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ISSUE 1


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AUTUMN 2012 VOLUME 1 ISSUE 1

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elcome to the first edition of Silverprint+ Creative. We are a photographic shop and online retailer based in Waterloo, London. We have a huge passion for film and alternative photography, with which we have been involved for 30 years now. Silverprint+ Creative is an opportunity for us to communicate the changes, diversity and choices available to those dedicated to image creation. We hope to expand our range of traditional and digital photography goods to include well chosen brands that offer you quality and confidence. Finally we are now also developing an Art range to compliment the business. Thanks for reading and thanks for getting involved! Cover Vans Artwork by Scott Atkinson scottatkinson01@hotmail.co.uk

SPOTLIGHT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 03

Photography by Jo O’Hanlon

NEWSFLASH. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 04

jo.ohanlon@yahoo.co.uk

ADVENTURES WITH ANNA-LOGUE. . . 0 5

Contact Silverprint+ 12 Valentine Place London SE1 8QH 020 7620 0844 sales@silverprint.co.uk www.silverprint.co.uk

SHOPPING LIST FOR. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 6 FILM PROCESSING

Editors Tim Mount Anna Zatonow Art Director Tim Mount Design Skin+Bones Advertising tim@silverprint.co.uk

COLLODION INTERVIEW. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Contributors Scott Atkinson Jo O’Hanlon Margaret Durow Joe Barnes Christo Geoghegan Anna-Logue Nicolas Mahe Victor Senkov Anthony Carr Oliver Wilkes Phil Chapman Howard Marianne Toth William Arnold Chris Baird Alexey Korotkov Colin Jones Karen Rowntree The Trouble With Jo Rob Griffith Rosie Welsh Seán Mackenna Martin Reed Yanon Charlotte Metcalfe

COLIN JONES INTERVIEW. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 7 PINHOLE COMPETITION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 CALIBRATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

APPETITE FOR CREATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 GLOBAL AFFAIR..............................................................25 SE1 EMULSION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 CHATROOM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 SILVERPRINT INDEX....................29

All rights reserved. All material in Silverprint+ Creative may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form without the written consent of Silverprint+ Creative apart from the illustrations in boxes 1 and 6 of page 12. Silverprint+ Creative and its contributors cannot accept any liability for reader discontent arising from the editorial features. Silverprint+ Creative reserves the right to accept or reject any article or material supplied for publication or to edit this material prior to publishing. Silverprint+ Creative cannot be held responsible for loss or damage to supplied materials. The opinions expressed or recommendations given in the magazine are the views of the individual author and do not necessarily represent the views of Silverprint+ Creative. We accept no liability for any misprints or mistakes and no responsibility can be taken for the contents of these pages.

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Margaret Durow “I am inspired to take photos because the only constant is change, and I want to keep track of the changes and my place in this endless world.” margaretdurow.com margaretdurow@yahoo.com

LIGHT

Christo Geoghegan

Joe Barnes “This is not archive material of the 1981 Brixton Riots or the Battle of Orgreave, in south Yorkshire in 1984, no, this is the currency of which we bare witness to each and every new dayNHS campaigns, Occupy St. Paul’s, cuts and further strikes - the age of resilience against rule and oppression. ” - Sophie Risner. joebarnesphotography.co.uk joebarnes_85@yahoo.co.uk

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“With my project 'Displaced', I wanted to document the shift of Kazakh nomadic culture and customs outside of Kazakhstan and into regions of Western Mongolia and China. The idea that key components of Kazakh cultural identity are now more prevalent in countries other than itself fascinates me. Starting in Mongolia, and then on into China, I hope to document this shift and photograph these displaced nomads. The first part of 'Displaced' was shot this past March in the Western Mongolian province of Bayan-Ölgii - where 90% of its population are of Kazakh descent.” christogeoghegan.com 01cgeoghegan@gmail.com


PHOTOKINA 2012 The 32nd edition of the world’s largest imaging trade show rolled into Cologne last week and we popped over there to check it out. If none of you have been or have heard of it, then it’s the size of a small planet! Nikon and Canon go head to head and the rest of the photographic world pitches up alongside them. The Leica stand was similar to stepping into the Tate Modern, Casio built a huge Train Set, Lomography ran creative classes and The Impossible Project launched their 8x10” black and white polaroid film. There was something for everyone at the show, with each hall catering for specific products, lighting, albums, video etc. We had a fantastic time, drank a lot of Fruh and most importantly found some great products and lines that we will be adding over the next month. The show was full of so much innovation and information that we will write a full article on Photokina 2012 in the next issue of Silverprint Creative. Watch this space!

Silverprint+ Business Development/Tyson Millar “Fronting up the Business Development area of any business is not easy, fortunately for Tyson this job is a walk in the park since managing ground staff in Australian Airports and guiding coach-fulls of young travellers throughout Europe over the past 10 years. With Silverprint’s already strong customerbase Tyson has taken on the challenge of meeting with our customers whether it be in the Colleges and Universities or in the Laboratories. His eclipsing 6’5” height is not meant to intimidate, no he’s here to assist in all areas, he’s on your side! Like all of our staff Tyson is a Photographer, he chooses to shoot both film and digital formats, with his favourite being medium format black and white film. His subjects include Travel, Artists and London’s thriving music scene.” To arrange a meeting and discuss any of your Business or College needs please contact; tyson@silverprint.co.uk M: 07791 270485

TERRY O’NEILL AWARD An International Competition in Contemporary Photography FINE ART/ REPORTAGE / FASHION / DOCUMENTARY / LANDSCAPE / WILDLIFE / PORTRAITURE / “Every year the entries for this award get better and tougher to judge. I’m so proud that it attracts so much talent - and that those on the shortlist can use the award as a springboard to great careers.” Submissions are now being invited for the Terry O’Neill/ Tag Award 2012. www.oneillaward.com

KODAK/THE WORD George Eastman left this world by his own hand on March 14’th 1932. His last message was “…my work is done. Why wait?” In the eighty years since then a great deal more work was done by the Kodak operation he founded, into areas that Eastman could probably not have imagined. By the year 2000 Kodak’s research had encompassed all niches in silver halide technology, achieving quality and diversity unimaginable at the time of Eastman’s death. Sophisticated computerisation enabled such control of emulsion behaviour that photography via silver was at its zenith. But the same silicon technology when applied to imagery was a genie suddenly released from its bottle. Fast forward the future and as we speak our beloved US film company is indeed an enormous whale now thrashing around in very shallow waters. Complacency has been sighted as the main factor behind their current financial situation. The endeavour that George Eastman instilled within the foundations of his company became apparently lacking in the upper management during the 90’s. This was then compounded by their inaccurate forecast in the speed of consumers switching from film to digital technology. The Asian market which was a large consumer of their traditional business embraced these new technologies at a rapid pace, leaving Kodak with a huge hole in their worldwide sales. As it stands, the Film Division is one part of the company that is profitable, which is in fact good news and hence the reason for the company now putting this division up for sale. Global brand names have been touted as having an interest in the division, realistically though the sale and future of the Film Division is extremely complicated, which unfortunately is the bad news. Our dedication to Film Photography remains determined, but we also understand the value that our customers put on our honesty. We hope that a deal can be brokered and that Kodak Film will always be available to our customers, but our hope cannot be blinded by naivety. A world without Kodak may be inevitable and the harsh reality of market forces will add another giant to the growing list of fallen empires. We will give you a full update in the next issue.

FILM RESCUE INTERNATIONAL We met the whole crew of Film Rescue International at Photokina and were very happy to hear that they can rescue and process any kind of old still or movie film you might have stashed away! Based in the Netherlands and Canada, Film Rescue are brave enough even to process Kodachrome, obtaining a black & white negative as a result. So don’t fear anymore, whatever type of old, dusty, forgotten film you might have sitting in your attic, get it out and send it to Film Rescue as they are there to save you!... well your film. www.filmrescue.com

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2.

OPEN THE CASSETTE. A STANDARD BOTTLE OPENER WILL WORK!

PART 1

FILM PROCESSING GET TO KNOW YOUR DEVELOPING TANK/READ THE INSTRUCTIONS.

ADVENTURES

WITH

ANNA-LOGUE 4.

LOAD THE FILM INTO A TANK: NOW THIS IS A TRICKY BIT! PRACTISE WITH A ROLL OF OLD FILM FIRST. PUSH THE FILM ON TO THE OUTER GROOVE AND ROTATE THE REEL ENDS IN OPPOSITE DIRECTIONS. ROTATE BACK AND FORTH UNTIL ALL THE FILM IS TAKEN UP ON TO THE REEL.

AS A RULE, YOU WILL NEED: 300ML TO PROCESS A 35MM FILM.500ML FOR A ROLL OF 120.

8.

11.

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CUT OFF THE LEADER OF THE FILM WITH SCISSORS.

1. 5.

CUT THE END OF THE FILM OFF AND PLACE THE REEL ON THE PLASTIC CORE IN THE TANK. PLACE THE FUNNEL ON TOP OF THE TANK, MAKING SURE IT CLICKS AS IT LOCKS. NOW YOU CAN TURN ON THE LIGHT. TAKE THE TANK OUT OF THE CHANGING BAG.

7.

X PREPARE YOUR “SOUP”!

MIX THE DEVELOPER WITH WATER IN RECOMMENDED DILUTION USING A MEASURING JUG.

PART 2

COOKING BEGINS

6.

CHECK THE MASSIVE DEV CHART AT DIGITALTRUTH.COM FOR THE DEVELOPING TIME FOR YOUR DEV/FILM COMBINATION. POUR THE DEVELOPER INTO THE TANK AND CLOSE THE LID. AGITATE THE TANK FOR 10 SECONDS EVERY MINUTE OF THE DEVELOPMENT. ONCE THE TIME IS UP THEN DISCARD THE DEVELOPER.

THE TEMPERATURE OF THE DEVELOPER IS ESSENTIAL. MAKE SURE IT IS 20° CELSIUS, USE A THERMOMETER AND PUT THE MEASURING JUG IN A HOT OR COLD BATH IF IT NEEDS TO BE HEATED/COOLED DOWN. PREPARE THE SAME QUANTITY OF STOP AND FIXER.

AFTER FIXING, THE FILM CAN BE SAFELY EXPOSED TO LIGHT. YOU CAN NOW UNSCREW THE TOP AND CHECK THE RESULT.

3.

LOAD YOUR FILMINTO THE TANK ALL THIS IN TOTAL DARKNESS! EITHER IN A COMPLETELY DARK ROOM, OR USING A CHANGING BAG

POUR THE MADE-UP STOPBATH (OR PLAIN WATER) INTO THE TANK, SHAKE FOR A MINUTE, AND DISPOSE OR POUR INTO A STORAGE BOTTLE FOR FUTURE USE. POUR IN THE MADE-UP FIXER AND ALLOW AT LEAST 5 MINUTES FOR FIXING, AGITATING AS FOR DEVELOPER.

10.

9.

IF THE FILM LOOKS PURPLE, IT MEANS YOU NEED TO FIX IT A BIT LONGER. OTHERWISE, IT IS READY TO WASH. USE A HOSE OR JUST PLACE THE TANK DIRECTLY UNDER THE STREAM OF WATER AND WASH FOR 10 MINUTES. AT THE END OF THE WASHING GIVE A FINAL RINSE FOR 1 MINUTE WITH DILUTED WETTING AGENT/WASHING LIQUID, THIS WILL PREVENT WATER MARKS ON THE SURFACE OF THE FILM.

PULL THE FILM OFF THE REEL, BE CAREFUL NOT TO TOUCH THE EMULSION AND NOT TO LET IT FALL ON THE GROUND! HANG THE FILM USING ONE CLIP, AND USE ANOTHER ONE AS A WEIGHT AT THE BOTTOM OF THE ROLL. LEAVE FOR ABOUT 4 HOURS UNTIL COMPLETELY DRY.

12.

13.


SHOPPING LIST FOR FILM PROCESSING: GROCERIES (make sure you choose only the

finest ingredients! good developer is essential as it is what affects the process the most):

DEVELOPER - £4.90: ON A SMALL SCALE, GO FOR A CONCENTRATED ONE-SHOT DEV THAT’S DISCARDED AFTER USE. RODINAL IS A GREAT OLD FAVOURITE, USE WITH SLOW AND MEDIUM SPEED FILM UNLESS YOU WANT THE GRAIN. FOR MORE CONVENTIONAL FINE GRAIN ILFOTEC LC29 KEEPS WELL IN PART USED BOTTLES.

STOPBATH - £5.26: NOT ESSENTIAL WITH FILM, YOU CAN GET AWAY WITH A GOOD RINSE, BUT IT CAN BE REUSED FOR PAPER SO IF YOU HAVE IT, USE IT!

