Benefits include: Salary commensurate with experience, health insurance, 401K, paid vacation/personal time-off. Schedule: Full-time. Anticipated start date: July 1, 2004 Application deadline: May 15, 2004

A full position description is available in PDF format at http://www.lyrecrest.net/DAA-description.pdf. Contact Ryan T. Ripperton, Executive Director, at ripperton@sinfonia.org or (800) 473-2649 ext. 24 for more information. To apply, please send résumé, cover letter, contact information for three references, and a detailed history of Fraternity experience to: Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Fraternity National Headquarters Attn: Director of Alumni Affairs Search 10600 Old State Road Evansville, IN 47711-1 1399

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Thanks, Jeremy!

RITUAL EDUCATION WORKSHOP: JUNE 25-27 The first Ritual Education Workshop will be held at the National Headquarters on June 25-27, 2004. This intensive look at Sinfonia's Ritual, history, and symbols will include an examination of the following topics: • • • • • • • • • • • • •

The history of Sinfonia and its evolving philosophy The Object and its relationship to the Ritual Ritual Revisions Throughout Sinfonia's History The Mills Memorial Sinfonia Symbols The Authors of the Ritual The Structure of the Ritual The Message of the Ritual Ritual Staging Ritual Regalia and Paraphernalia Number Symbolism The Founder and Early Members of Sinfonia The Mysteries, from the Ancients to Sinfonia

Complete information on this event, including application procedures and forms, can be obtained at http://www.lyrecrest.net/RitualEd2004.pdf.

CHAPTER OPERATIONS WORKSHOP: JULY 23-25 A Chapter Operations Workshop will be held at the National Headquarters on July 23-25, 2004, with the goal of giving chapter officers the tools needed to become increasingly more successful in all areas of their daily operations. Topics will include: • • • • • • • • • •

Recruitment Chapter Retreats Alumni Relations Chapter Citations Chapter Leadership/Management Province Interaction Special Projects Battling Apathy Choosing your Faculty Advisor(s) Creating a Presence on Campus

Complete information on the Chapter Operations Workshop, including application procedures and forms, can be obtained at http://www.lyrecrest.net/ChapterOpsWorkshop.pdf.


SINFONIA SONGS RECORDING FESTIVAL TO BE HELD JULY 18-21 The Fraternity is endeavoring to create a new CD recording of the complete Sinfonia Songs book from cover-to-cover. In addition to seeking recordings of selected songs from chapters and alumni associations (see page 27), the Fraternity is hosting a special recording festival at the National Headquarters. You could come to this once-in-alifetime, fun-filled, three-day experience! The assembled chorus will be rehearsed and conducted by Brian M. Stratton, Delta Omega (Southeastern Louisiana University) ‘79. Brother Stratton is in his twenty-fifth year of professional singing — a career in which he has performed several operas and appeared as oratorio soloist with choral organizations throughout the United States and Europe. Stratton has recorded several CDs and a video of spirituals with the renowned Moses Hogan Chorale and Singers, and the Mormon Tabernacle Choir featured Stratton on their recording recognizing the contributions of the Negro spiritual to American music. Brother Stratton presently serves Sinfonia as Governor of Province 14 (Louisiana) and has served as National Vice President (1997-2000). To spend three days with Brother Stratton perfecting the songs that all Sinfonians hold dear is an experience that no one could soon forget! Here’s how you can be a part of this unique experience: Date: Sunday – Wednesday, July 18 – 21, 2004 (attendees must be available for the entire period). Selection Criteria: The main selection criteria will be intonation and tone. You don’t have to be an operatic soloist to be on this recording... We are looking for voices to blend into the group, not stick out of it! Selection Goal: Approximately 24 brothers will be selected – six per vocal part. Application Procedure: Each brother interested must submit a recording (on compact disc or cassette) containing the following material: 1) Speak your name, initiating chapter (and current chapter, if different, or alumni association), and voice part. 2) Sing your part, either unaccompanied or accompanied by piano (playing all four vocal parts from the Sinfonia Songs book), to the following two Sinfonia Songs: “Vive L’Amour” (p.90; include the “solos,” which are written in the Tenor II part) and “A Sinfonian Grace” (p.84). If accompanied, your voice must be heard clearly over the piano.

3) Sing a scale of your choosing which demonstrates the extremes of your vocal range (if bass, low range should be featured; if tenor, upper range should be featured). This scale can be sung on any syllable, solfeggio, numbers, etc. 4) Optional: You may include another one-minute piece of your choosing that you feel demonstrates your singing ability. This could be anything – another Sinfonia Song, a church hymn, your part from a choral piece, a solo, etc. Please remember that we aren’t looking for a perfect performance! These recordings are meant only to evaluate the tone and intonation of your voice in order to gauge your ability to blend into the group. Any brother with a good voice, regardless of major or experience, will be evaluated equally for selection! Label the case cover of your recording with your name and full contact information (telephone numbers, email and mailing addresses, including information for the summer months). Application Deadline: Recordings (which can be submitted on compact disc or cassette) must be received at the National Headquarters by Saturday, May 15, 2004. Late application recordings will be considered only for alternate positions (in the event that a selected singer cancels his attendance). Those selected will be notified as soon as possible after June 10, 2004. Financial Considerations: All attendees will be responsible for paying for their own travel to and from the National Headquarters, as well as a $20 registration fee upon arrival (which will be used to purchase food for approximately ½ of the meals). All other meals will be on your own. Lodging in the guest cottage will be provided. All attendees will receive a complimentary copy of the final 2-disc set.

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The Many Facets of a Philanthropist A Conversation with David A. Klingshirn by Cheri Faith Spicer, Contributing Editor Convinced the time was ripe to celebrate the United States’ significant contributions to the field of classical music, long-time Cincinnati civic leader David A. Klingshirn founded the American Classical Music Hall of Fame in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1995. He served as Founder and Executive Director of the Hall of Fame from April 1995 to July 2000. On July 19, 2003, he was initiated as a National Honorary Member at Sinfonia’s 51st National Convention, joining many other famous Sinfonians in the prestigious National Honorary Alpha Alpha Chapter. Since that time, Klingshirn has been pursuing yet another avenue in his life. On April 24, 2004, he will be ordained a deacon in the Catholic Church in the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. When I started trying to find David, I learned he was away on a retreat at Mt. St. Mary’s Seminary of the West. And unlike the retreats we host here at Lyrecrest, his was one of silence! SINFONIAN: So, a retreat of 100 hours of silence? KLINGSHIRN: Yes! And I tell you what - we had options. We could either remain silent or we could not remain silent. I would sit at lunch or dinner or any meal, or in different lectures, and the things people say!!! You really kind of analyze it and think - “There was really no need to say that,” or “What a dumb thing to say.” We are so used to living in such a talking society that half of the class had their cell phones on their desk and would constantly look to see if they had any messages. You know, if you really want inner peace, you need to find that total solitude within your soul. I don’t think we’re a society anymore that appreciates that. I feel sorry for children when it comes to this concept. This is where music is going to have to come in and help re-sensitize people. You need to sit back and just listen and let that music take your soul and search it. If you always have to have a headset on or your cell phone, where it will ultimately lead you? Why do we have to have so much instant communication? Exactly! I was just doing a “David Time-line:” 30 years of work in the pharmacy field; then, 10 years dealing basically with the cultural affairs - and especially the Classical Music Hall of Fame; and now, the church. What an interesting progression! My questions are how and why things turned to take you where you now find yourself. All 3 of those are in ministry. You know, helping people in pharmacy is a wonderful ministry. I mean, the way you talk

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to an ill patient on the phone can either help them or... They’ll call me and they’ll say, over their pain medication, they’re terminal, and I can say to them “You know, I think your voice sounds stronger today” and they’ll say, “well, you know, I thought I felt better.” But just kind of reaffirm where people are and that makes a big difference. The Gallup Poll, for the last 20 years, rated pharmacists #1 in public trust. You will swallow anything a pharmacist gives you. You don’t really question it. A mother will come in with a 3- or 4-day old baby and she’ll get a medication for the most precious thing in her life. She’s going to just accept it and put that chemical in that baby. In pharmacy, you either do it right or you do it wrong. You don’t ever fill a prescription half right and it gives you a different perspective on life. And I wish our politicians would kind of follow that, you know. Well, you know, I think it’s their view. I don’t think they view what they do as truly serving others. They all seem to be working out of a self-service motivation. And you can’t be a real bastard at home and be a politician and just be everybody’s wonderful person. We have a situation here in Cincinnati right now. A man running for commissioner and he left his wife while she was pregnant - with a 1 year old and a 3 year old also. And it was brought out in the campaign that he was having an affair with one of the lobbyists that he had to vote on and he says it makes no difference. And you want to say, “Hey if you cheat on your unborn child you’re going to cheat on me as a politician?” But he doesn’t get that. So it’s going to be interesting to see if he wins or if he loses. If Society says, “Yes, you can cheat on your unborn child and your children and we trust you” Well... you know… I have a really hard time when people try to draw the line and say that the personal/private life of an individual doesn’t affect what he does professionally. It does – it just does. Yeah, it does - because if you have no scruples about cheating on your children, you’re not going to have many scruples about some pay-offs either. I’ve seen in that in your life there have been definite themes and streams, but you’ve taken them in so many different directions. What inspired you or maybe who inspired you to become as philanthropic as you are? And I don’t mean philanthropic in just monetary giving, but rather your entire


Photo by Lisa Kohler

CHANTICLEER An Orchestra of Voices

and So Much More by David L. Roush, Alpha Zeta (Penn State) ‘01


Photo courtesy of the Recording Academy ® (Photo by Larry Busacca WireImage/NARAS © 2003)

F

Four brothers are making their mark on the music world as part of San Francisco’s all-male vocal ensemble, “Chanticleer.” Music director Joe Jennings, Pi Upsilon (Colorado State) ‘79; alto Clifton Massey, Delta Mu, (Texas Christian) ‘93; tenor and Assistant Music Director Matthew Oltman, Pi (Simpson) ‘95; and bass Eric Alatorre, Omicron Pi (Cal State-Fullerton) ‘84 make up four members of this premier group. The group gets its name from the “clear-singing” rooster in Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. The twelvevoice a cappella ensemble sings an eclectic mix of music reaching as far back as early Renaissance and Gregorian chant to contemporary jazz, gospel and folk music. “It encompasses a variety of styles,” according to Jennings. “The real big distinguishing part was that we use countertenors. For Chanticleer that’s a traditional male voice part. We use the whole range of possibilities for the male voice.” The group sings mostly SATB repertoire. Chanticleer was founded in 1978 by Louis Botto. The group has flourished for over a quarter-century and has seen nearly 80 singers cycle through its ranks. They began touring in 1981 and today can be heard in venues around the world. Chanticleer has won a variety of awards, the most significant being their 2000 Grammy for the “Colors of Love” album and their two Grammy Awards for “Lamentations and Praises” in 2003. Alatorre was at the Grammy Awards with the group in 2000. He says they had absolutely no expectation of winning. “We went to lose politely and have fun at the party,” Alatorre says. “But the moment they announced our names, everything went into this weird spin, and it was a completely surreal and unexpected moment. I was sort of ‘lost’ from that point on.” The 14-year Chanticleer veteran adds, “It’s like the Grammys are something you see on TV, it’s not something you’re part of. But there I was on stage looking into the audience and it was just bizarre.” Chanticleer won the ASCAP-Chorus America Award for adventurous programming of contemporary music. They also received a National Citation from Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, both in 1994. An in-depth history and biography of the group can be found on their website, www.chanticleer.org.

