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Queens Deadline Gay Marriage Stopped:

Activists Vow To Fight Senate ‘No’s By DOMENICK RAFTER In the wake of the defeat in the New York State Senate of legislation that would legalize same-sex marriage, the LGBT community is preparing to take on the five Queens State Senators who voted no on the bill in a political battle that could affect politics in every corner of the borough. Joseph Addabbo Jr. (D-Howard Beach), Shirley Huntley (D-Jamaica), Hiram Monserrate (D-Corona), George Onorato (DAstoria) and Frank Padavan (R-Bellerose) were among the 38 state senators who voted no to the bill on Dec. 2. The top target for LGBT groups is Padavan, the lone Republican in the borough. Padavan barely survived a re-election campaign against Councilman Jim Gennaro (D-Fresh Meadows). Since the vote, speculation has risen that outgoing Councilman and unsuccessful Democratic candidate for mayor Tony Avella (D-Bayside) would consider challenging Padavan. Avella’s council district includes Bayside and Whitestone, which have been Padavan’s strongholds. Avella supports same-sex marriage. The next highest priority is the embattled Hiram Monserrate. Monserrate is already being challenged in the Democratic primary by Assemblyman Jose Peralta (D-Jackson Heights) even before the vote. Aside from his legal troubles stemming from his misdemeanor assault conviction, Monserrate had alienated Democratic supporters and leadership with his role in the “Gang of Three” coup in the state Senate in June that temporarily gave Republicans control of the Senate. Peralta has the support of the Queens Democratic leadership and the Empire State Pride Agenda, New York’s LGBT rights

Hiram Monserrate

Frank Padavan

George Onorato

advocacy group. “[Jose Peralta’s] record on LGBT issues demonstrates that he does not duck-and-run when our bills come up for a vote. He has stood up for us in the Assembly, and we will stand with him in his race for the State Senate,” said Alan Van Capelle, executive director of the Empire State Pride Agenda. “I will continue that fight when I get to the New York State Senate,” Peralta told a promarriage equality rally in Jackson Heights Monday. “I make that pledge to you tonight. I will continue to fight to make sure one day, sooner than later, we will have equal rights and we will have same-sex marriage in the state of New York.” Onorato may also face a primary challenge or may retire completely. Onorato’s district, based in Astoria and Long Island City, has a thriving LGBT community. Onorato was lobbied strongly by LGBT rights supporters to vote in favor of the bill throughout the year. Outgoing City Councilman Eric Gioia (D-Sunnyside) is being targeted for a run, as is Assemblyman Michael Gianaris (D-Astoria). Civil Rights Attorney Jeremiah Frei-Pearson, who helped lead the effort to lobby Onorato in favor the bill, has also been

Joe Addabbo

paign help from the LGBT community in his race against Republican Sen. Serphin Maltese in 2008, a race that helped ultimately give the Democrats their Senate majority. Addabbo claimed he decided to vote no after talking with constituents. He said the feedback from his constituents was overwhelmingly against the bill and that regardless of his personal view on the issue, which he refuses to divulge, he felt he needed to vote as his constituents felt. “I voted, again, the will of the people in my district,” Addabbo said at a press conference on the steps of City Hall Dec. 4. Addabbo enraged LGBT rights groups, especially those who helped on his 2008 campaign, by suggesting he never promised a yes vote on same-sex marriage. “I guess I would be a defector if, at some point, whether it being my campaign last year or at any point this year, I would’ve said, ‘Yes, I was going to vote for the marriage equality bill.’ But at no point did I ever say yes,” he said. LGBT rights groups claim Addabbo did in fact endorse same-sex marriage. Addabbo’s district, previously held by a conservative Republican, includes a large number of traditionally socially conservative Catholics in Howard Beach, Glendale, Maspeth and Middle Village. The districts of Assemblyman Michael Miller (D-Glendale) and Assemblywoman Margaret Markey (D-Maspeth) make up the bulk of Addabbo’s Senate district. Both Miller and Markey opposed the same-sex marriage bill. Reach Reporter Domenick Rafter at drafter@queenstribune.com or (718) 3577400, Ext. 125.

Shirley Huntley

mentioned as a candidate. Huntley won her seat in 2006 after defeating the controversial Ada Smith, who also opposed same-sex marriage. Huntley said she voted no because she felt her constituents were against it. However, LGBT rights supporters argue Huntley would not face political repercussions if she voted yes since all Assembly members from her district voted yes. Huntley went on to endorse a statewide public referendum on the issue. “I would fully support a referendum to allow the people of New York State to decide the issue.” Huntley said in a statement. She took on some of her critics who have been harshly rebuking her opposition to the bill. “I applaud those of you who have questioned my position in a civilized manner,” Huntley continued. “However, to those few of you who have been insulting and even threatening, I will not be bullied.” So far there is no indication on who may take on Huntley. Freshman Addabbo presents the most interesting issue for LGBT rights supporters. Addabbo was strongly pro-gay rights while in the New York City Council and had received near $10,000 in donations and cam-

Protest Focuses On Monserrate’s Vote ful right, especially in a society where we see so much fragmentation, both racial and ethnic, rich and poor, political philosophy, even in marriages and homes?” asked Jackson Heights Rev. Ronald Tompkins. “We need these rights to stabilize our community, to make our city and our world a bet ter place to live,” he added. At the close of the gathering, at tendee s were invited to take the stage and express their opinions. A collection of community activists from the LGBT community obliged. Gay Activists Alliance’s Rich Wandel emphasized t he impor tance of allowi ng same-sex marriage to provide the gay community legit imacy in the eyes of the law. “When the state senate says quite loudly ‘we are not real people,’ that does affect me,” Wandel said. “It affects me in how I tend to feel about myself, if I’m not wise enough to see past it, it affects me walking at night in the street in Jackson Heights and even more so elsewhere”. Western Queens for Marriage Equality’s Brandon Brock expressed a message of hope, referencing famous New Yorker Harvey Milk, who was defeated two times before being elected to public office in San Francisco. “The activism of today will bring the equality of tomorrow,” he said. “Don’t be afraid to hope New York.” On Saturday, Dec. 12 at 3 p.m., a march to Monserrate’s office has been organized to protest the Senator’s vote. The march will begin at 92nd St. and Roosevelt Ave. Reach Reporter Kaitlyn Kilmetis at kkilmetis@queenstribune.com, or (718) 357-7400, Ext. 128.

www.queenstribune.com • Dec. 10-16, 2009 Tribune Page 3

sion interview where Monserrate was asked if he planned to marry h is girlfriend, who he was convicted of assaulting. “It’s an outrage he can mar ry h is girlfriend but we, who love someone and have never hit them, can’t marr y the person that we love,” Dromm said. City Councilman-Elect Jimmy Van Bramer, who is also openly gay, implored the crowd to stop suppor ting leaders who do not ad- Councilmen-elect Danny Dromm (r.) and Jimmy Van vocate for the rights of all Bramer (c.) join others advocating for gay marriage. people “We have to make sure that we stop elect- proud,” Gianaris said. “He is a man that ing senators who are not commit ted to full you don’t have to worr y whether he’s going equal rights and marriage equality for all,” to change his mind because he’s proven himhe said. self time and time again. On that note, Assemblyman Jose Peralta The only vocal dissenter was Jackson (D-Jackson Heights), who is staging a bat tle Heights resident Ter rence Dineen, who infor Monserrate’s senate seat, took the stage terrupted Peralta’s speech by yelling about to a round of cheers and condemned the whether his strong Roman Catholic base will Senator’s vote. deter him from voting for same-sex mar“He decided to vote against those indi- riage, if elected. Peralta responded that he viduals that fight for us in Afghanistan…that had voted for same-sex marriage on three teach our children…that treat us in our occasions despite his religious affiliation. hospitals…individuals that are our neighbors, Dineen also posed a heated question tothat are our family members,” Peralta said. wards Van Bramer and at one point pro“And we’re going to say ‘no’ to that.” claimed, “Down w ith the church.” Throughout the rally, the call to vote for During the rally, a number of religious Peralta was repeated. Assemblyman Mike leaders, both Christian and Jewish, took Gia naris (D-Astor ia) assured at tendee s their turn on the microphone to suppor t Peralta was someone they could trust. same-sex marriage. “He is a man that is going to make you “Why would we deny anyone this beauti-

Tribune Photo by Ira Cohen

By KA ITLYN KILMETIS A number of dishear tened Queens residents huddled together on a frigid December night to rally against yet another hit to the borough’s LGBT community, in a neighborhood that knows the feeling all too well. On Monday evening, at the stairs of the Jackson Heights Post Office, no more than a block from the sites where the brutal, hatemotivated murders of both Julio Rivera and Edgar Garzon occurred, community leaders decried the same-sex marriage bill’s failure to pass in the State Senate and vilified the five Queens senators who aided in extinguishing the controversial piece of legislation. City Comptroller-Elect John Liu recalled the relevance of the rally’s location during his speech. “We’re standing just yards away from a corner that is deeply embedded in the memory of Queens and New York City, where somebody was brutally killed because of hate and when we deny people equal rights it leads to exactly this type of action – hate and bias against people,” Liu said. “What we need to do is get rid of institutional hate and bias.” Before a backdrop of strongly-worded posters with messages like “We are all Hiram’s Victims” and “Abusers can marry: Why can’t I,” the five Queens senators who voted the bill down on Dec. 2 were repeatedly denounced throughout the gathering, although a bulk of the group’s fury was hurled towards Sen. Hiram Monserrate (D-Corona). During an impassioned speech, openlygay City Councilman-Elect Danny Dromm explained his rage stemming from a televi-


Hevesi Linked To Fund Scandal

Page 4 Tribune Dec. 10-16, 2009 • www.queenstribune.com

By JOSEPH OROVIC Attorney General Andrew Cuomo unveiled a pay-to-play scheme that reportedly reached the highest ranks of the State Comptroller’s office, including former Comptroller Alan Hevesi. Elliot Broidy, chairman and founder of California-based Markstone Capital Group LLC, pleaded guilty to involvement in a nearly $1 million kickback scheme which netted his company $250 million in funds from the New York State Common Retirement Fund. “This is an old fashioned pay-off of state officials case,” Cuomo said. “This is bribery of state officials. Not just one; a number of state officials in the Comptroller’s office.” Broidy admitted to the felony charge of rewarding official misconduct, forfeiting $18 million while promising to cooperate with Cuomo’s investigation. He was released with travel restrictions and faces up to four years in jail. The investment mogul reportedly doled out kickbacks in the form of direct payments to an official’s friends, a bogus consulting agreement, luxury travel expenses to Israel as well as funding for a movie. The junket to Israel was reportedly given to then-Comptroller Alan Hevesi, according to the Daily News. Past news articles revealed Hevesi’s decision to invest the unusually large amount in Markstone, which was developing into a premier player in Israel’s financial scene. In an article in the Israeli business outlet The Marker, Hevesi said, “I don’t report to anybody. Only the law restricts me.” Cuomo’s announcement follows past revelations of corruption involving state pension funds. Most recently, Liberal Party boss

Ray Harding and Aldus Equity founder Saul Meyer both pleaded guilty to felonies revealed by the investigation. The criminal complaint claimed Harding gained $800,000 from the State’s pension fund in exchange for political favors. Among the political favors Harding did was helping then-Forest Hills Assemblyman Michael Cohen find a $150,000-ayear job with insurance giant HIP, vacat-

ing a seat that was ultimately be filled by Hevesi’s son Andy. Hank Morris and Dave Loglisci, who worked under and for Alan Hevesi, have been indicted on a 123-count filing charging that they used illegal placement agents to hand out millions in funds for political favors and their own financial gain. While those previous cases involved the abuse of a system that allowed middle-men to

garner favors from financial institutions, Cuomo said these latest revelations constitute a different modus operandi. “This is not about placement agents. This not about Mr. Morris,” Cuomo said. “Broidy was solicited to make these payments. There was a culture of corruption.” Reach Reporter Joseph Orovic at jorovic@queenstribune.com, or (718) 3577400, Ext. 127.

Monserrate Avoids Jail In Assault By JOSEPH OROVIC State Sen. Hiram Monserrate (D-Corona) was sentenced to three years probation as well as a fine and community service for his reckless assault conviction, and still can't see his girlfriend. The embattled official avoided what could have been up to a year in jail, instead having to pay a $1,000 fine and perform 250 hours of community service on top of the probation. "A sentence must not be only fair, it must appear to be fair," Justice William Erlbaum said. "A sentence that includes probation is the appropriate sentence." Monserrate has since stated he plans to file an appeal. The sentencing lasted an unusually-long four-and-a-half hours, with exchanges ranging from jocular to petulant and all points between. The session began with a motion by Monserrate's attorneys, Joseph Tacopina and Chad Seigel, requesting the sentence be waived. Erlbaum based the Senator's conviction upon a bruise on girlfriend Karla Giraldo's left arm, as well as visual evidence provided

by security footage of Monserrate forcibly moving her through the hallway of his apartment building. Seigel argued the footage showed Monserrate held Giraldo by the right - not left - arm, and therefore did not cause the bruise. "Is there some reason your office, which kills so many trees with all these motions, neglected to file this [in writing?]" a visibly irate Erlbaum said before denying their motion. Tacopina and Seigel asked the order of protection keeping Monserrate from Giraldo be lifted. The female epicenter of the case testified before the court, echoing the request. "I've always said this is an accident," Giraldo said through an interpreter. "I don't need an order of protection and want to continue with my life as usual." After pressing the strength of her assertions, Erlbaum grew visibly testy and suggested Giraldo go through counseling. Before the sentence was handed down, Assistant DA Scott Kessler requested 60 days incarceration followed by parole and counseling, taking nearly half an hour to press his case. "Are you sure there is no political mo-

tive?" Erlbaum asked, holding up a thick filing by the prosecution. "I don't think there's been a report like this for a case since Son of Sam. It's a misdemeanor case. We must not lose our bearings." An emotional Monserrate spoke before the court, asking he be allowed to see Giraldo again. "I am committed to providing her with happiness and good," Monserrate said as he choked back tears. "I regret all the upset that has occurred as a result of my actions." Erlbaum said the order of protection could be lifted in due time if the couple goes through individual treatment in good faith. "She's not on a leash, and curb your anger. Curb your anger." Erlbaum told Monserrate. The 42-year-old now faces a Special Committee in the State Senate, which could take disciplinary action, including expulsion. The committee, made up of five Democrats and four Republicans, hopes to wrap up its investigation by Dec. 31. Reach Reporter Joseph Orovic at jorovic@queenstribune.com, or (718) 3577400, Ext. 127.


Jamaica High School May Be Closed “Students tend to fall behind early, and the school is not successful at getting them back on track,� he said. Along with the academic failings, the school is no longer attractive to potential students. “Students are just not choosing to go to Jamaica High school,� he said. Melissa Forgione, rebuffs that claim. “It was on my daughter’s school list,� she said. “My husband works 70 to 80 hours a week paying school taxes so my daughter can go to the school of her choice.� Forgione added that her daughter is a third generation Jamaica High school student as her mother, husband and his brother attended. Forgione disagreed with the DOE’s summation of the school. She said the school and Principal Walter Acham weren’t given a chance to succeed. Acham became principal during the 2007-08 school year. “Give him his chance,� she said. “Rome wasn’t built in a day. Why pull the rug from underneath him? Give the school a chance to show its true colors.� Kenneth Cohen, president of the Northeast Queens NAACP and the Flushing Suburban Civic Association, agreed that Acham hasn’t been given enough time to fully turn the school around. “What did they expect in two to three years,� he said. Forgione said she called local schools to mobilize parent coordinators and is also starting a blitz of 311 to complain. Kathy Forrestal, a 15-year alum of the school, dubbed the DOE’s decision as “shameful.� “It is shameful to close the school without dedicating all the resources necessary to sup-

port the teachers,� she said. “I think it is letting everyone — students, faculty and the community alike — down.� Kaur said the other school in operation within 167-01 Gothic Dr., the land marked Jamaica High School, is teeming with resources, while Jamaica is left to fend for itself. “They have smart boards and [2009] laptops,� she said. “They are not giving us enough money to survive in the school.� Havemann said the phase out is just a pro- The Dept. of Education is considering closing Jamaica High posal at the moment. He School. said there is a 45-day window for public comment, along with a public about a closure of the school instead of a hearing, which will be held at the school at 7 phase-out plan, which would allow the freshp.m., Jan. 7. He said then the Panel for man class to graduate. Cohen added that students in the school’s specialized curricuEducation Policy will vote. “This decision and proposal is not a deci- lum wouldn’t be placed in comparable prosion we come to lightly,� he said. “It is grams. He is also concerned that the overflow of consequential and difficult.� He also added that if the panel votes in students from Jamaica High School would favor of the closure, the 2009 freshman class be packed into already crowded schools. “Where are they going to fit these chilwill be the last students to graduate as Jadren?� he asked. maica High School students. Kaur vows to keep fighting for Jamaica Kaur said a vote for school closure would mean that her siblings, who’ve looked to High School. “We want this school to go rising up,� following in her stead at Jamaica, won’t get Kaur said. their chance. Reach Reporter Sasha Austrie at Cohen said at a meeting held Tuesday night, the DOE representatives contradicted saustrie@queenstribune.com or (718) 357Havemann. He said the representatives talked 7400, Ext. 123.

Tribune Photo by Ira Cohen

By SASHA AUSTRIE The rally cry has been sounded and the fight to keep Jamaica High School is underway. “We’ve been protesting,� said Balgit Kaur, a freshman student at the high school. “We’ve wrote notes to the Mayor Bloomberg and [Chancellor] Joel Klein.� Kaur added that they’ve taken to the internet contacting alumni and rallying the current student population. Last week the Department of Education proposed to phase out four Queens High Schools including Business, Computer Applications and Entrepreneurship High School along with Jamaica High School. The history of Jamaica High School has spanned more than a century, but 82 years ago, the school, which sits on a picturesque landscape, opened its doors. A winding staircase leads up the grassy knoll, with a bell tower overlooking all who enter. Activists looking to continue the legacy of Jamaica High School are dismayed its history will be lost inside landmark halls that may no longer bear its name. According DOE spokesman William Havemann, the school has underperformed for years with a graduation rate below 50 percent. “This is not about punishing educators and staff,� Havemann said. “This is acknowledgement of facts that we cannot ask students to attend where they have less than a 50 percent chance of graduating.� Havemann said in the 2007-08 school year there was a 44.5 percent graduation rate and that increased to 46.5 percent last year. He added that even with the slight improvement Jamaica performed way below the Queens average of 67 percent.

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Edit Page In Our Opinion:

Don't Let It End Jamaica High School has a proud history and may come to a tumultuous end. The Dept. of Education announced last week that due to consistently bad test scores and a low graduation rate, the school may be "closed," and transformed into a series of smaller, independent institutions within the landmark shell. In its heyday, Jamaica High School shone bright, pulling in students from a wide swath of the borough and providing a top-notch education. Yes, it has had its troubles. Yes, it had been on the list of violent schools. Yes, its very registration had been under review in recent years. But it has since shed its violent image, and its results have shown progress. The new principal, only in his third year at the helm, may not have had enough of an opportunity to show how his tenure can make a difference. To close the school and cut off this magnificent structure from its history is an audacious step, and one that must not be decided based on numbers alone. The DOE needs to listen to the community, the students, the parents and the administrators before making a hasty decision based on a questionable formula. We hope that whatever decision is made is not entered into lightly, and bears in mind the heart of the school - not just its numbers.

In Your Opinion:

Page 6 Tribune Dec. 10-16, 2009 • www.queenstribune.com

Disappointed To The Editor: On behalf of Queens Community House, a multi-service organization with 36 programs throughout the borough, I am writing to express outrage at the outcome of the recent vote on the Marriage Equality bill brought to the New York State Senate. I am particularly disappointed that four of the dissenting votes came from Democrats representing Queens, the most diverse county in the country and perhaps the world. State Senators Addabbo, Huntley, Onorato, and Monserrate voted to limit the human rights of their gay and lesbian constituents, and it is reprehensible that they offered no explanation as to why. Marriage equality is part of a larger civil rights struggle in the United States, and the Queens Community House and the 20,000 residents we serve each year will continue to battle for equal rights that honor the full humanity of all people. Our elected officials must be reminded that the struggle for legal equality for marginalized populations is not new, their opposition to LGBT marriage places them on the wrong side of history, and they are not representing the beliefs of many of their constituents. These senators had and bypassed the opportunity to honor same-sex couples with more than 1,000 rights and responsibilities that opposite

sex couples currently receive. Most of us agree that the miscegenation laws that forbade interracial marriage until forty years ago are a great national embarrassment. Forty years from now our children will be baffled that loving couples were once treated as second-class citizens by their elected officials. Irma Rodriguez, Executive Director, Queens Community House

Bad Idea To The Editor: I graduated from Jamaica High School in 1994. Leaving Ryan Middle School in 1991, I was warned by classmates that if I went to Jamaica, horrible things would happen to me. Thankfully, I ignored their warnings and entered Jamaica in 1991, and it was the best decision I ever made in my life. The school’s unsavory reputation was just that: a reputation. The reality was that students were given amazing opportunities to learn, to be exposed to people from a myriad of backgrounds, and to make lasting friendships. I was more than prepared for college thanks to Jamaica, and had I paid attention to the school’s reputation, I would have missed all that. Many of the wonderful teachers I had are still there, and I know from firsthand accounts that Jamaica continues to offer students the same opportunities that my classmates and I had fifteen years ago.