FIXER - £10.39: GET ONE OF THE RAPID FIXERS, LIKE ILFORD RAPID FIXER OR FOTOSPEED FX20. KEEP IT IN A CONTAINER JUST TO USE FOR FILM AND DISCARD WHEN DEPLETED.

WETTING AGENT - £5.68: IT’S A DETERGENT THAT ALLOWS ALL THE WASH WATER TO SLIDE OFF THE FILM. FOR A SMALL AMOUNT, CHOOSE TETENAL MIRASOL 250ML. YOU CAN GET AWAY WITH A DROP OF WASHING UP LIQUID AT A PINCH, BUT THIS IS VERY THICK AND DOESN’T MIX EASILY, DISPERSE THOROUGHLY IN A MEASURE FIRST.

AGENT

COOKING ESSENTIALS PATERSON FILM PROCESSING KIT - £50 (INCLUDES TANK, MEASURES, FILM, THERMOMETER & CLIPS) TANK: PATERSON OR KAISER UNIVERSAL TANKS ARE BOTH EXCELLENT CHOICES. THEY BOTH INCLUDE 2 SPIRALS AND ALLOW YOU TO PROCESS 2X35MM FILMS OR 1X120. GO FOR PATERSON MULTIREEL 3 IF YOU’RE PLANNING TO PROCESS 5X4 SHEETS IN THE FUTURE USING THE MOD54 INSERT. MEASURES: PREFERABLY A SIZE BIGGER THAN YOU ARE ACTUALLY MEASURING TO, SO IF YOU NEED 300ML IN THE TANK, GO FOR 600ML. SYRINGES ARE THE BEST WAY OF MEASURING SMALL QUANTITIES OF VERY CONCENTRATED DEVELOPER LIKE RODINAL.

THERMOMETER: PROCESSING IS TIME AND TEMPERATURE CONTROLLED, SO IT’S PARAMOUNT TO KNOW WHAT THE TEMPERATURE IS, OTHERWISE YOU’RE GUESSING.

CLIPS: YOU CAN USE CLOTHS PEGS, BUT THE PATERSON CLIPS THAT ACTUALLY PIERCE THE FILM ARE A SURE WAY OF MAKING CERTAIN THE FILM DOESN’T SLIP WHEN DRYING.

SQUEEGEE: MAKE YOUR OWN MIND UP ABOUT THIS. IT’S ONE WAY OF GETTING MOST OF THE WATER OFF THE FILM, BUT ALSO CARRIES A HIGH RISK OF RUNNING A “TRAMLINE” DOWN IT. WE WOULD RECOMMEND A SMALL PIECE OF GOOD CHAMOIS CLOTH AS AN ALTERNATIVE. WET, WRING OUT, WRAP AROUND FINGER AND DRAW DOWN FILM. MUCH SOFTER, MUCH LESS RISK. CHANGING BAG - £24.96: THIS IS OPTIONAL, BUT VERY USEFUL THESE DAYS AS LESS PEOPLE HAVE EASY ACCESS TO A DARKROOM – MAKE SURE IT’S BIG ENOUGH, GENERALLY THE MEDIUM SIZE ONE FROM KAISER TENDS TO BE THE BEST OPTION. 06


Colin Jones THE MAN BEHIND THE LENS(ES)

COLIN JONES INTERVIEW With Karen Rowntree Colin was born in 1936 in the East End of London and shortly after was evacuated during the war. With little education Colin found himself becoming a ballet dancer after a teacher from one of his many schools enticed him into dancing. As a dancer with The Royal Ballet, Colin lived in the world of theatre, consisting of hard work and a life on the road behind the scenes, dreams and grease paint on the stage. It was this world that led Colin into photography which would become his ticket to success. After becoming disillusioned with the ballet for professional as well as personal reasons, Colin turned his eye to photography. While at the ballet he gained much experience and learned from the photographers working with the company. During this time Colin was married to Lyn Seymour one of the great ballerinas of that period. Lyn was to encourage Colin with his photography while they were both dancing, Lyn taking major roles and having ballets choreographed for her by the great choreographer Kenneth Macmillan. It was this inner world that became one of Colin’s first projects, photographing dancers backstage, during rehearsal and at rest time. From this beginning many projects followed including industrial working lives in the North West “Grafters”, delinquent Afro Caribbean youth in London “The Black House” and not forgetting the swinging sixties London including groups such as The Who and The Stones. Colin started working for The Observer newspaper in 1962 and has been published in The Sunday Times Magazine, Life, and National Geographic amongst others. His work is held in collections at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London and The Arts Council. He has held solo exhibitions at the National Gallery of Art in Washington DC, The Photographers’ Gallery, Michael Hoppen Gallery, Proud Gallery amongst others. Publications include Leningrad: History, Art, Architecture (1964), The Black House (1970), Great Rivers Of The World (1988).

K. You started as a performer and became an observer/catcher, how was that transition made?

C. To be a dancer you lived in a very close community, as a group you all helped

one another. It’s one of the things that fascinated me toward Coal Mining. They lived in groups, maybe had rows when at the surface, but when underground they stuck together and helped one another because it was very dangerous work. To be a ballet dancer is not quite as dangerous but there is a lot of injury. The camaraderie is the same and this conclusion always interested me. The real transition happened when I was on tour in the Philippines. In the theatre there’s a saying “The only people to travel on Sundays are fish and theatricals”. Sunday was our day off and if not traveling we were entertained. We were asked to this party given by Imelda Marcus and Marcus himself and you couldn’t turn it down, you had to go cause it was public relations being the Royal Ballet. We kept changing places at the table and I ended up sitting next to Imelda Marcus and on the horizon there was a big pool of smoke coming up, I turned to her and asked “do you know what that is” and she turned and said “Oh they’re

“ My photos will tell a period time.” SILVERPRINT.CO.UK FACEBOOK/SILVERPRINT

just burning off some of the ghetto”, that fascinated me. In the morning I asked my driver to take me there, he said he didn’t want to take me for fear of getting sacked. I suggested that he take me close enough and meet me later, he did. I went in and saw what was going on.You see the ballet world is very conservative, very few people are interested in politics, if they are it’s normally very right wing. Then I became a political animal, after seeing the way these people were treated. I didn’t see it in terms of photography it was a gut feeling at that point. I took my first photograph in Australia in 1958 on a camera that cost me £2.00, terrible thing, still got it.

K. How were the swinging 60s? After the hardship of the war it must have seemed very different?

C. What happened to me was I went into the army. I took a year out from the ballet and went and worked on a farm in Kent because I didn’t want to go into the army as a ballet dancer. Some of the blokes dressed in women’s clothes, they didn’t want transsexuals in the army in those days. I didn’t have the guts to do that. They put me in the Queens Royal Regiment it was funny really. When I got there the Sergeant Major lined us all up and shouted, which one of you is a ballet dancer. My life was made hell. With only one way out, I joined the boxing regiment. I was quite good but eventually came up against a professional and he knocked the shit out of me. So it was like going to prison for two years, you were captive.You learn a lot about people, lots of dramas and suicides.

K. That leads me on, through out your career you have been able to adapt to

different environments. Was this the press pass or have you a knack with people? I’m guessing it’s the latter?

C. I guess its self-protection. I went to Vietnam in 1969, the airplane just dropped

out of the sky and we asked why and they said so that the Viet Cong couldn’t shoot the plain down, it was quite thrilling. Some of the blokes on the plane were draft American Forces, pissed as farts. Underage you see they couldn’t stop them from drinking, if you can fight for your country you’re old enough to drink.!You have a sense of survival.


K. When your project The Black House (described as one of the most volatile

photography projects of the 1970s) was shown in Leicester the gallery was vandalized. That must have been scary and upsetting, but I guess proof of how powerful that work was at the time?

C. I didn’t go when it was on tour with The Art’s Council. It was vandalized by the N.F. They slashed it! I saw photographs of what they did.

K. How did you feel about that? C. I was rather pleased because I’m glad I upset them. Shortly after I finished that

project the Observer sent me off with James Fox the writer to do a piece on the N.F. in a way we both semi joined to get inside, that’s what you did in those days. The Socialist Worker did a big spread of my pictures and I was shit scared that the N.F. would see them.

K. How do you think reportage photography has changed? C. Reportage photography changed during the Vietnam War. At the beginning of

the war the Americans let you in and they gave you what you wanted. The Americans got to see that it was photography and newsreel film that got them into trouble. An example was the famous image of the Zippo Lighter, they were burning people’s houses with. The American government didn’t want it shown, NCB put it on and caused a rumpus. People nowadays are very switched on to this and it’s all model release forms nowadays. In France you can’t take pictures in the street, very sad because with the digital age arriving people are not allowed to record history, they wipe it off their cameras. At least my pictures will tell a period of time. I only hope that people are recording it today.

K. How do you feel about the digital age? Is it something you have been able to embrace?

C. No, I haven’t really. I fought to get copyright from the Observer / Guardian.

They wouldn’t let me have my pictures back, they said the pictures belonged to the Observer but they didn’t.You have a retainer but I was freelance not staff and I fought it that way. That’s why you see these days on pictures it says for the Guardian. The guys who are shooting now, unless they make a living out of it they will have nothing to fall back on. It’s my archive that keeps me going.

“ It’s hard to get work today

doing pure photography. If you’re going to do it you have to really go for it and realize you’re going to be broke most of the time.”

C. They made me a professor at the College Of Arts and I say to the students there that if you go to college, don’t bother doing a Photography course, do Art. A lot of the great photographers didn’t start until they were 30+ and if you have an understanding of Art, then this will really help. It’s hard to get work today doing pure photography. If you’re going to do it you have to really go for it and realize you’re going to be broke most of the time. Go and get an education, a degree in English before you do Art because if it’s in you it will soon come out if you are talented. I personally feel there aren’t so many talented photographers today.

K. Do you think that has a lot to do with the fact that the market these days

is saturated with imagery because of social networking, mobile phones, youtube, facebook etc?

C. Yes and another thing that changed photography was Television.When you have

K. What or who has been your favorite subject and why? C. The hardest was The Black House. Some of the great rivers of the world were

channels like Channel 4, BBC2 and the others doing all the documentaries now, this makes it hard. The hardest thing about photography is to come up with new ideas and you have to find the most amazing ideas.You want to do it in a way that no one else has done it. If you do clichés, which a lot of it is, you have to do clichés that are a lot better than anyone else’s.

K. How have people’s attitudes changed to the camera and being photographed?

K. Photographing the bands,The Who and The Stones how was that? C. It was mad.The Stones were alright cause I didn’t photograph them as a group,

fun. I enjoyed Burma, we had extended visas. I went up and down the River Irrawaddy a few times, it was just an amazing experience. What has been the greatest change for the photographer?

C. They realize they can make money out of it and get very upset if you don’t ask. But you have got to just do it. If you want the pictures you have to just go and get them.

only Mick Jagger. He was living in a flat at the top of Harley Street, when I knocked on his door he answered in his dressing gown. He made a cup of tea and went back to bed, where I also found Marianne Faithful, so I shot them in bed. Unfortunately the negatives were stolen, still can’t find them.

K. Do you still work on projects? C. I have done, well I did up until recently, but got into trouble. I started a piece on

K. Ohhh no, they would have been worth something now! C. Yes of course they would. Such is life!

Gustav Klimt and Egon Schiele, but I can’t show it, people get very upset when they see the pictures, because they are very sexual. I was photographing a friend of mine and people got upset especially my wife (he laughs), always been a bit of a devil with the women. What can I say, I like women!

K. Well yes who wouldn’t, we are great! If you had one piece of advice to offer up and coming photographers what would it be?

The Who were just plain mad. Pete Townsend asked me to go on their first American tour with them and I thought no I’d rather do the photography I want to do. I wasn’t really interested in rock and roll, I said I’d never do it again after that.

K. You have to tell me why? C. They were always so drunk.When I met them in a club in Manchester, they were

doing two gigs a night. On the table there were about 6 bottles of Mateus Rose and their manager came in and told them they had one hour until the next show. Pete Townsend said “sod it, we ain’t doing it!” The manager of the venue came and pleaded with them, but they weren’t in the mood and just carried on boozing the night away!

K. Thank you Colin.

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“ If you want the pictures then you just have to go and get them”

Colin Jones The School Run. Belfast, Ireland. 1984

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COLIN JONES The Who Manchester Airport Hotel,1966 Cover Shot for the Observer Magazine

“THE WHO WERE JUST PLAIN MAD” Colin Jones. 2012

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To celebrate the World Pinhole Day, which this year was on the 29th of April, Silverprint organised a Pinhole Workshop, where the participants had an opportunity to make their own pinhole cameras out of coke cans and take black&white pictures with them and process them in our darkroom. To follow that event we thought it was the best time to organise the 1st Silverprint Pinhole Competition, which had a huge interest and we received an overwhelming quantity of impressive images. We chose 1st, 2nd and 3rd prize winners as well as further 7 short listed participants and set up an exhibition at Silverprint in July.