A Vision for Chanticleer A consistent point that comes up in talking to Chanticleer singers is the expertise and direction of Music Director Joe Jennings. Asked exactly Joseph Jennings, Music Director, what his vision leads rehearsal. for the group is, Jennings has a basic, yet pointed response. “To sing good music,” Jennings says with a laugh, “...as well as we can.” He adds, “It’s our approach to music. We try to approach it from the inside out and be as true to it as we possibly can, no matter what style it is.” Jennings says that because they sing early music through contemporary music, Chanticleer tends to trace the evolution of music through history. “The whole idea is that we exist as one instrument... twelve voices as a soloist,” Jennings says. Jennings points out that it is the challenges that come along with his job that keep him with the group. He says that until the day comes when he no longer has music in front of him that is “waiting its turn” to be performed, his job is not finished. “It’s just about making music and making it available to as many people as we can reach with it; and let music do what music does to and for people.”

A Day in the Life of Chanticleer So what makes singing in Chanticleer different from other ensembles? For starters, it is a full-time job, and unlike most choirs, the singers receive full-time benefits and a regular salary. “What appealed to me the most was the idea of making a living solely as a singer without having to constantly be worried about where the next gig is coming from; To actually be employed, salaried as a singer,” tenor Matt Oltman says. Singers Jesse Antin, Justin Montigne, Soprano Tim Maguire Matt Oltman, and Brandon Brack agrees. rehearse for the next tour. MAY 2004

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“I feel that I’ve really stumbled onto something wonderful, here. Not many musicians get this kind of opportunity, and I think that it’s incredible,” according to Maguire. When not on tour, the group rehearses during the week from 11:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. with an hour lunch break. A small, unsuspecting church in the Mission section of San Francisco is where the group calls “home” during down times. From the outside, the church looks just like the others that dot the neighborhood. However, set foot inside while the group is rehearsing and the ground-floor hall is filled from wall to wall with the trademark Chanticleer sound. At a given rehearsal, singers stroll in, some going through their own individual warm-up routines. They do not have whole-group warm-ups. When touring, work schedules are dictated by the travel itinerary. There is no Chanticleer tour bus or corporate jet. The group flies a commercial airline to the region of their tour and uses a few rental cars to get around between concerts. The same system is used when they are at home in the San Francisco Bay area. On this particular day, rental cars take the group to a high school in Lafayette, California, as part of Chanticleer’s Singing In The Schools Program. The commute provides the opportunity for a pair of interviews from the back seat with Alatorre and bass John Bischoff. Asked if being on the road with the same group of men for an extended period of time builds potential for conflict, the members of the group say that they really do not experience any real head-butting, because of the opportunities for ‘alone time’ while on tour. “It’s like family... we take care of each other,” Alatorre says. “The only ones that are allowed to beat up on each other are the members of the ensemble. (If) anything else happens on the outside to affect the ensemble, we all pull together in a heartbeat.” Alatorre, who is known for his characteristic handle-bar mustache, adds that because of the way the group travels in small clusters, tensions can be eased by moving to another travel cluster every once in a while. Bischoff says that while most of the time spent touring is social, they all get time to separate themselves from a disagreement.

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“Yeah, things can come to a head. People can get in each other’s faces, but then you have room to sort of let it go away and you have time before a concert to focus on the concert and talk about your differences,” Bischoff says. Most of the group members are single. Some are in dating relationships and a few are married. Those with partners say that touring with the group away from home for long periods of time is a test of the strength of their relationships. “You must be comfortable talking on the phone,” according to tenor Brandon Brack, who joins our rental car on the trip back home. He says that touring has placed a stress on his relationship with his partner Jonathan. Brack adds, “If it’s worth it, you do whatever you can to make it work.” Group members say that they notice a difference between those couples who were together before coming to Chanticleer and those who started dating while already in the group. Bischoff is married. He says that his wife has been supportive since the day he decided to audition. She also occasionally comes along for a portion of the tour. “So far it works; it works fine, and I’m glad that she’s supportive.” On days when Chanticleer is not on the road touring, members take their music and their inspiration to the schools of the Bay area through the Chanticleer Education Outreach Program.

Chanticleer Education Outreach Program At a time when school budgets are bleeding red ink, art and music programs in many areas are becoming the first victims of funding cuts. Since 1986, Chanticleer has been using its talent to inspire high school students throughout the Bay area to pursue music or teach them how to take their performance to the next level. Choral teacher Bruce Lengacher of Acalanes High School in Lafayette, California, is thrilled to have Chanticleer work with his students on an on-going basis. “I think it’s a really good relationship that’s mutually


BROTHERS IN THE SPOTLIGHT Joseph Jennings

Students at Acalanes listen to feedback from Chanticleer singer Jesse Antin.

beneficial. It’s invaluable for us,” he says. “It’s great for me as a teacher because it allows me to get constant feedback from a very reliable source.” Lengacher also happens to be a college friend of singer Eric Alatorre. Recalling the exact wording of the Fraternity’s purposes that he learned as a probationary member in 1984, Alatorre says, “I still remember that after 20 years, and I look at what we do, and

“We can tell that they actually want to be here teaching us, and it makes us get more involved in the music and makes us appreciate it more.” ~High school student Jessica Hoffschneider my work with Chanticleer – it’s like we do all of those things and now I see the importance more than I ever could have as a student about what it means to do that. It’s very important that I learned all of that, and it’s still with me after all of those years.” Music director Joe Jennings says that not only do schools benefit from working with Chanticleer, but that the group receives something intangible in return from the students as well. “To be able to experience their joy and enthusiasm which they get from hearing us sing is really kind of indescribable,” Jennings says. Eleventh grader Jessica Hoffschneider says that the students get excited and really do understand the value of the program. “We can tell that they actually want to be here teaching us, and it makes us get more involved in the music and makes us appreciate it more,” she says.

Joe joined Chanticleer 21 years ago as a countertenor, shortly before becoming the music director. 25 recordings and many world tours later, the prolific composer and arranger continues to bring great vision to the group. The Augusta, Georgia, native earned his B.S. in Music Education and B.A. in Piano at Case Western Reserve and his M.M. in conducting from Colorado State. His work has impacted numerous ensembles. In addition to Chanticleer, Joe also leads the Golden Gate Men’s Chorus.

Eric Alatorre Eric is a Chanticleer veteran, a bass with nearly 14 years in the group. The Southern California native attended Cal State-Fullerton and San Francisco State University. Eric is known for his impressive handle-bar mustache, which he says he let grow from a young age, because nobody ever asked him why he was doing it.

Matthew Oltman Matt is a tenor in his fifth season with Chanticleer. The Des Moines, Iowa native earned his B.A. in performance from Simpson College and M.A. in music performance from the University of York, England. The former Simpson professor serves as the Assistant Music Director for Chanticleer and is on the board of directors for the Golden Gate Men’s Chorus.

Clifton Massey Clifton is a first-year Chanticleer alto. Originally from Dallas, Texas, the Texas Christian University graduate has a laundry list of ensembles on his résumé. Clifton is currently a master’s candidate at Indiana University, studying Early Music. Photos by Lisa Kohler

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Photo by Lisa Kohler

Upcoming Concert Dates April 2004 2 Berkeley, CA 13 Baton Rouge, LA 15 Jackson, MS 16 Birmingham, AL 17 Huntsville, AL 19 Princeton, NJ 20 New York, NY 21 Hartford CT 23 Schenectady, NY 24 Clinton, NY 26-27 Norfolk, VA May 2004 2 Vancouver, BC 15 San Francisco, CA 16 Sacramento, CA 19 Carmel, CA 21 San Jose, CA 22 Berkeley, CA 23 San Francisco, CA June 2004 3 Ojai, CA 11 Berkeley, CA Visit www.chanticleer.org for more information.

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The program has three main components: the School Residency Program, the Singing In The Schools Program and the annual Chanticleer Youth Choral Festival. The residency program takes Jennings to participating schools to provide an on-going source of instruction and feedback, allowing the choirs to work and improve between his visits. “When Joe comes in, he doesn’t coddle them. He treats them exactly the way he would, and if anybody gives him attitude he will call them on it,” Lengacher says. “It’s about the music.” ‘Singing In The Schools’ takes the group to a variety of schools to conduct workshops, master classes and miniconcerts. The program is intended to inspire students in grades 5 through 12 to sing, and give expert training to those who already do. 17-year-old Hoffschneider adds, “It’s actually really amazing for all of us (students) because a lot of schools don’t have this opportunity. I think that we’re really fortunate to be able to have them because they are an amazing group.” The annual Youth Choral Festival takes place in late October. It is noncompetitive, and during the festival, students are given the opportunity to work closely with Chanticleer’s Music Director

and singers. The day-long program includes workshops and an evening performance that allows students to share the stage with the group. Student composers have a chance to have their work performed. The winning piece from an annual student composer competition is performed during the festival concert as well. Lengacher says that other performing groups should follow Chanticleer’s lead in giving back to young artists in their areas. “I think there’s a huge message and almost a commitment on many levels. As performers you want to nurture future performers,” Lengacher says. “I think it’s essential.”

Becoming Chanticleer Chanticleer accepts audition tapes and résumés throughout the year, with the cutoff for the following year happening in early January. After listening to and closely scrutinizing each applicant, Jennings has to select only the ones who stand out significantly and call them back for second auditions in San Francisco. Purely by chance, Jennings is interviewed on the day of callbacks, shortly


“It’s just about making music and making it available to as many people as we can reach with it; and let music do what music does to and for people.”

on how many choose to leave. The group is consistently held at twelve voices. More information on how to audition can be found on Chanticleer’s website.