Michael Schenkler Publisher/Editor-in-Chief Queens County's Weekly Newspaper Group

Brian M. Rafferty, Executive Editor

Founded in 1970 by Gary Ackerman Published Weekly Copyright © 2009 Tribco, LLC

Shiek Mohamed, Production Manager

Queens Tribune (718) 357-7400 E-mail Address: news@queenstribune.com 174-15 Horace Harding Expwy. Fresh Meadows, N.Y. 11365 www.queenstribune.com

Ira Cohen, Photo Editor Regina Vogel Queens Today Editor

Michael Nussbaum Executive V.P./Associate Publisher

My neighbor currently attends Jamaica and is enrolled in the selective Gateway program. No one in her middle school had even told her that the program existed. Rather than attend Jamaica, her teachers were advising her to apply to small schools that she would have to travel nearly an hour to reach, but she chose Jamaica instead. She’s glad that she did, and doesn’t want to attend any other school. She heard all the same sorts of stories that I had heard years before, but she entered Jamaica in spite of her concern that the warnings would come true. Since starting at Jamaica, she has blossomed into a scholar, and she and her family are so impressed with the education she is receiving at Jamaica that her younger cousin and several younger friends applied to attend Jamaica beginning in September. Contrary to what the statistics and the school’s reputation suggest, she’s getting a fantastic education and loves going to school — as do her classmates. Jamaica is a special place. The interaction between current students and alumni is one of the things that I think makes Jamaica special – how many schools really exist where alumni of all ages clearly love their school and embrace each other as family, regardless of what year they graduated? I once saw a 90+ year old nearly leap with excitement when he learned we shared Jamaica as our alma mater. Current and former students alike (along with current and past teachers) celebrated Jamaica’s new status as a historic landmark last summer, and the hundreds of attendees were there to celebrate not just the building but the school. Would this love of school exist in a smaller school in that great building? I doubt it. Would students receive a great education in a small school? Possibly. But there are no guarantees, and students have been receiving a fantastic education at Jamaica High School for over 100 years. Students are still receiving fantastic educations at Jamaica today. Some students struggle with academics due to learning challenges, others enter the school without mastering skills at lower grades, and others simply are challenged by the need to begin learning English as high school students. Regardless, they all receive an education at Jamaica. What kind of home will these students find in smaller, more “selective” high schools? And if the city has the financial resources to launch and fund several new schools in the Jamaica building, why hasn’t it allowed Jamaica’s current students to benefit from those resources? In spite of funding cuts, graduation rates and test scores are improving, and to close the school without Marcia Moxam Comrie, Contributing Editor Reporters: Sasha Austrie, Harley Benson, Lori Gross, Joseph Orovic, Kaitlyn Kilmetis, Domenick Rafter Editorial Intern: Christina Fong Photographers: Ira Cohen, Michael Fischthal, Lee Katzman Contributors: Tom Allon, Melissa Hom, Michael VonDerLieth, Barbara Arnstein Art Department: Tania Y. Betancourt, Sara Gold, Rhonda Leefoon, Candice Lolier, Barbara Townsend Webmaster: Shiek Mohamed Assistant to the Publisher: Ria MacPherson

first dedicating the resources to support the teachers’ efforts is shameful. Instead of providing resources to a school striving to improve itself, the city has reduced the number of teachers in the school and left some classes this year without permanent teachers as of late in the fall term. The students, teachers and families most affected by the city’s decision to close the school are right to be infuriated and to feel betrayed by the city. Jamaica should be kept open to offer all students an education while also providing all the things a large school can offer with proper funding that a small “academy” can’t: a wider variety of athletic teams, varied extracurricular activities, more diversity, and a wider range of elective courses. The school needs the city’s support, not its condemnation. Kathleen Forrestal, Jamaica High, Class of 1994

Unbelievable To The Editor: State Senator Hiram Monserrate gets off with a slap on the wrist for domestic abuse. I cannot understand how the judge could do this considering the assault on this poor woman. This is a set back for every woman who are looking for justice against domestic abuse. In my book any man who assaults a woman is not a man at all. Furthermore I think the State Senate ought to give him the boot. I think the senate should show him the door and say, “Don’t let the door hit you on the way out.” Frederick R. Bedell Jr., Glen Oaks

Wrong Aid To The Editor: Every Christmas like clockwork, half the pages of every newspaper fill up with appeals to show good will to others, and to help the poor. Yet volunteering is not the best way to show good will or to really help others. As someone who works with low income city residents daily, I can tell you that volunteering at a local soup kitchen is not “a highly effective” way to help people in need. The statistics also support my point. According to the statistics at the Coalition Against Hunger itself, 60 percent of soup kitchens don’t have enough food to meet the demand, and 57 percent have to close early or turn people away as a result. What good then will it do to have more volunteers? So they can all hold the door open for those they turn away and thank them for coming? Give me a break. Soup kitchens and pantries fall under the category of necessary evils. Except for some small local ones, it is Howard Swengler Vice President of Sales Shelly Cookson, Corporate & Legal Advertising Account Executives Helene Sperber Merlene Carnegie Earl Steinman Tom Eisenhauer Shari Strongin Donna Lawlor Tony Nicodemo

Maureen Coppola, Advertising Administrator Accounting: Leticia Chen, Phyllis Wilson

a huge industry that exists to help big corporations via tax breaks for their donations of things they can’t sell. (You didn’t think they were giving away that food out of the goodness of their hearts, did you?) The corporations also save the millions they would have had to pay to dump the unsellable merchandise/food and have it carted away – because the food banks pay for that. It’s a win-win, but only for the corporations and the food banks, not for poor and hungry people. The head of the New York City Coalition Against Hunger, Joel Berg, doesn’t even believe that more volunteers is what we need to end hunger locally and nationally. He believes that increasing the food stamp payout to people, combined with getting rid of some of the dumber time consuming steps in its bureaucracy (like fingerprinting recipients which he has shown wastes $800,000 a year that could be used to feed poor kids) is the way we can significantly reduce poverty/feed the poor. He uses every opportunity to ask for improvements to the food stamp program, yet these Christmas time articles insist on ignoring his position and keep pushing pantries and volunteering. Let’s face it: poverty is the only reason that so many New Yorkers can’t buy food. There are no food shortages here. Bishop Mitchell Taylor, who works locally, has said that to solve the hunger (poverty) problem, “people need easier access to government benefits like food stamps.” He has never said, “people need more volunteers to serve them at soup kitchens.” New Yorkers who want to help kids and adults eat must understand starting now that soup kitchens and food pantries are mostly ineffective (see above statistics), for they help for one day, or one afternoon, at great cost to all of us including the poor. Besides which, all that moving and delivering of donated food from one place to another contributes to global warming, since the trucks use gas and the whole process generates trash and packaging along the way, and it makes the poor travel too – to the soup kitchens. If each person who reads this, including the author of the referenced article, stayed away from the soup kitchen but wrote a note to their Congressperson with a copy to Robert Doar (Commissioner of HRA/Food Stamps) and asked them to double the current food stamp allotment per person and reduce the re-application requirement to once a year (or even once every two years) instead of once every six months, it would do more to feed New Yorkers than all the well meaning but poorly thought out volunteering that is taking place right now in this city. Diane R. Pagen, Lefrak City Mitch Kronenfeld: Classified Manager Elizabeth Mance: Administrative Assistant Classified Ad Representatives: Nadia Hack, Peggie Henderson, Fran Gordon, Marty Lieberman, Chris Preasha, Lorraine Shaw, Sheila Scholder

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Cold Weather Tips: Save Energy. Save Money. Stay Warm. Conservation is a smart energy strategy year round. Frigid weather brings its own challenges for New Yorkers, and these cold weather tips offer ways to help you keep warm, save energy and get help with energy bills.

CONSERVE • Seal leaks around windows and doors with caulk or weather stripping. • Keep drapes or furniture away from heat sources so heat can flow freely. • Open curtains and let the sun warm rooms; close them at night to keep heat in. • Close doors and warm-air vents in unused rooms. • Get financial incentives for upgrades to homes and businesses that will help you save energy and money. Learn more at www.conEd.com/energyefficiency or call 1-877-870-6118. • Find more energy tips at www.conEd.com and www.getenergysmart.org, the web site of NYSERDA – New York State Energy Research and Development Authority.

GET HELP • Call 1-800-75-CONED (1-800-752-6633) if you’re having trouble paying your energy bill. • Ask about our Level Payment Plan, which spreads payments evenly over the year so colder months are less of a burden. • If you’re income-eligible, you can get help from the Con Edison-sponsored EnergyShare fund at 1-877-480-SHARE, or the Federal Home Energy Assistance Program (HEAP) at 1-800-692-0557 in NYC or 1-914-995-5619 in Westchester County. • If you receive a HEAP grant for another utility or an oil company and pay Con Edison bills, you may be eligible for our low-income rate. To qualify, fax a copy of your award letter to 1-212-844-0110.

STAY SAFE • Never use your kitchen gas range or oven to heat your home. It can cause a fire or create lethal carbon monoxide gas. • Never extinguish a pilot light. It could lead to a dangerous gas leak.

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www.queenstribune.com • Dec. 10-16, 2009 Tribune Page 7

• If you smell gas, leave the area at once and call 1-800-75-CONED (1-800-752-6633). A gas leak has the smell of rotten eggs. Don’t light matches or use any electrical device.


In Search Of A U.S. Senator: Run, Bill, Run! By MICHAEL SCHENKLER

Follow me on Twitter @QueensTribune I don’t know Kirstin Gillibrand. She was appointed as United States Senator from New

York State to replace Secretary of State Hillar y Clinton, by David Paterson, an accidental Governor in crisis, after he publically dissed the surviving member of America’s royal family. The non-auspicious start for Ms. Gillibrand, who has yet to be tested statew ide in an election, was compounded when her ideological beliefs proved inconsistent with the overwhelming majority of Democrats – her party – in New York State. Gillibrand a one-term Congre ssmember, a Democrat elected to the House from a conservative, Republican, upstate district, perhaps shouldn’t be faulted for being an NRA member, a guncontrol proponent who kept rifles under her bed, with an anti immi-

grant stance and what progressive New Yorkers would reject as Blue Dog, right-leaning tendencies. Perhaps her conservative perspective reflected the beliefs of her district and upbringing. They were however clearly inconsistent with her electability as a Democrat in our State where downstate expects progressive representat ion. So Ms. Gillibrand began to morph. She began advocating gun control, softening her conservative positions and fundraising for election. With popular senior Senator Chuck Schumer leading the way, her potential primar y opponents were convinced she was invincible or were otherwise persuaded not to challenge her. In reality, everyone knew that Gillibrand does not fit the mold of a Democratic U.S. Senator from New York and was absolutely vulnerable in a Democratic Primary where the hard core progressives turn out in greater percentage than others – she was vulnerable in spite of Chuck Schumer and a huge fundraisi ng head star t. Dav id Paterson’s support was irrelevant at best. Kirstin Gillibrand has not convinced this writer that she can repre sent h im or t he progre ssive Democrats of this City and State

in the U.S. Senate. Her willingness to change long-standing positions to play to the voters raises questions of principle and commitment. But the preprogrammed Gillibrand steamroller seemed to have cleared the field. But Gillibrand could lose the seat to a Republican without support from the progressive wing of the party. George Pataki and Rudy Giuliani are clearly two candidates that could take an all-important seat away from the Democratic Party. Compared to Pataki, it is only Gillibrand’s likely support of an Obama agenda that would make this writer consider a vote for her. But we once would have said that about Joe Lieberman. Today, we’d prefer Pataki to him. Long Isla nd Congre ssma n Steve Israel got out of the Primary race after a call from the White House was arranged. Manhattan Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney was next to abandon the race. Others were kept in line and Gillibrand was expected to have a free ride as the Democratic candidate expect perhaps for Suffolk Count y Legislature Majority Leader John Cooper, an early Obama supporter, progressive, gay man, with solid liberal credentials and an exploratory committee pursuing a quixotic, underfunded quest.

Till now, that is. Bill Thompson, a lifelong progressive New York City Dem who has served the people well in a number of positions over the past decades is the latest name in the game. Consistent, reliable, creative and one hell of a nice guy, Bill fits the U.S. Senate mold perfectly. With the party ready to abandon David Paterson in favor of Andrew Cuomo, having a black man on the statewide ticket would be an advantage to the party and Cuomo. Thompson demonstrated surprising strength in his challenge of Mayor Mike Bloomberg. Thompson was out-gunned financially by the self-funded billionaire. But it was more than that. Mike Bloomberg, with his political independence in a sullied system, had won over many who admired and respected and supported Thompson – including th is writer. Yet T hompson shown bright in spite of millions spent to sully his image. While also mentioned as a State Comptroller candidate – perhaps Cuomo’s choice to challenge incumbent appointed Comptroller Tom DiNapoli, another candidate never tested statewide – Thompson has a clearer path to history by seeking the Senate. A black man from the city, co-

incidentally who also served as President of the NYC Board of Ed, has already been State Comptroller – you may remember Carl McCall. And yes, recently, NYC Comptroller Alan Hevesi, after losing for Mayor, ran successfully for State Comptroller. State Comptrollers are, forgive me, nickel and dime positions. You don’t remember them unless they get indicted. Sit back and try to name several others than the two refer red to above. But to be the first black New York United States Senator, to hold the seat previously occupied by Bobby Kennedy and Hi llar y Clinton, to serve in that august body, the U.S. Senate, is part of history itself and my friend Bill Thompson is up to the task and deserving of the opportunity. He’s got what it takes. Kirstin Gillibrand is merely the creation of some political players who found it convenient to promote an aggressive, young, attractive woman. But the Democratic Primary for U.S. Senator from New York is lots more than a beauty contest and on the issue s; Bill Thompson represents the positions of the Party and the people of New York. Run, Bill, Run! MSchenkler@QueensTribune.com

Page 8 Tribune Dec. 10-16, 2009 • www.queenstribune.com

Paper Examines Convoluted Structure At Working Families By HENRY J. STERN City Hall, the newspaper, is in the midst of a five-part investigative series on the Working Families Party and the web of shadow organizations through which it operates as a political party, a lobbying firm, a non-profit charitable foundation, and a for-profit business serving candidates the WFP has endorsed. The newspaper was founded in June 2006, with Edward-Isaac Dovere as editor. It is owned by Manhattan Media, a pubHenry lisher of weekly community newspapers in New York City, whose president and CEO is Tom Allon. The printed edition of City Hall appears twice monthly, and it s web site, cit yhal lne ws.com, changes daily, occasionally more frequently, to publish current news. You can reach the staff at editor@cityhallnews.com. Past editions are available on the web site. The first three ar ticles published in City Hall expose an interlocking network of organizations consisting of the same handful of people, who gain substantial advantage by the purely hypothetical division of their enterprise into multiple companies. The separate organizations are governed by different state and federal laws, and activities which are forbidden for

one type of organization are permit ted for others. In fact, t he groups are the same, so the purpose of this convoluted structure appears to be to evade the prohibition of certain activities by certain types of organizations. For example, contributions to political parties are subject to specific limitations, while contributions to nonprofit foundations are not. The Working Families Party has hired a wellregarded law firm, Skadden, Arps, Slate, Stern Meagher and Flom, to look into their arrangements. Retired Chief Judge Judith S. Kaye of the Court of Appeals and Daniel Kurtz, former head of the Attorney General’s Charities Bureau, will oversee t he inquir y. T he firm should be aware that this is a matter in which there is significant public interest. Judge Kaye enjoys a fine reputation. Presumably she will act not as counsel for the Working Families Party, although it is they who have engaged her firm, but instead act on behalf of the general public interest in clean, honest elections with enforceable limitations on contributions in all forms, as well as full and complete disclosure of campaign receipts and expenditures. An important question in this

mat ter is not only whether t he WFP structure is compliant with existing New York State and Federal laws, but also whether these operations comply with the spirit of the laws, which are intended to secure full disclosure and fair competition between polit ical candidates and parties. For example, American and foreign companies incorporate in the Cayman Islands to avoid paying taxes and complying with regulations applied in the United States to business corporations. That does not mean that the practice of offshoring ones headquarters is ethical or tolerable. One interesting fact published so far in the series is that George Soros appears to have donated at least $350,000 to the network. We cite City Hall: “Some of the Fund’s financial supporters were the same as those for the Working Families Organization, including the biggest single named donation from 2006 (visible on a ‘Donations by Deposit’ form filed with the state attorney general’s office): $200,000 from the Open Society Institute of billionaire philanthropist George Soros, who also wrote a $150,000 personal check to the Working Families Organization that year. Those donations are far larger than the $94,200 limit that the Working Families Party is bound to hold

to under state law.” Soros, born in 1930 in Budapest, is reported by Forbes to be worth $11 billion. His fortune is self-made, and based on speculation in the stock market and in foreign and U.S. currency. He is repor ted to have made a billion dollars in one day, September 6, 1992, by short-selling English currency before the Bank of England stopped fixing its exchange rate. For this achievement, the British press called him “The man who broke the Bank of

Engla nd.” Soros has been a prominent philanthropist, and a suppor ter of left-leaning parties around the world. He funded dissident movements in Soviet bloc countries, and promoted democracy after the captive nations were freed. We will keep up to date as the series continues. We are curious whether the mainstream media will pick up the story, which appears to us to deserve wider coverage than it has so far received. StarQuest@NYCivic.org