3rd PRIZE WINNER Nicolas Mahe – Battlesfield

2nd PRIZE WINNER Victor Senkov – Metamorphis 2

Image shot with a 6x6 Zero Image pinhole camera

Image taken on a hand made pinhole plate based on Lubitel 166B.

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1st PRIZE WINNER Anthony Carr - A New Horizon (wk 47-70 of 110, Camera 61) A New Horizon (2011) documents the construction of a new UCLH Cancer Centre in London. Installed during week 47 of the build, the camera stayed ‘open’ continuously exposing until week 70, some 23 weeks later. Taken using a homemade ‘film canister’ pinhole camera loaded with 160 asa neg film.

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1 Oliver Wilkes – Trigger Shop with a pinhole camera made from an old Holga.

3

Howard – Getting Stuck In Shot on a single shot homemade cardboard camera 37mm f150 and a curved film plane for extra width.

2 Phil Chapman – Exploration and Discovery Shot with a converted Ensign camera called Gonzomatic Mk3 TTV pinhole camera.

4 Marianne Toth – Postcards from Bokor Taken with a home-made pinhole camera made of an ilford Pan 100 35mm x 30.5mm box.

5 William Arnold – Luxulyan Valley (November 1st to January 2nd) Camera:Travel sweet tim. Paper Negative on Kodak Polymax RC undeveloped and flatbed scanned

6 Chris Baird – Adventures First Image shot using an adapted Baldixette 120 camera.

7 Alexey Korotkov – Untitled Image shot with a pinhole tea can.

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Photography by Jo O’Hanlon

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PRICE GUIDE COLOUR FILM COLOUR NEGATIVE AGFA VISTA Wherever you are and whatever event you want, these versatile films are always at the ready. Ideal for snapshots both indoors and outdoors, in all weathers, with or without flash. 1545 VISTA 200 135-36/£1.99 1546 VISTA 400 135-36/£2.20 FUJI REALA 100 A premium ISO 100-speed emulsion delivering exceptional color accuracy. The finest, smoothest grain and the best sharpness of all SUPERIA films. 34992 REALA 100 120 5 PACK/£26.06 PRO 160NS Professional is an ISO film speed 160 daylight-type color negative film designed for professional use, featuring more highly optimized skin tone reproduction and neutral gray balance, especially important for portrait photography. 1524 PRO 160NS 120 5 PACK/£23.28 1446 PRO 160NS 4X5” 20 SHEETS/£85.20 PRO 400H provides superb skin tones with smoothly continuous gradation from the highlights to the shadows, highly faithful color reproduction, an exciting three-dimensional appearance to the image and single-channel suitability for uniform printing efficiency. 87164 PRO 400H 135-36 5 PACK/£8.34 95447 PRO 400H 120/£23.28 SUPERIA 200 Designed for flexibility and ease of use, SUPERIA 200 works equally well outdoors in daylight or indoors with flash. Enhanced color reproduction, sharpness, and smooth, fine grain. 23317 SUPERIA 200 135-36/£3.26 SUPERIA 400 An all-round general purpose, high-performance, high speed color negative film delivering truly fine-grain. 23329 SUPERIA 400 135-36/£3.84 SUPERIA 400 120 5PACK/£22.20 SUPERIA 800 A multi-purpose color negative film, with fine grain and outstanding color and sharpness. 20995 SUPERIA 800 135-36/£5.60 SUPERIA 1600 A multi-purpose color negative film, with fine grain and outstanding color and sharpness. Ideal for fastaction sports, non-flash stage photography, and general use with compact zoom lens cameras. 52712 SUPERIA 1600 135-36/£8.68 KODAK EKTAR 100 100 speed, high saturation and ultra-vivid color, offering the finest, smoothest grain of any color negative film available today.

tones plus exceptional color saturation over a wide range of lighting conditions. 1560 1559 1578 1624

PORTRA PORTRA PORTRA PORTRA

400 400 400 400

135-36 5 PACK/£32.58 120 5 PACK/£21.89 4X5” 10 SHEETS/£42.62 8X10” 10 SHEETS/£42.62

PORTRA 800 Delivers all the advantages of a high-speed film along with finer grain, higher sharpness, and more natural skin tones and color reproduction. PORTRA 800 Film—for perfectly stunning results with less-than-perfect light. 31735 PORTRA 800 135-36 5 PACK/£8.75 31723 PORTRA 800 120 5 PACK/£43.30 COLORPLUS 200 Offers excellent sharpness, clarity and skin tone reproduction. Great Value For Money! 3712650 COLORPLUS 200 135-24/£1.75 GOLD 200 This film provides an excellent combination of colour saturation, colour accuracy, and sharpness in a 200-speed film. 6033997 GOLD 200 135-36/£4.09 KODAK ULTRA MAX 400 film is the simple choice for any picturetaking situation - indoor, outdoor, flash, and action. 6034060 ULTRAMAX 135-36/£4.97 COLOUR TRANSPARENCY/SLIDE AGFA CT PRECISA 100 Pure radiant colours, extremely sharp and fine grain. Precise rendition of detail in all areas of light and shade. 1613 PRECISA 100 135-36/£3.82 FUJI VELVIA 50 Fujichrome Velvia is the benchmark ISO 50 daylighttype colour reversal film in the industry. 36657 VELVIA 50 135-36/£9.60 82314 VELVIA 50 120 5PACK /£27.00 1614 VELVIA 50 4X5” 20 SHEETS/£78.00 VELVIA 100 By incorporating advanced cyan, magenta, and yellow couplers, Fujichrome Velvia 100 gives photographers the saturation they require with the added advantages of higher speed and finer grain. 48230 VELVIA 100 135-36/£10.24 48294 VELVIA 100 120 5PACK/£28.62 1563 VELVIA 100 4X5” 20 SHEETS/£79.50 VELVIA 100F maintains the high colour saturation of the previous Velvia while achieving even more faithful colour reproduction, offering new freedom, flexibility, and ease of use in a wide range of shooting situations. 42956 VELVIA 100F 135-36/£9.49 42931 VELVIA 100F 120 5PACK/£28.87 1525 VELVIA 100F 4X5” 20 SHEETS/£79.50

801 EKTAR 100 135-36/£4.36 916 EKTAR 100 120 5 PACK/£19.81 1378 EKTAR 4X5” 10 SHEETS/£35.95

PROVIA 100F The staple diet material in Fuji’s range, giving extremely clean neutral balanced results. Good pushing capability, 2 stops push is hardly noticeable.

PORTRA 160 A significantly finer grain structure for improved scanning and enlargement capability in today’s workflow. Choose PORTRA 160 to deliver exceptionally smooth and natural skin tone reproduction.

19114 PROVIA 100F 135-36/£9.04 30017 PROVIA 100F 120 5PACK/£25.40 1500 PROVIA 100F 4X5” 20 SHEETS/£71.04 604 PROVIA 100F 8X10” 20 SHEETS/£230.47

1642 PORTRA 160 135-36 5 PACK/£26.21 1643 PORTRA 160 120 5 PACK/£19.97 1644 PORTRA 160 4X5” 10 SHEETS/£38.39

PROVIA 400X is a flexible high speed (ISO 400) daylight colour reversal material especially suited to low light situations.

PORTRA 400 The world’s finest grain high-speed color negative film. At true ISO 400 speed, this film delivers spectacular skin

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33136 PROVIA 400X 135-36/£10.91 33222 PROVIA 400X 120 5PACK /£30.73


PRICE GUIDE BLACK + WHITE FILM AGFA APX 100 Classic black and white film from Agfa at a fantastic price. 58270 APX 100 135-36/£2.83 FOMA FOMAPAN 100 100 Classic has a nominal speed rating of ISO 100/21°. 54612 54648 55978 55980

FOMA FOMA FOMA FOMA

100 100 100 100

135-36/£2.23 120 5 PACK/£2.21 4X5” 50 SHEETS/£26.96 8X10” 50 SHEETS/£107.92

FOMAPAN 200 200 Creative has a nominal speed rating of ISO 200/24°. 54690 FOMA 200 135-36/£2.62 54675 FOMA 200 120/£2.66 FOMAPAN 400 400 Action has a nominal speed rating of ISO 400/27°. 54746 FOMA 400 135-36/£2.62 54734 FOMA 400 120/£2.66 1619 FOMA 400 8X10” 50 SHEETS/£122.78 FUJI NEOPAN ACROS ACROS 100 was launched a few years ago as a new technology medium speed film intended as the “world’s highest standard in grain quality, rich gradation and outstanding sharpness”. 31858 NEOPAN ACROS 100 135-36/£4.57 1522 NEOPAN ACROS 120 5 PACK/£19.92 NEOPAN 400 A very popular monochrome film offering very high quality at a realistic speed. Launched in the UK in 1987 as Fuji’s answer to Kodak TMax, and utilising new technology silver halide grain construction to marry high speed with fine grain and good resolution. 48852 NEOPAN 400 135-36/£5.24 NEOPAN 400CN Fujifilms first black and white chromogenic film Fuji NEOPAN 400 NC offers an unobtrusive grain level with a wide exposure latitude, making it ideal for general use when the convenience of C41 colour negative processing is preferred. 54431 NEOPAN 400CN 100 135-36/£4.76 54443 NEOPAN 400CN 120/£4.14 ILFORD PAN F+ Ilford PAN F Plus is a relatively slow (50 ISO) very fine grain panchromatic film, with improved characteristics from the enhanced “Plus” emulsion. As with other slower films the contrast is relatively high-working, and care should be taken to avoid over development. 91052 PAN F+ 135-36/£5.83 71436 PAN F+ 120/£5.02 81378 PAN F+ BULK 35MMX30M/£58.72 FP4+ For high quality work, Ilford FP4 Plus offers all the benefits of a long line of Ilford FP predecessors, together with finer grain, faster processing, and greater sharpness. Offers great flexibility when compared with Delta and TMAX. 18445 FP4+ 135-36/£5.70 5886 FP4+ 120/£4.80 13296 FP4+ 5x4” 25 SHEETS/£35.06 20334 FP4+ 5x4” 100 SHEETS/£133.20 3230 FP4+ 5x7” 25 SHEETS/£56.54 91828 FP4+ 8x10” 25 SHEETS/£118.07

96945 FP4+ BULK 35mmX17M/£33.96 17531 FP4+ BULK 35mmX30M/£57.19 HP5+ Ilford HP5+ is a fast 400 ISO black and white film, building on the long pedigree of HP5, HP4, and (within living memory) HP3. Fine grain, good edge contrast and sharpness, and increased flexibility in processing. 47671 HP5+ 135-36/£5.70 59144 HP5+ 120/£4.80 95848 HP5+ 5x4” 25 SHEETS/£35.06 3294 HP5+ 5x7” 25 SHEETS/£56.54 7140 HP5+ 8x10” 25 SHEETS/£118.07 92949 HP5+ BULK 35mmX17M/£33.96 17568 HP5+ BULK 35mmX30M/£57.20 DELTA PRO 400 Ilford DELTA 400 uses an entirely new form of silver grain structure to produce a 400 ISO film with grain size more typical of 100 ISO. 37974 DELTA 400 135-36/£6.88 3301 DELTA 400 120/£5.62 3340 DELTA 400 BULK 35mmX30M/£62.08 DELTA 3200 Ultra-high speed B&W film from Ilford, DELTA 3200 is also unusual in that it is offered in 120 format, making it feasible to use medium format cameras in available-light situations. 26519 DELTA 3200 135-36/£8.59 26864 DELTA 3200 120/£6.77 XP2 An exceptionally fine-grained black and white 400 ISO film that is processed in standard colour negative chemistry (C41). 72922 XP2 135-36/£6.88 15780 XP2 120/£5.62 73226 XP2 BULK 35mmX30M/£63.02 KODAK TRI-X Classic and very popular 400 ISO film, basically unchanged for decades. The classic photojournalists’ film. Enormously flexible in processing. Prints with a distinctive punchy snappiness. 2618 TRI-X 135-36 £4.38 1153659 TRI-X 120 5PACK /19.26 35316 TRI-X 5x4” 50 SHETS/£75.04 57342 TRI-X BULK 35mmX30.5M/£110.06 TMAX 100 New generation ‘T-Grain’ technology, yielding very fine grain relative to film speed. This is done using a tabular grain structure, and a high degree of sensitisation. 25573 TMX 100 135-36/£3.83 61571 TMX 100 120 5PACK/19.26 28375 TMX 100 5x4” 50 SHEETS/£75.04 TMAX 400 27616 TMY 400 135-36/£3.79 3813 TMY 400 120 5PACK/19.26 97347 TMY 400 5x4” 50 SHEETS/£75.04 655 TMY 400 8x10” 10 SHEETS/£57.29 97579 TRI-X BULK 35mmX30.5M/£82.84 TMAX 3200 The ultimate in speed with existing technologies, 35mm format only, relatively fine grain considering the phenomenal speed, with the grain having a very sharp, attractive character. 646 TMZ 3200 135-36/£7.54


Artwork by THE TROUBLE WITH JO Photography by Jo O’Hanlon

SILVERPRINT.CO.UK FACEBOOK/SILVERPRINT


PRICE GUIDE CHEMISTRY FILM DEVELOPERS ID11 Classic fine-grain formula, the equivalent of Kodak D76, and dates back about as far. Originally used as a good formulation for cinema film, and became the standard for still photography work very quickly. The main characteristics are in maintaining full film speed while still delivering very fine grain, and suitable for virtually all film types.

a dilution of 1+9 but for greater development control and economy it can be used at 1+14. MULTIGRADE developer is clean working, has excellent keeping properties and gives a neutral image tone with most papers. 186 1 litre/£9.88

2437 ID11 1 litre/£5.00 85689 ID11 5 litres/£10.04

DEKTOL Neutral to cold working paper developer in powder form, and has been a long term favourite for those following the Ansel Adams tradition, being extensively covered in Adams ‘The Print’. The 3.8 litre stock dilutes 1+2.