Experiencing Chanticleer

Chanticleer performs a series of hometown concerts throughout the Bay area. Sitting in the lobby before the performance allows for an observation of the “buzz” among attendees. Clusters of people chat with each other. Many conversations center around how great the group sounds and recollections of prior performances. ~Chanticleer Music Director Joseph Jennings At this venue, singers become furniture movers, as the church altar must be rearranged prior to the after making them. show. There is no “backstage,” so singers use the lower“I usually do the callback calls,” according to Jennings. level of the church to prepare. A light spread of refreshAsked what kind of reactions he gets from people on this ments await the singers, and the same casual banter among day, Jennings laughs. members abounds. “I got everything from, ‘This is who? You’re calling me?’ Most singers interviewed say that singing has become to ‘Oh my God, I’m going to faint.’” Jennings says some of somewhat routine, but not in the negative way that most his more confident applicants may say things like, “I was people think of the word. coming anyway.” “Getting on the tuxedo, focusing, doing the warm-up, An interesting note that Jennings raises is that these engaging your mind, engaging your voice, the coming out phone calls are nearly equivalent in value to the actual faceand performing the music... that can sometimes become to-face auditions. routine,” tenor Matt Oltman says. “In some ways, the but“It’s a very telling moment for me in speaking with peoterflies do kind of go away when you are out there working. ple at that particular moment, because I find out a lot about It’s just your job, and you love doing your job.” them just in that conversation, about where they are develFrom the audience, the concert is anything but routine. opmentally and how they can express themselves,” Jennings The show is amazing. It is one of the few times when words says. fall short of describing an experience. The audience is taken Final selections are made after the callback audition. through a range of emotions, sometimes left at the end of a Each year a different number of singers are taken on, based song in silent rapture while other pieces bring them to their to their feet in a rousing applause. Acalanes High School teacher Bruce Lengacher put it best. “Go listen to them. You have to see it and hear it. Listening to a CD is ok, but you need to go see them live. There’s something about watching them perform. It’s a living organism that happens to have 12 bodies.” The blend of these twelve voices into one harmony makes Chanticleer much more than the link to its “clearsinging” namesake would suggest. Their unique sound, like so many other musical phenomena, must be experienced first-hand in order to be truly understood and appreciated. Sinfonians Oltman, Massey, and Alatorre relax before a performance.

David L. Roush is a senior at Penn State University, graduating in May 2004 with a double major in Broadcast Journalism and Communication Arts & Sciences. MAY 2004

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philosophy. Because I think your whole philosophy of life is based on philanthropy - you are a giver.

Did someone inspire you to be that way - or was it just a reaction to what you saw in the world?

I think at some point in your life, you just step back and just kind of look at it. You take wealth - a lot of people think of wealth as just dollars only. They don’t see wealth as your heath. They don’t see wealth as your psychological well being. They don’t see wealth as your environment. And you know from the moment you get up and you can swing your legs out of bed and you can stand up, your wealth has started. But we are a society that tends to think of everything in dollars. Yes, dollars are very important - I’m not that naive to think they’re not, but I’m not driven by dollars. I mean, it just does not - somehow my wealth in those other areas is very important. I just read in this morning’s paper they had Forbes list of 500 richest and that really does not interest me. I want enough money to be comfortable and have nice things and do nice things. I’m that materialistic but I’m not driven by it. I have everything I want. If you had to say to me, if I gave you X number of dollars, what would you want to do, I guess my first thought would be, “Hey I’d like to give it to music.” I’ve got everything.

I guess a lot of it depends. I’m very blessed to for having a positive attitude. My glass is always half full. And I’ll tell you - being a single person - you have to learn to just kind of fend for yourself. We live in a society that is - everything has to be a twosome - and I find this in my classmates, because there are 17 in my class and I’m the only single and some of these people can’t go to the john without their wife. So it’s been a blessing because I can either make my life happy or I can make it miserable. And so I just make it happy. You have to be able to live on your own. Yes, there are times, I want to say - maybe I did miss something, but you are going to miss things in life. Yes, having children would be nice, but I also believe that once you have a child, that child then comes first. You are not #1 because you are responsible and I think that’s something we’ve gotten away from in our society being responsible for what you do.

Who taught you the concept of benevolence and to place such emphasis on being the giver? I know it has to come from your faith - but were there other people - was there someone in your family or what was it? No, I think if you look at society as a whole - first going on the premise that people are basically good - you will see what we really focus on according to the news - everything is focused on the negative. But I know here in Cincinnati, if you have a good cause and if you really talk to people correctly, the money is there. I mentioned to a customer of mine - a patient - that we have a mighty Wurlitzer organ that’s in storage and the theater closed and the American Classical Music Hall of Fame has an opportunity for a permanent home that it could fit in very nicely. I mentioned it to this customer because I know he likes organ music and he said, “I’ll get you $250,000.” Well, he came back and I got a phone call yesterday because he wanted to put it in writing - the money - and he said, “We’re going to make it $450,000. We’re going to do $150,000 this June, $150,000 Jan 1st and $150,000 next June 1st.” You just need to do things - and I’ve been real lucky. Everything has fallen into my lap nicely. But I think it’s because you have to allow yourself to be open and look for the good in people and not be so pessimistic.

There’s always someone or something you can foist it off on or you try to. I like that philosophy that you have. And, you know, people say to me, and it kind of annoys me, when they’ll say, Oh, I hear you’re in the seminary - what denomination? And I always want to say - It’s the same God. I don’t care what your belief is - just believe in something. First of all, believe in yourself and then believe in something else. And I think a lot of people just don’t believe in anything - they don’t trust anything. What inspires your creativity? A dictatorship is much easier to control everybody but when you give people the freedom to be creative... A friend of mine gave me the nicest compliment - he didn’t mean it to be a compliment - he said you know, when I’m with you I feel like I need a legal pad just to jot down ideas. And luckily my executive director at the Hall of Fame, Stefan, is creative. He has a creative mind. And he’s so much fun to sit down with and just talk and we’re all over the map. And what I’ve been able to analyze in myself - my problem is and it’s a problem I need to work on is that I can always see the big picture. And with a lot of people- you have to start out with a very small picture. But I do - I see things. Like at the seminary… we have 75 acres - beautiful gardens that have not been kept. And I looked at those 7 different gardens and I got an MAY 2004

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idea because my mind was open. I thought, I’m going to go to all the landscape people in the city of Cincinnati and see if I cannot get each one to adopt one of these gardens and then they’re allowed to put their sign there and get people to come and look at these gardens. And I think it’s going to work. Well, I think what you have is what my German teacher called the German mind set – the “Welt augenblick.” You step back and you see the whole pie and you see how all the pieces work together and you see the end result. Somebody’s got to do that but that to me is the hardest to get people to begin to understand. And that’s because they sit down in front the television and the creativity is gone. They just sit there. And I’m not good at sitting and watching a football game, a baseball game, a basketball - I think your mind has to go into death just to sit there to watch a ball. I want to have an Olympics of Music in Cincinnati where every country sends their top violinist, their top person trombone, top pianist, top everything and have this huge parade of all countries marching down Central Parkway to Music Hall having this big opening ceremony - and then we have all these venues and have competitions in all these areas.

going... Let’s go back to music. It’s the universal language of mankind. My first homily that I’m going to give, I’m going to use a quote that Bobby Kennedy used about dreams. I have it. Here it is: “Some men see things as they are and say why. I dream of things that never were and say why not.” It’s by George Bernard Shaw. And it is frequently attributed to Bobby Kennedy - but he used it in a speech which Teddy quoted at Bobby’s funeral. I will send it to you today!!! I’m going to start out with that because I’m going to look out at those people and say “I see things and I wonder why and I dream other things and I wonder why not.” And I want them to dream. What do you like to read? What are you reading right now? There’s a great article in this morning’s paper about eating solo. It used to be that waiters and waitresses didn’t like that but now they like it because usually they tip better, secondly they’re easier to take care of, and they don’t just sit there and chat with somebody else. I love to take something to read - I love to read. I like to read something that stimulates me. I was at the library at the seminary, down in the stacks, just looking at books and I came across a book Where Did All the Good Sisters Go? It is 56 biographical sketches of women who either are in or who have left the Church. It’s so interesting because none of them badmouth the convent. They talk about those who left, the good that they got out of it, and how they’ve enjoyed going back. They also talk about some of the difficult times. Our first feminists were nuns. They ran our hospitals. They ran all these institutions. They were women who were able to get an education. If you were poor, and you went into the convent, you got an education.

“I think that’s something we’ve gotten away from in our society - being responsible for what you do.”

See, I think this could happen and I think Cincinnati is where it could happen. In all of the articles I’ve read about you and all the things that happen in Cincinnati, it seems like that would be the place because people are willing to take the risk.

Well, and that’s another thing - I’m a little bit of a control freak, too. I think those people who are exceedingly creative who are total big picture viewers must be in control and do have control issues because they know what it takes to accomplish what they see as the ultimate goal. And I think there’s something altruistic within it because they are not in it for glory they’re in it for the sake of the project - the end result. You have to have a sense of humor, too. Oh, my gosh, if you don’t laugh... Well, you do because there are moments when things get so tense, if there’s not someone there that can get a laugh

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So tell me - what do you do for fun? Right now, it’s fun. I make life fun. Sometimes, I consider myself very selfish because I love to walk. And there’s a series of 6 bridges going over the Ohio River. And I love to just walk and cross back and forth the different bridges. And there’s something about the water flowing beneath you and you just kind of let everything flow out – it just re-energizes me.


Aspiringo t Excel

A new book by Dr. Kenneth R. Raessler, Pi Omega (Gettysburg) ‘67, aims to share his extensive experience in order to help shape the future of music education.

Styles of Leadership Excerpt from Chapter 2: The Life of a Leader I have observed many models of leadership that I thought were effective (and some that were not, but we learn from these, too!) and have read about the great leaders of history. The words and ideas I offer here are the result of experience, observation, and history. I have learned that there is nothing quite so basic to leadership as the difference between authority and power. Authority and power are very different, and the life force of the authoritarian is quite different from the life force of the powerful. The teacher who has authority but no power may well be the study hall teacher who has the authority to control behavior but somehow appears powerless to control the students and their learning behaviors. This is the person who is in charge but not in control. The authority without the power simply does not produce positive results. I have lived through eleven presidents of the United States during my lifetime, and in most cases, history has already established their leadership styles. With no political bias, it is clear that a president who had the major look of a leader was John F. Kennedy. He received the authority when he was elected President, but it was his persona that gave him the power. During the short years of his presidency, the country was totally enamored with “Camelot,” and this image remains today. Even though there were questions about his personal integrity, he was still able to project political integrity as President. There was an elegance, a refinement, and a polish that people cherished. John Kennedy had developed the ability to command respect and to inspire confidence. To a lesser but never-the-less effective degree, Bill Clinton possessed these same qualities. Conversely, Harry S. Truman commanded the opposite look of a leader. He enjoyed his reputation as a “give ‘em hell” President. Today, he probably would have been labeled a “micro manager.” In a very different way, he also inspired confidence. What was it in the character of these two totally different leaders that commanded the same sort of allegiance and respect? It was power. Authority is given or delegated. Power is earned or taken.