Not 4 Publication.com by Dom Nunziato


Page 10 Tribune Dec. 10-16, 2009 • www.queenstribune.com

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

CIVIL COURT OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF QUEENS Index No. 98900/ 09 SUMMONS Plaintiff’s Residence Address: 231-27 Merrick Boulevard Laurelton, NY Venue is based on location of subject REAL PROPERTY NAOMI QUAZI, Plaintiffs, -against- IRA KESSEL SUK JA YUN AND SEU MI YUN, If said above named defendants be living, and if any of said defendants be dead, then any and all other persons who may claim as heirs-at-law, next-of-kin, devises, distributees, legal representatives and successors in interest of said defendants and the Register of the County of Queens, Defendants. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S): YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to appear in the Civil Court of the City of New York, County of Queens at the office of the Clerk of the said Court at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, New York, in the County of Queens, City and State of New York, within the time provided by law as noted below and to file your answer to the complaint with the Clerk; upon your failure to answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint, together with the costs of this action. Dated: November 9, 2009 Lamont R. Bailey, Esq. Bailey & Bailey, LLC Attorneys for Plaintiff 123-20 82 nd Avenue Kew Gardens, NY 11415 718-7015915 NOTE: The law provides that: (a) if this summons is served by its delivery to you personally within the City of New York, you must appear and answer within TWENTY days after such service; or (b) if this summons is served by delivery to any person other than you personally, or is served outside the City of New York, or by publication, or by any means other than personal delivery to you within the City of New York, you are allowed THIRTY days after the proof of service thereof is filed with the Clerk of this Court within which to appear and answer. To: SUKJA YUN AND SEU MI YUN, If said above named defendants be living, and if any of said defendants be dead, then any and all other persons who may claim as heirs-at-law, next-of-kin, devisees, distributees, legal representatives and successors in interest of said defendants. The forgoing summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an order of Hon. Anna Culley, a Judge of the Civil Court of the City of New York, dated the 2 nd day of November, 2009, and filed with the complaint and other papers, in the office of the Clerk of the Court at 8917 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, New York. This is an action pursuant to RPAPL 1501(4), the relief sought is to discharge of record a mortgage in the sum of $126,000 dated 12/5/90 and recorded 1/4/91 in Reel 3105 page 954 in the Queens County Register’s Office, and, in case of your failure to

appear, judgment may be taken against you discharging said mortgage, together with the costs and disbursements of this action; The property involved in this action is described as follows: 57-16 37th Avenue, Woodside, NY _______________________________________________________________________ NOTICE OF FORMATION of: 48-20 48 th STREET LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/28/09. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. The Post Office address to which the SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him is James Montgomery, Esq., 267 Fifth Avenue, Suite 810, New York, New York 10016. Purpose of LLC: to engage in any lawful activity. Street address of Principal Business location i s : 4 8 - 2 0 4 8 th S t r e e t , Woodside, New York 11377 ________________________________________________________________________ Notice of formation of GLOBAL TALK NETWORKS LLC, a limited liability company. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (SSNY) on 09/21/2007. Office located in Queens County. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the LLC to THE LLC: 32-41 Steinway Street 2 nd Fl, Astoria, NY 11103-4075. Purpose: Any lawful activity. ________________________________________________________________________ SUPREME COURT – QUEENS COUNTY In the Matter of the Application of Benny F. Terrusa, as Guardian of the Person and Property of JORGE REGUEIRO, an incapacitated person to sell certain real property pursuant to an order of this court dated October 16, 2009, by Hon. Charles J. Thomas, a Justice of this Court, an application to sell premises 14944 118 th Street South Ozone Park, N.Y. 11420 Block 11818 Lot 61 being a plot 30 feet by 100 feet will be made on the 22nd day of December 2009 at 11:00 A.M. at I.A. Part 20 of the Supreme Court at 8811 Sutphin Boulevard Jamaica, N.Y. 11435. Said property is presently under contract, subject to the approval of the court, for the price of $250,000.00. Contact PETER M. WOLF, ESQ. of Kew Gardens, N.Y. Attorney for the Guardian 125-10 Queens Boulevard Kew Gardens, N.Y. 11415 (718) 261-7580 ________________________________________________________________________ SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF OBJECT OF ACTION STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT: COUNTY OF QUEENS ACTION TO FORECLOSE A MORTGAGE INDEX NO.: 5741/09 PRIVATE CAPITAL GROUP, LLC Plaintiff, vs. DANIEL CURRAN, DEIRDRE CURRAN, Defendant(s). MORTGAGED PREMISES: 217-19 BEACH 116TH STREET, FAR ROCKAWAY, NY 11694 SBL #: BLOCK 16212 LOT 28 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT: You are hereby summoned to answer the Com-

plaint in this action, and to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the Complaint is not served with this Summons, to serve a notice of appearance, on the Plaintiff(s) attorney(s) within twenty days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within 30 days after the service is complete if this Summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York). In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. The Attorney for Plaintiff has an office for business in the County of Erie. Trial to be held in the County of Queens. The basis of the venue designated above is the location of the Mortgaged Premises. Dated this 12th day of November, 2009, Steven J. Baum, P.C., Attorney(s) For Plaintiff(s), 220 Northpointe Parkway, Suite G, Amherst, NY 14228 TO: DANIEL CURRAN, Defendant(s) In this Action. The foregoing Summons is served upon you by publication, pursuant to an order of HON. JOSEPH G. GOLIA of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, dated the 28th day of October, 2009 and filed with the Complaint in the Office of the Queens County Clerk, in the City of Jamaica. The object of this action is to foreclose a mortgage upon the premises described below, executed by DANIEL CURRAN and DEIRDRE CURRAN dated the 9th day of August, 2005, to secure the sum of $250,000.00, and recorded at Instrument No. 2005000533004 in the Office of the Clerk of the County of QUEENS, on the 22nd day of September, 2005; which mortgage was duly assigned by assignment dated the 21st day of December, 2006, and recorded on the 14th day of February, 2008, in the Office of the Clerk of QUEENS County at Instrument No. 2008000063083; The property in question is described as follows: 217-19 BEACH 116TH STREET, FAR ROCKAWAY, NY 11694 SEE FOLLOWING DESCRIPTION Block 16212 and Lot 28 ALL that certain plot, piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements thereon erected, situate, lying and being in the Borough and County of Queens, City and State of New York, known and designated on a certain map entitled, “Map of Rockaway Park (No. 3) 5 Ward, Borough of Queens, City of New York, belonging to the Rockaway Park Improvement Company Limited, surveyed by E. W. & F. W, Conklin, C.S.” filed in the Office of the Clerk of Queens County on August 13,1903, as and byLotsNos.634 and 635 In Book No.11 on said map. Said parcels taken together are bounded and described as follows: BEGINNING at a point on the Westerly side of Beach 116th Street (formerly Fifth Avenue) distant 140 feet Northerly from the corner

formed by the Intersection of the Northerly side of Rockaway Beach Boulevard (formerly Washington Avenue) with the Westerly side of Beach 116th Street; RUNNING THENCE Northerly along the Westerly side of Beach 116th Street, 40 feet; THENCE Westerly at right angles to Beach 116th Street, 100 feet; THENCE Southerly parallel with Beach 116th Street, 40 feet; THENCE Easterly again at right angles to Beach 116th Street, 100 feet to the point or place of BEGINNING HELP FOR HOMEOWNERS IN FORECLOSURE NEW YORK STATE LAW REQUIRES THAT WE SEND YOU THIS NOTICE ABOUT THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. PLEASE READ IT CAREFULLY. SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME. IF YOU FAIL TO RESPOND TO THE SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT IN THIS FORECLOSURE ACTION, YOU MAY LOSE YOUR HOME. PLEASE READ THE SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT CAREFULLY. YOU SHOULD IMMEDIATELY CONTACT AN ATTORNEY OR YOUR LOCAL LEGAL AID OFFICE TO OBTAIN ADVICE ON HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF. SOURCES OF INFORMATION AND ASSISTANCE The state encourages you to become informed about your options in foreclosure. In addition to seeking assistance from an attorney or legal aid office, there are government agencies and non-profit organizations that you may contact for information about possible options, including trying to work with your lender during this process. To locate an entity near you, you may call the toll-free helpline maintained by the New York State Banking Department at 1-877BANK-NYS (1-877-226-5697) or visit the department’s website at WWW.BANKING.STATE.NY.US. FORECLOSURE RESCUE SCAMS Be careful of people who approach you with offers to “save” your home. There are individuals who watch for notices of foreclosure actions in order to unfairly profit from a homeowner’s distress. You should be extremely careful about any such promises and any suggestions that you pay them a fee or sign over your deed. State law requires anyone offering such services for profit to enter into a contract which fully describes the services they will perform and fees they will charge, and which prohibits them from taking any money from you until they have completed all such promised services. § 1303 NOTICE NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your

home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. DATED: November 12, 2009 Steven J. Baum, P.C., Attorney(s) For Plaintiff(s), 220 Northpointe Parkway, Suite G, Amherst, NY 14228 The law firm of Steven J. Baum, P.C. and the attorneys whom it employs are debt collectors who are attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained by them will be used for that purpose. ________________________________________________________________________ Notice of formation of LE CHAVEZ LLC, a limited liability company. Articles of Organization filed with the Secy. Of State of the State of NY (SSNY) on 10/02/2009. Office located in Queens County. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the LLC to the LLC 150-13 Hillside Ave., Jamaica, NY 11432. Purpose: any lawful purpose. ________________________________________________________________________ Notice of formation of Knights Design & Construction LLC, a limited liability company (LLC). Arts. of Org. filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 9/4/ 2009. Office located in Queens County. SSNY designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the LLC to THE LLC 129-27 135TH PLACE SOUTH OZONE PARK, NY 11420 Purpose: Any lawful purpose. ________________________________________________________________________ SUPREME COURT – QUEENS COUNTY In the Matter of the Application of PETER M. WOLF, as Guardian of the Person and Property of MAHLIA ROBINSON, a/k/a MAHALIA ROBINSON, an incapacitated person to sell certain real property pursuant to an order of this court dated November 23, 2009, by Hon. Charles J. Thomas, a Justice of this Court, an application to sell premises 1332 0 1 1 1 th A v e n u e S o u t h Ozone Park, N.Y. 11420 Block 11637 Lot 10 being a plot 30 feet by 100 feet will be made on the 6th day of January 2010, at 11:00 A.M. at I.A. Part 20 of the Supreme Court at 88-11 Sutphin Boulevard Jamaica, N.Y. 11435. Said property is presently under contract, subject to the approval of the court, for the price of $320,000.00. Contact PETER M. WOLF, ESQ. of Kew Gardens, N.Y. Attorney for the Guardian 125-10 Queens Boulevard Kew Gardens, N.Y. 11415 (718) 261-7580 ________________________________________________________________________ CITATION File No. 2008-82 SURROGATE’S COURT, Queens COUNTY THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, By the Grace of God Free and Independent

TO: The heirs at law, next of kin, and distributees of VIVIAN GIRARDIN a/k/a VIVIAN V. GIRARDIN a/k/a VIVIAN ADELAINE GIRARDIN, deceased, if living, and if any of them be dead to their heirs at law, next of kin, distributees, legatees, executors, administrators, assignees and successors in interest whose names are unknown and cannot be ascertained after due diligence. Public Administrator of Queens County Attorney General of New York A petition having been duly filed by Albert E. Girardin who is/ are domiciled at 69-51 Alderton Street, Rego Park, New York 11374 YOU ARE HEREBY CITED TO SHOW CAUSE before the Surrogate’s Court, Queens County, at 88-11 Sutphin Blvd., Jamaica, New York, on January 14, 2010, at 09:30 o’clock in the forenoon of that day, why a decree should not be made in the estate of Vivian Girardin, a/k/a Vivian V. Girardin a/k/a Vivian Adelaine Girardin lately domiciled at 69-51 Alderton Street, Rego Park, New York 11374, United States admitting to probate a Will dated February 11, 2006 (and Codicil(s), if any, dated ), a copy of which is attached, as the Will of Vivian Girardin deceased, relating to real and personal property, and directing that: x Letters Testamentary issue to Albert E. Girardin x Letters of Trusteeship issue to Esperanza Girardin f/b/o Victoria Girardin Esperenza Girardin f/b/o Jacqueline Girardin Dated, Attested and Sealed, NOV 18 2009 HON. Robert L. Nahman Surrogate ALICEMARIE E. RICE Chief Clerk Christine R. Shiebler, Esq. Print Name of Attorney (631) 543-7667 Telephone Sarisohn Law Partners, LLP Firm 350 Veterans Memorial Hwy., Commack, New York 11725 NOTE: This citation is served upon you as required by law. You are not required to appear. If you fail to appear it will be assumed you do not object to the relief requested. You have a right to have an attorney appear for you. ________________________________________________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 11/24/09, bearing Index Number NC-001069-09/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me (us) the right to: Assume the name of (First) Adenike (Middle) Asanat (Last) Busari My present name is (First) Adenike (Middle) Sanat (Last) Ogunniyi My present address is 117-27 142 nd Street, Jamaica, NY 11436 My place of birth is Nigeria My date of birth is March 26,1978

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Queens This Week Vols Reach Out The Woodhaven Residents' Block Association lends its support and encouragement to the Woodhaven Richmond Hill Volunteer Ambulance Corps, which has found itself in dire financial straits. The WRBA encourages residents to attend a "pasta night" fundraiser hosted by the Volunteer Ambulance Corps this Sunday, Dec. 13. The Volunteer Ambulance Corps, which was started in 1965, has seen some of its major income sources slashed in the past year. As a result, the organization is now having difficulty paying the utilities at its headquarters, located at 78-15 Jamaica Ave. The pasta night will feature all-you-caneat pasta, salad, dessert, and coffee, as well as a D.J., karaoke, and 50/50 raffles. It will occur from 4-8 p.m. at the Ambulance Corp's headquarters. Tickets are $15 per person. "The Volunteer Ambulance Corps has long served the people of Woodhaven," said WRBA President Vance Barbour. "During these difficult times, it's important to support organizations like this one, which has done so much. The pasta night is a way to enjoy a great meal and support a great cause at the same time." The Volunteer Ambulance Corps's headquarters has been the location of the WRBA's meetings, which has strengthened the ties between the two organizations. To RSVP for the pasta night, call one of the following: Kathy Sexton-Dalbey at (718) 813-3869, Kelly Sexton at (347) 730-7805 or Kathy Leon at (347) 866-0473.

Groups Unite To Make A Difference

Willets Foes See Lawsuit Tossed Out A major blow was dealt to a group opposing the redevelopment of Willets Point two weeks ago at the same time the Economic Development Corporation continues its effort to buy as much property from current landowners as possible. Willets Point United, the leading group objecting to the City's redevelopment plan, had its lawsuit against the City dismissed by a federal judge. The group, a collective of landowners, claimed the blighted situation at the Iron Triangle was caused by the City itself. Judge Edward Korman dismissed the suit in its entirety, saying WPU did not raise a legitimate legal argument and lacked any reasonable basis for the lack of development in the 62-acre area. "The well-considered opinion not only discusses the enormous difficulties inherent with redeveloping the Willets Point area, but acknowledges that the City and City Council have taken the steps that are necessary to improve the area," said Michael Cardozo, counsel for the New York City Corporation. WPU countered it's a minor hiccup in what will be an enduring fight.

You Know, For Kids: The South Queens Boys & Girls Club received a $29,000 grant from the UPS Foundation, the charitable arm of UPS. The grant will be used to fund the Club's Foundation for Achievement program. Pictured l. to r.: Carol Simon, Exec Dir, Operations, South Queens Boys & Girls Club; Stephanie Kacerow, Comm Svcs Supe, UPS; Leo Compton, Exec Dir, Admin, South Queens Boys & Girls Club

"It has nothing to do with eminent domain and has nothing to do with the Article 78 we filed on the environmental review," said WPU spokesman Richard Lipsky. "The decision basically said the City can't be held responsible for the blight. If the City's not responsible for the blight, I wonder then who is. It seems pretty obvious they are." A lawsuit, which blamed Willets Point’s blight on the City, was The group has tossed out by a judge. taken notice of the proposed off-ramps from the Van Wyck Expressway into Willets Point. ard, bringing Bell Boulevard and Northern "The ramps are the lynchpin of the entire Boulevard and Times Square as "examples of project," Lipsky said. "The City has admitted well-lit areas where signs apparently are not the ramps have to be approved for the whole the main cause of traffic accidents. project to go ahead." The sign, which had previously been on WPU called for an open and fair process, 24/7 according to Skala, is now on only from with public hearings discussing the ramps. It 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., according to Athy. The has recruited several local officials and is in school has attempted to mute its colors. discussions with several more, including State C o m m u n i t y B o a r d m e m b e r E d w a r d Sen. Hiram Monserrate (D-Corona), whose Braunstein, who lives across the street, said vote to support the project ultimately led to earlier this year that the school's efforts had the City Council's approval of the plan. not gone unnoticed by his family. "We've had no commitments to him one Athy went on to write in his letter that the way or the other," Lipsky said. "Whatever display was approved by the Zoning Board your position is on the zoning, going for a and Community Board in a process which transparent open review process is a fair took several years. "We aim to please," he request." wrote, wrapping the letter up with, "howThe EDC has received its Requests for ever as our high school and over 40 commuQualifications from several companies hop- nity groups utilize this building, we feel ing to work on the project, and plans to send continuing to use the sign to announce out Requests for Proposals in the coming relevant events serves the community atyear, according to spokesman David large." Lombino. Skala responded a month later with a The corporation has had a steady pace of letter to Athy taking umbrage with his "saracquisitions, though markedly slower since casm" and the validity of some of Athy's the days before the project gained Council statements. In a letter to the editor, Skala also approval. took issue with Athy's invocation of religious Lombino said the City now holds over 70 humor. Athy had used what Skala called a percent of the land required to perform phase "Biblical voice," leading into the subject of one of the project, and continues to negotiate the sign in his letter by joking "[a] sign has with landowners. appeared to us and thus I speaketh unto thee The WPU's members contend they have […]" not been approached by the EDC, according The joke was "particularly insulting" to to Lipsky. Skala as a Eucharistic Minister in his "senior "They haven't talked to us since last year," years," he wrote back. he said. Earlier in the year, Braunstein had told the Reach Reporter Joseph Orovic at Tribune "nobody is as affected as my family," jorovic@queenstribune.com, or (718) 357- but Skala mentioned several neighbors of 7400, Ext. 127. Braunstein, including a woman he said was —Joseph Orovic bed-stricken with Alzheimer's disease, and another concerned with the sign's effect on her property value. Electr ic Sign Conflict Skala also wrote back that there is "no Keeps Shining such thing as a 'Zoning Board,'" and that Offended by a saucy letter defending the Community Board 11 "never even discussed, presence of an electric sign on the property let alone 'approved' the sign. He also claimed of Bayside High School, East Bayside the sign is illegal because it is "within 200 feet Homeowners Association President Frank of a park of ½ acre or more in size" despite Skala has fired back two of his own. the permit application being marked otherBayside High School's Principal Michael wise. On Nov. 24, the EBHA voted unaniAthy wrote in late October that several elected officials have reached out to him mously to demand it be removed entirely as complaining that the school's new electric inappropriate for a residential area. The sign that posts announcements is too Community Board this week designated a bright. special committee to handle the sign conflict As Athy cast the problem; "[the] new sign with the school. In an effort to obviate further is causing numerous residents (well, actually, conflict, Glen Oaks Village President Bob like one) great distress. Resident(s) are ap- Friedrich, who is running for state Assembly parently being forced to look through the to fill the seat of Mark Weprin (D-Little Neck), perfectly aligned windows with curtains raised offered to buy the sign for Glen Oaks use, in several neighbors' houses and then through according to Skala. Neither Friedrich nor Athy could be imthe trees of Raymond O'Connor Park in order to have their retinas damaged by our mediately reached for comment. 'Vegas-like' display which burns well through Reach Reporter Lori Gross at lgross@queenstribune.com, or (718) 357the night." Athy also denied Skala's claim that the 7400, Ext. 124. sign posed a traffic safety problem as a haz—Lori Gross

www.queenstribune.com • Dec. 10-16, 2009 Tribune Page 11

On Saturday, Dec 5, more than 200 people gathered to help children who are in need from parishes all over the Roman Catholic Dioceses of Brooklyn and Rockville Centre at the 11th Annual Make a Difference Christmas Party at the Immaculate Conception Center in Douglaston. The party was co-sponsored by two local Roman Catholic parishes; St. Mary Gate of Heaven in Ozone Park and Holy Child Jesus in Richmond Hill, as well as Austin's Steak and Ale House in Kew Gardens. Guests brought unwrapped gifts for children in need. Gifts consisted of items such as coloring books, toy trucks and board games. Guests were treated to five hours of dinner, dancing and entertainment, including a live band. Prizes, including jewelry, gift baskets and gift certificates to local restaurants were raffled off and a silent auction was held. Organizers say the event was very successful "We have help over 100 children a year by providing them with clothes and bare necessities and by satisfying a wish," said Thomas

Flood, one of the main organizers of the event. He expressed gratitude to everyone who attended. "Thank you 100 times over," he told the crowd. Ann Turner, another member of the organizing committee, told the guests that they have helped a "record breaking" number of families and children this year. She also thanked those who came out and gave despite the still-battered economy. Flood told guests that toys and clothes were not the only items wished for by children in needed. He told of children who wished for heating oil, reading glasses and braces. The party was dedicated in honor of Turner's father, Thomas Heaphy Sr., who was a Roman Catholic deacon at St. Mary Gate of Heaven church in Ozone Park. Heaphy was the inspiration for the party. Nearly two decades ago Heaphy and his family gathered to help other families in need in their parish. Eventually the idea spread to other parishes and, through networking, expanded diocese-wide and eventually into the Diocese of Rockville Centre. Heaphy died in 2006. During the party, Flood asked guests to stand and instead of a moment of silence, asked to audience to give Heaphy a standing ovation. Reach Reporter Domenick Rafter at drafter@queenstribune.com or (718) 3577400, Ext. 125. —Domenick Rafter


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Padavan Calls For Deep DOB Probe By LORI GROSS An inter-agency bust of the Depar tment of Building’s former Chief Plan Examiner by the Department of Invest igat ion last month has left lingering questions about how compromised the DOB has been. Former Chief Plan Examiner James Cheng was arrested late last month on charges of accepting cash payments from architect Sung Ho Shin, owner of a Flushing firm. Shin was charged with giving unlawful gratuities – a charge that differs from bribery – on the condit ion that Cheng, 55 of Nort h Woodmere, Long Island, review building plans before they were to be submitted to the DOB. A spokesman for the DOB said Cheng’s own duties as Chief Plan Examiner did not include approving plans, but affirmed that they did include assigning plans to be reviewed by examiners and reviewing them for compliance with the Building Code The DOI would not say whether or not they suspect Cheng of further wrongdoing. “It puts a doubt on ever y single controversial issue that’s been raised,” said State Sen. Frank Padavan (R-Bellerose) who was the Deputy Building Commissioner from 1968 to 1972. Padavan believes the DOB’s investigation should extend to “ever y contentious application that was ever filed where he had oversight re sponsibility.” Padavan also thinks controversial plans approved by Cheng or his staff should be re-reviewed for approval, with the practical exception of buildings that are already standing. DOB said it is reviewing “all jobs associated with Cheng and the architect,” but would not say whether their investigation extended to Cheng’s subordinates, or where the legality

of approvals made under him stand. Padavan, who recently wrote a let ter to DOB Commissioner Robert LiMandri demanding that his agency’s inspectors be more “diligent” in weeding out over-occupancy, said he can think of several incidences where, in his eyes, a dubious building plan was approved.

