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Simply

HYGGE

NO. 1

#HYGGE #FAMILY #FOOD #SIMPLICITY


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Simplicity is the ultimate form of sophistication LEONARDO DA VINCI


SIMPLY HYGGE CONTRIBUTORS Editor in Chief Anya Nøddebo Jensen Art Director Anya Nøddebo Jensen Pernille Boe Kaluzny Photography Anya Nøddebo Jensen Malene Marie Møller Contributors Monna Edith Larsen Malene Marie Møller

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If you have any questions, suggestions, or if you are interested in a collaboration, please contact me on anya@simplydanishliving.com

find more HYGGE on WWW.SIMPLYDANISHLIVING.COM


contents


Letter from the Editor 6 - 7 What is Hygge? page 8 - 11 Something for the weekend? 12 - 13 Hyggelige items in my wishlist 14 - 15 What does hygge mean to me - a portrait 16 - 17 Make your own bouquet - 18-19 Visiting the Pumpkin farm 20 - 23 Sticky Cinnamon Buns 25 - 27 Things you can do to create hygge 28 - 31 A hyggeligt home 32 - 39 HYGGE food - Toasting Marshmallows 40- 41 A autumn trip to the Apple Orchard 42 - 45 HYGGE food - Baking Snobrød 46 - 47 Scented candles - 48 - 49 Chasing Hygge - A hidden gem in Sweden 50 -55 Autmn Hygge images 56 - 57 Velvety Pumpkin soup recipe 58 - 59 Halloween in Tivoli Gardens 60 - 61 5 Hyggelige coffee bars in Copenhagen 62 - 63 Hygge food - Knækbrød 64 - 65 Conker animals 66 - 67 Thanks for visiting - and see you again soon 68 -70


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Welcome to SIMPLY HYGGE magazine My name is Anya - I am a native Dane, who live in Copenhagen with my British partner and our 2 daughters. Today I am immensely proud to present my new magazine ‘Simply Hygge’ to you all. You may have heard about the Danish word Hygge by now. You know, the word that advocates woolly socks, open fires, gatherings with friends, and snuggling up inside! It is true, Hygge is all of the above but the concept encompasses so much more, which is exactly why I have created this Magazine, to give you an insight on how you can - with a few elaborate changes - make the ordinary seem and feel extraordinary. I want to show you what hygge means to me and my family, and give you some simple ideas and recipes for bringing hygge into your own lives. Hygge is essentially free, and that is why I have chosen to share all of my best tips with you in my free magazine. You don’t have to invest in candles, woolly socks, thick comfy blankets and plush cushions if you don’t want to, but I am more happy to whet your appetite and get you as HOOKED ON HYGGE as I have been for years. As a young woman, I travelled, explored, and lived away for more than a decade. I loved my Globe-trotting life, but I always longed for something else. My search continued, but after a while, I realized that what I truly love most of all – are the simple pleasures in life. Pleasures that are found by being with people you care about, doing things that you enjoy, and generally being happy in the moment.   So grab a coffee, take a seat in your best chair and have a good read. This is Simply Hygge - Welcome.

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“Hygge is about finding pleasure in the small things in life. Making the ordinary feel extraordinary”

An introduction to the word HYGGE and why it is so important to us Danes.

Text: Anya Nøddebo Jensen // Image: Anya Nøddebo Jensen

Did you know that the Danes have been voted the happiest people in the World. For quite a few years now?

If the ‘setting’ is too extravagant or staged, people find they have to perform, and they might start to feel slightly uneasy, and that’s not particularly hyggeligt.

In Denmark we have a word or rather the concept of HYGGE. It is a word that has become a bit of an trendy word lately.

Hygge to me is if you can be with your favourite people, have a laugh, keep it on a nice friendly level, where you don’t have to pretend to be anything you’re not. That makes you relaxed and happy, and the atmosphere becomes hyggelig.

I personally believe that hygge is the feeling of comfort, tranquility, simplicity, and something everybody has an ability to achieve anywhere in the World.

Hygge is also embracing nature - come rain or shine, being in nature and taking care of it. Looking after each other, and making the small things in life matter.

Hygge is all about wanting to make people feel good, and by achieving that, making yourself feel good. Hygge has to be unpretentious, and on a level where everyone can feel part of it.

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W H AT I S H Y G G E

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LET ME TRY AND EXPLAIN HYGGE: This is where you connect the word hygge with another word - Weekend hygge, Summer hygge, Christmas hygge, Evening hygge...

In our materialistic, busy, and increasingly digital society, it is becoming more and more important to relax and slow down, and take pleasures in what we have. Not what we can get, but what we can give, and how we can make this Planet a better place to be. That is exactly what hygge is all about, and this is what I wanted to share with you here.