ILFOSOL 3

36243 3.8 litres Stock, dil. 1+2/£18.76

One-shot, general-purpose, liquid black and white film developer. Not perhaps the sharpest of developers, but a convenient substitute for ID11 or D76.

AGFA NEUTOL There are 2 types of Agfa print developer, NeutolNE(utral), & WA(rm), and choice of these can be used to control print image colour. The first choice has to be the paper type however, and this decides the general appearance of the print. The developer selected is then fine tuning this. Neutol WA is particularly suitable for the warmest image colour on chloro-bromides.

481 Ilfosol 3 500ml/£7.76 ILFOTEC LC29 Highly concentrated liquid developer, flexible and economic to use, diluting for most purposes between 1+19 & 1+29 648 ILFOTEC LC29 500ml/£16.96 PERCEPTOL Ultra Fine Grain Developer Ultra fine grain formula, supplied as powder. Exceptionally fine grain and high sharpness, with some loss (half to one stop) in terms of emulsion speed. 24465 1 litre/£5.00 KODAK D76 Powder fine grain formula generally similar to Ilford ID11, but now reformulated to a single powder, needing hot mixing. 21857 3.8 litres (1 US gallon)/£5.34 KODAK XTOL Fine grain and high sharpness, billed as a alternative and replacement for D76. A new powder film developer from Kodak, XTOL uses ascorbic acid, and is aimed as a substitute and enhancement of D76, providing higher speed and finer grain. Convenient, room-temperature mixing, dissolves very easily. Stable performance through a wide range of temperatures. Excellent keeping properties. 18944 XTOL 5 litres Working Solution/£8.45 KODAK TMAX Liquid concentrate developer useful for general purpose work with all films, good for speed increasing with extended development. Dilutes at 1+4, very sharp and fine grain. 6419 1 litre Conc. for 5 litres/£13.04 RODINAL Very economical and extremely sharp working, with high acutance which increases as it is diluted. Extremely concentrated, normally used at 1+25 to 1+50 dilutions, but can be used up to 1+300. Keeps extremely well. 71365 120 ml/£4.90 20858 500 ml/£13.09 PQ UNIVERSAL Print Developer Neutral tone universal print developer supplied as liquid, good consistency through working life. Dilution is 1+9 from the stock solution. As the name suggests, also doubles up as an energetic film developer which can be used with technical films, normally at a weaker dilution, start tests at 1+19. 25295 500ml/£6.53 61352 5 litre/£19.62 PAPER DEVELOPERS ILFORD MULTIGRADE MULTIGRADE is a rapid liquid concentrate usually used at

58121 66151 69062 33261

NEUTOL NEUTOL NEUTOL NEUTOL

NE NE WA WA

1.25 litres/£14.04 5 litres/£33.50 1.25 litres/£14.04 5 litres/£43.20

STOPBATHS Stop bath is a chemical bath used to stop the development of the film, plate, or paper. All commercially available stopbaths are based on acetic acid or citric acid, some with an indicator added, to show the point at which the pH becomes too high for the bath to do its job. 20578 ILFOSTOP 500ml odourless, dilutes1+19/£5.26 1323 KODAK PRO STOP 473ml dilutes 1+60, with indicator/£5.46 24107 FOTOSPEED SB50 Odourless Stopbath 1 litre/£9.98 24110 FOTOSPEED SB50 Odourless Stopbath 5 litres/£31.99 FIXERS Used in the final step in the photographic processing of film or paper, fixer stabilizes the image and makes it insensitive to light. 20860 ILFORD Rapid Fixer 1 litre/£10.39 7664 ILFORD HYPAM Fixer 5 litres/£29.22 2062 CHAMPION Amfix Fixer 5 litres/£18.76 95738 TETENAL SUPERFIX Odourless 1 litre/£9.68 24024 FOTOSPEED FX20 Rapid Fixer 1 litre/£8.99 24036 FOTOSPEED FX30 Odourless Fixer 1 litre/£10.00 24048 FOTOSPEED FX30 Odourless Fixer 5 litres/£31.99 WETTING AGENT Wetting agent is use for the final wash after the film has been processed, it breaks the surface tension of water allowing it to dry without water spots. 73018 90662 20723 24122

ILFOTOL Wetting Agent 1 litre/£11.82 PHOTO FLO Wetting Agent 473ml/£7.03 MIRASOL 2000 Wetting Agent 250ml/£5.68 FOTOSPEED RA50 Rinse Aid 500ml/£4.99

COLOR CHEMISTRY 55026 TETENAL COLORTEC C41 Negative Kit 1 litre/£20.17 27557 TETENAL COLORTEC C41 Negative Kit 5 litres/£59.21 729 Fuji Film Xpress C41 Kit 5 litres/£41.32 41178 TETENAL COLORTEC E6 1 litre Kit/£34.44 68355 TETENAL COLORTEC E6 5 litre Kit/£73.57 P979641A Fuji Chrome 6 Xpress E6 Kit 5L/£93.59


PRICE GUIDE PAPER COLOUR FUJI

MGD 20X24” 50 SHEETS/£113.34 37451 GLOSSY - 53263 PEARL - 56610 SATIN

CRYSTAL ARCHIVE RA4 Fujifilm’s mainstream professional paper for the optical exposure of a broad range of image types and has achieved outstanding results in independent artificial ageing tests. A rich, colourful, general purpose material, with a smooth gradation appropriate to portraiture. Colour balance neutrality is maintained from highlights to shadows. The base support and silver halide crystal control technology work together to produce improved whiteness, highlight and shadow depth qualities. Excellent reproduction of vivid colours, at the same time maintaining the subtlety of natural skin tones, with deep blacks and clean highlights. Excellent image sharpness and the unsurpassed image stability shared by all Fujicolor Crystal Archive Professional papers Back printed copyright message. Available in rolls (ranging from 4” up to 50” sizes) in most surfaces, & cut sheets from 8”x10” to 20”x24”.

ILFORD ROLLS MGD 20”ROLLx30M/£153.07 45828 PEARL

FUJI 8X10” 100 SHEETS/£27.88 15766 GLOSSY - 15947 LUSTRE - 15849 MATT

ILFORD FIBRE BASE PLEASE SEE OUR WEBSITE FOR THE FULL FB PAPER LISTING.

FUJI 10X12” 50 SHEETS/£25.27 15778 GLOSSY - 15999 LUSTRE - 15852 MATT

FOMA

FUJI 12X16” 50 SHEETS/£45.42 15837 GLOSSY - 15935 LUSTRE - 15864 MATT FUJI 20X24” 50 SHEETS/£83.78 1283/GLOSSY - 21869 LUSTRE - 20290 MATT BLACK+WHITE/RESIN COATED ILFORD

MGD 42”ROLLx10M/£113.26 83642 GLOSSY - 24009 PEARL - 7248 SATIN MGD 24”ROLLx30M/£183.85 24880 PEARL MGD 42”ROLLx30M/£321.56 51238 GLOSSY - 51240 PEARL MGD 50”ROLLx10M/£135.19 51265 PEARL MGD 50”ROLLx30M/£382.63 12297 GLOSSY - 51289 PEARL

FOMASPEED VARIANT High quality neutral variable contrast RC paper in two surfaces, glossy and semi-matt. Popularly priced, competitive with the Ilford market leader. FOMASPEED 311 8X10” 100 SHEETS/£42.84 56000 GLOSSY FOMASPEED 312 8X10” 100 SHEETS/£45.90 56013 MATT

MGD MULTIGRADE IV RC Leading make of resin coated VC paper, high speed, neutral tone, with premium weight base. Choice of 3 surfaces, glossy, pearl and satin. Various other rolls available apart from those listed, please check with us.

FOMASPEED 311 9.5X12” 50 SHEETS/£28.14 56025 GLOSSY

MGD 8X10” 25 SHEETS/£15.37 9902 GLOSSY - 80477 PEARL - 45685 SATIN

FOMASPEED WARMTONE High quality warmtone variable contrast RC paper in two surfaces, glossy and semi-matt. Popularly priced, competitive with the Ilford market leader.

MGD 8X10” 50 SHEETS/£21.31 14728 GLOSSY - 10979 PEARL MGD 8X10” 100 SHEETS/£39.49 38300 GLOSSY - 58948 PEARL - 93282/SATIN MGD A4 100 SHEETS/£53.50 3572 GLOSSY - 68586 PEARL MGD 9.5X12” 10 SHEETS/£9.17 47231 GLOSSY - 73253 PEARL - 61182 SATIN MGD 9.5X12” 50 SHEETS/£29.99 4493 GLOSSY - 29516 PEARL - 48558 SATIN MGD 11X14” 50 SHEETS/£41.68 7209 GLOSSY - 219 PEARL MGD 12X16” 10 SHEETS/£16.81 61694 GLOSSY - 85640 PEARL - 68815 SATIN MGD 12X16” 50 SHEETS/£49.39 11285 GLOSSY - 5752 PEARL - 2378 SATIN

FOMASPEED 312 9.5X12” 50 SHEETS/£28.14 56049 MATT

FOMASPEED W/T 332 9.5X12” 10 SHEETS/£13.03 594 SEMI-MATT FOMASPEED W/T 331 12X16” 10 SHEETS/£21.64 603 GLOSSY FOMASPEED W/T 332 12X16” 10 SHEETS/£21.64 602 SEMI-MATT FOMASPEED W/T 332 16X20” 10 SHEETS/£37.81 716 SEMI-MATT

WE HAVE A LARGE RANGE OF RESIN COATED AND FIBRE BASED PAPERS THAT WE ARE UNABLE TO LIST HERE.

MGD 16X20” 50 SHEETS/£75.46 95985 GLOSSY - 12108 PEARL - 83239 SATIN

TO SEE THE FULL RANGE OF PAPERS, FILM AND ALL OUR STOCK THEN VISIT OUR LONDON STORE OR ONLINE

MGD 20X24” 10 SHEETS/£39.76 98691 GLOSSY - 13220 PEARL - 4450 SATIN

www.silverprint.co.uk

MGD 16X20” 10 SHEETS/£26.78 10360 GLOSSY - 19290 PEARL - 97460 SATIN

SILVERPRINT.CO.UK FACEBOOK/SILVERPRINT


PRICE GUIDE DARKROOM PROCESSING KITS 1775 Paterson Film Processing Kit/£50.77 PTP572 Paterson Film & Print Processing Kit/£91.30 PROCESSING TRAYS 69145 DEVELOPING 42982 DEVELOPING 72985 DEVELOPING 26326 DEVELOPING 2667 DEVELOPING

DISH DISH DISH DISH DISH

8 x 10”/£5.82 12 x 16”/£10.94 16 x 20”/£14.08 20 x 24”/£26.60 37 x 48”/£114.37

SAFELIGHTS 162 Kaiser Safelight/B&W 17324 Paterson SAFELIGHT 51128 RH TORCH SAFELIGHT 51116 RH TORCH SAFELIGHT

Graded & Multigrade(K 4018)/£41.70 (Orange)/£26.08 COLOUR/£14.36 BLACK&WHITE/£14.36