Cheng was making an annual salary of $99,149 when he resigned last month from his post at the DOB’s Queens Borough office in Kew Gardens. A statement from DOB Commissioner Rober t LiMandri said that since 2002, tips from the DOB’s staff have led to more than 70 arrests by the DOI, “exemplifying the honest work of so many employees

who are dedicated to serving this City.” The statement also said “These allegations, if true, are clearly unacceptable and are not condoned in any way,” and that the DOB is “currently reviewing his jobs as a precaution.” Reach Reporter Lori Gross at lgross@queenstribune.com, or (718) 3577400, Ext. 124.

Art Exhibit Tinted By Controversy By JOSEPH OROVIC In recognition of World AIDS Day, Queens Media Ar ts Development launched “The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly,” an exhibit ion at the Queens Museum’s Par tnership Galler y on Nov. 29. The volunteer and admittedly low-budget effor t sur rounds the topic of AIDS and healthcare reform as part of QMAD’s “Framing AIDS,” a multi-disciplinar y collection of ar ts will run throughout the borough until Dec. 20. But despite good intentions and a solid volunteer, the exh ibition at QM A did not suffer its share of snags. Two prominent artists originally slated to be featured in the collection were abruptly shown the door, with all par t ies involved left somewhat bit ter by the experience. Partners Jack Waters and Peter Cramer, both HIV-positive art ists in their 50s, were to include a multi-media installation. But after what all part ies say was miscommunication and some ill words exchanged, they found their work outside looking in. “I haven’t yet talked to [Waters] but we’re going to have lunch next week,” said QMA

Executive Director Tom Finkelpearl. “He’s got a really distinguished career and is an important cultural producer. I feel terrible about the whole process.” Waters contends the dispute centered on a misunderstanding between himself and QMAD’s director Hector Canonge. After accepting the project’s limited budget, the ar tists shipped their installation’s components to the museum with the hopes of setting up. The scheduling must have been off, because Canonge expressed concern with their timing and how it’ll effect his dealings with the museum. Waters then noticed the exhibit’s main Web page featured their installation but lacked a credit line. “At that point we became concerned. We are, after all, ar tist s,” Waters said. “We figured Mr. Canonge had enough to deal w ith, I contacted those in charge of the Web site to have the problem addressed.” Waters said he received a vitriolic let ter from Canonge, claiming the duo were “ruining his relationship w ith the museum.” Canonge said the misunderstanding surrounds the couple’s perception of who ex-

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actly ran the exhibition. While QMA’s Partnership Galler y doe s technically fall under the auspices of the institution, it is primarily left open to non-profits as a space for their own exhibitions. “The safest thing for us would be to do our own shows and control our galleries, which is a terrible idea,” Finkelpearl said. Canonge said the structure of the exhibition may have confused Waters and Cramer, and left them with unmet expectations. “That’s one thing that I don’t think Jack and Peter understood,” he said. “The museum couldn’t offer all the incentives and all the support as they do when they have their own exhibitions.” In spite of the ill-will, Finkelpearl hopes to ultimately bridge a peace between the two parties. Both have done extensive work surrounding and suppor t he cause of AIDS as well as the gay community. “Once we get past this initial dispute, there could be a possibility those guys get along really well,” Finkelpearl said. Reach Reporter Joseph Orovic at jorovic@queenstribune.com, or (718) 3577400, Ext. 127.

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LEGAL NOTICE PROBATE CITATION File No. 2009-3608 SURROGATE’S COURT – QUEENS COUNTY CITATION THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, By the Grace of God Free and Independent TO: Hilda Robinson, John Henry Robinson and Vernon Staunton if living and if dead, to their heirs at law, next of kin and distributees whose names and places of residence are unknown and if they died subsequent to the decedent herein, to their executors, administrators, legatees, devisees, assignees and successors in interest whose name and places of residence are unknown and to all other heirs at law; next of kin and distributees of Etta Hebbons, the decedent herein, whose names and places of residence are unknown and cannot after diligent inquiry be ascertained. ATTORNEY GENERAL N.Y. STATE PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR QUEENS COUNTY A petition having been duly filed by Ruth Dumas who is domiciled at 172-05 108th Avenue, Jamaica, N.Y. 11433. YOU ARE HEREBY CITED TO SHOW CAUSE before the Surrogate’s Court, Queens County, at 88-11 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, New York, on 22nd day of October, 2009 at 9:30 .M. of that day, why a decree should not be made in the estate of Etta. M. Hebbons, a/k/a Etta Hebbons lately domiciled at 172-05 108th Avenue, Jamaica, N.Y. 11433 admitting to probate a Will dated December 6, 2000 a copy of which is attached, as the Will of Etta M. Hebbons deceased, relating to real and personal property, and directing that [x] Letters Testamentary issue to: Etta M Hebbons (State any further relief requested) HON. ROBERT L. NAHMAN Surrogate Alicermarie E. Rice Chief Clerk SEP 09 2009 (Seal) Thomas J. Adams, Esq. Attorney for Petitioner 718847-4572 Telephone Number 114-06 Jamaica Avenue, Richmond Hill, N.Y. 11418 Address of Attorney [Note: This citation is served upon you as required by law. You are not required to appear. If you fail to appear it will be assumed you do not object to the relief requested. You have a right to have an attorney appear for you.] _______________________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation of COASTAL LIGHT LLC, a domestic LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 09/11/ 2009. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: The LLC, 29 Beach 220th Street, Breezy Point, NY 11697. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. ________________________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation of Waldin Medical Billing Professionals, LLC, a limited liability company. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York on September 30, 2009. Office location: Queens. Secretary of State of New York

LEGAL NOTICE has been designated for service of process. Secretary of State of New York shall mail a copy of any process served against the LLC to c/o THE LLC, 187-10 Rome Drive, Saint Albans, New York 11412 Purpose: any lawful purpose. ________________________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation of United African Dance Troupe LLC, a limited liability company. Articles of Organization filed with SSNY on 7-3109. Office located in Queens County. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the LLC to the LLC, 131-41 224 St., Springfield Gardens, NY 11413. Purpose: any lawful purpose. ________________________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation of HX HOLDINGS LLC, a domestic LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 09/25/2009. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: The LLC, 23-39 BQE West, Astoria, NY 11103. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. ________________________________________________________________________ NIKOLIN REALTY, LLC Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (“LLC”), Articles of Organization filed with the Sec. of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 10/5/2009. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to the LLC, Nikolin Pepa, 13839 78 th Ave., Ste. E, Flushing, NY, 11367. The LLC’s principal business location is 13839 78 th Ave., Ste. E, Flushing, NY, 11367. Purpose or Character: Any lawful act or activity. #76508 ________________________________________________________________________ 20-34 119TH STREET LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 7/1/2009. Office in Queens Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 20-48 119th St., College Point, N.Y. 11356. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. _______________________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation of DOCTOR ON THE GO, PLLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/27/ 09. Office location: Queens County. Princ. office of PLLC: 92-04 Springfield Blvd., Queens Village, NY 11428. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the PLLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Practice of medicine. ________________________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation of QUEENS ASC PARTNERS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/22/09. Office location: Queens County. Princ. office of LLC: 192-13 Union Tnpk., Fresh Meadows, NY 11366. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80

LEGAL NOTICE State St., Albany, NY 122072543. Purpose: Any lawful activity. _______________________________________________________________________ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: GIASU LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 10/02/09. The latest date of dissolution is 12/31/2060. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, c/o Alexandros Giannakis, 35-55 29th Street, Apartment 6G, Long Island City, New York 11106. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. ________________________________________________________________________ Name: WEISMAN ENTERPRISES LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. Of State of NY 09/17/ 09. Off. Loc.:Queens Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to THE LLC, 218-01 Merrick Blvd., Springfield Gardens, NY 11413. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. ________________________________________________________________________ Notice of formation of The LULAS Boutique, LLC, a limited liability company. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (SSNY) on September 11, 2009. Office located in Queens. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the LLC to THE LLC 102-34 164 Road Hamilton Beach, NY 11414. Purpose; any lawful purpose. ________________________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation of MCGUINNESS MANAGEMENT TEAM LLC, a domestic LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 10/02/2009. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: Stephen McGuinness , 9109 96 St., Woodhaven, NY 11421. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. ________________________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation of Velvetchrome Assets Review LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/16/09. Office location: Queens Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o National Registered Agents Inc., 875 Avenue of the Americas, Ste. 501, NY, NY 10001, also the registered agent. Purpose: any lawful activities. ________________________________________________________________________ SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF OBJECT OF ACTION STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT: COUNTY OF QUEENS ACTION TO FORECLOSE A MORTGAGE INDEX NO.: 29648/07 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. MORENA RECINOS, Defendant(s). MORTGAGED PREMISES: 19863 FOOTHILL AVENUE, HOLLIS, NY 11423 SBL #: BLOCK:10532 LOT:138 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFEN-

LEGAL NOTICE DANT: You are hereby summoned to answer the Complaint in this action, and to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the Complaint is not served with this Summons, to serve a notice of appearance, on the Plaintiff(s) attorney(s) within twenty days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within 30 days after the service is complete if this Summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York). In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. The Attorney for Plaintiff has an office for business in the County of Erie. Trial to be held in the County of Queens. The basis of the venue designated above is the location of the Mortgaged Premises. Dated this 11th day of November, 2009, Steven J. Baum, P.C., Attorney(s) For Plaintiff(s), 220 Northpointe Parkway, Suite G, Amherst, NY 14228 TO: MORENA RECINOS, Defendant(s) In this Action. The foregoing Summons is served upon you by publication, pursuant to an order of HON. JAIME A. RIOS of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, dated the 4 th day of November, 2009 and filed with the Complaint in the Office of the Queens County Clerk, in the City of Jamaica. The object of this action is to foreclose a mortgage upon the premises described below, executed by MORENA RECINOS dated the 11th day of June, 2007 to secure the sum of $500,000.00, and recorded at Instrument No. 2007000459147 in the Office of the Clerk of the County of QUEENS, on the 6th day of September, 2007; The property in question is described as follows: 19863 FOOTHILL AVENUE, HOLLIS, NY 11423 SEE FOLLOWING DESCRIPTION Block 10532 and Lot 138 ALL that certain plot, piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements thereon erected, situate, lying and being in the Borough and County of Queens , City and State of New York, bounded and described according to the above mentioned map, as follows: BEGINNING at a point on the Northerly side of Foothill Avenue, distant 205.47 feet Westerly and Northwesterly along the arc of a curve having a radius of161.12 feet from the extreme Westerly end of a curve connecting the Northwesterly side of Hillside Avenue with the Northerly side of 202nd Street; RUNNING THENCE Northerly along the division line between Lots 39 and 40 on a certain entitled, “Map of Holliswood, Jamaica, Queens County, New York” and filed on August 13,1891 a distance of 105.00 feet; THENCE Westerly at right angles to the last mentioned course, a distance of 15.00 feet; THENCE Northerly at right angles to the last mentioned course, a distance of 40.00 feet; THENCE East-

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

erly at right angles to the last mentioned course, a distance of 62.88 feet; THENCE Northeasterly at an interior angle to 98 degrees 53 minutes 25 seconds with the last mentioned course, a distance of 44.85 feet; THENCE Southwesterly at an interior angle to 69 degrees 44 minutes 38 seconds with the last mentioned course, a distance of 100.21 feet; THENCE Southeasterly at an interior angle to 92 degrees 106 minutes 17 seconds with the last mentioned course, a distance of 91.09 feet; THENCE Southwesterly at an interior angle of 189 degrees 23 minutes 42 seconds with the last mentioned course, a distance of 56.00 feet; THENCE Southeasterly at an interior angle to 170 degrees 58 minutes 32 seconds with the last mentioned course, a distance of25.90 feet to the Northerly line of Foothill Avenue; THENCE Northeasterly and Easterly along the arc of a curve to the right, having a radius of 161.12 feet along the Northerly side of Foothill Avenue, a distance of 25.00 feet to the point or place of BEGINNING. Premises known as 198-63 Foothill Avenue, Hollis, New York HELP FOR HOMEOWNERS IN FORECLOSURE NEW YORK STATE LAW REQUIRES THAT WE SEND YOU THIS NOTICE ABOUT THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. PLEASE READ IT CAREFULLY. SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME. IF YOU FAIL TO RESPOND TO THE SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT IN THIS FORECLOSURE ACTION, YOU MAY LOSE YOUR HOME. PLEASE READ THE SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT CAREFULLY. YOU SHOULD IMMEDIATELY CONTACT AN ATTORNEY OR YOUR LOCAL LEGAL AID OFFICE TO OBTAIN ADVICE ON HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF. SOURCES OF INFORMATION AND ASSISTANCE The state encourages you to become informed about your options in foreclosure. In addition to seeking assistance from an attorney or legal aid office, there are government agencies and non-profit organizations that you may contact for information about possible options, including trying to work with your lender during this process. To locate an entity near you, you may call the tollfree helpline maintained by the New York State Banking Department at 1-877-BANKNYS (1-877-226-5697) or visit the department’s website at WWW.BANKING.STATE.NY.US. FORECLOSURE RESCUE SCAMS Be careful of people who approach you with offers to “save” your home. There are individuals who watch for notices of foreclosure actions in order to unfairly profit from a homeowner’s distress. You should be extremely careful about any such promises and any suggestions that you pay them a fee or sign over your deed. State law requires anyone offering such services for profit to enter into a con-

tract which fully describes the services they will perform and fees they will charge, and which prohibits them from taking any money from you until they have completed all such promised services. § 1303 NOTICE NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. DATED: November 11, 2009 Steven J. Baum, P.C., Attorney(s) For Plaintiff(s), 220 Northpointe Parkway, Suite G, Amherst, NY 14228 The law firm of Steven J. Baum, P.C. and the attorneys whom it employs are debt collectors who are attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained by them will be used for that purpose. ________________________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation of 188 GREEN ST., LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/02/09. Office location: Queens County. Princ. Office of LLC: 80-55 255 th St., Floral Park, NY 11004. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. Of its princ. Office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. ________________________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation InterActive Publications, LLC Filed with the Sec of State NY (SSNY) on 09/03/2009. Principal office location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom processes against the LLC may be served. SSNY Shall mail any process against the LLC served upon him/her to: 14945 258 th Street, Rosedale, NY 11422. Purpose: Any lawful activity. _______________________________________________________________________ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: COMPREHENSIVE HEALTH CONSULTANTS, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 11/03/09. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, c/o Koenig & Samberg, 300 Old Country Road, Mineola, New York 11501. Purpose: For any lawful purpose.


Queens CLOSEUP Holiday Flea/Fair A giant Holiday Fair/Flea Market will be held Dec. 19, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Flushing House, 38-20 Bowne St. The Flea Market will be held in the Large Game Room on the ground floor of Flushing House. A huge variety of goods will be on sale, including jewelry, arts and crafts, collectibles, new and gently used clothing, white elephant items, etc. Admission is free. For vendor information, please call Joshua Lutz, activities leader, at (347) 532-3010.

Menorah Lighting On Dec. 11 at 4 p.m. a ceremonial lighting of the Chanukah menorah will take place outdoors at the Queens Public Library at the corner of Main Street and Kissena Boulevard. The lighting of the menorah is sponsored by Free Synagogue of Flushing and The Flushing Development Center. It is hoped that many people of all faiths will gather at the library to usher in the holiday of Chanukah. All are certainly welcome.

Jewelr y Workshop The Voelker Orth Museum is offering a family-friendly workshop focused on jewelry making basics and techniques. Participants will design and make wearable art in each session. Participants will make decorative pendants at the Crystal Amulets workshop held Dec. 30, 1-2:30p.m. The workshop is being taught by Lynn Hanousek. All supplies are provided. Participants may also bring any beads or materials that they would like to incorporate in their projects. Families are welcome to join. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Fee: $3 per participant. The Voelker Orth Museum is located at 149-19 38th Ave., Flushing. To learn more call (718) 359-6227 or go to vomuseum.org.

Actor Wanted Theatre Time Productions is auditioning for the role of Danny in “Laura” by Vera Caspary and George Sklar. They’re seeking a male between ages 17 and 19. If interested, please contact the director Tom Williams at (516) 459-5585 to schedule an audition and any further information. The show will be performed April 16-18 and 23-25 at 15-43 149th St.

The Knights of Columbus’ General Sherman Father Shine Council 569 will hold its annual 2009 Children’s Christmas Party from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Dec. 12 at 163-16 Pidgeon Meadow Road. Tickets are $5 for adults and free for children under 12. For more information, contact Freddie Jost, (917) 577-7499.

Sacred Music Society Rev. Msgr. Joseph A. Funaro and The Sacred Music Society of Our Lady Queen of Martyrs present their Annual Christmas Concert at 4 p.m. on Sunday afternoon, Dec. 13. The Sacred Music Society joins with the Oratorio Society of Queens to perform this concert under the artistic direction of Music Director of Our Lady Queen of Martyrs, Maestro David Close. The concert feature highlights from the Christmas portion of Handel’s “Messiah” and beloved Christmas orchestral and choral works. The performance also features Geraldine McMillian, soprano, John

The Nutcracker Tchaikovsky’s holiday music comes to life as Ballet for Young Audiences introduces children to the story of Clara’s Nutcracker. He turns into a prince and takes her to visit the Enchanted Forest with its magical dancing snowflakes and the wondrously beautiful Sugarplum Fairy in the Kingdom of the Sweets. The event will be held at Flushing Town Hall, 137-35 Northern Blvd., Dec. 13, 2 p.m., and again Dec. 19, 2 p.m. Tickets: $15/$12 Members; $12 Children; $10 Member Children. For information, visit flushingtownhall.org, or call (718) 463-7700, Ext. 222.

Brass Quintet Come and enjoy and afternoon of Christmas music with one of the most popular Brass Quintet in the New York Area on Dec. 13 at 4:30 p.m. at St. Mel Church, 26-01 154th St. There is a $15 donation.

They Might Be Giants Grammy Winners They Might Be Giants will play two benefit concerts at the New York Hall of Science on Dec. 13. The two shows, at 1 p.m. and 3:15 p.m., will feature TMBG’s newest songs from their latest children’s album “Here Comes Science,” which examines a wide array of scientific ideas. Proceeds from the $35 concert tickets will be donated to NYSCI. For more information about the benefit concerts at NYSCI and to buy tickets, visit nysci.org/tmbg. Visit theymightbegiants.com for more about They Might Be Giants and “Here Comes Science.”

Holiday Concer t The Oratorio Society of Queens, under the direction of Maestro David Close, will hold rehearsals for the fall season every Monday night at 7:45 p.m. at the Studio of the North Presbyterian Church, 25-33 154th St., Flushing, in preparation for a fabulous Annual Holiday Concert on Dec. 20. OSQ will be rehearsing Part I of Handel’s “Messiah” along with Christmas carols and Chanukah songs. For additional information on rehearsals and concerts, call (718) 2793006 or visit queensoratorio.org.

Gilded Age On Dec. 14, Irma Wesley will present the “Gilded Age,” exploring the grand houses of the late 19th and early 20th Century. This will take place at the Queens Community House Kew Gardens, 80-02 Kew Gardens Road, Suite 202, at 1 p.m. All are welcome. The Community House also has support for those

who are experiencing a death & find it hard to cope. Please call Patricia Arcila at (718) 268-5960.

Santa Breakfast The Forest Hills Chamber of Commerce’s members are welcome to bring friends and family to Uno Chicago Grill for a Breakfast Buffet with Santa on Dec. 19 from 8-11 a.m. There will be assorted foods, a picture with Santa and a complimentary goodie bag. Adults pay $13.99 and children are admitted for $6.99.

Precious On Dec. 18 at 1 p.m., Joyce Berger will moderate the movie “Precious,” which can be seen at the Kew Gardens Cinemas. The discussion will take place at the Queens Community House Kew Gardens. Every one is welcome.

Holiday Lights The Richmond Hill Block Association is holding its third annual Holiday Lights Competition. Cash prizes will be awarded. The Holiday lights displays of Richmond Hill homes will be evaluated on originality, brightness, creativity and other criteria. The overall winner will be awarded a prize of $300. Two additional prizes of $100.00 will be awarded to the next best displays. For the third year, prizes (totaling $500.00) are being provided by Wilson Vargas of Dynamic Properties Realty. Wilson has been a strong supporter of the Richmond Hill neighborhood and the RHBA. Dynamic Properties Realty can be reached at (718) 8462477. Prizes will be awarded on Wednesday, Dec. 16, at 7 p.m. All participants are invited to attend. Hot cocoa and cookies will be served. You must register to participate. Registration is free. To register, call, visit or email The Richmond Hill Block Association, 11008 Jamaica Ave., Richmond Hill, (718) 8493659, rhba@att.net Come join in the fun and make Richmond Hill a little brighter this season with your Holiday lights.