HYGGE: verb: ‘kom lad os gå hjem og hygge os’ (‘Come let us go home and hygge together’) - this is hygge with someone else. HYGGELIG(T): adjective: et hyggeligt hus (a hyggeligt house) or if you had a hyggelig time with someone: “we had such a hyggelig night with you guys last night”!

If you mention to your children that you are going home to hygge every child will have their own perception of what that means: For some it means going to the bakery, buying a tasty treat, and eating it at home - maybe with a hot drink. For others, it means gathering lots of cushions, huddling up together on the sofa and watching a good film, or TV show, whilst eating popcorn. Or it might be going for a brisk walk in the forest, and afterwards going home, and getting warm, rosy-cheeked and happy.

Perhaps if we start by looking at the antonymous word “uhyggelig” we get an idea of what the opposite word means: UHYGGELIG: adjective: something that makes you scared or terrified. ‘En uhyggelig drøm’ ‘My daughter came into my bedroom last night – she had an ‘uhyggelig’ dream’

The perceptions are all different, but it is almost always something you do with the people you care about. If you are on your own though, it is also very easy to create hygge: a warm cozy blanket, a tub of ice cream and a good film on Netflix - the quintessence of hygge too.

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SOMETHING FOR THE WEEKEND? How about the ultimate Rhubarb & raspberry crumble? When I was small, I was not very fond of cooked fruit, but the past few years I have discovered a serious love for fruity crumbles. It is probably one of the easiest and quickest cakes you can make, and because there is a lot of fruit in it, and not too much sugar, I try and tell myself that it is actually quite healthy. Here is the recipe for you - so you have something you can whip up on a whim, should you suddenly have guests over for afternoon coffee:

// RECIPE: Anya Nøddebo Jensen // PHOTOGRAPHY: Anya Nøddebo Jensen //

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INGREDIENTS FOR THE FRUIT COMPOTE: 500 g rhubarbs - fresh or frozen 500 g raspberries - fresh or frozen 1 dl sugar 1/4 dl water FOR THE CRUMBLE: 80 g organic oats 175 g butter 140 g brown sugar 1 tbsp cinnamon

ENJOY AND GET SOME BEFORE IT IS GONE!! WE LOVE ADDING A TINY SCOOP OF VANILLA ICE CREAM TO OUR CRUMBLE. UTTERLY DELICIOUS!!

METHOD HOW TO MAKE THE FRUIT-COMPOTE: Clean and rinse your fruit thoroughly. Pop in a medium saucepan on medium heat - make sure it doesn’t burn as it will spoil the taste. Add the sugar and stir. Slowly bring to the boil, and stir until a liquid mix. Pour the compote into a pie tray. Turn on the oven 190 degrees Celsius.

TO MAKE THE CRUMBLE TOPPING:

Put the flour and cinnamon in a bowl and mix well. Stir in the sugar and the oats. Cut the butter into small cubes, add to the mixture and rub it in with your fingertips until the mixture is the texture of large breadcrumbs. Lay the crumble mixture on top of the fruit. Pop the crumble into the oven and bake for 30 minutes or until crispy and golden brown. The fruit might seep through but that is the whole point.

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HYGGELIGE ITEMS ON MY WISHLIST If you fancy creating some hygge in the colder months I have picked the perfect items for you. These are all proven to increase your chances of a hyggelig time almost by 100%.

CHEQUED PANTS // AIAYU

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1. H&M HOME // CANDLEHOLDER 2.WOOLLY HAT // TIGER OF SWEDEN 3. SCARF // BECK SÖNDERGAARD 4. LANTERN // THE OAKMEN 5. COLOURBLOCK THROW// FERM LIVING 6. DRESSING GOWN // KARMAMEJU

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7. LEGWARMERS// FALKE 8. CUSHION // H&M HOME 9. CASHMERE SOCKS // CATHERINE ROBINSON 10. THROW // ELLOS 11. WAX CANDLE ‘TALLOW’ // ONTWERP DUO 12. BEDDING ‘GRID’ // ARNE JACOBSEN 15


W H A T D O E S H Y G G E M E A N T O M E? A PORTRAIT - MONNA EDITH LARSEN, 86 YEARS OLD

The special someone, who taught me everything there is to know about HYGGE is my Grandmother - (the Danish word is ‘MORMOR’). My Mormor is the Master of hygge, tasty old fashioned recipes, DIY projects and she is even a very accomplished flower decorator.

The other day I went to my Mormor’s house. She still lives alone, and still has the same amazing garden. We sat down for a coffee, a chat and my Mormor made a stunning Autumn bouquet from the flowers we picked in the garden. We had a long conversation about hygge, and how you would hygge in the ‘Olden days’.

My Grandparents had the most fantastic garden, with hundreds of different types of flowers, ripe seasonal fruit, and a garden filled to the brim with so much produce they were almost self-sufficient.

This is what my Mormor had to say about hygge:

“HYGGE, and this is the important bit I think - is about all the special things you remember when you get older. I can guarantee that it is not the materialistic things I recall.