TANKS AND ACCESSORIES 79756 PATERSON 35mm TANK & SPIRAL/£21.90 54981 KAISER UNIVERSAL DEV TANK inc. 2 Spirals/£21.91 79878 PATERSON UNIVERSAL TANK inc. 2 spirals/£23.47 84776 MULTIREEL 3 TANK Paterson/£24.52 96529 MULTIREEL 5 TANK Paterson/£29.64 65734 PATERSON MULTIREEL 8 Processing Tank/£40.16 67076 PATERSON FILM REEL/£13.03 84639 PATERSON FILM REEL x 6 Pack/£61.03 44868 KAISER FILM REEL/£11.51 68535 COMBI-PLAN 5 x 4” Film Processing Tank/£99.95 1809 MOD 5x4” Processor (fits Paterson Multi-Reel 3)/£44.50 FOCUS FINDERS 54211 MICRO-FOCUS FINDER Paterson/£26.08 2452 Kaiser Enlarger Focus Magnifier ‘focuscop’/£42.67 FILM CLIPS 89622 KAISER Film Clips One Weighted Plastic x2/£10.16 40238 KAISER Film Clips One Weighted Stainless Steel x2/£5.74 28713 PATERSON Film Clip Set/£9.90 MEASURES Ranging from 45 ml up to 1.2 litres in the clear plastic cylinders, easy to measure volumes, although from the point of view of rugged-ness the Mixing Jugs may be preferable. If you need to measure very small volumes the range of syringes may be preferable. 34317 PATERSON 45ML GRADUATE/£5.72 89370 150ML GRADUATE Paterson/£5.72 72408 300ml GRADUATE Paterson/£6.77 50072 600ml GRADUATE Paterson/£8.86 58951 1200ml GRADUATE Paterson/£9.90 69546 MIXING JUG 1 litre Paterson/£8.86 5214 PATERSON MIXING JUG 2 litre/£13.03 SYRINGES Good for measuring small volumes, a 20 ml syringe is ideal for example for measuring out one-shot developers such as Ilford LC29 or Agfa Rodinal, which can be often be taken straight from the bottle, and more accurately than using a graduate. 49104 37923 40201 70507 63579

SYRINGE SYRINGE SYRINGE SYRINGE SYRINGE

1ml/£0.60 3ml/£0.60 5ml/£0.84 20ml/£1.78 50ml/£5.09

STORAGE BOTTLES 27922 BOTTLE POLYETHYLENE 35878 BOTTLE POLYETHYLENE 24672 BOTTLE POLYETHYLENE 14865 BOTTLE POLYETHYLENE 14840 BOTTLE POLYETHYLENE 30640 BOTTLE POLYETHYLENE 47160 CONCERTINA BOTTLE 1 96226 CONCERTINA BOTTLE 2

250ml/£0.96 500ml/£1.19 1 litre/£1.40 2.5 litre/£2.64 5 litre/£4.20 10 litre/£6.00 litre/£6.47 litre/£8.95

PROTECTIVE GLOVES Good quality vinyl gloves, essential wear for prolonged exposure to most B & W chemistry, and any exposure to colour chemicals. 17214 VINYL GLOVES / 1 PAIR/£0.40 22576 MARIGOLD GLOVES x 100 Pack (50 pairs)/£11.40 TIMERS 38349 Hanhart MESOTRON TIMER Sweep Hands £81.60 51044 Process - Triple Timer/£46.26 51057 Digital Lab Timer/£23.32 PRINTWASHERS Great design and quality printwashers for archival wash of fibre-based papers with minimal water usage. 32188 33109 32211 33112 32247 33124

SILVERPRINT SILVERPRINT SILVERPRINT SILVERPRINT SILVERPRINT SILVERPRINT

PRINTWASHER PRINTWASHER PRINTWASHER PRINTWASHER PRINTWASHER PRINTWASHER

12 12 16 16 20 20

x x x x x x

16” 16” 20” 20” 24” 24”

6 Slots/£263.99 12 Slots/£352.34 6 Slots/£327.47 12 Slots/£464.68 6 Slots/£458.56 12 Slots/£660.74

ENLARGERS 11234 VCP6005 6 x 6cm Kaiser Colour Enlarger/£966.89 11430 VCP7005 6x7 cm Kaiser Colour Enlarger/£1,188.00 4701 VCP9005 6 x 9cm Colour Enlarger/£1,269.66 11371 VPM3505 35mm Kaiser MG Enlarger/£1,058.70 11383 VPM6005 6 x 6cm Kaiser MG Enlarger/£962.36 11396 VPM7005 6 x 7cm Kaiser MG Enlarger/£1,211.42 11416 VPM9005 6 x 9 cm Kaiser MG Enlarger/£1,249.56 11320 VP3502 35mm Kaiser BW Enlarger/£410.38 11332 VP6005 6x6cm Kaiser BW Enlarger/£763.66 11357 VP7005 6x7cm Kaiser BW Enlarger/£978.11 1447 Paterson Universal Enlarger No Lens/£192.00 1448 Paterson Universal Enlarger with 50mm Lens/£222.00 1449 Paterson Universal Enlarger with 75mm Lens/£224.40 OTHER ACCESSORIES 28823 Lupe 8x £6.85 51960 Kaiser Base Magnifier 10x/£9.02 50973 Kaiser Force Film Washer/£24.24 61520 PATERSON Force Film Washer/£11.99 51057 Digital Lab Timer/£23.32 6399 PATERSON Film Squeegee/£11.99 48572 PATERSON Print Squeegee/£24.52 51336 PATERSON FUNNEL 4.25”/£5.72 73725 PATERSON Chemical Mixer Paddle/£5.72 15267 Paterson HIGH SPEED PRINT WASHER 8” x 10”/£27.12 16021 Paterson HIGH SPEED PRINT WASHER 12 x16”/£45.90 1185 BLACK-OUT FABRIC 48” x 40” (1 metre)/£5.47

THERMOMETERS 89634 Developing Tank Thermometer Standard/£8.54 2380 Developing Tank Thermometer wide range/£9.88 830 Tray Thermometer/£10.55 3974 Precision Thermometer/£21.36 17128 Paterson 9” Spirit Thermometer/£13.03 80492 Paterson 12” Spirit Thermometer for Colour/£13.24 PRINT TONGS 698 Prints Tongs S/S/£26.08 89587 Print Tongs x2/£5.78 51083 Print Tongs with Clip/£8.82 90455 PATERSON Print Tongs/£7.81

All prices are correct at time of going to press and are inclusive of VAT where applicable. All prices are subject to change without notice. All prices are quoted in Sterling. All offers are subject to availability. In the event that a product is listed at an incorrect price due to a typographical error or error in pricing information from our suppliers, we shall have the right to refuse or cancel any sale based on the incorrect price whether or not the sale has been confirmed.


PRICE GUIDE PINHOLE + ALTERNATIVE PINHOLE SUPPLIES ZERO CAMERAS Made of high-quality teak wood, Zero Pinhole cameras are beautiful art objects with exquisite antique design. Brass shim of 0.001” is used for pinhole construction, making the pinhole conform to a more accurate film stop number and yield sharper images. ZERO 25B BASIC 5x4” Pinhole Camera/£101.66 ZERO 50B 5x4” Extended Pinhole Camera/£152.47 ZERO 75B 5x4” Extended Pinhole Camera/£203.28 ZERO 75B DELUXE 5x4” Pinhole Camera + 2 xtns + Accs/£257.40 ZERO 2000 BASIC CAMERA 120 Format 6 x 6cm/£101.66 ZERO 6x9 cm Multi-Format PINHOLE CAMERA (Basic Model)/£158.29 ZERO 6x9MF DELUXE Pinhole Camera/£184.80 ZERO 612B Pinhole Camera/£174.00 ZERO 135 BASIC 35mm Pinhole Camera/£101.66 ZERO 135 DELUXE Pinhole Camera/£183.00 ZERO EXPOSURE SCALE/£21.12 ZERO CABLE RELEASE ADAPTOR/£66.00 ZERO IMAGE Pinhole/Zone Plate adapter for Copal 0 Shutter /£171.60 SILVERPRINT PINHOLE PLATES These double-etched precisely pre-drilled pinhole plates are available in sizes 0.2mm, 0.3mm and 0.5mm. They offer a precise and very reliable solution to a homemade pinhole camera at low cost. Each plate comes with a Silverprint Exposure Calculator and instructions with a focal length/fnumber chart. 1943 SILVERPRINT PINHOLE PLATE SIZE 0.2mm/£13.50 1944 SILVERPRINT PINHOLE PLATE SIZE 0.3mm/£13.50 1945 SILVERPRINT PINHOLE PLATE SIZE 0.5mm/£13.50 STENOFLEX A portable darkroom & pinhole camera all in one cleverly designed box. The cardboard box functions as the camera, inside you will find 10 sheets of traditional photographic paper, a red filter so you can set up your own darkroom, developer and fixer, and instructions in both English and French. 1814 STENOFLEX PINHOLE CAMERA/£30.00 LOMOGRAPHY DIANA Based on the original iconic 1960’s Diana camera, rebuilt from the ground up, this camera features removable lens for Pinhole Function that allow to shoot a super-wide-angle, severely oldschool image through a tiny hole. 1514 DIANA STANDARD (No Flash)/£38.62 HOLGA Take it back to the earliest days of photography with this little lady. There’s no need for a lens, as a tiny pinhole on the front of the camera will be your only conduit for light. Due to its small size, every shot is a long exposure – from 1 second in sunlight to several hours on a dark night. Images are extremely soft focus and dreamlike – any moving subject is rendered as a ghostly blur.

SILVERPRINT CYANOTYPE KIT Our new kit offers a simple, straightforward and fun way to coat and expose cyanotypes with no need for measuring devices or darkrooms – all you need is in the box! The kit contains: ·15 sheets of Arches Platine Art Paper ·5 sheets of OHP Digital Contact Film ·2 vials of Potassium Ferricyanide and 2 vials of Ferric Ammonium Citrate, which are already measured and ready to mix with water ·Storage box which also doubles up as a tray for mixing chemicals/washing the paper to fix ·Black storage bag to keep paper away from ultraviolet light ·Foam coating brush ·Protective vinyl gloves ·Easy step by step instructions. 1821 SILVERPRINT+ Cyanotype Kit/£25.00 SILVERPRINT SOLAR PAPER Solar Paper pack contains 25 sheets of 8x10” light sensitive blueprint paper. Cheap, safe, very simple and fun to use and doesn’t require any chemicals or darkroom conditions. All you need to do is take a sheet of paper out of the pack and arrange a composition of objects or negatives onto your paper. Interesting shapes or semi-translucent objects will give a nice effect; Leaves, grass, flowers, glass objects, feathers, jewellery, paper cutouts, fabrics, lace – all will work great. After exposing the print in the sunshine for a few minutes, wash it in tapwater to see a wonderful white-on-blue image emerge. Solar Paper is the perfect EDUCATION tool that allows children to learn about composition, negative/positive and the physics of light – all in a fun, safe and playful way. 1813 Solar Paper 8x10” 25 Sheets/£15.00 LIQUID LIGHT EMULSIONS Liquid Photographic Emulsion, also known as Liquid Light or Silver Gelatin, is a silver-based sensitizer designed for applying on any surface, exposing with an enlarger, and processing in conventional black & white chemistry. It is virtually the same emulsion as found on ordinary photographic paper, but in a liquid form and can be coated on a wide range of 2D and 3D surfaces, this way offering the freedom to produce images on the material of your choice. 67607 SILVERPRINT SE1 EMULSION 240ml/£35.52 50890 SILVERPRINT SE1 EMULSION 1 litre/£125.53 1771 Foma PHOTOGRAPHIC EMULSION 1l. (with hardener)/£68.16 461 Black Magic Normal/Hard 300ml/£34.38 55576 Black Magic VC 300ml/£38.34 51752 Black Magic Photo Gelatin 100g/£19.98 182 ROLLEI Black Magic Additiv Dev. Hardener 250 ml/£11.76 2121 SILVER GELATIN Book Martin Reed & Sarah Jones/£20.00 FOTOSPEED SALT PRINTING KIT The Kit contains: 5 sheets 8x10in Canelleto paper, 5 sheets 8x10in digital contact film, 2ml syringe 250ml solution each of: Salt - Silver & Stabilisers 1,2&3, protective gloves, buckle brush and full detailed instructions for use. Ammonia is required to activate the silver solution and is not supplied.

1392 HOLGA 135 PC [35mm Pinhole Camera]/£44.93

49006 FOTOSPEED SALT PRINTING KIT/£59.99

HARMAN TITAN 5x4” Pinhole Camera comes with 10 sheets of 4 x 5” Ilford Delta 100 Professional film, 10 sheets 4 x 5” Harman Direct Positive paper, 10 sheets 4 x 5” Ilford Multigrade Paper and Ilford Pinhole Exposure Calculator.

FOTOSPEED GUM BICHROMATE KIT Kit contains 5 sheets of 8x10’’ Canellto fine are acid free paper, 5 sheets 8x10’’ digital contact film (to make contact negative) 250mls each of sizing, sensitising & clearing solutions. 3 tubes of high quality branded water colour paints (additional colours available from any art shop) + protective gloves and full instructions. Additional items required are a water proof coating board to attach the image paper and gummed tape to secure.