The differences between authority and power need to be investigated. In K-12 education, there is always a leader or authority who controls public school music teachers, whether a supervisor, principal, or superintendent. If that leader has also gained the respect of music teachers, then the music teachers award that leader with power. There is not a great deal of consensus in most K-12 districts, although those authorities who are true leaders are working to institute more consensus-building relationships. But in K-12, even if the leaders do not have respect, power is taken because authority is very clearly defined in a hierarchical ranking. The same structure between authority and power can be found in higher education, but the role of the faculty and how they award power to a leader is different. On most university campuses today, there is a continuing tension between faculty and administration over the “right” of the faculty to make decisions – or at least participate in the decision-making process. In the university setting, the traditional relationship of faculty to authority lies in a governance system that is based on the old concept of “shared” power or shared governance, often through consensus when and if that is possible. In higher education, power is both earned and taken by a process of dialogue with faculty – after sometimes lengthy or convoluted debate. In higher education, the process of sharing that unequivocal knowledge discussed earlier is critical to leading faculty towards consensus. In K-12, authorities and leaders move ahead after they make decisions with or without consensus or debate. Accountability lies with a higher authority: the school board or state. In higher education, it is different. Sometimes shared governance doesn’t work. Some faculty want both the authority and the power, and they continually press, naively, because they don’t understand the difference between the two – or the necessity for two separate processes. Many faculty (see Chapter 12: Music in Higher Education) are too wrapped up in their own disciplines to see the larger or collective vision, no matter how clearly it has been shared. I clearly recall informing a university music faculty of a decision I had made on my own, although I had discussed MAY 2004

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the problem with many faculty individually. I knew I had the support of 90 percent of the faculty. Even though I had shared my concerns, one faculty member questioned why I had not consulted with the entire faculty before making that decision (the question of dialogue and debate bringing consensus). My response was that I knew what their reaction would be, knew how much support there was and, thus, wished to avoid going directly against the wishes of a few in a confrontative situation. This decision created much tension at the time, and probably some never forgave me for making it. I needed to do this, however, to follow my own vision (see Chapter 1: The Look of a Leader). In this instance, I used my authority but took the power. Clever leaders at the university level grant to the faculty that which looks like a lot of authority, but most are much less inclined to delegate real “power,” especially when the faculty numbers more than fifteen to twenty-influence, yes, but power, no. So how does this all relate to leadership in music education, and more specifically, to individual teachers who may operate as separate entities? As a music educator, you are awarded authority over your students, but you usually have little or no administrative authority except in your classroom. Based on the administrative authority you have, it becomes essential for you to develop strategies to influence decisions and gain more authority over your day-to-day professional existence. You must assess how much authority you have to do your own job. How much influence do you have with your colleagues or with your superiors to be persuasive in decision making? Do you have input into the development of curriculum, or are you told what to teach and when to teach it? How much input do you really want in decision, making, or is it just easier to sit back, let things happen, and then complain about the results? (That is not the look of a leader.) You may have more authority than you think. For instance, you may have significant authority to determine the design, structure, and sequence of your curriculum. You probably have the authority for repertoire selection, for discipline and classroom management, for the planning and implementation of instructional activities, or for the use of Dr. Kenneth R. Raessler recently retired as Director of the School of Music at Texas Christian University. He holds degrees from West Chester, Temple and Michigan State Universities. In steady demand as a lecturer, consultant and clinician, Raessler is an awardwinning music educator, residing with his wife in Fort Worth, Texas. In May 2004, he completes a six-year term on The Sinfonia Foundation Board of Trustees. The hardcover edition of Aspiring to Excel can be ordered online at http://www.giamusic.com.

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technology. How you use that authority is a critical component of your individual leadership. How well you lead in using that authority in music education is the way you earn power. Just as there is a relationship between administration and faculty over the processes of authority and power so, too, is there a relationship between authority and power in the classroom in which the music educator is the authority. How you exercise your authority, in curricular design, teaching competence, through motivation, inspiration, and your own aspirations for excellence, will determine how you are given power by your students. Students will give you power through their commitment, expression of emotion, achievement, increased self-confidence, and their own desire for excellence. It is a shared process, perhaps more natural in design and authentic in purpose (and certainly less political) than the balance of power and authority between central administration and faculty. Thus, you must establish at some point in your career whether you would rather just function in your own domain or truly develop the ability to have input into your professional existence. This is leadership. The true leader could not allow someone else to have total control over his or her professional life. It simply is not professional. Leadership is taking control over that which you can control and working to improve that situation while aspiring to excel in the domain in which you are the leader. By doing so, you are demonstrating leadership that will be noticed by others. Your success creates the look of a leader, a look that is grounded in achievement, success, and vision. Whether or not you have developed this ability to influence, it is important for you to ascertain the style of leadership you feel comfortable with and that provides you with the most success. Every leader has developed a style of some sort. Even the leader with a bland leadership style is exhibiting a style of leadership, although probably not very effective. Since leadership is not something we do but rather something we are, it is important to develop a style that is effective and matches your own personal qualities. It is important to know who you are (self-confidence) and where you want to go (vision). Some people find success in a democratic style of leadership that invites colleagues to work together and participate in decision-making. Such a person encourages cooperation and supports the creative thinking of groups of individuals. George W. Bush appears to be exhibiting this leadership style. He has earned the reputation of delegating power to others and then giving them the authority to execute their judgments. Other styles fall at the opposite end of the continuum by leading in an autocratic manner. Certainly the well-known Pied Piper of Hamlin had an autocratic style of leadership. He made one kind of music, and the rats just followed him to the end. There was no consensus or discussion about the process – it was his way. I know music educators today who are clearly Pied Pipers, and let there be no

See Aspiring to Excel, page 21


“What is music without harmony? Verily it is not music. Life without goodwill and fraternity — what is it? Indeed it is not life. He has not truly lived who has not lived for others, in sympathy and in harmony with his fellows.”

Percy Jewett Burrell A Life Lived For Others by John A. Mongiovi, Committeeman-at-Large and National Historian This year marks the 40th anniversary of the passing of one of the Sinfonia’s most influential leaders, Percy Jewett Burrell, Alpha (New England Conservatory) 1899. Let us reflect on the life of our elder brother, who emphasized the ideal of the Brotherhood of Man both in our Fraternity and in the United States through his chosen profession. Percy Jewett Burrell was born on February 10, 1877 to Alice Bell Neal and Joseph Maurice Burrell of Boston. After graduating from the Phillips Grammar School in 1891 and the English High School in 1894, he attended the New England Conservatory, from which he received a Diploma in Elocution in 1896. Burrell was initiated into the Sinfonia in 1899 and served as president of the chapter at the New England Conservatory in 1900 and 1903. He was instrumental in the expansion of the club into a national Fraternity, which he served as Supreme President from 1907 to 1914. One report describes Burrell as being “gifted with an executive ability rarely found and with an abundance of oratory, that, were he placed on the floor of the Senate Chamber, at Washington, would make some of the noted speakers of the same look small.” A report from the 1909 Sinfonia Convention describes the manner in which he presided over the meeting: Of course, Burrell was masterly. With those hand-splitting crashes of the gavel he compelled attention and pushed things to a finish. Our Supreme is one of the kind who wears well. You may think he is an all right block of Boston ice when you first meet him, but he wears neither his heart nor his mind on his sleeve, and so your regard for his true worth and executive ability is constantly growing. But even those who have known him long had to acknowledge that the way he handled this convention was immense, surpassing all former records.

Burrell stands alongside his lifelong friend, Sinfonia’s founder Ossian Everett Mills, as one of the primary articulators of the Fraternity’s philosophy, which today continues to guide thousands of musical students at over two hundred academic institutions across the nation. Sacrifice for others, personal responsibility, fraternal love, and the Brotherhood of Man are among the recurring themes of Burrell’s writings, for which he is esteemed by countless Sinfonians. His philosophy can be aptly summed up in the following words,

which he wrote in 1908: Brotherhood! The brotherhood of men! What spiritual significance! Do we catch its true meaning? Does it give us a real and vital experience? Do we get a spiritual insight? Do we look out with a broader vision? Do we think in terms and live in acts of brotherhood? If we do, we move in harmony, attuned to both God, the Father, and man, the Brother. What is music without harmony? Verily it is not music. Life without good-will and fraternity — what is it? Indeed it is not life. He has not truly lived who has not lived for others, in sympathy and in harmony with his fellows.

In 1902 Burrell received the post-graduate degree of Bachelor of Oratory from Boston University, where he was also a student of Methodist theology. His talents led him to be a well known public speaker with an enviable reputation as a teacher of oratory, and later as an author and director of national reputation. From approximately 1917 to 1945 Burrell was in high demand throughout the United States and by the mid-1930s stood preeminent in his profession as a consultant, author, organizer and director of historical and patriotic pageants and community and religious drama. His work took him from coast to coast, and no one was more in demand than he for his service in this field. Dr. Albert Bushnell Hart, Professor-Emeritus of History at Harvard University called Burrell “the master pageant-master,” and Dramatist Percy MacKay said of Burrell, “I know of no other person who combines his mastery of minutiae with the kind of human idealism necessary for projecting such phases of community art.” Among these was the Pageant of Saratoga, with 6,500 participants and 125,000 spectators making it the largest historical spectacle of its type ever given in the country at the time. By 1932, over 100,000 persons had come under his guidance as pageant participants and committee members, and over 1,200,000 spectators had seen his indoor and outdoor productions. One can imagine that, as one report described, “Assuming Billy Sunday attitudes, Director Burrell paced up and down the floor shouting instructions, wheedling men and women to talk louder and clearer.” Burrell described a pageant as “a play which has as a plot the history of the town, and as its hero, the town itself,” MAY 2004

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but he regarded the drama as more than a mere form of entertainment. Burrell wrote, “The impulses of art, education, patriotism and religion, reach out and select this form of expression as a means of revelation of life itself.” It was his hope and belief that the spirit of community would be reflected by those who participated in these drama “in closer bonds of neighborliness and good-will toward one another.” To him, the best gift that a pageant bestowed upon a people was “the social solidarity left behind it.” The pageant was a way to bring out the soul of a community and the soul of the country. Thus he called it “the Drama of Democracy.” Through the pageant, Burrell put into action the ideal

expressed in his words: It is a truism that as long as man loves but himself and his art he can never attain to the full measure of manhood or reach the sublimest heights of his art. He must seek to love men as brothers and art, not for the sake of art itself, but art as a means toward bringing all men up to that verdant plateau where their souls may be fed in very rejoicing in all that is true, beautiful, abiding.

Percy Jewett Burrell died in 1964 at age eighty-seven and had no descendants. He is buried in an unmarked grave in Watertown, Massachusetts.