When I lived abroad, one of the first people I visited on my return, was my Grandmother. We would sit together, sip coffee and talk about what had been going on. Mostly about me, but in the later years, I have been told so many tales from when my Mormor grew up, became a young woman, a Mother, Grandmother and now Great Grandmother.

No, the things I remember most fondly are the moments in time that I spent with the people I loved the most and the smaller pleasures in life. You see - at the end of the day - those precious moments are actually what really matters. The small moments are in fact the big moments. The moments that count.

My daughters also love their ‘Oldemor’ (that’s the name for a Great Grandmother - it means ‘Older Mum’.) -and she is a frequent guest at our house. I believe it is important to spend as much time together with the people you care about. You never know when they are not around any more. It is also incredible how much joy it brings - with the younger and older generations together.

That is essentially what hygge is all about”

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And of course, playing games and reading with my Great Grandchildren. Teaching them things and learning many new things from them.

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An AUTUMN BOUQUET - and how you can make your own just follow along with the pictures...

Making bouquets is all about layering. Find your ‘Key’ flower, add foliage and more flowers as you go, building the bouquet - one flower at the time. At the end be sure to cut the flowers at an angle and tie the bouquet together. 18


Made by Monna Edith Larsen // Photography & Text Anya Nøddebo Jensen

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PUMPKIN PICKING Text: Anya Nøddebo Jensen // Photography: Anya Nøddebo Jensen

Since I moved back to Denmark around 10 years ago the tradition of Halloween has gone from an reletively unknown tradition, to one of the most loved holidays every year. I never used to get all dressed up, or go ‘trick or treating’ as a child myself, but it has become increasingly popular and the Danish children love it.  One thing I always wanted to experience is a visit to ‘a pumpkin patch’. I have seen many images of pumpkin fields on the Internet, and I wanted to see one for myself, and share the experience with the girls. So I did a bit of research, and found a local farm - KILDEBRØNDE FRUGTPLANTAGE where they too had embraced the newly adopted tradition of Halloween, and allowed people to come and pick their own pumpkins. I always like taking the children to organic farms, not only for the organic fresh produce, but also for educational purposes, as I think it is good for kids to learn where the food they eat come from. Yes we can buy it in the supermarket, but where does it grow?

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We went to the pumpkin farm, and it didn’t disappoint. There were rows and rows of big orange pumpkins, small orange pumpkins, green pumpkins, oval pumpkins - you name it, we saw them. The girls were surprised to discover that the stalks were very prickly  and that the pumpkins were all covered in mud on the side that were on the ground, and some even had worms crawling on them. Luckily the pumpkin we picked was big and orange and round. The pumpkin is now waiting for a funny/scary face for Halloween. That day was one of the most hyggelige days we have had this autumn.

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My favourite HYGGE dish

STICKY CINNAMON BUNS One of my favourite flavours, when I bake, is cinnamon. I absolutely love the smell, the flavour, and the fact that it reminds me of my childhood and my Sunday trips to the Bakers.

This recipe is quite easy to make and is perfect for a chilly autumm day, sitting in your favourite chair sipping a hot drink, and enjoying these delicious Sticky Cinnamon buns!

The Danish Bakeries are World famous and a popular destination when people need a bit of ‘Hygge’ food. If you look outside the most popular Bakers on Sunday mornings, there is usually a long queue because everyone is getting something  hyggeligt  for breakfast! Sunday is the morning most people have time to sit together, eat breakfast and chat,  reading the paper, drinking coffee.  When I go to the bakery here in Denmark, I always pick a Cinnamon Danish without a doubt.

INGREDIENTS

Usually, when you try and replicate a Danish, it ends up rather dry because we make it with dough, and the bakers use real pastry. But luckily not in this house - because my Grandmother happened to have a recipe that will give you the yummiest, stickiest cinnamon buns ever. The proper Danish name for this is ‘Kanelsneglekage’ and it is made in a baking tray, so the ‘buns’ end up sticking together’. 

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Makes 14–16 cinnamon buns FOR THE DOUGH  25g fresh yeast, or 2 tsp dry yeast 100 ml of milk 1/4 tsp cardamom 1/2 tsp salt 1 tbsp sugar 1 egg 130g soft butter 350g all-purpose flour FOR THE FILLING  175g soft butter 150 g brown sugar 1 tbsp cinnamon 1/2 tsp cardamom 1 pinch of salt FOR THE TOPPING  You can decorate with icing sugar. I like to ‘pipe’ mine out finely with a piping bag.


“Hyggelig fact In Denmark we love our traditional breakfast pastry. In Danish we call it ’Wienerbrød’ - and in English Wienerbrød is called ‘a Danish’.”