Grand Par ty Havurat Yisrael, one of New York’s most dynamic synagogues, will be hosting a Grand Party which will include Children’s Activities for Hanukkah to be held on Dec. 13 starting at 4 p.m. The party is open to people of all ages. Donations to help defray the cost of the program are $15 for adults and $5 for children under 13. For updated information, please visit us at havuratyisrael.org.

Chanukah With Chabad Celebrate Chanukah with Chabad of Rego Park’s Family Activities on Dec 10 at Barnes & Noble on Austin Street at 3 p.m. There will be a Chanukah Story Time at no charge. On Dec. 13 at Queens Jewish Center, 66-05 108 St., Chabad will host Family Fun Day from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., featuring Arts n’ Crafts, Activities and our main feature will be the constructing of a Lego Menorah. There will also be a Grand Menorah Lighting at Queens Boulevard and 67 Road. from Dec. 14 to Dec. 17 at 5:30 p.m., Dec. 11 and 18 at 3 p.m., and Dec. 12 at 6 p.m. Also, a Grand Menorah Lighting at Queens Center Mall on Dec. 15 at 6 p.m.For more information, please call (718) 8976578 or (718) 393-3085 or visit chabadrego.org.

Midsummer Night’s Dream The Secret Theatre’s resident acting company, The Queens Players, present Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. The show will play at The Secret Theatre Studio at 44-02 23rd St., Long Island City. There will be showings Dec. 3 through Jan. 3 at 8 p.m. There will be matinee performances at 3:30 p.m. on Dec. 19 and 20. A Midsummer Night’s Dream in Winter? Emphatically, yes. In Director Katherine M. Carter’s energetic new staging of Shakespeare’s most beloved romantic comedy, follow four young lovers into a colorful and mysterious forest where fairies Titania and Oberon rule, where a band of “rude mechanicals”, led by the hilarious Bottom, rehearse a play and where love is put to the test by the mischievous Puck. In the end, will the lovers end up with their correct mate? Will the mechanicals make it to their performance before the Duke? Is Titania doomed to love an ass? A Midsummer Night’s Dream is a nonstop comedy that will warm you up in the cold winter months The case includes Jeni Ahlfeld, Andrew Ash, Charles Baker, Katie Braden, Timothy J Cox, Angelica Duncan, Charlotte Layne Dunn, Brandon Hillen, Chris Kateff, Sarah King, Paul Markert Miriam Mintz, Joe Mullen, James Parenti, Patricia Phelps, Tiffany Turner, Randy Warshaw, Time Williams and Heidi Zenz. For more information call (718) 392-0722 or visit secrettheatre.com or thequeensplayers.com. Tickets are $15.

Grand Menorah Lighting Chabad of Rego Park will sponsor a Grand Menorah Lighting at Queens Center Mall on Dec. 15 at 6 p.m. For more information, call (718) 897-6578 or (718) 393-3085, or go to chabadrego.org.

The Long Fall The Queensboro Hill Library hosts a book club on Fridays at 2 p.m. On Dec. 18, it will discuss The Long Fall at 60-05 Main St. For more information, call (718) 359-8332.

WRBA Meeting The Woodhaven Residents’ Block Association will be holding town hall meetings on Saturday, Dec. 12, Saturday, Jan. 9, 2010, and Saturday, Feb. 13, 2010 from 1-3 p.m. at the Woodhaven-Richmond Hill Volunteer Ambulance Corps, 78-15 Jamaica Ave., Woodhaven, as part of their mission to keep residents informed and have them participate in the civil process. Bring a friend or neighbor, all are welcome.

Food Drive Assemblyman Michael Miller (D-Glendale) is holding a food drive to benefit the food pantry at Sacred Heart. The drive will run from Dec. 3-17. All non-perishable food items are welcome. Food can be dropped off at any of the following locations: Nulite, located at 87-35 Myrtle Ave, Glendale; Glendale Auto Tech, located at 72-14 73rd Pl. in Glendale; Sacred Heart Parish Rectory, located at 83-17 78th Ave., Glendale; Office of Assemblyman Michael Miller, 83-91 Woodhaven Blvd., Woodhaven.

www.queenstribune.com • Dec. 10-16, 2009 Tribune Page 15

Christmas Party

Easterlin, tenor and Vaughn Fritts, bassbaritone with the Orchestral Arts Ensemble of Queens. The concert is a much anticipated event at the church as parishioners and friends begin their preparations for the Christmas season. It is an annual tradition that brings the whole community together as the entire audience joins in singing their favorite Christmas carols with the chorus and full orchestra! The concert is performed in the church which is located on Ascan Avenue and Queens Boulevard. Tickets are $20, $18 seniors and students with ID, and children, 12 and under accompanied by an adult, are free. For additional information, please call the Our Lady Queen of Martyrs Rectory at (718) 268-6251.


Queens Center Mall, which kicked off its holiday season a week before Thanksgiving, is offering specials throughout the holidays to lure shoppers away from the internet and catalogs. At Queens Center, t he halls are decked with sales placards and promos. The sports apparel store, Champs, is offering free layaway for only 10 percent down payment. Half carat diamond earrings come free with a purchase of $399 at Zales. And Aeropostale, t he apparel retailer, offered “50 p ercent off e ver y t hing,” w ith an asterisk excluding markdowns and fragrances. These deals appeal to shoppers like Kaleena Reese who plan to spend a lot less this year. Reese is a counselor at Bernard M. Fineson Developmental Services Disabilities Office, a state-run office in Queens Village that has laid off some administrators and food service employees recently. “We don’t know if we’re going to be next,” Reese said, referring to the staff of counselors. “So it’s al l about savings.” Some vendors are seeing a corresponding drop in purchases of their more expensive items. One of them is A&L Engraving, a kiosk that sells desk ornaments, je welr y, a nd plaque s. Their most popular items are engraved necklaces priced from $15 to $19. “It used to be that you’d hear people say, ‘These are so cheap,’” said Ivet t Gelencser, an employee at A&L Engraving. “Now you hear, ‘These are so expensive.’” Still, many salespeople at Queens Center say they are breathing a sigh of relief after

the busy weekend. For the apparel outlet Club Monaco, a sale with some items marked half-off became a weekend-long shopping frenzy. “It was nuts,” said one Club Monaco employee who declined to be named, citing his company’s media policy. “We put out all the merchandise from the back and it was just going.”

H o we v e r, d i s c o u n t s can erode or eliminate thin profit margins. To alleviate an anticipated 4 to 6 percent drop in sales nationwide this season, the J. C. Penney Company is h av i n g i t s d e p a r t m e n t stores, such as the one at Queens Center, maintain an inventory that is more targeted to the size and tastes of its market, according to a company press release. This is one way to crawl back into the black amidst a consumer spending slump, according to retail analyst Walter Loeb. With a more carefully selected inventor y, Loeb said the retailers will not be as susceptible to revenue loses from steep discounts. “They, therefore, can offer the customer value, but not necessarily have to take the second and third markdowns in order to get rid of the merchandise,”

Loeb said. NYS Col lection, a sunglasses kiosk at Queens Center, boasted a “Hot! Winter Sale,” but didn’t sell quite as much over the weekend as t he y did last year. Never t hele ss, Andres Torres, an employee at the store, was enthusiastic about the weekend’s crowds. “We were all waiting for this,” Torres said. “Hopefully it gets bet ter and bet ter.”

www.queenstribune.com • Dec. 10-16, 2009 Tribune Page 17

By SAM FELLMAN Doors opened at Queens Center mall at midnight on Black Friday, inaugurating the holiday shopping season four hours earlier than last year. W hen they opened, a crowd was already lined up for the free giveaway: $10 gift cards for the first 200 customers. This was the mall’s first 23-hour-long Black Friday – as the day after Thanksgiving is known. Faced with dwindling consumer spending, a nine percent unemployment rate in Queens, and fierce competition from online retailers, the county’s preeminent mall is trying new tactics like these to draw in holiday shoppers. Similarly, many stores are running blowout bargains, but have also reduced their inventor y as overall sale s are expected to dip from last year’s figures. So far, retailers say they have seen more traffic than last year. Queens Center is a four-story, 22-acre behemoth that attracted 27 million shoppers last year, according to Macerich, the company that operates it. With retailers reaping $876 of sales per square foot last year, it is one of the nation’s most profitable malls. By comparison, the average mall in the U.S. generated $393 per square foot that year, according to the International Council of Shopping Centers, an industry trade group. November and December are big months for Queens Center, typically account ing for 23 percent of annual sales. With these windfall months on the line, the shopping center is running promotions like Freebie Fridays for the first time. On each of the four Fridays leading up to Christmas, the first arrivals for the mall’s opening at 11 a.m. win prizes, like free gift wrapping, $10 gift cards, or complimentary photos with Santa. Another new event is the Friday Free-For-All. Each Friday at 12:30 p.m., three randomly chosen shoppers can be seen tearing through wrapped presents that conceal $500 in gift cards. “We recognize that consumers are valueconscious this season,” said Dawn Simon, spoke swoman for Queens Center. “Our shopping center is awarding them with perks, special experiences, and lots of freebies, hence Freebie Friday.” Macy’s, one of the mall’s two anchor stores, plans to be open for 72 hours straight the week of Christmas, along with some other stores in the mall; the hours are not mandator y. The event, now in its third year, accommodates residents who work late or have put off shopping until the last minute, according to Simon. “The borough of Queens caters to a ver y diverse work population,” said Simon. “People work various hours; they work during the middle of the night.”

Tribune Photo by Ira Cohen

Queens Center Adapts For Holidays


Page 18 Tribune Dec. 10-16, 2009 â&#x20AC;˘ www.queenstribune.com


Compiled by DOMENICK RAFTER

Police are looking for Lauren McWilliam, who has been missing since Nov. 30.

114TH PRECINCT ROBBERY SUSPECT SOUGHT: The N YPD is asking the public’s assistance in ident ifying a suspect wanted for robbery. On Nov. 30 at approximately 2:38 a.m., a black man armed with a firearm approached a 61-year-old white male and demanded his money. The victim complied and the suspect fled the location with an undetermined amount of mone y. There were no repor ted injuries. Anyone with information regarding this incident is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 1-800 577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers Web site at nypdcrimestoppers.com or by texting their tips to 274637 (CRIMES) then entering TIP577.

www.queenstribune.com • Dec. 10-16, 2009 Tribune Page 19

6, 180 lbs, with brown eyes and brown hair. 101ST PRECINCT Anyone with information regarding this JEW ERLY STORE ROBBERY: T he NYPD is asking for the public’s assistance person is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 1in identifying four individuals wanted in 800-577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime connection w ith a jewelr y store robbery. On Nov. 28 at approximately 2:50 p.m., Stoppers Web site at nypdcrimestoppers.com four suspects, two of them with firearms, or by texting their tips to 274637 (CRIMES) entered the Gold Fashion Jewelr y store lo- then entering TIP577. cated at 2125 Mot t Ave. in Far Rockaway. 109TH PRECINCT One victim in the store had a gun placed to FORCIBLE TOUCHING: The NYPD is his neck and was thrown to the ground and handcuffed. Second and third victims were seeking the public’s assistance in identifytaken at gunpoint to the rear of the store ing an individual wanted in connection with the sexual forcible touching into the bathroom. The four of an eight-year-old. suspects removed several trays On Nov. 28 at approxiof jewelry as well as cash totalmately 2 p.m., inside the ing an undetermined amount. Flushing branch of the The suspects then exited the Queens Public Library, at 41store and fled on Mott Avenue 17 Main St., a man forcibly towards Beach 22nd Street. touched an 8-year-old girl. He The suspects are described left the location in an unas a two black men in their known direction. The perpeearly 20s, and two other men, trator is described as a while black or Hispanic with light male, between 30 and 35 skin complexion. One suspect years of age, 5-foot-7 or 5was wearing a nav y blue Yanfoot-8, medium build and was kees jacket w ith a large Yanlast seen wearing a dark kees emblem on the left chest and a patch on the left shoul- Police are looking for this jacket, blue jeans and a dark der. All four suspects wore man in connec tion with cap. Anyone with information baseball hats; two of the sus- forced sexual touching of regarding this incident is pects wore hoods over the an 8-year-old girl. asked to call Crime Stoppers hats. Anyone with information regarding this at 1-800 577-TIPS (8477). The public can incident is asked to call Crime Stoppers at also submit their tips by logging onto the Stoppers Web site at 1-800 577-TIPS (8477). The public can also C r i m e submit their tips by logging onto the Crime nypdcrimestoppers.com or by texting their Stoppers Web site at nypdcrimestoppers.com tips to 274637 (CRIMES) then entering or by texting their tips to 274637 (CRIMES) TIP577. then entering TIP577. INSUR ANCE FORG ERY: A former FATAL ACCIDENT: On Wedne sday, MetLife insurance agent from Flushing was Dec. 2, at approximately 11:36 p.m., police arrested Dec. 3 for allegedly embezzling responded to a report of a vehicle accident $109,000 from customers. Jian Zhang, 50, of Elm Avenue in Flushat the intersection of Beach 13th Street and ing, was arrested by the Special ProsecuSeagir t Boulevard in Far Rockaway. After fur ther inve st igation it was deter- t i o n s D i v i s i o n o f t h e Q u e e n s D i s t r i c t mined that a Jeep Liber ty, traveling east- At torne y’s office and charged w ith second bound on Beach 13th Street when the op- degree forger y and grand larceny. He is accused of intercepting mail in conerator, described as a 21-year-old black man, lost control of the vehicle and struck a light nection with customers’ policies so that their pole. The driver of the auto was transpor ted policies could be sent to his home address by EMS to Peninsula Hospital where he was in Flushing. He then allegedly submitted loan pronounced dead on arrival. at 12:34 a.m., requests against the life insurance policies and cashed checks for the money when he Dec. 3. received them in the mail. He endorsed and cashed a total of 29 checks diver ted to his 105TH PRECINCT MISSING WOMAN: The NYPD is ask- home address between 2007 and early in ing the public’s assistance in locating a 2009. After MetLife noticed a large number of address changes and looked into the acwoman who has been repor ted missing. Lauren McWilliam, 44, was last seen on count, Zhang was promptly fired. Ten insurance policyholders were victimNov. 30 inside 80-45 Winchester Blvd. in Queens Village at approximately 7:40 p.m. ized, some multiple times. According to the She is described as a white female, 5-foot- investigation, the money paid to Zhang ranged from $1,500 to $10,000. A hearing will be held in Queens County Cour t. If convicted, Zhang faces up to 15 years in prison.


Plus

LIFESTYLES

TIS THE SEASON FOR HEALTH AND WEALTH BY GRACE-MARIE TURNER From now through the end of the year, seniors have a chance to enroll in a Medicare prescription drug plan, and those who already are enrolled can switch plans. With Congress debating many changes to the Medicare program, seniors should try to get the most out of this year’s openenrollment period. The Medicare prescription drug benefit is different from most government programs because seniors have a choice of private drug plans which receive subsidies from the Federal government to provide their drug coverage. This gives seniors a wide range of options in premiums, co-payments, and drug choices. The drug benefit program is designed to keep prices low by forcing private plans to compete against one another. This has resulted in greater choice and flexibility. And because seniors are smart shoppers, the drug benefit has proven to be among the most cost-effective government programs in history. When the program was created in 2003, lawmakers predicted seniors would pay about $44 per month for drug coverage in 2009. According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, the average monthly premium in 2009 was only $35. Further, the program is saving taxpayers money, coming in

nearly 40 percent under budget so far. Some lawmakers, though, want to change the program because they don’t like involvement by private plans, despite the fact that the program is highly popular with seniors. This could mean that seniors with low incomes would have access to fewer drugs while others wind up paying higher premiums. The health reform bill that recently was passed by the U.S. House of Representatives allows the federal government to negotiate prices directly with pharmaceutical companies. This might sound desirable, but the government doesn’t negotiate. With the rest of Medicare, it dictates prices and imposes benefit restrictions rather than relying on competition and consumer choice to contain costs. The legislation also would force lowerincome seniors to get their drug coverage through Medicaid rather than Medicare, giving them no choice of private plans and forcing them into a program where the government determines what drugs will and will not be available to them. This could save the Federal government money, but other changes in the legislation would result in higher drug costs for other seniors. According to the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office, these changes could result in a 20

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percent increase in prescription drug premium costs for Medicare beneficiaries over the next decade. Government price manipulation also poses an enormous threat to the future of drug innovation. If drug companies are forced to sell their products at belowmarket prices, they’ll look less attractive to investors, and thus have less capital for research and development of new medicines. For now, though, the Medicare drug benefit is a good deal for seniors - all the more reason to take advantage of this open-enrollment period. Many plans have lowered their co-payments and eliminated deductibles. Others now provide coverage in the infamous “donut hole.”

Those who are internet-savvy can sign up or switch plans by visiting medicare.gov. Using the “Medicare Plan Finder,” seniors can compare how different drug plans stack up against one another. Those without web access can call 1-800-Medicare and speak to a customer service representative. Just remember to act before the end the year, since the open-enrollment period ends on Dec. 31. And pay close attention to what Congress is doing that might change options, and premiums, for seniors in the future. Grace-Marie Turner is president of the Galen Institute, a non-profit research organization focusing on patient-centered solutions to health reform. She can be reached at P.O. Box 320010, Alexandria, VA, or at turner@galen.org.

K EEP FLU GERMS AWAY W HEN V ISITING S ENIORS

Schools with only a third of the students sitting in chairs, offices sending out notices to employees asking anyone with a fever or cough to please stay home, and hand sanitizer stations popping up everywhere; the signs are very visible this year that flu season has arrived. Seasonal and H1N1 flu viruses are making big headlines. And while everyone has the potential to catch either variety, senior citizens tend to suffer more from the complications of flu. “It’s a good idea for everyone – including caretakers of senior citizens – to get the flu shot. And there are many other ways to help prevent the spread of viruses from one person to another,” said Richard Bitner with Visiting Angels, a senior home-care service. “If you provide care, or even just frequently visit with a senior, pay attention to their living environment to make sure it is safe and protects your loved one from viruses. And make sure you take care of yourself as well, so you don’t pass on the germs.” Seniors are more vulnerable because they spend time with grandchildren, get

out and explore new activities and visit with friends and family. The CDC recommends everyone over the age of 50 get a yearly flu vaccine because the flu can be more serious and even deadly for seniors. About 36,000 people die from flu complications annually, and of those deaths, 90 percent are age 65 or older. In addition to getting both the seasonal flu vaccine and the H1N1 vaccine, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends the following steps to help protect your health: If you are sick with flu-like symptoms, stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone – unless you need to get medical care; Even if you aren’t sick, keep your home stocked with a supply of over-the-counter medicines, alcohol-based hand rubbing solution and tissues, so that if you do start experiencing symptoms, you don’t need to go out and to purchase supplies; Wash your hands every day with soap and water – or if this isn’t available, hand sanitizer; and Avoid close contact with sick people.


A PLACE TO CALL HOME:

Former Astoria Church Changes Roles, Serves As Shelter For Gay Outcasts By SARA HAMDAN With sky blue walls and music playing in various rooms, the converted church in Astoria looks more like a summer camp dormitory than a homeless shelter for gay youths. Aqua, a gay 23-year-old whose full name will be legally changed to Aqua Angel - Bel Starr from Daoud next month, sets a plate of chicken wings and secret sauce on a wooden table at the end of the room. Anansi Bumbray, who used to be a male named Andrew, strikes a pose in front of him and asks if she is "giving off girl or giving off guy today." As Aqua reassures her that she looks like a regular girl, Quayshawn Williams, a gay male, grabs a chicken wing off of Aqua's plate and runs across the room in black stiletto heels. "We may not like each other sometimes," Aqua says in an exaggeratedly loud voice for Williams to hear, "but as far as I'm concerned, I'm here with family; brothers and sisters who I can be loud and gay around. They understand me."

A New Home After making rounds at other homeless shelters, sleeping in subway trains and scraping by to make ends meet this year, Aqua was granted a bed at the shelter in Astoria last week. The shelter, which opened in mid-November at the Church of St Andrew's, is the newest addition to the Ali Forney Center's seven housing sites for gay youth in New York City.

This shelter is part of a program created through a partnership between the Ali Forney Center and the Episcopal Community Services of Long Island. The organizations invested more than $200,000 into renovating the space to offer 16 beds for some of the thousands of homeless gay youth like Aqua, Bumbray and Williams in New York City. The director of the Ali Forney Center points out that the church is not just exhibiting tolerance of homosexuality, but displaying acceptance by reaching out to troubled gay teens. "A bishop did the opening prayer the day we launched the shelter," said Carl Siciliano, the center's director. "And we have counselors there every night for guidance." The site of the Astoria shelter was formerly an Episcopal church for 50 years before it was decommissioned. Siciliano said that members affiliated with the church reached out to the Ali Forney Center with the specific intention of helping gay youths. "Many of these kids are fleeing violent or difficult situations," said Siciliano. "It often has to do with religion. And here is a church reaching out to them."