MONUMENT TO BE PLACED In 1998, Committeeman-at-Large and National Historian John Mongiovi began working with city government officials and members of the Burrell family to gain the necessary permissions to erect a suitable monument on the grave of Percy Jewett Burrell. Last summer he received the necessary approvals and had a monument cut, which will be placed on Burrell’s grave this spring. The monument bears the Sinfonia insignia and reads: Percy Jewett Burrell Feb. 10, 1877 Mar. 22, 1964 Sixth Supreme President of The Sinfonia Fraternity of America Master Pageant Master “He Has Not Truly Lived Who Has Not Lived For Others In Sympathy And In Harmony With His Fellows.” Donations up to the amount of $50 are being accepted to fund this effort. When the total of $1,500 is reached, any additional donations will be made as a contribution to The Sinfonia Foundation in Brother Burrell’s honor. Donors’ names will be listed in some fashion, probably on a program for the Memorial Service that will eventually take place to officially install the monument, and will be placed in the Fraternity’s archives. Donors will also be notified of the date of the installation service. To contribute to this cause, please make your check payable to “John Mongiovi,” write “Burrell Memorial” on the memo line, and send it to: Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Fraternity of America 10600 Old State Road Evansville, IN 47711-1399 Please include your name, mailing address, email address, and phone number so that your contribution can be appropriately acknowledged.

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Although he has passed from this world, Fred McFeely Rogers, Xi Psi (Westminster) ‘87, is still with us. Exhibits, concerts, lectures, and books abound – all in celebration of the life of an unassuming yet truly extraordinary man from Pennsylvania. The task of honoring him has been a journey of discovery – discovering things about Mister Rogers, about life and about me. I invite you to go with me now, with his words as our guide, to gain a better understanding of the heart of this amazing Sinfonian, and hopefully, yourself. Fred Rogers once said, “More and more I’ve come to understand that listening is one of the most important things we can do for one another. Whether the others be an adult or a child, our engagement in listening to who that person is can often be our greatest gift. Whether that person is speaking or playing or dancing, building or singing or painting, if we care, we can listen… The purpose of life is to listen – to yourself, to your neighbor, to your world and to God and,

Remembering Our Neighbor His Lessons on Listening and Love by Cheri Faith Spicer, Contributing Editor when the time comes, to respond in as helpful a way as you can find… from within and from without.” I have asked myself a question throughout my life and this is it: Why do we love those whom we love? Haven’t you wondered the same thing? I believe we all have. Now, thanks to the wisdom of Fred Rogers, I have an answer that works for me and this is it: I love them because they listen to me. Even when I may think that they aren’t, and even when there isn’t one good reason for them to listen to me, their words and actions have born out that they truly do listen to what I say, bless their hearts!!! They listen and the realization of that makes me feel very loved. In turn, I listen to them and, I pray, they feel just as loved. Sounds pretty simplistic

and uncomplicated, doesn’t it? Well, it’s not. Rogers said, “Understanding love is one of the hardest things in the world.” And it is true. The quest for such understanding is not an easy row to hoe. Jacob Needleman, professor of philosophy at San Francisco State University and a consultant in the fields of psychology, education, medical ethics, philanthropy, and business, says “Simply put, there is nothing, nothing in the world that can take the place of one person intentionally listening or speaking to another. The act of conscious attending to another person — when one once discovers the taste of it and its significance — can become the center of gravity of the work of love. It is very difficult. Almost nothing in our world supports it or even knows about it.” May sound a bit dramatic – but look around you. I think you will see that it is true. Rogers once said, “Deep within us – no matter who we are – there lives a feeling of wanting to be lovable, of wanting to be the kind of person that others like to be with. And the greatest thing we can do is let people know that they are loved and capable of loving.” Paul Johannes Tillich, German-born Protestant theologian said, “The first duty of love is to listen.” Fred Rogers performed that duty better than almost anyone ever has. He acknowledged the need, accepted the challenge and acted upon it. He went on to MAY 2004

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learn how to empower himself, his family and friends – and the world – to listen. And he succeeded, even though he never stopped trying to do and be more. I challenge you to think about your life – your friends, your family, your place in this world. To whom do you really and truly listen? And who really and truly listens to you? “Imagine what our real neighborhoods would be like if each of us offered, as a matter of course, just one kind word to another person.” Throughout his life, Fred Rogers was many things to literally thousands of people. From son, to composer, to television pioneer, to consultant to world leaders in times of distress, to advocate of all the children in the world, the bottom line in Fred’s own eyes was this – he was your neighbor – a person whom you could trust with your problems, turn to when upset and rely upon to be there when needed. As he said, “It always helps to have people we love beside us when we have to do difficult things in life.” And that’s exactly how he lived his life. “Love and trust, in the space between what’s said and what’s heard in our life, can make all the difference in this world.” He made a difference by being true friend to all and Sinfonians, he was your brother. How proud you must and should be. Not being a Sinfonian, but having been surrounded by them all of my life, true Sinfonians are no stranger to me. While I am aware that Fred Rogers’ involvement in Sinfonia was very limited, when I think of world figures and how they live their lives, I am proud to know that a man such as Fred Rogers is a Sinfonian – one of those brothers whom I love, respect and admire. He believed that “You bring all you ever were and are to any relationship you have today” – a philosophy that should inspire everyone to be brothers in the truest sense of the word. In the year since we lost Fred Rogers, I have realized that the lights are still on in “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.” I know that from all of the memories that so many people have shared about him, not only with me, but world-wide. He even said, “I find out more and more every day how important it is for people to share their memories.” And so, here is one of mine. Even though I am not of the “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” generation, there have

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been times when I watched his show. The show I will never forget was a day when he sang one of his songs – one of the hundreds he composed for the show over the years. The song was “It’s You I Like.” I remember it because it made me cry. And yes, I did feel somewhat ridiculous crying because of a song on “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” but now I understand why I reacted the way I did. We all want and need to be liked in just the way the song describes: It’s you I like, It’s not the things you wear, It’s not the way you do your hair, But it’s you I like. The way you are right now, The way down deep inside you, Not the things that hide you, Not your toys, they’re just beside you. But it’s you I like, every part of you, Your skin, your eyes, your feelings Whether old or new. I hope that you’ll remember Even when you’re feeling blue That it’s you I like, It’s you yourself, it’s you, It’s you… I… like! “Love isn’t a state of perfect caring. It is an active noun like struggle. To love someone is to strive to accept that per-


son exactly the way he or she is, right here and now.” “You don’t have to do anything sensational for people to love you. When I say, ‘it’s you I like,’ I am talking about that part of you that is far more than anything you can ever see or hear or touch…that deep part of you that allows you to stand for those things without which humankind cannot survive: love that conquers hate, peace that rises triumphant over war, and justice that proves more powerful than greed. So in all that you do in all of your life, I wish you the strength and the grace to make those choices which will allow you and your neighbor to become the best of whoever you are.” Fred Rogers’ legacy of listening and loving live on and continue to make a difference in the lives of those who come in contact with all things “Mister Rogers.” May you live in the footsteps of your brother Fred Rogers and learn to listen and love as he.

“In the external scheme of things, shining moments are as brief as the twinkling of an eye, yet such twinklings are what eternity is made of – moments when we human beings can say, ‘I love you,’ ‘I’m proud of you,’ ‘I forgive you,’ ‘I’m grateful for you.’ That’s what eternity is made of: invisible, imperishable good stuff.” Fred, we wish you all of the “good stuff” eternity could possibly hold. And thanks for being our neighbor.

Aspiring to Excel, from page 16 mistake – it is their way or the highway. In a more controversial analogy that will probably raise some eyebrows, I believe Jesus Christ was a very autocratic leader. He had a singular philosophy based on love and kindness, and he was able to exhibit that great love and kindness as he led others. Leadership styles can also be exhibited in your teaching style, which is an often-overlooked kind of leadership. Some prefer a quiet kind of leadership in the classroom, while others prefer a highly structured and systematic approach. Still other teachers like to delegate tasks or challenges to groups of students and are comfortable with a team approach, which can sometimes be chaotic. Successful teaching and quality leadership are based on fairness, trust and, yes, love and kindness. Setting high expectations for faculty or students can be the ultimate form of caring. The love and kindness issue has two very important aspects: the ability to give love as well as the ability to receive love. People frequently have more difficulty receiving love than giving it, even though the desire to receive love is a common trait. We must learn to allow love to enter the equation of good leadership. All too frequently we feel as though we are not deserving of love and, therefore, if we truly let it happen, we will appear as unworthy, soft, or weak. Now, back to the autocratic style of leadership. As stated earlier, Harry S. Truman was well known for his autocratic “the buck stops here” style of leadership, and history has shown that it was an effective style for him, possibly even without the love and kindness. The only love I can recall him exhibiting was when he verbally criticized – to the press and, thus, the nation – the critics who gave his daughter poor reviews after her Carnegie Hall debut. He did exhibit love for his daughter. I wonder how well she received it. By the way, Harry Truman also played the piano, but the only thing the

public ever heard him play was Missouri Waltz (he was from Missouri!). On the surface, one might conclude that a democratic method of leadership might be the preferable style. It certainly is American. In my opinion, however, the right style or the best style will vary from individual to individual and from situation to situation, and will be shaped as much by the experiences one has in life and teaching as it is by individual personality. I have never known a successful leader who was completely democratic or absolutely autocratic. I have, however, been acquainted with some unsuccessful leaders who attempted to be totally one or the other. I have also experienced people who thought they were leaders but never led; this produces anarchy, and anarchy in education is chaos. The type of leadership style that is most effective is the one that is wisely chosen on the continuum from autocratic to democratic. Again, though, the most important thing is that you establish a leadership style that is effective for you. The music education profession desperately needs leaders who are at the front of their profession developing a plan for the success of their music programs. In the application of love and caring, the good leader must learn when to step forward and when to step back, how to shift from being democratic to autocratic. The best leaders are those who can sense when to make that shift innately and do so in a way that challenges and inspires others to accept their leadership, whether faculty, colleagues, or students. When leaders lose support from colleagues or students, those who are true leaders will go back and analyze their approach and adjust the degree of democratic or autocratic style they have used. Successful leaders will do this intuitively and constantly; unsuccessful leaders will never do this, continue using the same approach, and fail. MAY 2004

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The Alumni Newsletter of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Fraternity From A Sinfonian At War This is the second Christmas I will be spending on the other side of the world from my hometown of Granite, IL. I am currently serving as the Admin Clerk for 1st Stinger Battery. At this time of year (Christmas 2003) I miss being home, but I don't spend too much time being homesick, because I know everybody at home supports me and is awaiting my return with a hero's welcome, or at least a home-cooked meal. I want to wish all the Lyrecrest staff and Sinfonians everywhere Merry Christmas and Happy New Year. It doesn't snow on Okinawa, but I have the memories of Christmas Caroling. I can't be there, so somebody be sure to sing "O Holy Night" for me. Enclosed is a picture of me atop Mount Suribachi, Iwo Jima, taken April 16, 2003, 58 years after the famous flag raising. I appreciate the copies of The Sinfonian I have received since I've been here, but if anyone else wants to write, please don't hesitate! OAS, AAS, LLS! Timothy Kirkpatrick, Epsilon Kappa (SIUCarbondale) ‘98 Lance Corporal, USMC 1st Stinger Battery Marine Air Control Group 18 1st Marine Aircraft Wing Unit 37232 FPO AP 96603-7232