// RECIPE: Anya Nøddebo Jensen // PHOTOGRAPHY: Anya Nøddebo Jensen //

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For the dough  25g fresh yeast, or 2 tsp dry yeast 100 ml of milk 1/4 tsp cardamom 1/2 tsp salt 1 tbsp sugar 1 egg 130g soft butter 350g all-purpose flour For the filling  175g soft butter 150 g brown sugar 1 tbsp cinnamon 1/2 tsp cardamom 1 pinch of salt For the topping  Decorate with icing sugar. I like to ‘pipe’ mine out finely with a piping bag.

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METHOD For the dough

Heat the milk in a small saucepan until it is warm but not too hot (so you can put your finger in it). Pour the milk into a mixing bowl, and dissolve the yeast in the warm milk, whisk in the egg, sugar, salt, and cardamom.  ‘Crumble’ the butter into the flour, so it turns fine and grainy.  Add together with the ‘wet’ ingredients. Get the dough out on the table top, and knead until the dough becomes smooth and soft. Cover the dough with a clean tea towel and leave to rise for 1 hour in a warm spot. For the filling

Heat the oven to 200 Celsius.  Mix together the butter, brown sugar, cinnamon and cardamom to make a smooth, soft buttery paste.  Take the dough and roll it into a big rectangle using all the dough, approx 1 cm thick. Spread the butter mixture thinly and evenly onto the dough.  Starting at the shortest edge - tightly roll the dough into a sausage. Cut the sausage into small swirly rolls – approx. 2 cm thick, you’ll get around 14-16. Place the rolls next to each other in a greased baking tray and leave them to rise for another 30 mins in a warm place. Sprinkle a bit of sugar mixed with cinnamon on top.   Bake the buns in the oven for 22-25 mins. Remove the buns from the oven and leave to cool slightly before decorating them with icing sugar. 

ENJOY! These buns are best served warm, and trust me they’ll be gone before they go cold......

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THINGS YOU CAN DO TO CREATE HYGGE Text: Anya Nøddebo Jensen // Photography: Anya Nøddebo Jensen

If you have ever visited Denmark you’ll find that most people make an extra effort to make their homes cozy and inviting - you know;  hyggelige. Our winters are usually grey, cold, and often very long, so creating a place with atmosphere and comfort is very important to the Danes. The Danes make a great deal out of hygge. Hygge is part of our day to day, and many of us use the word almost on a daily basis. We create some of our hygge with decorative items, but the most important part of hygge is being with others, feeling at ease, relaxing and being yourself. Saying that, it is also possible to have a hyggelig time on your own, with a good film, a tub of ice cream!.

Here are a few things I know we do to create hygge in my family:

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GET SOME CANDLES The Danes have an infatuation with candles. We burn them all the time, summer, winter, inside, outside, in shops, cafés, even kindergartens and schools. We love a source of light, and fairy lights, small lanterns, and hurricane lamps are also used to create the ambient hyggelige light we so adore LOOSE THE TECHNOLOGY Switch of any electronic devices, and put  them somewhere for later. Sit down on the floor and bring out the  old school boardgames, the watercolours, an old book, or go to the kitchen and make something  together. Hygge is very much about being together. These moments - on the grand scale of life are ultimately what matters. Togetherness. DECOR Dress your home according to the season. In the winter, bring out the darker colour palette, and

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stock up on chunky knits, soft cushions, throws, all the items that make it easier to cosy up on the sofa. You can also create small seasonal vignettes by adding flowers, branches and foliage in a similar colour - pop it all in a vase, and it place on the table. And don’t forget the candles! IMPROMPTU MEALS Sometimes the most hyggelige times you have are the unplanned, spontaneous events, where you quickly make a cake, because a friend comes over, or if you make dinner out of what you have in the fridge. If the spread is too elaborate, is gets a bit too stiff, and hygge goes out of the window. So make sure you try and refrain from discussing politics and wealth. Some people find it rather uncomfortable - which is the total opposite of hygge.


BE IN NATURE In Scandinavia we have a saying “There is nothing called bad weather - only bad clothing”, so you’ll see people out and about whatever the weather. Go outside, explore, feel nature, be part of nature, go to a farm, or the apple orchard, go for a swim, watch the sunset, lie in the grass.

B.R.E.A.T.H.E


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a hyggeligt home Text: Anya Nøddebo Jensen // Photography: Malene Marie Møller

Malene Marie Møller has one of the most stylish and hyggelige homes I have ever seen. Malene lives in an old villa just north of Copenhagen.

be the old registry office. Malene has made sure to keep many of the original features, as she loves the history of the house.

