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July 18 , 2011

Simmons summer this issue P.1 Learn about BOSTON P.2 Beaches in Boston

Just in Case you didn’t know…

P.3 Other things to do…

Boston is the capital and the most populous city of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, a state of

By Sara H. RA South

ISSUE

Did you ever know? Learn about BOSTON!

the United States of America. Founded in 1630, Boston is one of the oldest and most culturally significant cities in the United recognized as a gamma global city. Boston was founded on November 17, 1630, by Puritan colonists from England, on a peninsula called Shawmut by its original Native American inhabitants. For more info visit: http://www.bycitylight.com/citie s/us-ma-boston-history.php

• At 90 feet below the surface, the Ted Williams Tunnel is the deepest in North America. • The Fleet Center was built 9 inches from the old Boston Garden, so the classic structure had to be demolished brick-by-brick. • More than 18 million people visit Boston every year. • In the fall and spring of 2002, the Boston Parks and Recreation Department planted 622 trees citywide. • The 60 story tall John Hancock Tower boasts 13 acres of glass. • The famous "Citgo" sign in Kenmore Square contains five miles of neon tubing. • The average single-family housing unit in Boston lists for about $500,000. For more info visit: http://www.boston.com/travel/boston/ articles/2004/02/18/fun_facts_and_qu ick_hits_about_boston/

By Phoung N. RA South

States. Boston is

• Logan International Airport is built almost entirely on top of land that, before a landfill project, used to be Boston Harbor. • If you don't include college students, only about 600,000 people reside in Boston. • The average price for a bowl of New England clam chowder in Boston restaurants is $4.40. • Nearly 70 percent of housing units in Boston are occupied by renters rather than owners. • A two-bedroom apartment in Boston costs $1,343/month, on average. • Before a landfill project started in 1857, the Back Bay area of Boston was a 570 acre body of water. • Only 34 of Boston's 840 restaurants serve fast food. • About 250,000 college students live in Boston. • The Big Dig created about 80 miles of underground lanes in a 7.5-mile corridor.

Castle Island and Pleasure BAY!! This beach is absolutely amazing! This is a place bursting with history, and lovely place to picnic, walk, bring your dog, BBQ, run, or sit and watch the boats go by... There is an old fort here: Fort Independence, which gives Castle Island its name. Not a lot of people know this but: Edgar Allan Poe was stationed here during his short stint as a soldier. They even say he used it as a model in his story "The Cask of Amontillado"!!!!!!!!!!! A little background information! Pleasure Bay is one of the most popular swimming and sunning beaches in the City. Foot showers and water fountains are located on-site. Because the bay is fully enclosed by the man-made Head Island Causeway, water and sediment quality are consistently high. The causeway located behind the beach provides a great walk way for strolling around Pleasure Bay. Originally freestanding, Castle Island has been connected to the mainland since the 1930s, when streetcars brought bathers to Pleasure Bay. Fort Independence, located on Castle Island, is a five pointed granite structure. The current structure is the eighth fort to occupy this site and contains over 172,687 linear feet of hammered stone and was constructed under the direction of Colonel Sylvanus Thayer between 1834 and 1851. The fort is open during the summer months, and visitors can explore independently or take a free tour. The fort and the island are on the State and National Registers of Historic Places, and Fort Independence is a National Historic Landmark. There are views to Logan Airport and the Harbor Islands, and visitors can observe boating activity in the Harbor. The area is excellent for jogging, walking, picnicking and hiking, and there is a fishing pier and swimming area.

Do you love lying in the sand, soaking up sun and feeling that cool, salty ocean breeze? I do. But a real vacation isn’t driving to your local beach for a day and spending half of it looking for a spot in an overcrowded parking lot. A real vacation is getting away, exploring a new place and trying different things. The best thing about this is: you can do it on a budget! Check out Beth Greenfield’s article on: Bargain Beach Getaways via Yahoo Travel 1. Culebra, Puerto Rico Located off the eastern shores of the main island, sleepy Culebra is rich with uncrowded playas edging calm and cerulean waters--plus a small clutch of basic but bright hotels, like Mamacita's, averaging $100 nightly. 2. Playa Del Carmen, Mexico Stretch your dollar in this laid-back Cancún respite, offering diving, snorkeling, shopping and primo sunsetcocktail spots--not to mention inns from charming to chic, like Hotel Cielo or Kinbé Hotel, for $55 to $150 a night. 3. St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida This unfussy chain of barrier islands along the Sunshine State's west coast really has it all: a variety of wide beaches, cheap seafood-shack meals, a slew of affordable ($65 a night and up) places to stay and a fun nightlife scene. 4. Grand Bahama, Bahamas Sugary sand, a relaxed vibe and cheap Bahamian eateries abound in Freeport and Lucaya, where hotels include the Island Seas Resort (from $100 nightly) to the more upscale Radisson Our Lucaya (from $165). 5. Bermuda Pink sands, pampering resorts, scenic golf courses and incredible snorkeling are all good reasons to head here- -along with cheapcaribbean.com's four-night, all-inclusive deals from $699 per person, with options including Grotto Bay Beach Resort and Coco Reef Bermuda. http://travel.yahoo.com/p-interests-38864564;_ylt=Ar_stGY.q.G_jgrFe3fgbQnc6cB_


Find your tropical paradise…here in Boston! Here are some city secrets not everyone knows about!

And they are easily accessible!!! The

prize

for

best-known

Seeking out the best beaches in Boston and bringing them to you!

Our prize for southernmost

urban beach goes to Revere

urban beach goes to

Beach. Ask a Bostonian if

Wollaston Beach in Quincy.

there are any city beaches, and

This gently curving beach has

he or she will likely mention

all the joggers on the sea side

this one. While it might be

and all the food shacks on the

regarded as the anti-Vineyard,

city side.

Revere Beach is nonetheless loads of fun, convenient for

Wollaston Beach is best

most city dwellers, and a great

known for its

place to people-watch.

jogging/bicycling trail, which runs about 2.3 miles. Caddy

It's easy to find this beach. Just

Park, at the southern end of the

get on the Blue Line and

beach, has more than 15 acres

follow all the people with their

of fields and a lookout tower.

radios blasting merengue or

Moswetuset Hummock, at the

hip-hop. It's a youthful beach,

beach's northern end, is a mix

popular with teenagers and 20-

of woodland trails and

somethings, especially those

marshland used in the 1600s

who listen to WJMN-FM.

as a Native American summer campsite. There are nice views of Quincy Bay and the 144acre Squantum Marsh.

For more info please visit: http://www.bu.edu/mfeldman/026/beaches.html

The least-urban award goes to the Lynn Shores Reservation - including Nahant Beach, Lynn Beach, King's Beach, Red Rock Beach, and Long Beach - which offers some of the best beaching in the state. These beaches are scattered throughout Lynn, Nahant, and Swampscott, and include 4 miles of waterfront, 2 miles of jogging trails, a mile-long system of fragile sand dunes (Long Beach), and tide pools brimming with marine life (Red Rock Park). There is no lifeguard program at King's Beach, and access from Boston requires two bus transfers. Take the Green or Orange Line to Haymarket T station, transfer to No. 400, 440, 441, or 442 bus to Central Square in Lynn, transfer to No. 439 bus to the rotary near the boathouse. Or take the Blue Line to Wonderland, transfer to No. 441 or 442 (Marblehead) bus to Central Square in Lynn, transfer to No. 439 bus to rotary near the boathouse.

Check them out!

BEACHES in BOSTON

We got the city and the water, but what about the beaches?!


Summer Newsletter 3 2011