Choosing A Hard Life Aqua grew up in a religious household and left his parent's place when he was 21 because life had become too difficult at home. "When someone calls you gay and useless in the same sentence, what are

you left to do?" he said, as Bumbray styles his dark curls. "The whole reason I'm in the city in the first place is because my parents kicked me out when they found out I was gay." His parents, with whom he still keeps in touch along with his siblings and cousins, live in upstate New York. He has been in and out of shelters over the past few years, including Sylvia's and other housing sites administered through the Department of Homeless Services. When kicked out for bad behavior, he lived in subway trains, sometimes for weeks at a time. "In order to get on the train, I would let men view me at night to get the $5 bucks," said Aqua. "That way I could get on twice." In June, he was placed on the 150person waitlist for a bed at one of Ali Forney's housing sites after doing rounds of interviews at the center's main office in downtown Manhattan. He moved into the Astoria location in late November. This center, which has fewer beds than other shelters and provides counseling services such as job coaching, has made him feel he can fulfill his ambitions. He has plans to start nonprofit organizations to help homeless youth, including one called NYC Youf. "There was a time [at other shelters] when I had plastic forks and knives and spoons hidden underneath my pillow," he said. "People were telling me they were going to come at me at 2 a.m. when everyone's asleep. You can't live like that."

No Place To Go He and Bumbray met three months ago at Sylvia's, another shelter in New York City for gay youth. She had been in and out of shelters for the last three years, after living with her grandmother for two years in Staten Island when her mother asked her to leave home at 16. She is now 22. "When your own family ostracizes you and makes you feel like a black sheep, it makes what you're going through that much harder," she said. Since moving into this shelter with a community of like-minded people, Bumbray has been able to patch up her relationship with her mother and get her life back on track. "My mother's neighborhood turned really bad and people were making fun of me [when I left]," said Bumbray. "It's easier on the both of us if I'm in a shelter." She is now polishing her essays for an application to Hampshire College in upstate New York, where she hopes to study social sciences in fall 2010. In the meantime, she plans to save up for a sex change operation and is taking hormones to enhance feminine features. The operation costs $20,000 and she expects to take out a medical loan for half that amount. She spends her days looking for a job for the $10,000 she needs.

Following The Rules

Page 22 Tribune Dec. 10-16, 2009 â&#x20AC;˘ www.queenstribune.com

Photo by Sarah Hamdan

The former St. Andrews Church is now a shelter for homeless gay youths.

The center offers services in resume building and job searching at a separate location in Park Slope, which Bumbray finds useful. She visits the "camp," as this Brooklyn site is nicknamed, often during the week. When at home after curfew, she and other residents are expected to do chores, demonstrate good behavior and progress so that they can extend their stays. Once given a bed, residents, all between the ages of 16 and 24, are eligible to stay for six months and are then re-evaluated. The shelter closes its doors at 8 a.m. and reopens at 8 p.m. from Sunday through Thursday. It is an emergency shelter, which is not open during the day, except on weekends. On Friday and Saturday, the curfew is midnight, though they have to earn the right to stay out late. Timings are more flexible during holidays, which included Thanksgiving. "This is the first year in six years that I didn't spend Thanksgiving with a family member," said Bumbray. "But I have family here too, now." When Ali Forney opened its first shelter in 2002, most of the residents were from New York City. Today, there are up to 8,000 homeless gay youth in the City and Siciliano said that about a third of residents at the center's seven housing sites come from other states. About 15 percent come from other countries, including the Caribbean and East Africa. Residents are predominantly black or Latino and are escaping difficult situations at home. "As far as I'm concerned, even though our stories are different, it's all one outcome: we all ended up here," said Aqua. "We're a small community and it's our duty now to help each other as much as possible."


Leisure

Boro Restaurant Gets Local Flavors

Photo by Michelle Castillo

Nilsson storefront nook is as busy as ever, with lunch lines easily 20 people long stretching past the sidewalk into Jackson Avenue. Among those waiting was art critic Lily Wei, wh o f r e q u e n t s t h e place at least once a month. On this occasion, she brought two friends who had never eaten there. “Their product is good, and their food is really good,” Wei said between sips of fair-trade coffee. “It’s the only place around here that has passable fresh food.” one of Sage GenA wooden shelf of eral Store’s suppastries, cupcakes pliers. Since she and other deliciously and her husband sinful delights near star ted farming the doorway invites 12 years ago, patrons to ruin their they’ve become appetites on desser t. spoiled on fresh produce. Most of Sage General Store, which focuses on local E v e r y st e p i n t h e t h e i r f o o d i s food produc ts, creates fantastic dishes from cooking process is in the open: Customers p i c k e d d i r e c t l y its humble storefront. can see the baskets from their fields mere hours before it ends up in their fr ying of produce from which the chefs whip up pans and dinner table. The produce has less meals. Although Nilsson’s restaurant always feat ime to deteriorate because plant s start to tured some organic or local produce, she break down as soon as they are harvested. “The minute something’s cut, it’s bleeding was able to fully suppor t the movement by nutrients,” Satur said. “People can taste the changing her daily menu to a weekly one. difference in day-old bread. Same with veg- Some traditional favorites were stricken from the menu, but she added new specials such etables – people can tell the difference.” as skillet-fried free-range chicken that uses local poultr y and produce that had weathered the summer’s storms. She did meet resistance from a few people who missed seeing the regular dishes, like the daily tuna fish sandwiches, but she was able to appease them by tr ying to put the items on the next dish’s play of hot and cold, chew y and SUSHI YA week’s menu. crunchy and sweet and hear ty walks a deli2311 Jer icho Tur npike, Arvin Raidman, a real estate broker who cate tight-rope of flavor and texture to reNew Hyde Park eats at the Sage General Store at least once markable lengths. (516) 741-2288 a week, approved of the good cause, but T hai ch icken let tuce wraps ach ieve CUISINE: Japanese similar heights using the same play on disHOURS: 11 am to 10 pm Monsonant flavors and textures. The mixture Thurs; 11 am to 11 pm Fr i & Sat; of chicken, pine nuts, bell peppers and 11 am to 9 pm Sun string beans is finely diced and PARKING: Lot served in bowl shaped leaves of RESTAURANT iceberg let tuce. The wraps radiUnt il this week I left every ate the edge of a circular dish hibachi restaurant I’d been to w ith an ar tful beet-flower garwith a bad taste in my mouth. nish ing the center. Too much show, not enough By TAMMY SCILEPPI As the name implies, the ressubstance – a razzle-dazzle perIn the premier of this retaurant takes pride in its sushi formance to distract from the fre sh ingly enter taining a nd pre sentations. The Iron Tuna is cookie-cutter flavor. heart warming play, “free and par ticularly notable. The spicy Then along came Sush i Ya, a breez y” Ne w Yorker, Amy tuna is wrapped carefully in annew hibachi lounge and sushi Loo’s “me generation” sensiother thin-seared slice of tuna and bar in New Hyde Park. One bility, comically collides with glance at the ar tful ly prepared meals and served in a shallow pool of oily-red sauce. mom Rosa’s old school values, The chef’s salad is also superb. Fresh one bite from any of the masterfully crafted as they spar lovingly over a rodishes leaves only one impression – this is greens are flanked by thin slices of bright mantic locksmith, red dresses, red tuna, topped with a flower formation the real deal. and a CPA. The final hilarit y Ever y dish is pai nstaki ngly prepared of yellow-tail and salmon roe and drizzled – a flying Peking duck. w ith special at tent ion to composit ions in a light dressing. “Rosa Loses Her Face” is beThe hibachi offerings per form just as of form a nd color and flavor. Even t he ing presented at the Queens dishes hot from the hibachi are pristinely well. The special grilled short ribs are mariTheatre in the Park through presented to evoke the senses. So forget nated in a tangy Japanese pear sauce and Dec. 13. The play is writ ten Comedy the volcanoes; forget the haphazard grilled to perfection, served with a helping by Kit ty Chen and directed by chopping; and forget the knife juggling of fresh grilled vegetables on the side. Nancy Robillard. Best of all, it’s affordable too, running – come to Sush i Ya, where food is t he This is a must-see for anyone who has ever average prices of $10 to $20 for an entrée main at traction. experienced the “parent knows best” genThe fried calamari salad is a great open- and $3 to $10 for a roll. eration gap, or the culture gap. Sush i Ya has t wo re staura nt s, w it h ing act. Lightly bat tered rings of tender The show is presented in association calamari are served over a bed of let tuce another location of the same name in with the Electric Theatre Company of and doused in a sweet chili sauce. The Garden City. Scranton. Funding is provided by the New

By MICHELLE CASTILLO Leslie Nilsson realized something had to be done. Unprecedented summer rains had destroyed the tomato crops and made traditional summer fruits like berries ripen much later. The zucchini crops rot ted, a nd with growing schedules pushed back, the problems looked like they would persist into the fall. The final straw came when Nilsson, a restaurateur, cal led her produce buyer only to hear the woman weeping because she selling so lit tle produce she couldn’t suppor t her family. Nilsson then chose to refashion her Long Island City restaurant and use only locally grown produce. “It’s a personal philosophy,” Nilsson said, who in addition to owning the 2-year-old Sage General Store restaurant is the CEO of Sage Events, a special event and wedding planning company. “If I can throw my business to someone who’s a small business owner like myself, I would ult imately do it.” It’s also good business for Nilsson. A quarter of patrons seek out restaurants with menus that focus on “green” food ingredients, according to the Zagat Survey of 2010 New York City Restaurant s. Two-thirds find it impor tant that their food is locally grown, organic or sustainable – and 56 percent of customers are willing to pay more for it. Though the definition of what exactly constitutes as local is vague, “locavores,” as they are known, consume produce from noncorporate farms that use sustainable farming practices. Local has different meanings, too, from a 100-mile radius to entire bioregional area. Keeping food local means more nutritious food that retains the natural flavors, according to Paulet te Satur, owner of Satur Farms,

Page 26 Tribune Dec. 10-16, 2009 • www.queenstribune.com

Fresh Fish And Fun

misses the daily macaroni and cheese. However, he did see one upside. “I could live without it,” he said as he laughed and pointed to his stomach. He then ordered the new daily special, Maryland crab cakes with jalapeno-corn grits. Another person who is glad that Nilsson made the change is grower Edward Harbes IV, who works on Harbes Family Farms in Mattituck, N.Y. His farm supplies Sage General Store with crops like pumpkins, squash and sweet corn. “I think it’s really terrific when a community can come together and support each other, especially in difficult economic times,” Harbes said. “If we can continue to help one another, it’s going to have a positive effect in the future.” His farm was hit especially hard this past summer. Alt hough the cold weather is setting in, the aftereffects are far from over. The heav y rain made the soil condition too wet to use farm equipment for fear of degrading the soil tilth, or mixture of nutrients in the soil. Now, he and growers like him are an entire season behind. By now, Harbes should be harvesting his pumpkins and squash. But a walk in his fields shows that almost all 50 acres of the vegetables were still green. He planned to extend his season into November, something he has never done – to give his crops more time to mature. This, in turn, will push back his winter crop of essential cover crops like oats and winter rye, which put nutrients back in the soil. That then delays his spring growing season. With fewer winter crops to choose from, Nilsson said that it will be challenging to stick with her local produce menu but she’s counting on farms with greenhouses so she can make salads. There are also root crops, like beets and braising greens, and she’s considering canning some local produce. “If you throw your money where you can best help people, it’s great,” Nilsson said. “Even though, in the end in this case, ultimately everyone is benefiting.” Sage General Store is located at 24-20 Jackson Ave. To learn more call (718) 3610707 or go to sagegeneralstore.com.

Fun And Frenzy Flow At Queens Theatre Hit

REVIEW

ensues as “Rosa Loses Her Face.” Yo r k C o m m u n i t y Tr u s t / L i l a A c he s o n Wallace Fund for the Ar t s. Tickets are $32-38 and are available at queenstheatre.org or by phone at (718) 7600064 or in person at the theater’s box office, located just below the towers at Flushing Meadows Corona Park.


DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

Queens Today SECTION EDITOR: REGINA VOGEL

Send typed announcements for your club or organization’s events at least TWO weeks in advance to “Queens Today” Editor, Queens Tribune, 174-15 Horace Harding Expressway, Fresh Meadows, NY 11365. Send faxes to 357-9417, c/o Regina. IF YOUR ORGANIZATION MEETS ON A REGULAR BASIS, SEND ALL DATES FOR THE ENTIRE YEAR.

DANCE COUNTRY WESTERN Saturday, December 12 Gunsmoke performs at the Christmas Dance. $12. The NY Metropolitan Country Music Association. $12. Glendale Memorial Building, 72-02 Myrtle Avenue at 7:30. 763-4328.

DINNER SAFAD HADASSAH Wednesday, December 16 annual Chanukah Dinner. 263-9529. LIVING THE DREAM Saturday, Januar y 16 TriBoro Intergenerational Services, Inc. of Jamaica presents the Life and Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Songs, dance, speakers and luncheon in St. Albans. $40. 481-7927.

FLEA MARKETS HOLIDAY FAIR Sunday, December 13 from 9:30-12:30 at Temple Tikvah of New Hyde Park, 3315 Hillside Avenue. GIFT SHOP SALE Sunday, December 13 F l u s h i n g To w n H a l l ’ s g i f t show will host a sale from 105. 463-7700, ext. 222.

Page 28 Tribune Dec. 10-16, 2009 • www.queenstribune.com

RELIGION REFORM TEMPLE Friday, December 11 Chanukah dinner at 6. $25 adults, $12 children 3-12. Reservations. Reform Temple of Forest Hills, 71-11 112 th Street at 10. $12 includes bagel buffet. 2612900. REGO PARK JC Sunday, December 13 Chanukah Concert at 2:30. $10 advance. Saturday, December 19 Parashat and Hafarat Club t 1:30. Sunday, December 20 “Expression in the Arts” Chanukah Brunch at 11:30. 7. Saturday Shabbat Services at 9. Wednesdays 12:30-2:30 Yiddish Vinkel. Rego Park Jewish Center, 97-30 Queens Blvd. 459-1000. CHANUKAH FEST Sunday, December 13 the Rockwood Park Jewish Center in Howard Beach will hold a Chanukah Festival. 641-5822.

EDUCATION/GAMES/CRAFTS DEFENSIVE DRIVING Saturday, December 12 at Our Lady of the Blessed Sacrament in Bayside from 93:30. $45. 229-5929. FUTURE CAREERS Saturday, December 12 Careers Without College at 2 at the Central library. KNIT AND CROCHET Saturdays at the Seaside library at 2:30. PET OWNERS Sundays (not on holidays) from 1-4 free workshops on pet behavior at Crocheron Park in Bayside (weather permitting). 454-5800. KNIT & CROCHET Mondays at 4 at the Douglaston/Little Neck library, 249-01 Northern Blvd. INSTRUCTION & DANCE Mondays and Fridays 7:158:00 dance lessons, dance from 8-11. Italian Charities of America, 83-20 Queens Blvd., Elmhurst. $10. ADULT CHESS Every Monday at 6 at the Queens Village library, 9411 217 th Street. ONE-ON-ONE COMPUTER Mondays at the Arverne library at 6. BALLROOM DANCING Monday, December 14 at the Forest Hills library at 6:30. BASIC CROCHET Monday, December 14 at the St. Albans library at 1. WRITE PROSE Monday, December 4 at the Seaside library a 5:30. DRAWING CLASS Tuesdays at 1. All medias, all levels. 969-1128. BASIC COMPUTER Tuesday, December 15 at the Briarwood library. Register. INTERMED. COMPUTER Tuesday, December 15 at the Forest Hills library at 10:30. COMPUTER BASICS Tuesday, December 15 at the Glen Oaks library. Register. EMAIL Tuesday, December 15 at the Queens Village library. Register,. BASIC COMPUTER Tuesday, December 15 at the St. Albans library. Register. COMPUTER CLASS Tuesday, December 15 at the Sunnyside librar y. Register. BEGIN COMPUTERS Tuesday, December 15 at the Queensboro Hill library. Register. ADULT SCRABLE Tuesday, December 15 at the Fresh Meadows library at 1. SCRABBLE CLUB Tuesday, December 5 at the East Flushing library at 3:30. INTRO COMPUTERS Tuesday, December 15 a t the Central library. Register. GET YOUR YARNS OUT! Tuesdays after evening Minyan at 8, knitters, crocheters, needlepointers, and others meet at the Forest Hills Jewish Center. 263-7000, ext. 200. WATERCOLOR CLASS Wednesdays at 9:30 at NAL. Traditional and contempo-

rary, all levels. 969-1128. EMAIL Wednesday, December 16 at the Central library. Register. CITIZENSHIP CLASS Wednesday, December 16 at the Langston Hughes library at 10. WORKFORCE CAREER Wednesday, December 16 at the Central library at 11. HOLIDAY ORNAMENTS Wednesday, December 16 at the LIC library at1:30. POLISH YOUR RESUME Wednesday, December 16 at the Central library. Register. BEGIN COMPUTERS Thursday, December 17 at the East Elmhurst library at 10 and again at 11. BASIC COMPUTER Thursday, December 17 at the Glen Oaks library. Register. BEGIN COMPUTERS Thursday, December 17 at the Queensboro Hill library. Register. CHESS CLUB Thursdays at 5:30 at the East Flushing library, 196-36 Northern Blvd. SCRABBLE/CHESS Thursdays at 4 at the Windsor Park library, 79-50 Bell Blvd., Bayside. CHESS CLUB Every Thursday at 6 at the Queens Village library. QUILTING CLASSES Thursdays 10-2 at the Maria Rose Doll Museum in St. Albans. 917-817-8653 to register. KNIT/CROCHET Thursdays at 6 and Fridays at 10:30 at the Fresh Meadows library. KNIT & CROCHET Thursday, December 17 at 3 at the Central library. CHESS CLUB Fridays at 3:30 at the Auburndale library, 25-55 Francis Lewis Blvd., Flushing. CHESS & CHECKERS Fridays at 4 at the Lefrak Cit y library. GAME DAY Fridays at the Bay Terrace library, 18-36 Bell Blvd. for all ages from 2:30-4:30. INTER. COMPUTER Friday, December 18 at the Forest Hills library t 10:30. KNIT & CROCHET Friday, December 8 at the Fresh Meadows library at 10:30. BASIC COMPUTER Friday, December 18 at the Auburndale library. Register. BUDGET GIFTS Saturday, December 1 holiday gifts on a budget at 2 at the Whitestone library. CAREER POTENTIAL Saturday, December 19 Career Exploration Inventory at the Central library at 3. PUBLIC SPEAKING Saturday, December 19 learn how to communicate effectively at Elmhurst Hospital. 457-8390.

ALUMNI CARDOZO 70-74 School reunion being planned. 347-414-4775.


ENTERTAINMENT basement, 216-01 Union Tu r n p i k e , B a y s i d e . 4 6 4 4 5 8 2 . Tu e s d a y s a t 7 : 1 5 (doors open 6) at the Rego Park Jewish Center, 97-30 Queens Blvd. 459-1000.$3 admission includes 12 games. EBONY HILLBILLIES Thursday, December 17 at the Far Rockaway library at 5. NY CHRISTMAS CONCERT Thursday, December 17 at the Forest Hills library at 6:30. FROM THE SCRIPT Saturday, December 19 adults read original scripts and participate in acting scenes at the Forest Hills library at 1. KWANZAA Saturday December 19 with the Ebony Hillbillies at 2 at the Flushing library. RUSSIAN AVANT-GARDE Saturday, December 19 at the Forest Hills library at 2. CHRISTMAS & CHANUKAH Saturday, December 19 at the North Forest Park library at 2. HOLIDAY CONCERT Saturday, December 19 with Linda Ipanema at 2:30 at the Fresh Meadows library. HOLIDAY MUSIC

Saturday, December 19 at the Maspeth library with Teresa Mazzilli at 2. JINGLE BELL SWING Saturday, December 19 at the Bayside library at 3. A CHRISTMAS CAROL Saturday, December 19 at the Sunnyside library at 3. PAUL TAYLOR DANCE Saturday and Sunday, December 19, 20 at Queens Theatre in the Park. 7600064. CARMINA BURANA Saturday, December 19 Queens College Choral Societ y at 8. $20. 793-8080. ASTRONOMY Saturday, December 19 from 7-9 An Evening With the Stars at Alley Pond Environmental Center. $12 non-adult member, $7 children 7-12. Register. 2294000. KWANZAA CELEBR ATION Sunday, December 20 at Flushing Town Hall. $15. 463-7700, ext. 222. MESSIAH Sunday, December 20 the Oratorio Societ y of Queens performs portions of Messiah at Queensborough Communit y College. $25. 2793006.