The house was built in 1932, and originally belonged to the village church. The kitchen and dining area used to

I asked Malene for her top 5 tips on how she creates hygge at home:

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MALENE’S TOP TIPS ON HOW TO CREATE A STYLISH AND HYGGELIGT HOME Candles - and lots of them - all year round. Lighting some candles is one of the first things I do when I get home. Display your favourite books, magazines and personal bits and bobs everywhere - it creates a bit of life around the house, and gives the home and rooms personality. Use dimmer switches on all your lights - and make sure you use them. Dim the light in the evening and create a hyggelig and cozy atmosphere. Rugs, blankets, pillows, and throws add a touch of softness to your home, and it encourages you to sit down, relax and embrace your surroundings A comfy armchair in a corner with a good reading lamp, and a soft snuggly blanket to seek refuge in, with a good book and a hot cup of tea.


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I hope you have enjoyed the visit to Malene’s stunning home. Malene is a proffesional blogger, and creates visual content for many brands. She is also a coveted stylist and trendspotter. If you fancy seeing more of Malene’s amazing home, cool design, and everything else she writes about - you can find her on WWW.BOLIGCIOUS.DK

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“THE KITCHEN USED TO BE THE OLD WEDDING REGISTRY OFFICE FOR THE CHURCH - NOTICE THE ORIGINAL CEILINGS”


HYGGE FOOD I have always enjoyed looking at movies where people are toasting marshmallows on the open fire. Sitting around an outdoor fire at dusk with family and friends is the epitome of hygge. Naturally it gets even more hyggeligt, if you have some nice treats to share, so when my girls told me about some yummy toasted marshmallows they’d enjoyed on a field trip with their school, I knew I had to give it a go, as I had never tasted marsmallows toasted before. So we made some sticks, lit the fire and toasted marshmallows to our hearts content. I can tell you that the first mouthful was heavenly: sticky, gooey, warm and absolutely scrumptious. It won’t be the last time I’ll try something my girls suggest. In America they also make something even yummier - S’mores -which is a toasty hot marshmallow, sandwiched in-between 2 crackers with a thin sheet of chocolate - even more delicious I might add...

INGREDIENTS

METHOD

Sticks to put the marshmallows on – I used hollow bamboo sticks with a skewer popped into the end for the marshmallows.

Get your fire burning, and wait until the flames are small and the coals red hot.

A bonfire, firepit or bbq. Marshmallows (for toasting). Crackers (if you fancy making ‘Smores Chocolate sheets (if you fancy making S’mores)

Put your marshmallow onto your stick (if you leave the sticks to soak for 1/2-hour before using them they are less likely to catch fire). Hold your marshmallow over the fire until golden brown and caramelized. If you want to make S’mores get your crackers out and put some chocolate on the bottom one - leave to one side. Carefully place the hot melted marshmallow op top of the chocolate, and place the remaining cracker on the marshmallow and chocolate.

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41Recipe: Anya Nøddebo Jensen // Photography: Anya Nøddebo Jensen


A N AUT U M N T R I TO T H E A P P L E O Text: Anya Nøddebo Jensen // Photography: Anya Nøddebo Jensen

I remember the first time I picked my own apples. It was a stunning Autumn day, and my best friend and I were biking around. Suddenly we came across a yard filled with stunning, perfectly ripe apples. We climbed up a tree and helped ourselves to an apple.

We haven’t got any apple trees in our garden, so I managed to locate an Apple Orchard not too far away, because I wanted to give the girls ‘a taste’ of what picking your own apples feels and tastes like. You see - we all eat fruit in this family quite a bit of fruit, and that’s great. But going to the actual Apple orchard and seeing the many rows of trees and speaking to the farmers was something entirely different from just buying the apples in the shops.

We then found a secluded spot, and sat on the grass. It was so satisfying polishing the apple on your jeans, and taking a crunchy bite. The apples were usually sour and unripe, but if you picked them at the perfect time, the bite was truly heavenly and it just felt good lying there on the grass, eating something you picked yourself.

The Apple Orchard we go to is stunning. There are sheep, and rows and rows of apples, pears, and even raspberries. There is a small stall that displays all of the produce, and allows you to taste so you can choose your favourite and then go and pick it.

Never had I tasted such an apple. This apple was probably the best and the tastiest apple I had ever come across, and that memory have stuck with me ever since.

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P O RC H A R D

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Here are a few tips if you fancy a trip to the Apple orchard yourself: We always go when the weather forecast is sunshine. It’s getting colder now (The fruit usually ripens in September/October) so make sure you wear enough clothes. Wellingtons or trainers are also a good idea as the grass is often wet. Bring a fruit basket, or a tote to carry your fruit. Remember that a many kilos of fresh fruit weigh a lot, so if you want to bring a basket, make sure it is light-weight, and also remember that smaller children can’t carry too much. We usually go to the farmer and ask what type of fruit they have; they might even have samples for you to taste. Then they will direct you as to where you can find the fruit you need, and off you go. We always end up with 8-10 kg apples, and even though you think that sounds like a lot, I can guarantee you it they won’t last long. If you plan to visit Denmark, here is a list of places where you can pick your own fruit. We always go to FRYDENLUND FRUGTPLANTAGE.