1807 Ilford Pinhole Photography Kit/£165.00 PINHOLE CAMERAS: A DIY GUIDE BOOK Did you ever think that the oatmeal container you open every morning when you make breakfast could be turned into a camera? In Pinhole Cameras, photographer and pinhole aficionado Chris Keeney shows you how to transform basic household containers into amazing photographic devices. 1818 PINHOLE CAMERAS by Chris Keeney/£10.99 ALTERNATIVE PROCESSES SILVERPRINT.CO.UK FACEBOOK/SILVERPRINT

48837 FOTOSPEED GUM BICHROMATE KIT/£49.99 SILVERPRINT ARGYROTYPE KIT - COMING SOON


Artwork by THE TROUBLE WITH JO Photography by Jo O’Hanlon

16


Rob Griffith is the author of Practical Colour Management and has previously run training courses for X-Rite, Canon Europe, The Royal Photographic Society and The British Museum. He has many years of colour management experience in a wide variety of different work flows and market sectors. www.colourcollective.co.uk Colour Managing Black and White Photography Colour management for black and white photography sounds almost oxymoronic. Why would a black and white photographer need to invest time and money in a technology that sounds as though it only applies to colour photography? The reason that all black and white photographers should have their work flows properly colour managed is that as far as your computer software and hardware is concerned grey is just another colour, and without calibrating and profiling your kit you won’t get truly neutral accurate black and white prints and your monitor won’t be showing you the actual tones in your image. If anything colour management is more important for a black and white photographer than those that only shoot colour. Colour management isn’t difficult. It needn’t be expensive. It will save you time and save you money.You will also get better looking images and prints. Monitors You might expect this article to start with image capture but first I want to talk about the most important piece of kit in a digital darkroom: the monitor. We all judge our images based on what we see on a monitor, but while it’s said that a camera never lies, a bad monitor - or a badly colour managed one - certainly can. Just as a cheap lens may not capture the detail you want, a cheap monitor may fail to show your image to its full potential. Among the worst are those on lap tops, where the manufacturer will often scrimp on quality to keep the price low. Monitors bundled with PCs are also often not the best. The first step to achieving a monitor you can trust is to buy one designed for viewing colour critical images. In much the same way as you’d never judge a lens purely on its focal length or speed, you can’t judge a monitor solely on its size or resolution. Most are designed for general office use, where image quality isn’t that important. Budget for a monitor in the same way you would for a lens: spend more to get the best, and economise only with a knowledge of the compromises you are making. Look at the specification long and hard for features that help ensure greater uniformity or evenness of colour, stability over time, controls for colour adjustment, and advanced calibration functionality. EIZO has a range of monitors called ColorEdge, and NEC has the SpectraView range. Both are designed specifically for image editing. Even if you only plan to display monochrome images you won’t see accurate tones or neutrals unless you calibrate and profile your monitor. Calibration is the process of adjusting something to certain standards or values. In the case of monitors, you generally adjust them to a certain white point (Kelvin value), tone curve (or gamma) and luminance (or brightness). Use the same target values on multiple monitors, and they will look similar; use the same target values on a single monitor, and over time it will always display the same colours. Profiling is the process of measuring the colour capabilities of a device, and how it reproduces colour. These measurements, used in colour conversions by your operating system and applications, are saved as a computer file called an ICC profile. When you view an image in Photoshop, for example, the colours or tones are being converted from the image colour space to the monitor profile, before going via the graphics card to the monitor. If you haven’t got an accurate monitor profile, then a default one will be used, which will not reflect the behaviour of your monitor. Monitor calibration systems, such as X-Rite’s i1 Display Pro, come with a colorimeter - a device for measuring colour, and software to load on your computer, to enable you to calibrate and profile your monitor. The i1 Display Pro costs around £175, is easy to use, and very accurate.Your monitor should be calibrated about once a month. A good quality monitor, properly calibrated and profiled, will reproduce your images accurately, and can be trusted. Colours will be accurate, greys will be neutral and you’ll see better highlight and shadow detail. To ensure your monitor remains accurate, it should be recalibrated every month. One last thing. I used the phrase ‘digital darkroom’ earlier. Often used to describe the processing of images, it also has an important literal meaning. The environment around your monitor should be SILVERPRINT.CO.UK FACEBOOK/SILVERPRINT

neutrally coloured and dim. Excessive ambient light falling on your monitor, or brightly coloured surroundings, will mean that your eyes may struggle to fully adapt to the image on the monitor. The influence may be small, but then so may be the tweaks and edits you are doing to an image. Capture & Processing Assuming that you are shooting RAW then with a profiled and calibrated monitor you can begin to make tweaks to your images with the confidence that the image you are looking at is accurate. There are tools to help you to adjust and colour manage RAW images. The most popular one is X-Rite’s ColorChecker Passport, which consists of a test target and some software.You take a shot of the test chart, process it through the software and it creates an ICC profile for your camera and lighting. It’s used a lot by fashion and fine art photographers and can really improve the colour accuracy of a shot. However, for those shooting pure black and white it’s probably not the best tool. Datacolor’s SpyderCube though is excellent for getting the tonality of an image spot on. The SpyderCube has white areas for setting highlights, grey for mid-tones and a great black trap for the shadows. With a few clicks you can get much better tones out of an image and then apply the same settings to other shots from the shoot. If you are shooting colour then the choice of RGB working space, the ICC profile that Photoshop uses while editing images and that you convert the RAW image into, is vital. The choices are sRGB, Adobe RGB or ProPhoto RGB. sRGB is the default for most software but is a small colour space. Adobe RGB is bigger and better and the most common choice. ProPhoto RGB is very large and can be a little difficult to handle but is the default for Adobe Lightroom. For the black and white photographer though all working spaces can display a similar range of tones so the choice is less important. They all share the same gamma of 2.2 and so show tones pretty much the same. If you want to edit your images in grey scale rather than RGB then the best working space is Gamma 2.2. If you remember I recommended you mentioned that monitor calibration is often done to the same gamma or tone curve value, 2.2. So consistency with the working space makes sense. Output To get an accurate print from an inkjet printer you need a printer profile. Most paper manufacturers have ICC profiles for combinations of their media with common inkjet printers available for download. A printer profile enables the software printing an image to tune the output for a particular printer and paper combination and so print as accurately as possible. Many paper re sellers will provide a free printer profiling service. They’ll send you a special test chart of around 1000 colour patches to print along with some instructions, you then post the print to them and they measure it with a very accurate colour measuring device called a spectrophotometer and then email you back an ICC profile. Similar services that you have to pay for are available as well if your paper re seller doesn’t offer the service.You can also buy the equipment to profile your own printers. X-Rite’s i1 Photo Pro 2 system sells for around £1200, which means you have to using a lot of different papers or printers for it to be worth buying your own kit. Most printer profiles are made by measuring a full range of colours, and of course neutrals and near neutrals are an important part of that range. A good printer profile will produce a neutral print of a black and white image, and of course if you want a sepia or other slightly toned print they will print those accurately as well. It is also possible to produce profiles for the Advanced Black and White modes some printers have, modes that mostly just use the black inks. The Quad Tone RIP (http://www.quadtonerip.com) is a very inexpensive piece of software designed for monochromatic printing and includes a module for creating grey ICC profiles for inkjet printers. Using the Advanced Black and White modes with good profiles will create prints with richer tones and depth. What you see is what you get When your workflow and equipment is properly colour managed you will get the results you want with the minimum of fuss, just as if you controlled your traditional dark room processes well you’d get better prints. A colour managed monitor will show highlight and shadow detailed that would be lost on an uncalibrated monitor, and grey will be grey not slightly green or magenta. A profiled printer will reproduce the image from the screen as accurately as possible, retaining the tones and neutrals so you get a good print without endless rounds or printing, editing and then printing again. Any investment in colour management rapidly pays for itself and you’ll be able to spend more time behind the camera and less time in front of a desk.


FREE PERMAJET ICC PROFILE SERVICE The printer, ink, and paper combination will all contribute and have an effect on your final prints. All manufacturers use different paper coatings and ink formulations which cause these variations.

The only way to correct this is to work with colour profiles whether they are generic (created on a single selected printer) as a starting point or to be 100% accurate, ones that have been custom/bespoke created specifically from your printer, ink and paper combination.

WHY USE ICC PROFILES? An ICC profile will ensure that you produce perfectly colour balanced prints every time. Each paper will vary in base, texture characteristics, ink absorbency and coating layer technology so you will need a separate profile for each paper type with your printer. Profiles are extremely useful, eliminating time, ink and paper wastage. Jan Pietruszka

WHY DO THE COLOURS THAT I SEE ON MY MONITOR NOT ALWAYS MATCH MY PRINTS FROM THE PRINTER?

DO YOU FIND THAT THE COLOURS OF YOUR PRINTED IMAGE DO NOT MATCH WHAT YOU SEE ON YOUR MONITOR? ICC Profiling is extremely important to anyone wanting to print images that match their monitor, avoiding the hassle of guesswork adjustments and wasted time, paper and ink. PermaJet has been offering this service to its customers for 10 years by providing the very highest quality ICC Profiles produced with some of the most technically advanced equipment.

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pj-silverprint-332x255.indd 1

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18 21/09/2012 15:58


collodion Rosie Welsh chose collodion photography to explore in her finals at St Martins; she was taught by Sean Mackenna, who came from the radically different discipline of photography in American Civil War re-enactment. A discussion chaired by Martin Reed R Fundamentally speaking I think there’s been a resurgence - within the art world - of traditional processes and mediums, specifically with reference to photography. Many people feel the need to usurp the digital age by focussing on the real and the tangible. My interest in Wet Plate has stemmed from this idea. M Where do you think the resurgence came from, did it wash over from the US? R Yes I would say it began in the US with the Ostermans and has since spread to European countries like Paris and now in London there’s a growing interest in the process. M What led you both to collodion? Sean, in your case you were following American Civil War re-enactment. Was that your principal interest? S the Civil War re-enactment was what I used to do – I was seriously ill with peritonitis in1999, and I wasn’t really well enough after that to do the Civil War stuff. Then I thought, well I still want to do the re-enacting because I enjoy it – I’ll do photography. And at first I was going to see if I could do some sort of dry-plate ferrotype – there are dry plate ferrotype processes. But I very fortunately found Bob Zabers forum, and the details were on that. Through his forum I found Carey Lea and The Silver Sunbeam, the original manuals. And I thought I’ll give it a go, I’ll make it really as it was. The thing that really gets me about the process is that I do everything – I start with the glass and the chemicals, and I finish up with my own albumen paper, and it’s as the process was in the 1850’s or ‘60’s.You do the process completely, you’re in complete control. M Yes, you’ve completely unshackled yourself from the manufacturer. Bringing up the term ‘syntax’, photographing with wet plate imposes very strict controls on the way you work, do you see that as a strength, that it’s confining you into a certain way of operating? S It concentrates the mind marvelously. I restrict myself to still lives these days but I’ll set it up and spend the morning working just to get one photograph that I want. I might do a positive like a tintype or an ambrotype, and do a negative as well so I can do prints, but I’ll confine myself to that one image, trying to get it as I see it. M Rosie, how do you find working in this very constrained way? R If you put some thought into the planning process SILVERPRINT.CO.UK FACEBOOK/SILVERPRINT

– choosing how and where to photograph – it can be fairly manageable. They used to take kits out into the field so it used to be portable, after all.

Whereas you might have come home with half a dozen undeveloped dry plates and then find none of them are any good.

S …if you’re organised – when I used to do the historical re-enactments I took my darkroom tent with me. And of course the whole business, being the wet collodion process, you coat the plate, you sensitise it, you take the photograph, you go back into the darkroom tent, you process it, and fix it. That all has to be done within a relatively short period of time. There were dry collodion processes that people tried but they were much slower.

And there is a certain pleasure, as the image comes up when you’re developing, and you can see it’s coming up well. Because it’s all so very quick. Normal modern photography it’s all temperature and development and you don’t see it developing, but with this you’re actually holding the plate and you’re actually watching as it comes up, you know within 20 or 30 seconds whether it’s any good or not, any it’s pnly going to take a minute or two to process, and then it’s into the fix and you’re there. Well, you’re either there or you’re not!

M What led you to collodion Rosie? R I was feeling dissatisfied with the act of simply pressing a button to take a photograph. So I went on a journey to discover and tick off various different processes in the darkroom. I got my hands on the book Spirits of Salts and went through it methodically, trying out all kinds of toning and silver emulsion coating, but it still wasn’t enough for me. It was about being there from beginning to end, creating a photograph completely from scratch. So I started looking around and came across Wet Plate Collodion in a book and got really enthusiastic about wanting to do it. I built a darkroom in my flat and continued from there, building equipment, buying cameras and continually testing, trying and failing. Nothing was happening at first; I was getting no reaction whatsoever. Eventually I stumbled across Sean online and after visiting him and learning about it all from a true Wet Plate veteran, I finally managed to produce an image. M So it was the thing of actually creating an image in the camera, rather than making a print in an alternative process which was important? R It’s

all about the physical nature of the whole process and that you’re actually making this entirely by yourself, the art of Wet Plate and for me, personally, coming from a background in sculpture, I found that being so involved with the process was more rewarding than using film. There’s something quite miraculous about the wet plate, and coming at it the way I have the more you get nothing, the more you really want it. S One of the things about wet collodion, particularly when you’re doing it in the field is that you don’t come back with any dud exposures. Because you have to process at the point, if you make an exposure and it’s no good you just wipe off the plate and pour another one. So if you go out with half a dozen plates you know you’re coming back with half a dozen decent exposures.