Letter To The Editor Thanks for the December 2003 issue. The story about Justin Campeau's campaign to resurrect Zeta Omega Chapter, and his battle against cancer, was inspiring. This is a great example of the spirit of service that Phi Mu Alpha encourages in the men who have affiliated with this unique organization. I personally experienced this spirit when my daughter was to give her (high school) senior piano recital on the Steinway on one of the stages of the University of Arkansas Music Department in April 2003. The recital was about to begin, when it became obvious that the "sound man" whom we'd contracted through a departmental secretary to record the recital was not going to show up! Of course, Anna had prepared for more than a year for this event, and it was quite upsetting to realize that a record of this

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"crowning achievement" might in fact never be made! Just short of a panic, I announced to the audience that I was going to search the halls for someone who could step in. After several frantic minutes, I came upon Jason Rutledge, who is a member of the local PMA chapter. Via several cell phone calls, he arranged for one of their own, Clint Baker, to hustle over to the recital hall, turn on all the equipment, and permit the stalled recital to begin. This was unwanted drama, of course, but the "rescue" efforts of these two gentlemen was a service to our family, and I think, worthy of mention in these pages. Sincerely, Richard Heckmann, Kappa Sigma (Valparaiso) ‘75 M.D.

October 19, 2003 saw the world premiere of a new Sonata for Trombone and Piano by Omicron National President Richard Crosby, Eta-O (Cincinnati) '75. This work was commissioned by the Kentucky Music Teachers Association and was featured on their Kentucky Composers Concert during their convention at the University of Kentucky in Lexington. The premiere featured trombonist Ken Haddix (to whom the work is dedicated) with the composer at the piano. Crosby has recently transcribed the accompaniment for symphonic band and the work will be featured in that format when the Eastern Kentucky University Symphonic Band appears at the College Band Directors National Association convention in Atlanta, Georgia on February 27, 2004. This sonata was Crosby's first commission as a composer and he is anticipating focusing more and more on composing in the coming years in addition to his teaching at Eastern Kentucky University, where he is a Professor of Music, and his service to Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia.

For Andy, statue 'beats anything' Sheriff Andy Taylor never had much fun in big-city Raleigh. But Andy Griffith, Alpha Rho (North Carolina) ‘45, the actor who played him on the enduring television show, looked Tuesday as if there was no place he'd rather be. On a chilly, misty early morning, more than 400 people gathered at Pullen Park in Central Raleigh and cheered as Griffith helped unveil a bronze, life-size statue that depicts the scene from the opening credits of "The Andy Griffith Show": Sheriff Taylor and his son Opie walking hand-in-hand to the fishin' hole. (continued next page)

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION CONTACTS

Central Florida David Schreier (daves@cfl.rr.com) Dallas/Ft. Worth Jeff Cranmore (jcranmore@mckinneyisd.net) Philadelphia Ryan Dumont (phillyalumni@comcast.net) Washington, D.C. Rob McKeever (robmckii@aol.com)

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION INTEREST GROUP CONTACTS California: Los Angeles Christopher Thaxter christopherthaxter@yahoo.com

Colorado: Denver Carl Henriksen carl@sinfonia.org Florida: Jacksonville Brian Griffin zotemart@yahoo.com Florida: Southern Rob Garrido jazzvox305@hotmail.com Florida: Tampa Dave Groomes dgroomes@yahoo.com Georgia: Atlanta Ellis Johnson egj2@hotmail.com Illinois: Central Justin Lee jrlee@illicom.net Indiana: Evansville and Indianapolis Andrew Miller joseph_sinfonian@yahoo.com

Missouri Mike Makowski mikemakowski@hotmail.com

Missouri: Saint Louis Patrick Emberton patrick@pizetachapter.org

New England: Northern (ME, VT, NH) Brian Dellinger bdellinger@bluehen.udel.edu

New Jersey: Northern Rich Legon rslegon@verizon.net New York: NYC Will Mulligan sinfonia-in-nyc@earthlink.net

Ohio: Cincinnati Christopher Stothfang dlphima@yahoo.com Ohio Valley Matt Burgio mb388097@ohiou.edu Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh Andy Zerance azerance@tribweb.com Virginia: Fredricksburg Matthew Downey downeymb@yahoo.com Virginia: Richmond Rob McKeever mckeever@sinfonia.org Virginia: Tidewater John Boyd jaboyd@vbcps.k12.va.us Wisconsin: Southeast Dan Krueger yesman@idcnet.com

PROVINCE ALUMNI COORDINATORS Province 3 Gary A. Bailey bailey@thecds.net Province 4 Louis G. Young louis7@aol.com Province 5 Mark Salzman

Province 24 Thomas C. Henry tcfritz1@hotmail.com Province 25 Gaetano L. Molinary II

MarkSalzman@charter.net

dblakewagner@yahoo.com

Province 13 David W. Groomes dgroomes@yahoo.com Province 19 Jayson Moll

Province 33 Wes Taylor

jayson.moll@sbcglobal.net

Province 20 John Brian Heath jbheath@email.unc.edu

Province 21 Justin A. Staub tankbone2002@yahoo.com

guymolinary@hotmail.com

Province 28 Blake Wagner

wtaylor@physast.uga.edu

Province 37 Justin R. Lee jteach79@yahoo.com


The Alumni Newsletter of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Fraternity The event was part tribute to a simpler time and part ambitious marketing campaign by cable network TV Land, which broadcasts reruns daily and gave the city the statue for free. "It's not as purty as a woman with a child, but for a man with a child, it's all right," said Griffith, grinning after the light blue curtain hiding the statue fell. "That beats anything." The statue depicts the first scene ever shot in the series, which ran from 1960 to 1968 and has never left the air. With 27 million viewers a month, the show is the highest-rated on TV Land, said Larry Jones, executive vice president and general manager of TV Land and Nick at Nite. Its wholesome storylines set in quintessential small-town Mayberry and its memorable characters such as the zany Deputy Barney Fife, adorable Opie and always patient Sheriff Taylor spawned a massive following. People traveled from out of town and even from other states for the ceremony. "It's something we can both watch together," said Thomas Smith, a 42-year-old sales engineer from Holly Springs who brought his 8-year-old son Chandler. "There's not too many shows you can do that with your son." Griffith, 77, grew up in Mount Airy and now lives in Manteo. He has released 13 albums and played the title character on another long-running television show: "Matlock."

Philadelphia Area Alumni Association Greetings from Philadelphia! Our alumni association has been active now for close to four years. We meet each month for lunch or dinner at area restaurants. We've also attended local concerts and organized events with nearby collegiate chapters. Last summer, the three officers attended the National Convention down in Washington, DC. We look forward to more brothers being involved with our group so we can plan more ambitious projects such as holding our own recital or a Mills Music Mission. For more information, contact our secretary Mitch Berger at 610-876-6677, email mitchian@comcast.net. Our website is www.mysticcat.org/~phillyalumni. ~Ryan Dumont, Lambda Beta (Susquehanna) ‘92 President

The Dallas Wind Symphony selected fanfares from seven composers in its second-annual competition, three of whom are Sinfonians: Robert Washburn, Theta Iota (SUNY-P Potsdam) '67, "Olympics Fanfare;" Thomas P. Rohrer, EtaOmicron (Cincinnati) '80, "The Heart of It All;" and, Marvin Lamb, Zeta Mu (Sam Houston State) '65, "Sacred Ground."

Dan R. Edwards, Gamma Alpha (James Madison) '75, Minister of Worship at Centerville Baptist Church in Chesapeake, Virginia has received the 2003 Composer of the Year Award by the Publishing Division of Jeffers Handbell Supply, Inc. of Irmo, South Carolina. This award is presented each year in recognition of the sales of their work through Jeffers. Edwards had his first works published in 1988. His pieces include music for children's choir, adult choir, handbells, small instrumental ensembles and several commissioned works. He resides in Chesapeake with his wife Lori and their two children Rebecca and John. Timothy Genis, Alpha Nu (Eastman) '84, assistant timpanist for the Boston Symphony Orchestra was appointed timpanist staring with the 2004-2005 season. He has been a member of the Boston Symphony since 1993 and is currently head of the percussion department art Boston University. He has also played with the Rochester Philharmonic, Philharmonia Virtuosi, Radio City Music Hall and Hong Kong Philharmonic orchestras and has been a Zildjian performing artist since 1997.

First American Masters Arts Festival Ray Evans Harrell, Alpha Chi (Tulsa) '60, is the artistic director for the First American Masters Arts Festival Biennial, which features the music of Ned Rorem. The Premiere Concert was held at Merkin Concert Hall in New York City's Kaufman Center (Goodman House) in late October 2003 and featured a panorama of the works of Rorem. It was both a retrospect on Rorem's life works and an eightieth birthday celebration. The works presented ranged from two opera, choral pieces & art songs from 1947 to a vocal quartet cycle published in 1997. The Festival

continues in 2004 with concerts of Rorem's complete organ and guitar works, "Spring Music" and the cycles "Aftermath" and "Songs of Sadness" at Merkin Hall and on the historic Riverside Church organ. Harrell also is the conductor for New York's Magic Circle Opera Repertory Ensemble, Inc., which regularly presents works that might otherwise be judged as obscure. Bringing this American Music to the public represents not only a service to music but the continuation of the principles learned as a Sinfonian. In addition, Brother Harrell has become an expert concerning Native American (Cherokee) music. As ceremonial leader for the Nuyagi Keetoowah Community, he helps other Native Americans rediscover their heritage, especially in music and dance. He has recently arranged an early oral tradition Cherokee work, “Stomp Dance Song,” for students to be able to learn this earliest American music. Ray Evans Harrell remains a Sinfonian doing his job, making and presenting American music to the next generation of students in American music. ~John H. Curtis, Zeta Gamma (Valdosta State) '83

Pianist Gary B. Holt, Alpha Theta (MiamiOhio) '66, has received the title of full professor at the Cologne College-Conservatory of Music (Musikhochschule), Germany. He teaches voice majors classical artsong interpretation (Leidgestaltung). The Cologne institution is the largest European music academy with some 1800 students and 440 on the faculty.