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“An apple a day keeps the Doctor away”

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As a child, one of the first experiences I had with making my own food was the popular ‘SNOBRØD’ - roughly translated as twisted bread. It is basically bread on a stick, cooked over the open fire, and since you have cooked it all by yourself (with a little help from nearby adults) it is probably the best meal you have ever had.

most times you will end up with slightly charred bread that is probably doughy and sticky on the inside - which is what most people end up with, but don’t worry that is part of the tradition and it doesn’t really matter, because you made it and you get to fill it with jam, sausages, butter or ketchup - whatever your preference. The key here is to keep turning your bread, staying well clear of the flames.

If you do it correctly, the bread will have a beautiful golden brown crust and be toasty and crunchy, but to be honest,

THIS MAKES AROUND 6-8 SNOBRØD 25 G YEAST 3 CUPS OF WATER 1 TSP SALT 1 TSP SUGAR 500 G FLOUR OLIVE OIL 46

Recipe: Anya Nøddebo Jensen // Photography: Anya Nøddebo Jensen

INGREDIENTS


HYGGE FOOD METHOD Get your sticks, and cover the top with a bit of butter or olive oil. Get your dough, and divide into balls.

Go looking for some long branches of wood (from fruit trees, oak, beech, birch etc) - they have to be about one meter long.

Get your dough balls, and roll into a long ‘snake’ and then carefully wrap it around the stick, so it connects and looks like a hot dog roll (around your stick).

Peel off the bark, and soak in water for 1/2 hour to prevent the wood from catching fire. You can also use metal skewers or bamboo sticks. (The sticks used here are specially made for Snobrød.)

Sit down on a blanket (you’ll be there a while) and carefully place your stick above the coals. Turn the stick, as you can see the bread cooking. If it starts getting black, turn it around. Keep doing that until every bit of the bread is golden brown, then take it off the fire.

Dissolve the yeast in the water, and add the sugar, salt, and flour, and mix it well, until the dough is smooth and everything is well combined. Knead the dough for about 5 minutes and leave to rise in a warm spot until doubled in size (around 1 hour).

Get an adult to help you get the bread of the stick, and leave to cool for a few minutes. Then you fill it with jam, sausages, butter or ketchup, whatever you prefer!

Light your fire, you can use a campfire, BBQ, or a fire pit. Leave and let the flames burn down so you have only the red hot coals left. (Remember to have an adult present at ALL time)

ENJOY, THIS BREAD TASTES HEAVENLY

**One small reminder is to keep and eye on your children, and explain to them that fire can be dangerous. If it is very windy, it is probably better to wait, or find a less windy spot, as sparks can fly from the fire.**

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creating hygge with scented candles Candles are an integral part of hygge, and the Danes loves to burn candles all year round. Some people say that the concept of hygge started somewhere, with a source of light in the middle, and people huddling together, to keep warm. Togetherness is very much the heart of hygge. It’s common to create a certain atmosphere in your home, and at dusk lighting some candles, and sitting down together, - playing a game, reading a book, or watching TV. Today I have rounded up my top 5 favourite Scented candles. I have tried and tested loads of candles and these I absolutely love:

“Midnight in the garden of Scandinavia. Echoes of a late evening at the summer house in the distant countryside where the fir trees tower over the silent lake and the elves dance seductively in the honeysuckle mist” .NAT BY SKANDINAVISK

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“Uplift your mind and body with our Perfect Peace candle, a blend of 25 pure essential oils including pine, myrrh & lime peel. Breathe deeply and feel your tension lifting away.” PERFECT PEACE BY NEOM ORGANICS

“To uplift, to unwind...or simply to add an air of sophistication”. LIME BASIL & MANDARIN DELUXE CANDLE BY JO MALONE

“Dreamy and delicate, it exalts the expression of its round, bright leaves, subtly powdered with iris”. VIOLETTE BY DIPTIQUE

“Notes of solid black Ebony wood combined with ripe peaches and aplple blossom”. MAKASSAR EBONY & PEACH BY VOLUSPA

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A hidden gem in the Swedish countryside

Text: Anya Nøddebo Jensen // Photography: Anya Nøddebo Jensen

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“c h a s i n g h y g g e ” Sometimes you come across something unexpected, and something that is so perfect for that particular moment in time. It doesn’t happen often, but when it does it is truly something special something you’ll remember for awhile.

We were out for a drive and came across a sign by the road that said “Freshly baked bread”. It was just before noon, so it seemed like the perfect time to buy some bread for our lunch. We were asked to drive around the back, and we were so surprised and happy when we discovered the most beautiful organic farm with several greenhouses all filled to the brim.

We experienced such a moment, some weeks ago when we were holidaying in the stunning city of Båstad - in the South of Sweden.