M So there is a parallel with digital in that sense, it doesn’t go off to a lab and disappear for a week or two. R Yes, that’s one of the greatest qualities. And now we’re so oversaturated with digital images, bringing Wet Plate back is very exciting. M Rosie, is this a technique you think maybe you’re just visiting, or are you going to stay with it for a long time. R I’ve been working with it for three years now and I still suffer the occasional technical issue because there’s so much to learn in terms of the process, it’s a lifelong commitment. M Getting working with it, has it been very difficult, in terms of sourcing equipment & materials? R It can be a bit of a nightmare because I’ve been shooting in a studio rather than outside, so I haven’t got the natural light, which is the key ingredient. You can’t use tungsten light, so I had to build my own lights... S It’s like photographing in the dark, it looks perfectly light to you, but as far as the collodion process is concerned the lights aren’t there! You need fluorescent lights indoors, because there’s enough UV in fluorescent lighting, and if you get a big enough bank of tubes you get reasonably short exposures. R It hurts your eyes a bit at first so you’ve got to adjust to it. I built two big lighting troughs. On one there’s 2 long aquarium lights, and on the other there are 20 light bulbs, ‘SAD’ ones that emit UV rays. So that was quite a feat. And that’s the thing, everything with this process, every time I thought I was ready to go, and I had all the equipment built I’d find one more thing that I needed – and then they don’t sell it in this country or they’re discontinuing it. For example, I bought screw fit light bulbs and now I find out they’re discontinuing the baton holders for that particular model! So there’s quite a lot of crawling around. To get the glass to fit in the first place I tried to adapt a normal dark slide and I found really thin glass that took me a week or so. All the time you’re building on what you’ve learned and every time you think you’re ready, you’re not. M Health & safety – quite an issue.You’ve been doing this in a college environment? R I was doing it in my bedroom, I wouldn’t recommend this!


M But the traditional way, as demonstrated by Scully & Osterman uses cadmium salts in the sensitiser, potassium cyanide as fixer…at what point do you jump out and say I can’t do it this way. There’s a positive aspect to using cyanide isn’t there? S So they say. Carey Lee, the first 50 pages is the beginners section, and he ends this with about 30 notes, and one of them is don’t use potassium cyanide! Now this is an American writing in 1867, don’t use potassium cyanide, quite unnecessary. And he’s right – ordinary hypo works ok, but if you’re doing positives, one of the advantages of cyanide was the colour of the finished positive, and the fact the cyanide would tend to bleach out the shadows a wee bit, so giving a better contrast. But if you use ammonium thiosulphate, this too, it works very fast, and I understand it can also bleach a little if you leave them in, although I’ve never found it necessary to. Ammonium thiosulphate is particularly useful if you’re working in the field, because using a strong solution a tintype will be completely fixed in half a minute, which means due to the nature of the collodion coating it will wash much more easily than modern film. Plates I’ve made in the field will only have been washed for 3 or 4 minutes in changes of water, and are very permanent. M There’s an enormous historical record which seems very permanent, so this doesn’t seem have been an issue. S Well most of the historical ones probably were made with cyanide which washes out quickly, but if you use ammonium thiosulphate, and a bit of care you’ll be fine. And there’s certainly no necessity to use cadmium compounds at all. There are quite satisfactory substitutes. I’ve imitated cadmium compounds by using zinc, which lives next door to cadmium in the periodic table and presumably has some of the same qualities, and indeed was used in the 19’th century, you see zinc bromides & iodides mentioned in some 19’th century formulas. But one collodion I use was made with sodium iodide and sodium bromide, they both dissolve well, they’re both relatively cheap to buy, and they’re safe. And of course you are dealing with something that is a mixture of alcohol and ether, if you were stupid there could be a fire risk, but then we use other similarly inflammable things – one doesn’t smoke when pouring a collodion plate! M What of the effect of the fumes on the respiratory system? S Not really an issue, the Victorians worried about that but the thing is you don’t need to be in the dark when you pour the plate. That’s when you get what fumes you do, I normally pour my plate in my darkroom, but with the door open. I’ve never found the fumes worrying me. R The thing with ether is that some people respond to it more than others, in the past when it was used as an anaesthetic some people actually died under it…but I’ve discovered through research that only one guy who used Wet Plate ever had problems with it. There’s a slim chance, but if you’re careful with it or wear a mask you can limit the effects. And I always pour it outside. M It does seem like there’s a reputation attached to wet-plate which has been given to it by people who

haven’t much experience of it. S That’s why when I set out to try to do traditional photography, I had heard these stories, and I thought I’ll do dry plate tintypes. But then I found Bob Zarbos site, and other people seemed to be getting on quite well. I’ve never had any trouble. The main problem with ether as an anaesthetic of course is it’s flammable, and there were accidents and explosions. Whereas chloroform isn’t flammable. R But killed people as well... S Anything

that will put you to sleep will kill you if you’re put to sleep too much. M Rosie, at the moment you’re producing final prints, ambrotypes? R Not prints as such, because with collodion you can either make positive or negative plates and it is simply a matter of the length of exposure that can change the outcome and increase or decrease contrast. Currently I work mainly with positive ambrotypes as I love the look of the final image becoming almost embedded on the surface of the glass. I also find the tonal range a little softer for my purposes than that of tintypes and I’m fascinated by the contrast that is created between the fragile nature of the glass itself and the ethereal appearance of the image. M Are you going to produce negatives and carry that through to prints on albumen paper? R In the past - when I first began - I was working for six months and not seeing any results. I only got the process working 5 days before my degree show so at the time, positives were practically my sole option as it was the most efficient way to produce results. I’m quite interested in what Sean told me - that collodion has no grain - and that means that the enlarging potential is infinite. S Well, in theory if you had a perfectly poured plate and a perfect lens on the camera then you could enlarge infinitely, but of course you never do have a perfectly poured plate, but there is in theory no grain because the iodides and bromides are dissolved at molecular level. It’s not like a gelatin emulsion where you have enormous silver bromide & iodide crystals floating about in gelatin. Everything is dissolved. It’s finer grain, in a sense, than the finest grain film could ever be. R But for me it’s not necessarily about enlarging, although it’s something I have been exploring for a project. I studied sculpture, and from this viewpoint of photography the plate equates to an object.

I want to create something that is fundamentally a physical object, something precious and timeless, a tangible moment in which time is preserved.

M What’s the reaction been to your working in this traditional field – has there been any prejudice from college staff, who feel you should be embracing the cutting edge of digital? R No, not at all. Everyone was really excited and supportive. I really do feel that there’s been a resurgence of interest in traditional mediums and the level of skill involved is definitely something which intrigues many people. M I think it’s probably come out the other side now, I’m talking about 5-10 years ago, and I think in education at that time digital was perceived as being the pinnacle. R I found exclusivity, that’s what I found.You encounter a lot of exclusivity whilst trying to break into the world of photography, although that said, I feel like attitudes are changing and during the three years I’ve been working with the process as more people come on board more resources have started surface and it’s gradually becoming more accessible. This is all very exciting and the process will continue to prosper as long as the price of silver nitrate doesn’t increase too much. M It always will be an elitist sort of area to work in, but it would be good if the hurdles that you have to jump could be simplified a bit – has that been the most difficult thing, actually finding all the sources for the chemicals, equipment, all the different things you have to bring together. R Yes, because I went into Sean’s darkroom and tried to photograph it in my mind, as I didn’t have a camera to hand! I then went out and tried to recreate all the little bits of equipment that he uses that are integral to the process. M So it’s very important to have a teacher then, you would say, someone who has experience who you can work with? S Well it certainly helps. I managed to start partly through luck, because if you have a success the first time you do it, then you know you can do it, and if it goes wrong for say the next 3 times, you know it works. So I was lucky the first time I did it. But I looked very hard to see if I could find somebody ten years ago, and I could find nobody who did it. R The

key things are the formulas and getting hold of the correct ones, because I tried out so many from reading forums that were just useless. Until Sean showed me the Carey Leas manual, I had previously looked at some old manuals for reference, but they were all very confusing.You really need a lot of direction in those areas, the key ingredients. M References that you go to for the most useful information on collodion? S Carey Lea is brilliant. The first 45 pages tell you everything you need to know. All you have to do is translate the American grains and drams etc into grams 20


Photography by Rosie Welsh

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and millilitres. It tells you how to make a silver bath, I always make my silver bath the way he describes. His simple negative developer is beautiful, and it works for positives as well, although I do use a special positive developer which makes the highlights more metallic and white. Warbecks no. 2 developer.

M There’s maybe a point where you’ve put so much effort into it that you can’t bale out, you’ve just got to keep on going R I’m just very stubborn, and the failures early on made me want it even more.

near east, and people started using this marvellous new writing material, which was much better than clay tablets. But of course, the papyrus didn’t last archivally, so archaeologically the result was a disaster, and there are periods where no records exist because the papyrus just decayed. Whereas the clay tablets last for ever!

M Your next move Rosie, printing onto albumen paper? R I have tried albumen printing, but prefer the quality of the print on glass. M What sort of community working with collodion exists in the UK so far? R When I started, there were about ten people, to my knowledge; you probably taught most of them Sean? But over the course of three years, this has dramatically increased and new Wet Plate artists are emerging all the time.

M One of the motivating factors, your reaction possibly to digital? R I did my dissertation on the mass consumption of images, their over saturation and how this is devaluing all those significant moments previously captured by ‘real’ photography. I sometimes feel like we’re “drowning in a sea of images.”

R Taking it back to photography, we’ve progressed so rapidly in the last 200 years that different avenues of the materials weren’t researched to their full potential, and now digital is eclipsing the traditional, there are gaps there that will never be filled. M Ironic also that it was really only when sophisticated computer modelling arrived that emulsion technology could be taken to the extraordinarily high levels that it reached – but that also made digital imaging possible,

S I’ve taught some of them. I prefer it to be non commercial. The Ostermans run it differently, they’re on a kind of mission, and naturally they have to charge, they couldn’t do the sort of work they do unless they charged for it. Equipment is a problem, because you do need…there are ways of converting a standard film holder to take a slightly smaller sized wet plate. It’s covered in Mark Ostermans notes, but you really need a proper wetplate back which you can fit on the camera in place of the ordinary back. R You really need access to a workshop… S …Or get one made. There’s an engineer in the States, Ray Morgonveck who runs the Sire Camera Company. My early backs that I used were made by him. R The problem for me was, being a student, I didn’t really know how much money I’d spent, but the total must have amounted to quite a lot. I tried to do it as cheaply as I could, not skimping, but just because I couldn’t go and buy everything I needed in one go, it all took longer and I made more mistakes. M Do you see it as a long apprenticeship, putting this amount of effort and investment into it? Also will it enhance the value of the work as art? R This is what I feel is quite sterile about the work I’ve shown so far, because it just shows the end of the process, it’s like an end to a journey but the journey hasn’t been described. What I need to incorporate now is that journey, so people understand what’s really involved in such an arduous process. M You have to package that into it somehow. My experience of working with students is that frequently they’ve been assessed without the assessors really understanding the depth of experience and understanding that’s gone into creating the work. S I think Rosie’s probably spent more than it should have cost – if I’d met Rosie at the beginning of this it would have been rather cheaper. Two grand is a very high price to start. By the time you’ve bought the chemicals and bits and pieces, a couple of hundred plus whatever camera you’re going to use is what it should be. Plus the cost of the lighting. R The lighting was really expensive, even though I made them myself and I bought all the parts as cheaply as possible. The light bulbs are about £15 each, and the timber was very expensive. I made stands so that the lights could move up and down, and incline. I designed everything myself, which added to the time.

Photography by Seán Mackenna Title: Lazy Jacks

S Ironically, in 100 years time, there will probably be fewer photographs remaining, because for all the mass of digital photographs taken, how many are printed that will last? M With traditional negatives, they can be held up to the light and seen as objects in themselves, and even if covered in dust a print can still be made. We’re heading into the dark ages, visually.

which eclipsed the traditional. But maybe there’s the comforting thought, that as long as you can get hold of some basic chemicals including silver salts, some collodion, or gelatin maybe, it will always be possible to work the photographic process to make a real image. And that knowledge will never be lost. Thank you both very much!