HEALTH ADULT ALZHEIMER The Adult Day program is available weekdays 10-4 in Flushing. Contact 358-3541. HATHA YOGA Saturdays, December 12, 19 at the Queensboro Hill library at 10:15. TAI CHI Mondays and Thursdays at 11 at the Cardiac Health Center in Fresh Meadows. 670-1695. $5 a class. FEMALE CANCER Monday, December 14 free “Looking Good, Feel Better” program for women undergoing chemotherapy and radiation therapy from 5:306:30 at the Anextis Conference Room at NY Hospital Queens in Flushing. 1-800ACS-2345. AUTISM Monday, December 14 at the Broadway library at 6 and Tuesday, December 15 at the Jackson Heights library at 6 and Thursday, December 7 at 6:30 at the Forest Hills library. YOGA DANCE Tuesdays 4:30-5:30 at the Cardiac Health Center in Fresh Meadows. 670-1948. $10 class. MEMORY PROBLEM? Tuesday, December 15 d o you take care of a person with a memory problem? Alzheimer’ Support Group at 6 at the Jackson Heights library. COPD Wednesday, December 16 Jamaica Hospital holds free Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease support groups. 206-8410. OA Thursday, December 17 at the Howard Beach library at

10:30. AUTISM Thursday, December 17 QSAC support group in Astoria. 728-8476, ext. 16. CANCER ACTION Thursday, December17 Flushing Cancer Action Council meets at 3 at the Flushing library, MEDITATION Thursday, December 17 at 6 at the Woodside library. WOMEN & HEART Thursday, December 17 National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease at North Shore Universit y Hospital in Forest Hills. 830-1511. VISUAL IMPAIRMENT Friday, December 18 at the Hollis library at 11. OA Fridays 6:30-8:30 at Unit y Center of Flushing, 42-11 1 5 5 th S t r e e t . B e g i n n e r s meeting except the last Friday of each month, which is a writing meeting. CO-DEPENDENTS ANON. Fridays 10-11:45 at Resurrection Ascension Pastoral Center, 85-18 61 st Road, Rego Park. Women only. BLOOD DRIVE Sunday, December 20 f r o m 9 : 3 0 - 3 a t Te m p l e Tikvah, 3315 Hillside Avenue, New Hyde Park. 516-746-1120.

ENVIRONMENT ALLEY POND HIKES Saturday, December 12 observe fresh water spring and stream. “Hikes to Highlights of Nature” in Alley Pond Park. 11am. $5 each hike. 229-4000.

www.queenstribune.com • Dec. 10-16, 2009 Tribune Page 29

NEW YEARS EVE Bellerose Jewish Center in Floral Park with music, dining and dancing. $65 per person. 343-9001 by December 21. GUIDED TOUR Saturdays and Wednesdays guided tour of the landmark Poppenhusen Institute. 3580067 reservations. CHORAL CONCERT Saturday, December 12 the Communit y Singers of Queens will present “Golden Anniversary of Song” at 8 at Church on the Hill, 167 th Street and 35 th Avenue, Flushing. 658-1021. FRESH MEADOW POETS Saturday, December 12 discuss and critique poems at 10 at the Forest Hills library. SYMPHONY 101 Saturday, December 12 at noon at the Central library. Also at the Jackson Heights library at 3:30. KWANZAA CELEBRATION Saturday, December 12 at 1 at the Langston Hughes library. HOLIDAY CONCERT Saturday, December 12 at the Steinway library at 2 with Linda Ipanema. CHANUKAH SONGS Saturday, December 12 at 2:30 with Irene Failenbogen at the Forest Hills library. JINGLE BELL SWING Saturday, December 12 at the South Hollis library at 2:30. AMERICAN DANCE Saturday, December 12 American Dance Salon’s Holiday Dances at 3 at the Woodhaven library. CAROLING Saturday, December 12 St. Clare’s Parish Christmas Caroling in Rosedale in the schoolyard at 6. BIG BAND Saturday, December 12 the Queens Center for the Performing Arts hosts the Lew Picardi Big Band Swing Orchestra at 8 in the Spotlight Theater at St. George’s in Flushing. 321-8496 ticket information. $20 adults. HOUSE TOUR Sunday, December 13 Flushing Historic House Holiday Tour from 1-5. 939-0647 ext. 11 for reservations. SACRED MUSIC SOCIETY Sunday, December 13 “Messiah” and Christmas favorites will be performed at Our Lady Queen of Mart yrs in Forest Hills at 4. $20. 2686251 ticket information. NUTCRACKER Sunday, December 13 and Saturday, December 19 The Nutcracker will be perf o r m e d a t F l u s h i n g To w n Hall. 463-7700, ext. 222. OPEN MIC Sunday, December 13 at 2 for poets at the Central library. CHANUKAH Monday, December 14 at the Forest Hills library at :30. BLUES Monday, December 14 Eddie Lee Isaacs and his Blues Guitar at 6:30 at the Rosedale librar y. BINGO Tuesdays at 7:15 at American Mart yrs Church, church

DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

Queens Today


DINING & ENTERTAINMENT Page 30 Tribune Dec. 10-16, 2009 • www.queenstribune.com

Queens Today MEETINGS MUSIC CLUB Saturday, December 12 at the Queensboro Hill library at noon. CAMBRIA HTS FRIENDS Saturday, December 12 the Cambria Heights Friends of the Library meet at 4 at the librar y. WOODHAVEN BLOCK Saturday, December 12 from 1-3 at t he Volunte e r Ambulance Corps, 78-15 Jamaica Avenue. AMER. LEG. AUX. Saturday, December 12 Leonard Unit 422, American Legion Auxiliary, meets in Flushing. 463-2798. COMM. BD. 7 Monday, December 14 at 7 at Union Plaza Care Center, 33-23 Union Street, Flushing. CATHOLIC VETS Monday, December 14 American Mart yrs Cat holic Wa r Ve t e ra n s Po s t 1 7 7 2 meets in Bayside. 468-9351. AMERICAN LEGION Monday, December 14 American Legion Post 510 meets at St. Robert Bellamine in Bayside Hills. 428-2895. TOASTMASTERS Monday, December 14 at the Briarwood library at 6:30. WATCH Monday, December 14 Women at the Chapel Hall (WATCH) meet at the Communit y Church of Little Neck. 229-2534. VFW POST 4787 Mondays, December 14, 28 Whitestone VFW Post 4787 meets at 8 at 19-12 149 th Street, Whitestone. 7460540. Ladies Auxiliary meets the second week also. AMERICAN LEGION Mondays, December 14, 28 Queens Village Post 301 meets in Creedmoor. 4795780. TOASTMASTERS Mondays, December 14, 28 Queens Toastmaster’s District 46 Club 5876 meets at Queensborough Hall. 7936456. FRESH MEADOW CAMERA Tuesdays the Fresh Meadows Camera Club meets. 917-612-3463. AMERICAN LEGION Tuesday, December 15 the Edward M. McKee Post 131 of the American Legion meets at 10-20 Clintonville Street, Whitestone. 7674323. TALK OF THE TOWN Tu e s d a y, D e c e m b e r 1 5 learn the art of public speaking with the Talk of the Town Toastmasters in St. Albans. 527-5889. KNIGHTS OF PY THIAS Wednesday, December 16 Queensview Lodge 433 meets in Whitestone. 3520787. PUBLIC SPEAKING Wednesday, December 16 Learn the Art of Public Speaking at the Voices of Rochdale Toastmasters Club at 7:30 at the Rochdale Vill a ge C o m m u n i t y C e n t e r, 1 6 5 - 6 9 1 3 7 th A v e n u e , J a maica. 978-0732. FLUSHING CAMERA Wednesdays, December 16,

30 Flushing Camera Club meets at Flushing Hospital. 441-6210. HLAA Wednesday, December 16 Hearing Loss Association of America meets at the LIJ Speech and Hearing Center, 430 Lakeville Road, New Hyde Park at 6:30 for refreshments and social time, meeting at 7. BOOK CLUB Wednesday, December 16 The Woodhaven Library Book Club meets at 2 at the library. 849-4980. MURDER SURVIVORS Wednesday, December 16 POMC (Parents of Murdered Children) and other survivors meet in Kew Gardens. 740-1061. TOASTMASTERS Thursday, December 17 Exc e l s i o r To a s t m a st e r C l u b meets at Queensborough Hall. 271-9641. REPUBLICAN WOMEN Thursday, December 17 Women’s Republican Club meets in Glendale. 5263987.

MOVING ON Thursday, December 17 the Transition Center “Moving On Friendship Circle,” for widows and widowers over 50 meet at the Samuel Field Y, 58-20 Little Neck Parkway. 225-6750, ext. 236. CIVIL AIR PATROL Fridays 6-10 at Vaughn College of Aeronautics, 86-01 23 rd Avenue, East Elmhurst. Academy WOMAN’S GROUP Fridays the Woman’s Group of Jamaica Estates meets at noon. Call 461-3193 for information. POMONOK FRIENDS Saturday, December 19 at the Pomonok library at 10:30. QUEENS GREENS Sunday, December 20 West Queens Greens meet in Sunnyside. 728-1092. PFLAG Sunday, December 20 PFLAG, a support group for parents, families and friends of lesbians and gays, meet in Forest Hills. 271-6663.

SENIORS

PARENTS

GAME DAY Monday, December 14 at the Queens Village library at 1. AARP 1405 Monday, December 14 the Flushing AARP Chapter 1405 meets at the Bowne Street Communit y Church, 143-11 Roosevelt Avenue at 1. AARP DRIVING CLASS Tuesday, December 15 at the Forest Hills library at 1. CLEARVIEW Tu e s d a y, D e c e m b e r 1 5 Bake sale from 10-2. Selfhelp Clearview Senior Center, 208-11 26th Avenue, Bayside. 224-7888 to register. STARS Wednesday, December 16 at 10:30 at the Hollis library. Friday, December 18 at the Queens Village library at 10:30. Senior Theatre Acting Repertory is rehearsing for their next season. FOREST HILLS Wednesday, December 16 Lecture on Food Safet y from 10:30-11:30. December 16 Christmas/Hanukah/Kwanza part y. Lunch 12-1 with entertainment 1:15-2:15. December 17 lecture Eating Healthy During the Holidays from 10:30-11:30. 108-25 62 nd Drive. 699-1010. AARP 4977 Wednesday, December 16 at 1:30 at Corona Congregational Church hall, 102-18 34 th Avenue, Corona. MOVING ON Thursday, December 17 the Transition Center “Moving On Friendship Circle,” for widow/ers over 50 meet a t Sa m u e l F i e l d Y, 5 8 - 2 0 Little Neck Parkway. 2256750, ext. 236. SENIOR LUNCH Saturday, December 19 at noon at Church of the Resurrection in Kew Gardens. 847-2649 reservations.

SPIRITUAL SUPPORT Friday, December 18 support group for parents seeking spiritual support with a biblical look at parenting. Resurrection Lutheran Church, 189-20 114 th Road, St. Albans from 7-9

SINGLES SINGLES 45+ Wednesday, December 16 the Singles Center of the Samuel Field Y in Flushing holds a Wednesday Night Rap. 7:30, $7. 225-6750, ext. 243.

TALKS GLENDALE BOOK Saturday, December 12 “Tears of the Giraffe” will be discussed at 11. FRESH MEADOWS Saturday, December 12 Protect Yourself From Identit y Theft at 2:30. FOREST HILLS BOOK Monday, December 14 “A Good Soldier” will be discussed at 3. CENTRAL LIBRARY Monday, December 14 “The Christmas Thief” will be discussed at 4. FRESH MEADOWS Thursday, December 17 “Homecoming” will be discussed at 2:30. IMMIGRATION SERVICES Thursday, December 17 at 6:45 at the Elmhurst library. QUEENS VILLAGE Thursday, December 17 Literary Soup Book Club meets at 6:30. QUEENSBORO HILL Friday, December 18 “The Long Fall” discussed at 2. MASPETH Saturday, December 19 “The Art of Racing in the Rain” discussed at 10.


DINING & ENTERTAINMENT Page 32 Tribune Dec. 10-16, 2009 • www.queenstribune.com

Queens Today YOUTH TEEN TUTORING Saturdays, December 12, 19 at the Bayside library at 10. MATH HELP Saturdays, December 12, 19 at 10 at the Flushing library. SCIENCE LAB Saturdays, December 12, 19 at noon at the Central librar y. CHESS CLUB Saturdays, December 12, 19 at the Douglaston/Little Neck library at 12:30. KWANZA A Saturday, December 12 at 1 at the Langston Hughes library. CHESS CLUB Saturdays, December 12, 19 at the Flushing library at 2. HOMEWORK HELP Monday, December 14 at the LIC library at 2:30 and at the Hollis library at 3. CRAFT KIDS Monday, December 14 at the Flushing library at 3. HOLIDAY ORNAMENTS Monday, December 14 at the Fresh Meadows library at 3:30. DUNGEONS & DRAGONS Monday, December 14 at the Baisley Park library Register. BOY SCOUTS Saturdays 1-3 at St. Paul’s Church. 271-4309. TWEEN BOOK CLUB Monday, December 14 at the Far Rockaway library at 4. KNIT & CROCHET Mondays at the Douglaston/ Little Neck library at 4. S TORY TIMES Tu e s d a y s a t 1 0 : 3 0 a n d Thursdays at 7 weekly story times at 7 at Barnes & Noble, 1 7 6 - 6 0 U n i o n Tu r n p i k e , Fresh Meadows. HOMEWORK HELP Tuesday, December 15 at the LIC library at 2:30 and the Hollis library at 3. TEEN TUTORING Tuesday, December 15 at the Bayside library at 3:30 S TORY T I M E Tuesday, December 1 at the Lefferts library at 3:30. JUNIOR BOOK TALK Tuesday, December 15 at the Bellerose library. Register. CHILDREN’S BOOK TALK Tuesday, December 15 at the Queens Village at 4. HOMEWORK HELP Wednesday, December 16 at the LIC library at 2:30. SCIENCE TIME Wednesday, December 16 at the South Hollis library at 3. NAPKIN HOLDER DOLL Wednesday, December 16 at the Bay Terrace library. Register. HOLIDAY CR AFT Wednesday, December 16 at the Peninsula library. Register. CHESS Wednesday, December 16 at the Queen Village library at 3:30. BOARD GAMES Wednesday, December 16 at the Langston Hughes library at 4:30. HOMEWORK HELP

Thursday, December 17 at the LIC library at 2:30 and the Hollis library at 3. LITTLE KIDS CRAFTS Thursday, December 17 at the Howard Beach library at 3. SPARKLING ORNAMENT Thursday, December 17 at the East Flushing library at 4. HOLIDAY CRAFT & PARTY Thursday, December 17 at the Queens Village library at 4. HOLIDAYPOETRY/ CRAFTS Thursday, December 17 t the Seaside library a 4. LIBERTY SCIENCE Thursday, December 17 X Ray Vision at the Steinway library at 4. WINTER ARTS & CRAFTS Thursday, December 17 at the Hillcrest library at 4:30. CRAFTS Thursday, December 17 at the Lefferts library at 4:30. GAME DAYS Friday, December 18 at the Bay Terrace library at 2:30. HOMEWORK HELP Friday, December 18 at the LIC library at 2:30 and the Hollis library at 3. AUBURNDALE CHESS Friday, December 18 at the

Auburndale library at 3:30. HOLIDAY CRAFTS Friday, December 18 at the Maspeth library at 3:3. GAME DAY Friday, December 18 at the Queens Village library at 3:30. ARTS & CRAFTS Friday, December 18 at the Briarwood library. Register. STORY SHARERS Friday, December 18 t the Central library at 4. ARTS & CRAFTS Friday, December 18 at the East Flushing library at 4. GAME PLAYERS Friday, December 18 at the Hillcrest library at 4. HOLIDAY CRAFT Friday, December 18 at the Poppenhusen library at 4. CHESS CLUB Friday, December 18 at the Ridgewood library at 4. FAMILY STORY TME Saturday, December 19 at the Flushing library at 11. SCRAPBOOKING Saturday, December 19 at the Ozone Park library. Register. S TORY T I M E Saturday, December 19 at the Court Square library at 2.

TEENS TEEN TUTORING Saturdays, December 12, 19 at the Bayside library at 10. CHESS Saturday, December 12 at the Douglaston/Little Neck library at 12:30. KWANZAA Saturday, December 12 at 1 Langston Hughes library. CHESS Saturday, December 12 at 2 at the Flushing library. OPEN MIC Sunday, December 13 poets read 2-4 Central library. KNIT & CROCHET Mondays at the Douglaston/ Little Neck library at 4. DUNGEONS & DRAGONS Monday, December 1 at the Baisley Park library. Register. YOUTH DEVELOPMENT Monday, December 14 Queens Youth Development meeting at 6 at the South Hollis library. TEEN GAMING Tuesday, December 15 at t Fresh Meadows library at 3. WII PARTY Tuesday, December 15 at the Auburndale library at 3:30. TEEN TUTORING Tuesday, December 15 at the Bayside library at 3:30. GRAPHIC NOVEL/MANGA Tuesday, December 15 at 4 at the Bayside library. ANIME/MANGA CLUB Tuesday, December 15 at the Central library at 4. TEEN TIME Tuesday, December 15 at the Peninsula library at 4. READ & BEAD Tuesday, December 1 at the Seaside library at 4. TEEN TUESDAYS Tuesday, December 15 at the Hillcrest library at 4:30. TEEN GAMING Wednesday, December 16 Fresh Meadows library at 3.

GAME DAY Wednesday, December 16 at the St. Albans library at 3. TEEN WII Wednesday, December 16 Queens Village library at 3:30. CHESS Wednesday, December 16 at 3:30 Queens Village library. TEEN GAMES Wednesday, December 16 at the Central library at 4. GAME DAY Wednesday, December 16 Howard Beach library at 4. WII Wednesday, December 16 Ridgewood library at 4. TEEN BOOK CLUB Thursday, December 17 at the Cambria Heights library at 4. TEEN ZINE Thursday, December 17 at the Central library at 4. ANIME/MANGA CLUB Thursday, December 17 at the Far Rockaway library at 4. TEENTIME Thursday, December 17 Richmond Hill library at 4. CHESS CLUB Fridays at 3:30 at the Auburndale library. COLLEGE CLUB Friday, December 18 at the Pomonok library at 4. GAME DAY Friday, December 18 at the Bay Terrace library at :30. BOOK CLUB Friday, December 18 at the Far Rockaway library at 3:30. WII SPORTS Friday, December 18 at the Lefrak Cit y library at 4. CHESS CLUB Friday, December 18 at the Ridgewood library at 4. SCRAPBOOKING Saturday, December 19 at the Ozone Park library. Register.