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When you walked inside they also had a shop that sold the freshest vegetables, fruit, plants, flowers and lots of other types of fresh organic produce from the farm. If you ventured further, you came through to the Orangery, and a stunning courtyard garden, with the most exquisite café that sold beautiful homemade cakes, bread, pastries and freshly brewed coffee. We simply had to stop, sit down and take it all in. Naturally we had quite a bit of cake!! It made me think; Do you know that the Swedish word FIKA means ??

“TAKING A BREAK FOR A COFFEE AND A BITE TO EAT” That was exactly what we did here - and it was very hyggeligt too. The point I am making is that every single country in the World have their own perception and interpretation of the word HYGGE. It is something you can find anywhere in the World. All you have to do is go look for it!!!

Bäckdalens Handelstrådgärd & Café

Hallvaravägen 188, 269 91 BÅSTAD, Telefon 073 766 71 55, basilika@basilika.nu http://www.basilika.nu


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“Every leaf speaks bliss to me, fluttering from the autumn tree” EMILY BRONTË

Photography Anya Nøddebo Jensen 57


V E LV E T Y P U M INGREDIENTS 1 LARGE HOKKAIDO PUMPKIN (I HAVE ALSO MADE THIS WITH NORMAL PUMPKIN) 2 LARGE LEEKS CHILI POWDER CURRY POWDER BUTTER OR MARGARINE FOR COOKING 1 CHICKEN STOCK CUBE (OR IF YOU ARE VEGETARIAN - A VEGGIE STOCK CUBE) 1 L BOILING WATER (OR MORE IF IT IS A LARGE PUMPKIN) 1/4 L CREAM

Make your own version of the most scrumptious, delicious, and utterly Moorish Spicy Pumpkin Soup. This is how you do : 58


MPKIN SOUP Peel the skin of the pumpkin, remove the seeds and chop into 1-2 inch chunks. Clean and chop your leeks into 1 inch slices. Boil the water and pop the stock cube in so it can melt - you need 1 l. Get a large saucepan on the stove on medium/high heat. Put a very generous amount of butter in the pan. When ready add your leeks and cook until glassy - do not make them go brown or burn, as it will destroy the taste of the soup. Add your curry powder (I use around 1 tbsp) and stir it into the leeks Add your chili powder - be careful as it gets very spicy very fast - I use a dash (1/4 - 1/2 tsps). Add some more butter - quite a bit, and then add your pumpkin chunks. Stir (and add butter if it goes dry, mustn't let it burn. Stir until the pumpkins get a sort of velvety surface. Add your water with the stock cube in. Turn the heat down. Leave to simmer for a few minutes. Add salt, pepper and cream. Leave to simmer until the pumpkin is soft. Take of the heat, and with your hand blender, carefully blend the soup until there are no more chunks. Be careful as this is very hot. I do this in the sink, so I am sure the saucepan won't fall anywhere, as well as prevent any splash-backs. If you need, put the soup back on the stove for a few minutes, until piping hot. Serve with crusty fresh bread and generous lashings of butter.

ENJOY.....

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// Recipe: Anya Nøddebo Jensen // Photography: Anya Nøddebo Jensen //

METHOD


HALLOWEEN FUN IN TIVOLI GARDENS Copenhagen has the oldest amusement park in the World, and it is called Tivoli gardens. If you think fairground rides, candy floss and roller-coasters you are right, but Tivoli gardens is soo much more. You see, Tivoli gardens have managed to combine all of the above in the most stylish, cool, and very Danish way.

Today it is still magic, and one of our favourite places to go as a family. Tivoli has expanded the opening hours and is now open for Halloween and Christmas, where they set the scene for either Scary Halloween or Magic Winter Wonderland.

When I was a child, Tivoli was only open during the summer season; from April through to end of August, and I remember it being a magical place where you came, once a year, for a very special day out. I still remember all the bright lights, the hyggelige ambiance and the many different foreign smells - candy floss, fireworks, sweet-nuts, waffles and tyres burning from the bumper cars.

We went to Tivoli, and enjoyed the display for Halloween. A bewitched land with pumpkins, spiderwebs, ghosts and ghouls everywhere. You can carve your own pumpkin lanterns, see the biggest pumpkin in Denmark, go for a ride on the carousel or the many other fairground rides, or go shopping for tasty snacks from some of the small stalls. It is one of the most (U)hyggelige things you can do for Halloween.

Text: Anya Nøddebo Jensen // Photography: Anya Nøddebo Jensen

Images are from Halloween 2015

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TIVOLI GARDENS OPENS FOR HALLOWEEN FROM THE 14TH OCTOBER - 6TH NOVEMBER 2016 TIVOLI, VESTERBROGADE 3, 1630 KØBENHAVN V, TELEFON: +45 33151001, INFO@TIVOLI.DK

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HYGGE IN CO

KOMPA9 Simple, cozy decor, and very friendly staff. The menu is great, and so is the organic coffee. Their Brunch is my favourite in town. Kompa9 is perfect for a chilled afternoon catching up on gossip.