John Koshak, Alpha Zeta (Penn State) '58, was named conductor and professor emeritus at Chapman University, where he was professor of music and director of orchestra for 32 years. The newly established John Koshak Visiting fellowship will bring performers, conductors and educators to Chapman for guest residencies and master classes. While at Chapman, Koshak developed the orchestral program from a group of community players to a 90-member symphony comprised mostly of students and a 50-piece chamber orchestra. He also established an undergraduate instrumental conducting program. John Koshak earned degrees from Penn State and Columbia Universities and a conducting diploma from the Mozarteum in Salzburg, Austria. MAY 2004

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(Continued) Dr. Joseph W. Landon, Omicron Pi (Cal State-FFullerton) '65, founding Chair of Music and Humanities at Cal State-Fullerton, was given special recognition at the ground-breaking ceremonies for the new $40 million Performing Arts Center at CSUF on March 21, 2003. The new facility will include an 800 seat Concert Hall, 250 seat thrust stage Theatre, a 100 seat "Black Box" Theatre, and a variety of teaching and specialized areas for the music, dance and theatre departments. The new performing Arts Center will also provide for the cultural needs of North Orange County's cultural life.

The Music Academy of the West appointed W. Harold Laster, Eta Zeta (Newberry) '73, vice president and dean. Laster will be responsible for recruiting and admissions, the music library and archives, and the buildings and grounds department. He was dean of the Aspen Music Festival and School from 1995-2002 and has degrees from Maryville College and the University of Southern California.

Richard E. Strange, Gamma Sigma (Wichita State) '50, was awarded the Medal of Honor at the 2003 Midwest Clinic. He is director emeritus of bands at Arizona State University and conducts the Tempe Symphony Orchestra. He earned degrees from Wichita University, the University of Colorado and Boston University and is past president of the American Bandmasters Association and the College Band Directors National Association.

Robert Wessel, Alpha Phi (Fort Hays State) '39, retired elementary music teacher and musician from the Metro Nashville Schools, has composed over 100 compositions, the last 80+ of which having been done since his retirement in 1981. He has studied composition with Dr. Thom Hutchinson, Dr. Philip Howard, Dr. Michael Kurek and Dr. Michael Rose. During his tenure as a teacher he played in numerous ensembles and orchestras, served as a substitute organist in 18 different churches in the Nashville area and held the position of Church Organist at Old Hickory First Presbyterian Church for 11 years where he also served as an elder for many years. Currently and for the past several years, he has attended Old Hickory Methodist church where he has served on the Board, sung in the choir and played piano or organ at various times.

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THE FINAL CHORD George Appelman, Beta Iota (Albion) '37, passed away on December 10, 2002 in Algonac, Michigan. While in the Army during World War II, George played in the 97th Infantry Division Band. From 1946 to1980, he developed a school band program in Algonac that was featured in concerts, parades and sporting events all over North America, as well as at occasions in their home area. For 24 years, the Algonac Marching Band played for the halftime shows at the Detroit Lions' games, including the 1954 and 1957 championship games. In 1998, George was inducted into the Algonac High School Hall of Fame. He is survived by his wife, Sally, two sons, a daughter, five grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren.

Corliss R. Arnold, Gamma Lambda (Hendrix) '44, of Venice, Florida, died September 19, 2003. He was 77. He held the doctorate in sacred music from Union Theological Seminary in New York City and was Emeritus Professor of Music at Michigan State University where he taught for thirty-two years. He was Organist and Director of Music at the Peoples Church, East Lansing, for thirty-three years. Dr. Arnold was a Fulbright Scholar to France and studied at the Summer Organ Academy at Haarlem in the Netherlands. He held three certificates from the American Guild of Organists: the Associateship, Fellowship and Choirmaster. He was the author of the first major survey of organ literature in English: Organ Literature: A Comprehensive Survey, published by Scarecrow Press. The book is currently in its third edition. Dr. Arnold and his co-editor had almost completed the 4th edition, which will be completed and published in early 2004. Dr. Arnold received his BM Summa cum laude from Hendrix College in Conway, Arkansas, and MM from the University of Michigan. He served as a church musician at First Presbyterian Church, Conway, Arkansas; First Methodist Church, Conway, Arkansas; First Methodist Church, El Dorado, Arkansas; Reformed Church of Closter, New Jersey; First Methodist Church, Oak Park, Illinois; and Temple B'nai Abraham Zion, Oak Park, Illinois. He was married to Betty for forty-two years. They have three children, and five grandchildren.

Royal L. Brantley, Gamma Phi (Southwest Texas State) '47, 80, of Canyon, TX, died August 18, 2003. Mr. Brantley was born in Yorktown, Texas, attended Texas public schools, graduating from Harlandale High School in San Antonio in 1940. Brantley served as a first lieutenant in the Army Air Corps during World War II, piloting B24 bombers in the Pacific Theater. After the war, Mr. Brantley completed a bachelor of music education degree in 1947 at Southwest Texas State University, and in 1949, he

received the first master of music in vocal performance ever awarded by the University of Texas-Austin. He was head of the Vocal Music Department and director of choirs at Tarleton State for four years. He came to West Texas State University in 1953, serving as associate professor of vocal music and head of the vocal music department until 1984, continuing as a part-time instructor until 1988. Mr. Brantley, "Mr. B" to his students, introduced musical theater and opera to the High Plains through the Opera Workshop. From 1953 to 1979, Brantley directed, composed, conducted, produced, and/or performed in 54 productions. His original opera "Samuel" was produced there. He was the original music director for the musical drama "TEXAS", adapting, arranging and adding to the score over the course of 18 years. Remembered as an accomplished professional performer for his portrayal of leading roles in the "King and I," "The Most Happy Fella," "Fiddler on the Roof," and "Man of La Mancha," Mr. Brantley made his last appearance on stage with a cameo role in "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum" in 1990. Mr. Brantley was recognized with numerous honors and awards including the Alumni Association Phoenix Award for Teaching Excellence, induction into the Branding Iron Theatre Hall of Fame, Professor Emeritus of Music, and the nationally recognized Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Orpheus Award. He was preceded in death by his mother, and a son, Dr. John Stuart Brantley. Survivors include his wife, Charlotte; two daughters; a son; four sisters; a brother; three granddaughters; eight grandsons; a great-grandson; and many nieces and nephews. Memorials may be given to the Royal L. Brantley Scholarship Fund at West Texas A&M University, P. O. Box 60766, Canyon, TX 79016. Long -time Winston-Salem music businessman C. H. Duncan, Rho Psi (Wake Forest) ‘70, passed away in November 2003. Mr. Duncan was a 1970 honorary member of the chapter at Wake Forest University. Several years ago, he served on an advisory board to the ASU School of Music. Wiley Housewright, Beta Gamma (Columbia) '37, the former dean of the Florida State University School of Music died in his home of respiratory complications. He was 90. "I will miss sitting next to him at concerts," said Charlotte Krehbiel, who has known Housewright for more than 60 years. "When I think of him, I see a smiling person. He was always smiling, especially when he heard good music." When others think of Housewright, who spent 32 years with FSU before retiring in 1979,


THE FINAL CHORD they see an insightful man with a giving nature. He and his late wife, Lucilla, donated millions of dollars to FSU, particularly to help with the building of a new performance hall on the campus. After retiring, Housewright turned his attention to writing books about Florida's music and dance history. Before his death, Housewright was working on a children's musical book. "Wiley Housewright epitomized the man who could do it all. He was a superb teacher, an exemplary administrator and an accomplished scholar," said Jon Piersol, FSU's current dean of the School of Music. "But beyond that, he was a true and gracious gentleman." Before moving to Tallahassee, the Texas native taught at the University of Texas and public schools in New York. Krehbiel said she first met Housewright in New York, where they sang together. She said it didn't take long for her to realize how talented and influential he would become. "He thought well on his feet, right to the very end," Krehbiel said. "What made him special was his real passion to help and give back."

University of Texas at Austin School of Music professor emeritus Kent W. Kennan, Alpha Iota (Texas-A Austin) '54, died on November 1. Born in Milwaukee April 18, 1913, Kennan studied music and composition at the Eastman School of Music and received the Prix de Rome in 1936. He taught briefly at Kent State University before joining the faculty at UT in 1940. He left to serve in the armed forces during World War II and spent two years at Ohio State University before he returned to UT in 1949. Kennan was especially acclaimed as the author of Counterpoint and The Technique of Orchestration, both of which remain standards in music education. Though he penned work for orchestra, chamber groups, chorus, piano, voice and organ, his teaching and administrative duties often eclipsed his musical output. His “Night Soliloquy for flute and orchestra,” written in 1938, remained his best-known work. Kennan served as graduate adviser and chairman of the School of Music. Although retired, he continued to mentor young composers, meeting with recipients of the Kent Kennan Endowed Graduate Fellowship in Music Composition or Theory, which he endowed. Recognizing his years of devotion to the School of Music, the College of Fine Arts bestowed upon him its highest honor, the E. William Doty Award. Named for the founding dean of the College of Fine Arts and chairman of the School of Music, the Doty Award recognizes individuals who have made extraordinary contributions to education, the arts and society, as well as rendered exceptional service to the college and University.

Wallace Kuralt, Alpha Rho (North Carolina) ‘57 died December 15, 2003 in a hospital in Fort Myers Beach, FL, at the age of 64 from a rare

form of skin cancer. Kuralt and his wife Brenda raised their family at their home in Carrboro, NC. At one time, they owned nine Intimate Bookshops, including the original store in downtown Chapel Hill. Mr. Kuralt was the brother of CBS newsman Charles Kuralt. Wallace Kuralt graduated from UNC in 1960 and returned to Chapel Hill after serving in the Army. When he returned, he walked up one side of Franklin Street and back down the other, stopping at each business to apply for a job. At The Intimate Bookshop, the owner hired him, and his fate was set. After working there for seven years, Mr. Kuralt and his wife took over the shop in 1965. They expanded and came to own eight bookstores in North Carolina and one in Atlanta. In 1992, a fire destroyed the downtown store, but Kuralt rebuilt it bigger and better while trying to retain the charm of the original shop. After he closed the bookstores, he and his wife opened Past Perfect, an antique store that featured old books. Kuralt is survived by wife, Brenda; sons, Justin, Charles and Hamilton; daughter, MaryCatherine; sister, Catherine; and seven grandchildren. A memorial service was held in Gerrard Hall at UNC with Rev. Robert Seymour officiating.

Frank Mantooth, Gamma Theta (North Texas) '66, passed away at his home in Garden City, Kansas, at the age of 56. Brother Mantooth, an eleven-time Grammy nominee, was a pianist, composer, arranger and educator with five CD's and innumerable works to his credit.

Dr. Paul S. Martin, Lambda Gamma (Edinboro) ‘77, died from cancer on Wednesday, December 3, 2003. He was a professor at Edinboro University as well as an assistant conductor with the Erie Philharmonic Orchestra for over 25 years. He was a minor musical celebrity in Erie during his time at Edinboro.