Page 34 Tribune Dec. 10-16, 2009• www.queenstribune.com

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: COMPREHENSIVE HEALTH CONSULTANTS, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 11/03/09. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, c/o Koenig & Samberg, 300 Old Country Road, Mineola, New York 11501. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. ________________________________________________________________________

process to the LLC, c/o Criterion Group, LLC, 35-11 36 th Street, 3 rd Floor, Long Island City, New York 11106. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. ________________________________________________________________________ SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF QUEENS BENEFICIAL HOMEOWNER SERVICE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, -Against- UNKNOWN HEIRS OF THE ESTATE OF LILLIAN U. CRAIGWELL, if they be living and if they be dead, the respective heirsat-law, next-of-kin, distributees, executors, administrators, trustees, devisees, legatees, assignees, lienors, creditors and successors in interest and generally all persons having or claiming under, by or through said defendants who may be deceased, by purchase, inheritance, lien or inheritance, any right, title or interest in or to the real property described in the complaint, UNKNOWN HEIRS OF THE ESTATE OF STANLEY CRAIGWELL, if they be living and if they be dead, the respective heirsat-law, next-of-kin, distributees, executors, administrators, trustees, devisees, legatees, assignees, lienors, creditors and successors in interest and generally all persons having or claiming under, by or through said defendants who may be deceased, by purchase, inheritance, lien or inheritance, any right, title or interest in or to the real property described in the complaint, BENEFICIAL HOMEOWNER SERVICE CORPORATION, LICIA RAMOS, HECTOR RAMOS, LESLIE SADLER, MARVIN SADLER, JAMES MILES, BLAIR CRAIGWELL, AS HEIR TO THE ESTATE OF LILLIAN CRAIGWELL, DIANA CRAIGWELL, AS HEIR TO THE ESTATE OF LILLIAN CRAIGWELL, THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE, Defendants. Index No.: 13115-08 Date Filed: SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S): You are hereby summoned to answer the complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the complaint is not served with this summons, to serve a notice of appearance, on the plaintiff’s attorney within twenty (20) days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within thirty (30) days after the service is complete if this summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York); and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS OF THE ESTATE OF LILLIAN U. CRAIGWELL, UNKNOWN HEIRS OF THE ESTATE OF STANLEY CRAIGWELL, The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an order of the Honorable Duane A. Hart, a Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, QUEENS County, dated the

10th day of November, 2009, and filed with the complaint and other papers in the office of the Clerk of the County of QUEENS, New York. This action is for final judgment of foreclosure and sale of the premises known as and by 90-11 175th Street, Jamaica, New York, New York, described in the Schedule A which is annexed hereto as Exhibit “A”. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME IF YOU DO NOT RESPOND TO THIS SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE MORTGAGE COMPANY WHO FILED THIS FORECLOSURE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT, A DEFAULT JUDGMENT MAY BE ENTERED AND YOU CAN LOSE YOUR HOME. SPEAK TO AN ATTORNEY OR GO TO THE COURT WHERE YOUR CASE IS PENDING FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ON HOW TO ANSWER THE SUMMONS AND PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY. SENDING A PAYMENT TO YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY WILL NOT STOP THIS FORECLOSURE ACTION. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. Dated: New Rochelle, New York Signed Pursuant to 22 NYCRR §130-1.1-a LISA L. WALLACE, Esq. McCabe, Weisberg & Conway Attorneys for Plaintiff 145 Huguenot Street, Suite 310 New Rochelle, New York 10801 Tel. 914.636.8900 ________________________________________________________________________

Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 12/01/09, bearing Index Number NC-001122-09/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me (us) the right to: Assume the name of (First) MEL (Middle) OSCAR (Last) MANHEIMER My present name is (First) MELVIN (Middle) OSCAR (Last) MANHEIMER AKA MEL OSCAR MANHEIMER My present address is 92-30 2 1 6 TH S t r e e t , B e l l e r o s e Manor, NY 11428 My place

of birth is Brooklyn My date of birth is September 03, 1925 ________________________________________________________________________

AKA BRANDEN TERRELL WHYLIE My present address is 39-13 108 TH STREET, Corona, NY 11368 My place of birth is Manhattan, NY My date of birth is December 14, 1990

Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 11/10/09, bearing Index Number NC-001064-09/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me (us) the right to: Assume the name of (First) Kit (Middle) Chung (Last) Lam My present name is (First) Chung (Middle) Kit (Last) Lam aka Kit Chung Lam My present address is 88-29 62 nd Drive, Rego Park, NY 11374 My place of birth is China My date of birth is November 28,1947 ________________________________________________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 10/8/09, bearing Index Number NC-000909-09/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me (us) the right to: Assume the name of (First) Candy (Last) Sweet My present name is (First) Cashmere (Middle) Tansil (Last) Neal aka Cashmere Neal My present address is 207-15 Hillside Avenue, Queens Village, NY 11427 My place of birth is Manhattan, NY My date of birth is March 25, 1988 ________________________________________________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on the 6 day of June, 2008, bearing Index Number NC26808, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435-3710, grants me the right to: Assume the name of Hugo Jaime My present name is Hugo Jaime Gallego aka Hugo Jaime My present address is 87-50 Kingston Pl., Apt. 7H, Jamaica, Queens, NY 11432 My place of birth is Elmhurst, Queens, NY My date of birth is 5/21/89 ________________________________________________________________________ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: CRITERION PROPERTY MANAGEMENT LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 08/26/09. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: 128-02 HOLDING, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 01/20/04. The latest date of dissolution is 12/31/2103. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 128-02 Liberty Avenue, Richmond Hill, New York 11419. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. ________________________________________________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 10/29/09, bearing Index Number NC-000862-09/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me (us) the right to: Assume the name of (First) ANNARITA (Middle) ANGELIS (Last) NAPOLITANO My present name is (First) ANNARITA (Last) NAPOLITANO AKA ANNARITA ANGELIS My present address is 52-25 69 Street, Maspeth, NY 11378 My place of birth is Brooklyn My date of birth is August 05, 1978

Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 11/25/09, bearing Index Number NC-001078-09/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me (us) the right to: Assume the name of (First) BRANDEN (Middle) TERRELL (Last) VANHORNE My present name is (First) BRANDEN (Last) WHYLIE

To Place Your Legal Advertisement, Call the Tribune at (718) 357-7400 Ext. 144 or E-Mail Your Copy to the Tribune at: legals@queenstribune.com

Legislative Update Sen. Joseph P. Addabbo, Jr. (D-Howard (Tier V) for state and local government emBeach), reported on the conclusion of weeks’ ployees outside New York City that the Govlong negotiations on the state budget be- ernor says will save $30 billion over 30 years; Enacting reforms of how the state’s public tween the Legislature and the Governor. authorities operate (transfer“During the recent special sesring—$200 million from the sion, we faced one of our greatest Battery Park City Authority, $90 budget deficits in New York State million from the Regional history,” explained Addabbo. Greenhouse Gas Initiative, $10 “At the same time, this challenge million from the Environmental represented a unique opportuProtection Fund, and $26 milnity to evaluate our priorities and lion from the Dormitory Austreamline our resources. In short, thority—to the State General we need to learn to do more with Fund); less as a matter of practice from Working to start a tax penthis point forward.” alty forgiveness program ex“My Senate colleagues and I pected to increase state revenues remained steadfast in opposing Senator Joseph by $250 million in 2009-2010; the Governor’s deficit reduction Addabbo, Jr. and plan which would have disrupted Expanding the hours of operation of video and dismantled our classrooms in midyear, and further weakened our overburdened lottery gaming, which is expected to generate health care system. For months, we negoti- an additional $39 million for the state this ated an alternative budget which trimmed fiscal year. $2.7 billion from our deficit, while maintainA bill sponsored by U.S. Reps. Carolyn ing the quality of our educational and health care systems that are of paramount impor- Maloney (D-Astoria) and Peter King (RLong Island) to increase the public accessitance to every New Yorker.” Addabbo believes that the Governor’s bility of data filed by companies that reproposed $1 billion in school aid and health ceived funding from the Troubled Assets care reductions would certainly have had a Relief Program (TARP) passed the House negative effect on the schools in his district, unanimously. H.R. 1242 would require the Department and these same cuts would have meant reof the Treasury to put all TARP recipients’ duced federal funding as well. The final bipartisan plan passed by the reports—currently spread among 25 different NYS Legislature to shrink the state budget government agencies using incompatible formats and systems—in a standardized database includes: Sparing schools from any midyear cuts, language so that TARP funds can be accestaking nearly $400 million of federal stimulus sible, traceable, and fully transparent. Such a funds earmarked for education in next year’s system would be the most efficient mechabudget, putting it toward filling this year’s nism for oversight, audits, and investigations. gap; “Today, the House has taken the WashReducing health care spending by $107 million, without the loss of approximately ington buzzword of ‘transparency’ and put it $750 million in federal funding for medical into practice,” Rep. Maloney said. “We must services, and reversing the Governor’s pro- require the use of the technological tools that posed doubling of gross receipts tax on hos- are available today. In a day and age when UPS and Federal Express can tell pitals from .35 percent to .75 peryou where a package is anywhere on cent; the globe— and post it to a public Eliminating the plan to delay website— the Dept. of the Treasury rebasing payments to nursing can’t do the same thing with the homes and hospitals (costing them massive packages of federal dollars $60 million); backing up financial institutions. My Preventing the loss of over bill will create a sophisticated and 12,000 jobs from cuts to vital sercomplete data stream to provide a vices, while cutting 12.5 percent complete picture of how TARP funds to remaining balances of local assistance grants; Congresswoman are being used in near-real time.” “If we’re going to give billions of Reducing MTA funding by Carolyn Maloney dollars in TARP money to banks, it’s $140 million; Cutting SUNY, CUNY and community important that every dollar is accounted for,” colleges operating aid funding by 5 percent; said Rep. King. “The misuse of TARP funds Cutting 5.4 percent from the Office of was unacceptable and unfair to American Mental Retardation and Developmental Dis- taxpayers. This bill will add transparency so that TARP funds can be traced and banks can abilities; Creating a new, less costly pension level be held accountable.”


Queens Focus PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . . PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . On The March: .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE ...PEOPLE . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE.. PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE . . .PEOPLE... It is with heavy heart that I pass on the news that Joe Veyvoda has passed into the hands of our Lord. Joe had a distinguished career with the NYPD. He held the positions of Chief of Personnel, Chief of OCCB and Chief of Patrol. In retirement he served as the Retired Representative to the Captains Endowment Association. Joe was a member of the Holy Name Society and the Pulaski Association. He also served as the president of the Pulaski Association Scholarship Foundation. Joe is survived by his wife, Isabelle. Joe will be waked Wednesday and Thursday from 2-5 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. at the Edward Jamie Funeral Home, 208-17 Northern Blvd., Bayside (718) 224 2390. There will be a Funeral Service 10 a.m. Friday at The Armenian Church of the Holy Martyrs, 209-15 Horace Harding Expy., Bayside.

enrolled at Syracuse University for the 2009-10 academic year. Syracuse’s new students are studying from among the more than 200 majors offered at the institution: Miri Chung of Bayside, enrolled in SU’s The College of Arts and Sciences; Alvin Cruz of Bayside, enrolled in SU’s L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science; Jeffrey Fang of Bayside, enrolled in SU’s The College of Arts and Sciences; Yae-Jee Ha of Bayside, enrolled in SU’s The College of Arts and Sciences; Shorung Joo of Bayside, enrolled in SU’s Martin J. Whitman School of Management; Min Young Park of Bayside, enrolled in SU’s The College of Arts and Sciences; Jonathan Tam of Oakland Gardens, enrolled in SU’s Martin J. Whitman School of Management; Kesi Wang of Oakland Gardens, enrolled in SU’s The College of Arts and Sciences; and Kaity Wong of Oakland gardens, enrolled in SU’s Martin J. Whitman School of Management.

Rani Thukral, the Founder of Rani Spas, was named Best Entrepreneur – Service Businesses - Up to 100 Employees - Health Products and Services at The 6th Annual Stevie Awards for Women in Business on Friday, Nov. 13. Headquartered in Bayside, Rani Spas has Queens locations in Bayside, Woodhaven, Bellrose, Richmond Hill, Forest Hills, Jamaica, and Astoria. Rani Salons were started in New York in 1994 when Rani Thukral came to New York City from India with $250 in her pocket, and began doing beauty treatments in a McDonald’s Restaurant in Queens. Over the years she has gone from performing mini cosmetology services on the streets of New York, to getting her Ph.d while being a successful mother and wife; to running a Spa company today with over 14 locations and three cosmetic labels brands in New York with sister offices in India and China. The Stevie Awards for Women in Business feature categories including Best Entrepreneur, Best Executive, Mentor of the Year, Fastest Growing Company of the Year, and Best Overall Company. For a complete list of winners by category, visit stevieawards.com/women.

The following area residents are among the approximately 3,600 new students who have enrolled at Syracuse University for the 2009-10 academic year. Syracuse’s new students are studying from among the more than 200 majors offered at the institution: David Ainahmanesh of Howard Beach, enrolled in SU’s Martin J. Whitman School of Management; Vincent Oreilly of Howard Beach, enrolled in SU’s L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science; Benjamin Piazza of Howard Beach, enrolled in SU’s L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science; Christopher Shepherd of Ozone Park, enrolled in SU’s L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science; Pryia Mahabir of Richmond Hill, enrolled in SU’s The College of Arts and Sciences; Stanley Huang of Ridgewood, enrolled in SU’s The College of Arts and Sciences; Diego Isio of Ridgewood, enrolled in SU’s College of Visual and Performing Arts; and Aleksander Thimjo of Ridgewood, enrolled in SU’s The College of Arts and Sciences.

The following area residents are among the approximately 3,600 new students who have

The following area residents are among the approximately 3,600 new students who have enrolled at Syracuse University for the 2009-10 academic year. Syracuse’s new students are studying from among the more

Girl Scout troops 4071 and 4295 of Forest Hills collected food and created homemade Thanksgiving cards to donate to Faith Mission and local families in need on Thanksgiving.

than 200 majors offered at the institution: Yohanna Kim of Forest Hills, enrolled in SU’s The College of Arts and Sciences; Natalie Sarmiento of Forest Hills, enrolled in SU’s The College of Arts and Sciences/ S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications; Stephanie Yee of Forest Hills, enrolled in SU’s College of Human Ecology; Ying Yi Lin of Rego Park, enrolled in SU’s Martin J. Whitman School of Management; and Edward Santiago-Ramos of Rego Park, enrolled in SU’s College of Visual and Performing Arts. Ashley Isaac of Whitestone was inducted into the Tau Delta chapter of Lambda Pi Eta, the National Communication Association Honor Society, during a ceremony at Quinnipiac University on Oct. 18. Students with at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average with 60 semester credit hours completed and students with at least a 3.25 GPA for communication studies courses with 12 semester credit hours completed are eligible to be inducted into Lambda Pi Eta. New York City school teachers swept the three prizes for their schools in a state-wide curriculum competition based on awardwinning author Walter Dean Myers’s new Civil War era young-adult novel Riot and sponsored by publisher Egmont USA. First prize went to MariaClelia Perna, an eighth-grade English teacher at Horace Greeley Intermediate School (IS 10) in Astoria. Second place went to Catherine Piccolo and Matthew Rotella, seventhgrade English and social studies teachers, respectively, at Adrien Block Intermediate School (IS 25) in Flushing. Third-place winner Meghann Walk is a librarian and social science instructor at Bard High School Early College in Manhattan. For her winning entry, Perna’s school will receive an historical archive of more than 20 original Civil War newspapers that report on a dark four-day period in New York history – known as the Draft Riots of 1863 – when Irish immigrants, angered by being drafted into the Civil War, began a destructive and deadly assault that targeted the African-American citizens whom they blamed for the drawn-out war. Myers collected and used the newspapers as primary research for Riot, and donated portions of his extensive archive for the contest. Piccolo and Rotella’s second-place curriculum is a collaborative lesson that integrates English language and social studies content to help students develop their own newspaper accounts of New York City dur-

ing the time of the riots. In honor of the winning entry, the Block School receives a classroom’s worth of signed copies of Riot and two copies of the audiobook. Walk’s third-place curriculum focuses on the Colored Orphans’ Asylum, one of the real-life New York locations destroyed in the riots. Her lesson uses primary source documents to understand the role of point-of-view in recording history, and encourages students to understand the riots in the larger historical context of race, gender, and class. For her winning entry, Bard High School Early College receives two signed copies of Riot and two copies of the audiobook. Air Force Airman Yu Yuan graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Tex. The airman completed an intensive, eightweek program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Yuan is the daughter of Dagang and Ruizhen Yuan of Flushing. She is a 2007 graduate of Newcomers High School, Long Island City. Allstate Insurance Company has recognized Allstate exclusive agency owner Joseph Thomas with the Regional Champion award for high standards in customer satisfaction, customer retention and profitable business growth. His agency is now one of the top Allstate agencies in the nation in auto, property, commercial, power sports insurance and financial services sales. With his team of dedicated employees, Thomas is dedicated to helping customers meet their protection and retirement needs while managing a successful small business. “It’s a tremendous honor to earn Regional Champion recognition,” said Thomas. “My agency’s commitment is to serve customers and the Bellerose community.” “Joseph is a respected member of the business community, states Charlie Lala, New York Region Sales Leader. “I am proud of the commitment that Joseph and his agency show their customers.” Thomas owns the Allstate agency located at 248-21 Union Tpke. in Bellerose, and can be found on the Web at allstateagencies.com/ a038873. Send him an email at a038873@allstate.com.

www.queenstribune.com • Dec. 10-16, 2009 Tribune Page 35

Scouts Collect:

New York Army National Guard Col. Stephanie Dawson leads her command and staff of the 369th Sustainment Brigade, the Army’s famous “Harlem Hellfighters” up 5th Avenue during the New York City Veterans’ Day Parade Nov. 11. The unit led a New York Army National Guard contingent of nearly 1,500 Soldiers from all five boroughs as New York City celebrated the 90th anniversary of the parade. The daylong event also celebrated the recent commissioning of the USS New York with Naval and Marine contingents from the ship participating in the parade.


Bayside mom Kariza Chan

Bayside resident Kariza Chan was chosen by Harper’s Bazaar magazine as the most chic woman in her 40’s, from thousands of submission to their Fabulous at Every Age contest. Chan, a 5-foot-9 model and mother of three teenage girls, said her daughters entered her into the contest without her knowing. She and four other winners from different age brackets ranging from their 20s to their 60s each won $5,000, and will be featured in the magazine’s February issue. In a publicity photo taken with actress Elizabeth Hurley and the other winners, Chan showed off her figure by wearing a Christian Dior suit. Ladies, there’s a lesson to be learned from Ms. Chan: be good to your daughters, and your skin.

Models Of Queens

Mighty Mom

Mike The Bodyguard In an unexpected display of solidarity atypical in New York politics, Mayor Mike Bloomberg defended Gov. David Paterson, who, to put it kindly, has lost favor among the general public. At an Elmhurst Hospital press conference when a reporter posed a question about Paterson, Bloomberg retorted “Cut the guy a break.” He also continued on about how at least he is trying to do something unlike the legislature, which is seemingly idle. We never pictured the diminutive Bloomberg as a protector type but the surprising scene played out like the righteous playground dogooder defending a frail target from a pounding at the hands of a local bully. You’re mother would be proud, Mayor.

Brittany Pareja Home: Howard Beach Age: 18 Height: 5’ 0” Weight: 120 lbs Stats: 34-32-35

Page 46 Tribune Dec. 10-16, 2009 • www.queenstribune.com

Grooming

Karen Hauer makes our dance card

For this petit stunner from Howard Beach, modeling has been an idea for years. “I haven’t been modeling for long, but I always wanted to,” said Brittany Pareja. The part-time hostess at Lenny’s Clam Bar in Howard Beach and full-time City Tech student got her first taste when she was in a fashion show in high school at Christ the King. “I’ve always had it on my mind,” she said. “Once I did it I realized I love it. I had fun. I love the adrenaline rush.” Currently studying art and advertising, fashion calls for Brittany, who has already taken a couple of classes at FIT. “I plan to transfer into fashion marketing; I love fashion,” she said. She envisions her future as a fashion merchandiser who does some modeling on the side, maybe for Betsey Johnson or Mac – but her real ambition is to one day grace the cover of Vogue magazine. “That’s a real big goal,” she admits. In the meantime, she keeps herself busy making beaded accessories with pieces she picks up from Pearl’s of Michael’s. She particularly likes the Michael’s location on Woodhaven Boulevard near Metropolitan Avenue. Though when hanging out with friends she usually spends her time in Manhattan – preferably in SoHo or Greenwich Village – she can still be found at home in Howard Beach spending time with her parents and her sister.

Call Acme

Can Dance Karen Hauer thought she could dance, but apparently, America didn’t feel the same about her sultry ballroom moves. The Venezuela-born Queens resident couldn’t dance her way into the top 10 of the hit television show, “So You Think you can Dance.” Hauser and her partner were eliminated from the completion two weeks ago when she didn’t garner enough votes from America to stay out of the bottom three couples. Even with a lack of public vote Hauser still had a chance, but the judges refused to give her a lifeline. We’ve seen her dance and any day she wants to shimmy and twist her hips our way we’ll watch with bated breath.

Future Fashionista

Al Gore had his post-loss beard. Former 28th Councilmanic District candidate Mel Gagarin has followed in the vice prez’s footsteps. The 27-year-old is now sporting the sort of facial fuzz you’d expect to see in HBO’s Deadwood. At this rate, he’ll quickly approach Monopoly-man status, with the ends of his mustache curling up. We wonder what his wife thinks being married to President William Taft.

A coyote or similar animal was spotted in a Queens parking lot in the Rochdale Village housing complex last month. The Rochdale Public Safety Department is asking that anyone who spots the animal notify them, and the co-op offered safety escorts to residents fearing the carnivorous creature’s appetite. The Daily News reported that animal control officers set a trap to catch the coyote. With any luck, a Road Runner could lead him right into it.

Confidentially, New York . . .

Poker Face

Eric Buchman, fourth place $2.5 mil

Do you know what you get for placing fourth in the Miss America Pageant? You leave with what you came with. Do you know what that same placement garners you in baseball playoffs? No one has any recollection of anything you did that year. Want to know what you get for placing fourth at the 2009 World Series of Poker Championship Event? A cool $2.5 million. You read right. Eric Buchman, a Queens resident, brought home a fourth place prize that is more than most of us may seen in our lifetime. Have you ever heard of placing fourth in any competition and walking away with $2.5 million? Well, obviously you’re entering the wrong competitions.

QConfidential: Who We Are QConfidential, a selection of local celebrity, politics and gossip edited by Michael Schenkler. Contributors: Sasha Austrie, Lori Gross, Kaitlin Kilmetis, Marcia Moxom Comrie, Mike Nussbaum, Joe Orovic, Brian Rafferty, Domenick Rafter. You can reach us by email at Conf@QueensTribune.com


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