ROYAL SMUSHI CAFÉ I mean, coffee served in Royal Copenhagen porcelain! In a whimsical haven! What is not to love? Oh yeah and the cakes aren’t bad either. I love this place. 62

CAFE PLATEAU A Parisian café just outside Copenhagen in tre Hellerup. The Café has lovely small dishes boiled eggs with freshly baked ryebread, Sal and avocade toast and much more. It is serio hyggeligt there.


ELIGE CAFÉS OPENHAGEN

endy s like lmon ously

When you ask people what they love to do to have a hyggelig time, many people say that having a coffee and a good old chat with a friend tops that list. Coffee has become part of our modern culture, so much that almost all of us have a coffee with a friend at least a couple of times a month.

CAFÉ PALUDAN

Beautiful café combined bookstore. Very lovely rustic ambience, fabulous books and good service. It reminds me of old English bookstores, that serve a lovely cup of coffee.

So I have complied a list of my top 5 hyggelige Cafés in and around Copenhagen should you be lucky enough to visit.

GRANNYS HOUSE Excactly like visiting your Grandma’s house - if your Grandmother makes amazing, extravagant and tasty cakes, pastries, coffee and bread. Very hyggeligt.


One thing the Scandinavians adore to eat is 'Knækbrød' also known as crispbread or crackerbread. We use it as an afternoon snack with lashings of butter, garlic cheese, honey, or jam; we serve it with our cheese-boards, put in the lunchboxes, or even with a plate of Tapas.

I have made my own for a while now, and it disappears overnight if I forget to put them away in the pantry. So without much further ado - this is the recipe for my “Easy peasy Knækbrød”

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HYGGE FOOD INGREDIENTS

METHOD

1 DL OATS 1 DL SUNFLOWER SEEDS 1 DL PUMPKIN SEEDS 1 DL LINSEEDS/FLAXSEED 3 DL FLOUR 2 DL OIL (I USE RAPESEED OR OLIVE OIL) 1 1/4 DL WATER 1 1/2 TEASPOON BAKING POWDER A GOOD PINCH OF SALT.

Preheat oven to 200° Celsius Mix it all together - give it a good old stir, and take a portion onto baking paper. Put another sheet on top, and flatten the dough inbetween the sheets with you hands and a rolling pin. Form into a square, and keep rolling with your rolling pin so it becomes nice and thin (less then 0.50 cm). Cut into diamonds or squares with pizza cutters, ensuring you make them similar in size. Grind a bit of extra salt on top with your salt grinder. Put in the oven for about 15 minutes, or until golden brown. Leave to cool.

ENJOY

Recipe: Anya Nøddebo Jensen // Photography: Anya Nøddebo Jensen

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CONKER ANIMALS AND HOW TO MAKE YOUR OWN Text: Anya Nøddebo Jensen // Photography: Anya Nøddebo Jensen

The Horse chestnut trees are filled with conkers during the autumn months. We love conkers in this family. We love finding the prickly green fruits, and opening them to find a brand new shiny conker inside. In many countries, the children have conker fights, but it is not a tradition here in Denmark. But making Conker animals is a big thing, and it is a hyggelig event turning a simple conk-

er into a magical creature. These little animals are adorable as small gifts, and the children enjoy playing with them and making little places for them to live. I remember making conker animals myself, both at home but also at school and in kindergarten - it is so much fun creating these small creatures.

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YOU WILL NEED In addition to your conkers, you’ll also need a small screwdriver, some matches -for the legs and tail- yarn or twine and some permanent markers for drawing faces. To decorate your animals gather together items like small pine-cones, acorns, flowers, glitter and pieces of fabric, pins, or whatever else you think fits

METHOD

Get your conkers - you’ll need one for the body and a smaller one for the head. Get your matchsticks, and cut the black bit off. Holding the conker on a firm surface, make holes for the legs and tail with your screwdriver. You also need a hole to connect the body and head - also with a matchstick. Conkers are quite hard, so you’ll need to ‘drill’ into it with the screwdriver. Do not hold the conker in your hand but leave it on a hard surface. Give your conker animal legs, tails and ears with your matchsticks. Draw the face on using the marker pens and decorate the rest of the animal as you wish. *If your children are very young I recommend that you make the holes in the conker, as it is quite hard and they could end up hurting themselves*


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It has been my pleasure to share all of my ideas of hygge with you in my

”SIMPLY HYGGE MAGAZINE” FIRST EDITION October 2016 I hope you have enjoyed my magazine, and that I have got you as HOOKED ON HYGGE as I am Keep a look out for the next issue of

“SIMPLY HYGGE MAGAZINE “ The Festive Edition -it will be filled to the brim with all the things you can do to make your Christmas hyggelig.

HYGGE DOESN’T GET ANY BETTER THAN THAT


www.simplydanishliving.com 70


Simply hygge