Francis Morton McKim, Jr., Gamma Pi (Cal State-FFresno) '50, age 73, passed away April 3, 2002. Born in 1928 to descendants of the White family of The Mayflower and Captain John Smith of the Jamestown Colony, McKim's lifelong dedication to music began early on when a great aunt sent him a family violin. A graduate of Lemoore High School and Fresno State University, he enlisted in the US Army where he served as a chaplain's assistant, playing piano, organ, violin and singing at services. In 1951, he married artist Doris Moen and in 1955 they moved to San Lorenzo, where he taught vocal and instrumental music for 34 years, in order that they could be close to the San Francisco Opera and Symphony which they attended faithfully for many, many years. Francis was director of music at Castlemont

and Fairhaven Bible Chapels for many years and played in the San Leandro and Hayward State University symphonies. As a member of First Presbyterian Church of Berkeley he served on the Organ Committee and performed in the church orchestra. Surviving Francis are his wife Doris, his brother John Wesley McKim, his niece Pamela and other family members.

Vito S. Pascucci, Eta Phi (Southern Mississippi) '69, 80, of Kenosha, died Aug. 18, 2003. Born in Kenosha on Oct. 12, 1922, he was the son of the late Peter and Filomena (Lenardi) Pascucci. During World War II, he served with the Glenn Miller Army Air Corps Band. While stationed in Europe, he learned woodwind-manufacturing techniques from Leon Leblanc, with whom he co-founded the G. Leblanc Corp. after the war in 1946. In 1951, he married Betty Holm in Kenosha. In 1989, he acquired controlling interest in Leblanc's French parent company. At the time of his death, he served as chairman of the American firm and president-directeur general of the French firm. He worked on behalf of the music industry and music education, and served terms as chairman of the American Music Conference and president of the National Association of Band Instrument Manufacturers. He earned many major awards from the music industry, and received honorary doctoral degrees from four universities and colleges. He served as president of the Kenosha Manufacturers Association, later the Kenosha Area Business Alliance. He was a member of both the Kenosha Police and Fire Commission and the Harbor Commission. He also served as a director of St. Catherine's Hospital and the First National Bank of Kenosha, later Bank One. For many years the Custom Tailors Guild included him on its annual list of Ten Best-Dressed Men. Surviving are his wife of Kenosha; a son, Leon of Kenosha; a daughter, Sharon Allison of Denver, CO; two sisters, Helen Rizzo and Viola "Dolly" Doherty, both of Kenosha, and one grandchild.

Lloyd Pfautsch, Alpha Lambda (Illinois Wesleyan) '50, longtime professor of sacred music and director of choral activities at Southern Methodist University, died at Baylor University Medical Center after suffering a major stroke. He was 82. One of the country's most respected university choral conductors and teachers for half a century, Mr. Pfautsch was also a widely published and performed composer. Soon after arriving at SMU, Mr. Pfautsch founded the Dallas Civic Chorus which he directed for 25 years. Mr. Pfautsch's students have gone on to positions as choral directors around the world. Born in 1921 in Washington, MO, Mr. Pfautsch graduated from Elmhurst College and received master's degrees in divinity and sacred MAY 2004

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THE FINAL CHORD

NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS NEWS

music from Union Theological Seminary. He was ordained a minister in the Evangelical and Reformed Church, but turned down a pastorate to pursue music. A gifted bass-baritone, he sang with the Robert Shaw Chorale and the NBC radio chorus, and he sang the title role in Mendelssohn's “Elijah” in performances throughout the country. One of Shaw's other singers, Edith Herseth, became his wife. Mr. Pfautsch was awarded honorary doctorates from Elmhurst College, Illinois Wesleyan University and West Virginia Wesleyan College. At SMU he received the Outstanding Professor Award three times, the Distinguished Teacher/Scholar Award, and was named the Meadows Foundation Distinguished Teaching Professor. In addition to his wife, Edith, Mr. Pfautsch is survived by a daughter, Deborah; three sons, Peter, Eric, and John; and several grandchildren, a sister and numerous nieces and nephews.

John Stephen "Steve" Yoder, Nu Pi (Central Michigan) '91, age 48, of Saginaw, Mich., died November 2, 2003, at Covenant Health Care Center in Saginaw, Michigan. Mr. Yoder was a music director and instructor at Central Michigan University. He had instructed or directed many percussion units during his career. He served on the Saginaw Area Arts Council, the 20/20 Council of Saginaw, was a member of the Great Lakes Judging Association, a member of the Michigan Color Guard Judge's Association, was the coordinator of the Transportation and Volunteer Programs for the Bay Area Social Interventions Services, was inducted in to the Michigan Color Guard Circuit Hall of Fame in 1996, had served on the Board of Directors for the Michigan Color Guard Circuit for almost 25 years, and was a member of the Winter Guard International Percussion Advisory Board. Surviving besides his parents are four brothers, one sister, and 11 nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held Crossroads Evangelical Church. The family requests that memorial contributions be given to the Northcoast Academy of Saginaw, Michigan. Condolences may be sent to Yoderfamily@grisierfh.com.

THE FINAL CHORD The submission of obituaries and pictures is strongly urged and gratefully accepted. Please submit original, clear photographs and obituaries that are clearly typed. All written materials should be sent to the National Headquarters, Attention: Contributing Editor. Written materials may also be sent via email in Word format to editor@sinfonia.org. Photographs may also be sent via email to editor@sinfonia.org in a highresolution format. Deadlines for all submissions are: May Issue - March 1; December Issue - October 1. All articles are subject to editing.

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TWO CHAPTERS INSTALLED / REACTIVATED Upon successful completion of the Fraternity's lengthy and challenging colonization process, the following two chapters were installed or reactivated within the last twelve months: Pi Kappa (Langston University), installed April 19, 2003. Beta Sigma (University of Idaho), reactivated December 11, 2003.

LYRECREST BAR AUCTIONED AND REMOVED On March 6, 2004, the bar at the National Headquarters was removed and loaded onto a trailer by Wes Penn, Sigma Psi (Tennessee-Martin) ‘03. The bar, which was announced for auction on Ebay in the previous issue of The Sinfonian, has been located in the National Headquarters since before the Fraternity purchased the building in 1970. The removal of the bar was made necessary by a need for increased space. The bar was serving no function at the Headquarters, and the increasing popularity of the Lyrecrest Chapter Retreat program made the space lost to the bar and accompanying cabinet an inconvenience.

The purchase price of the bar was used to offset the cost of repairing and redecorating the affected area. The collection of donated college steins representing campuses on which Sinfonia has collegiate chapters retains its home on the wall at the former site of the bar.


REQUEST FOR SUBMISSION OF SINFONIA SONGS RECORDINGS As you may have read on page 5, the Fraternity is endeavoring to create a new CD recording of the complete Sinfonia Songs book from cover-to-cover. Many of the songs were previously recorded as part of the Century of Brotherhood CD series several years ago, but some songs still need to be recorded to make this new compilation complete. For this reason, the Fraternity is requesting that chapters and alumni associations record some of the songs below and send them to the National Headquarters for consideration. Recordings should have a “studio sound,” rather than being part of a live performance, and they must be submitted on CD. All submissions must be received at the National Headquarters no later than May 15, 2004. If your recording is selected, the group will be credited in the liner notes of the final disc! What an excellent way to bring prestige to your chapter or alumni association!

SINFONIA SONGS A Toast to Sinfonia (a cappella) (p.34) America (p.127) At Parting (p.100) Break, Break, Break (p.119) Brown Eyes (p.93) Dona Nobis Pacem (p.79) Farewell to You, My Brothers (accompanied) (p.50) Farewell to You, My Brothers (a cappella) (p.51) Five Songs for Male Voices (5) (p.102) Gaudeamus Igitur (English) (p.77)

Hymn (p.5) Idyll (p.101) Let Me Call You Sweetheart (p.98) Light Your Pipe (a cappella) (p.42) Night Shadows Falling (p.73) Pilgrimage Hymn (p.8) Sinfonian Prayer (p.86) Student Life (a cappella) (p.44) The Colors of Sinfonia (p.52) The Man of Upright Living (p.74) United Stand (a cappella) (p.28)

MILLS MUSIC MISSION SONGBOOK Ain’t She Sweet (p.6) America (p.19) Auld Lang Syne (p.49) Battle Hymn of the Republic (p.20) Camptown Races (p.42) Danny Boy (p.36) Deck the Hall (p.46) Dream a Little Dream (p.10) For He’s a Jolly Good Fellow (p.39) Girl of My Dreams (p.15) Good Night Ladies (p.33) Hark! The Herald Angels Sing (p.51) Home on the Range (p.40) It Came Upon a Midnight Clear (p.50) I’ve Been Workin’ on the Railroad (p.26)

Jingle Bells (p.47) Lo, How A Rose (p.45) Love’s Old Sweet Song (p.33) O Come, All Ye Faithful (p.48) Oh! Susanna (p.38) Old Kentucky Home (p.34) Silent Night (p.54) Sweet Adeline (p.16) The First Noel (p.53) The Marines’ Hymn (p.21) The Star-Spangled Banner (p.22) The Wide Missouri (p.41) There’s Music in the Air (p.32) We Three Kings of Orient Are (p.52) Yankee Doodle (p.24) You Tell Me Your Dream (p.7) Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah (p.28)

Sinfonia Store Graduation Sale ‘04 PLUS

Samples of the special savings available now: Regular Price Pint Glass: $6.50 Pilsner: $7.50 Stein: $12.00 11 oz. Maroon Coffee Mug: $6.00 17 oz. Black Noble Coffee Mug: $8.00 Red Greek Letter T-Shirts (S-2XL): $14.00

Black Hooded Sweatshirt (S-2XL): $39.00 Gray Greek Letter Sweatshirt (S-2XL): $29.00 All Hats: $13.00 Hardcover Themes for Brotherhood: $9.00 NEW!! Large Flag (3’x5’): $125.00

SALE $3.75 $4.25 $8.75 $3.75 $4.75

$10.50 $28.00 $19.00 $10.00 $7.00 $105.00

Special gifts suitable for the graduate or alumni Sinfonian...

The Sinfonia Line On sale now in the Sinfonia Store! These jewelry and desk accessories make perfect gifts for loyal brothers to show their pride in Sinfonia.

Visit www.lyrecrest.net/merchandise for more specials on your favorite Sinfonia merchandise.


NON-PROFIT ORG. US POSTAGE

PAID Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Fraternity of America, Inc. 10600 Old State Road • Evansville, IN 47711-1399

St. Meinrad, IN Permit No. 16

RETURN SERVICE REQUESTED

Sinfonia Store Graduation Sale ‘04 Celebrate graduation with the best prices of the year on your favorite Sinfonia merchandise! See page 27 for details. Visit the Sinfonia Store today for fantastic savings!

www.lyrecrest.net/merchandise Hurry — prices good while supplies last.

Sinfonian - May 2004  

May 2004 Sinfonian

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