S Ironically, in the near east, everyone used to write on clay tablets, and about 8 or 9 hundred BC the Egyptians started exporting papyrus in great quantities into the 22


APPETITE

4 CREATION

Mary Quant iphone 1968 So let’s face FACTS, everyone you know from your Nanna to your 7 year old cousin possesses a mobile phone. From “The Brick”, through “the future’s bright, the future’s Orange”, renew the contract, lose the Nokia and realise you need Phone Insurance, The Millennium, Pay-As You Go for three months, your Motorola Razr forgotten, lonely and left to sit in the back of a draw, onto O2 and the Phone Charger convention that now sits in the attic . It’s been a steep learning curve and a revelation in the art of communication and miscommunication, yes we’ve all sent texts we wish we hadn’t at 3am in the morning. The good the bad and the ugly, in just 30 years we’ve had a fresh taste of the future with every phone we’ve received. Somehow though they were the warm up acts to the iphone.

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When I held it for the first time in my grubby mitts, little did I know the true impact it would have on my simple and complicated life. Used for the majority of time to avoid any eye contact with the human race when riding on public transport or waiting for friends, it does everything, it helps me with everything, it knows everything and yet still the nerd in all of us screams for more! If it were an athlete, it would be the genetic child of Daley Thompson and Jessica Ennis, a DNA monster running over mountains and high jumping buildings. We move forever forward and with the imminent arrival of the iphone5 we will witness the birth of a billion new Apps. Yes, even though the modern phone is a ridiculously smart petite world of

Artwork by THE TROUBLE WITH JO Photography by Jo O’Hanlon

engineering, there is a parallel universe. One where we can turn this telephone into a spirit level? You laugh, yet my bathroom cabinet looks perfectly straight and I don’t have a metre long piece of yellow painted steel sitting at the back of a wardrobe! So with the unstoppable revolution, we thought a serious look at the apps that exist in

force that is the digital it was time to take available photographic the techno sphere.

Androids, Blackberrys and iphones are all welcome… Here’s what we found;


FOTOMETER PRO So first up is this classy little number, the light meter comes with a leather case! It’s made in Hong Kong and visually looks like the old SEKONIC L398 Light Meter. “The App supports reflected and incident mode of measurement, so you can stand far and point towards the object of interest or place it right next to the subject for measurement. The meter covers ISO value from 25 to 6400 with 1/3 EV stepping, and it covers aperture value from 0.95 to 1000 - allowing you to measure exposure value for a huge aperture expensive lens all the way down to a home made pinhole camera ! After measuring the current luminance and adjusting the EV wheel to fine adjust light intensity for your object of interest - it is time to take the picture. We’ve integrated a count-down timer at the back of our meter, after everything is set, just click the timer button to start counting down - this feature is especially useful for pinhole photographers.” So that’s the sell from the online boys and girls, I’ve put it in the hands of our reality experts here in the shop.

Verdict Right I’m not gonna lie, I had a go on this for 4 minutes and almost drowned my iphone. If you’ve used Photoshop, Logic, InDesign, sod it if you’ve ever used a Remote Control in your life, then give this one a large swerve! Plus the sales pitch above was ripped straight from Bucket Labs, which is slightly concerning, as they spent a whole week up to their necks in computer code, designing templates, making videos and then lost the will to live when they actually had to sell their beloved product to an English speaking market, which I’ve heard is pretty large? Finally you can’t have a Poster on an iphone, it’d be a flyer at best and if you did make a Phoster for your birthday then nobody would come. Leave it. EASY RELEASE The other end of the spectrum here. Easy Release has been designed by somebody who actually cried whilst holding a biro and a clipboard. Most probably on the current X Factor drive. It’s a portable Model release form that you fill in, sign, the model/subject

Verdict Nice little bit of kit, beautifully designed and pretty handy if you’ve left your Gossen at home. Seems to over expose in normal conditions but let’s not forget what this is, which is a 69p app on your phone! Could get you out of jail on a forgetful day. iWATERMARK Next up is the you take will be that if you took one would be a

When you create a watermark you can easily adjust its scale, opacity, font, color and angle. Do everything using the touch interface on iOS and Android devices.

PHOSTER Next up is an app that’s spelt wrong! Here’s the pitch; This App is for you to create posters to promote and invite your friends at your party, concert, birthday etc. You will share your created posters with your friends via facebook, twitter, tumbler, and email. With stylish templates which are already within the application, you will be able to create posters without great effort. When you get the job done of first step making posters, you can utilize various effects and decorates to complete the chic posters your own.

Brilliant, straight in to the Circus talk, “Roll up for Flying Pachyderms and Fire Breathing Clowns!” Verdict It’s not amazing, it’s a very simple form of Photoshop, very simple I impress and you know what, it’s good. Excellent for £1.99. It’s not for Professionals, it’s perfect for some nice snaps that you’ve taken on your iphone and fancy smartening them up. Helps get your eye in and your head around some simple and very important techniques and language. Back to basics, which is never a bad thing! HELLO PHOTO “Long live film” they proclaim, “we know it’s not dead!”. Listen sweetheart, we’ll still be watching a reel of Charlie Chaplin’s “Great Dictator” whilst the hard drive containing mankind has crashed. The aim of Hello Photo is to allow old people to scan their priceless negatives, I think? You can use the phone as a camera or a light box, get to choose 35mm or 120mm formats, create contact sheets etc. However if we rewind it a little, you will need 2 iphones? You’ll need one as the light box and one as a camera. Expensive app to get up and running that, but most households have two iphones? Then you’ll have to buy the app twice, one app for each phone. I’ll stop now.

8mm I absolutely love this app! Plus my lady’s been using it, so it looks like it’s also got her seal of approval. Sure Super 8 is beautiful, Spielberg made “Duel” on it, I get to run around with a gun for a camera, which was my favourite activity when I was touring around a sizzling Florence,Italia, 5 years ago. The only problem is that I still haven’t developed the two cartridges I shot. It’s £15 for the cartridge and £15 to get it developed, say with Stanley Productions, Wardour St, London. So £30 for 3 and half minutes per cartridge is a pretty big hole in the pocket. Then I’ll need a projector, so instead I’ll end up digitising it? So let’s get this straight, I’m gonna spend £45 for a digital file?

OK so this is how it works. Take or select a photo then choose from a selection of included example watermarks (both text and graphics) or add your own text or graphic watermark. Your customized watermark can be text, business logo or your signature. Then from a roller select one of these and instantly watermark any photo.

Let’s move it on.

FOCUSOID can do something amazing!

Verdict This is similar to making a sandwich without bread. Buy yourself a half decent scanner, get your negs out and put the kettle on. The quality will be decent from a budget scanner and you won’t have wasted your time on a half baked idea, sold by people who haven’t shaved yet!

idea that every photograph a Cindy Sherman. Or maybe a million photographs then Cindy? I’m not sure either.

Verdict It’s free, so let’s take that into account from the off. After that fact though you ‘re wasting valuable seconds of your life. Sure it works but let’s think about this...I’m gonna take 100 holiday snaps and iwatermark them all and then slap them up on facebook ? Time consuming and slightly pointless. The reviews aren’t great either, crashes a lot and you’ll need to upgrade to use it if you’re a professional.

effects.

signs and a witness signs.You can also take a photo of the model/subject and send the signed agreement to your email. Verdict Ridiculously simple and very effective. I filled it out in 3 minutes. No paperwork to lose and it reminded me that with Winter now approaching fast that I’ll need to get one of those fake pens for the touch screen on my iphone whilst wearing gloves. Which you will need for this app, the pen not the gloves, as with only my nail my signature came out as Tom Moon. Ooof £6.99 for an app though is a bit pricey, so unless you really need this, then leave it off the Christmas List! FOCUSOID Turn any of your iPhone photos into professionally looking stylish pictures. Focusoid permits to easily simulate different out-of-focus techniques used by professional photographers, like Shallow Focus, Depth of Field or Tilt Shift

Verdict 8mm cost me £1.49 and I get 9 film effects, 8 lens options, camera front or back filming options, flash and old gate clacking audio if I fancy it or not. HD, 2xAspect Ratios (usual suspects) and then there’s the Frame Jitter function which simply helps you with “hangover hand!” Easy to use, fun and with some useful filters, which seems to be the general consensus on iTunes. Conclusion The 8mm app makes me want to get those cartridges dev’d and transferred. So it’s inspiring in a strange way, this app should tempt me back to film and that is maybe the lesson learned. It’s one that I’ve been preaching for a while now and it’s simply choice. The ever expanding world of digital offers consumers and creatives almost an unlimited choice of products and goodies. However so much of the future seems consistently connected to the past. The look, design and functionality with the best of these Apps are heavily based on giving you options that were available 40, 50 years ago. It would be a shame if we were to lose some of our past, as our future maybe lost without it.

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I’VE SEEN THE LIGHT... Liquid Photographic Emulsion, also known as Liquid Light or Silver Gelatin, is a silverbased sensitizer designed for applying on any surface, exposing with an enlarger, and processing in conventional black & white chemistry. It is virtually the same emulsion as found on ordinary photographic paper, but in a liquid form and can be coated on a wide range of 2D and 3D surfaces. It offers the freedom to produce images on the material of your choice, such as hand-made paper, plaster, fabric, glass, ceramics, rubber, metal, painted surfaces, wood, plastic, canvas, walls, stones - endless creative possibilities here, including, as featured on the cover of Silverprint+ Creative 1, images printed on a pair of VANS by Scott Atkinson. Scott is a customer of ours and used our very own Silverprint Liquid Emulsion called SE1. Our SE1 Emulsion is a normal contrast bromide emulsion, which is versatile and easy to use. The contrast of it is between grade 2 and 3. The high silver content allows a certain degree of dilution with water, making it more economical. The emulsion has a substantial concentration of high bloom gelatin, meaning it adheres very well to various surfaces, very often without the need to use subbing solution as a primer. Processing is as for normal paper- the emulsion is quite robust, and does not usually need hardening, or the

use of slow fixing agents. The image colour is neutral to slightly warm-black, and it reacts well to toners of all types including selenium, also to Lith development. We provide the SE1 emulsion in 2 sizes, 250ml and 1 litre bottles. There are other brands of Liquid Emulsion available on the market, including single-graded ones manufactured by MACO, and a very reasonably priced Foma emulsion, all of which we stock at Silverprint. The best way to learn about using the Liquid Emulsion is to get your hands on a copy of Silver Gelatin: A User’s Guide to Liquid Photographic Emulsion, proudly produced by Silverprint. The book covers the great range of artistic possibilities and technical aspects of emulsion work exhaustively, and also contains extensive colour portfolios. Now in its 3’rd edition, we recommended this book to everyone wanting to work seriously with emulsion.

The first section features the work of top photographers and artists working with silver emulsion. The second section is a clear and concise technical guide, taking the reader through all the necessary background information needed to produce exciting images on a multitude of surfaces. Technical sub-sections detail stepby-step the ins and outs of: Base Selection, Emulsion Coating, Printing and Processing, Finishing and Storage, Troubleshooting, Camera Plates and application of further techniques including toning. Formulas of print developers, stop baths, bleachers, toners and the emulsions themselves complete this exhaustive publication. SE1 Emulsion 240ml/£35.52 Silver Emulsion by Sarah Jones & Martin Reed/£20

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Like us on Facebook Please enter the promotional code above within the Voucher Code section of the On Line Silverprint Basket before submitting your order. Parameters: 10% off your next web order. Discount is not valid on film stock products. Discount is limited to one web order per customer. Valid until 31st OCT 2012 for UK Customers Only.

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APUG www.apug.org/forums/home.php FADU www.film-and-darkroom-user.org.uk/forum/fadu_ front_page.php

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APUG and FADU are excellent. Full of knowledge and expertise these two forums pretty much cover it all.

O R CHAT

Too much time spent on the internet in chat rooms or playing games is said to have a negative impact on social relationships and school achievements, not to mention development of a vitamin D deficiency. The internet is the perfect tool to show your best side, you have complete control in how you present yourself but nothing is comparable to living in the real world. Having said that we all know that the internet is great for initial research and there are many forums and chat rooms available to ask questions. We thought a point in the right direction could be a good idea.

Don't be intimidated though as the members possess different skills, knowledge and experiences. Plus the participation in using this type of sounding board can help you overcome difficulties, gain confidence and generate new ideas. They also need knew members and are both very welcoming. Guardian Camera Club www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/series/cameraclub Also the Guardian online have a Camera Club. They set projects every month you can work along with, giving you an assignment to practice your technique. You can submit these images online, and the best or worst are selected whereupon an expert provides feedback, compliments and tips on how to improve. PHOTO FORUM www.photo-forum.org A supportive non-exclusive London group meet up in the pub. It runs every second Thursday of the month 6pm - 8pm (currently closed for the summer). It is a place for photographers working across the spectrum to bring images, ideas, photo stories, approaches and any work-in-progress for debate and criticism.

PHOTOGRAPHERS GALLERY www.thephotographersgallery.org.uk Another place to visit in London is the internationally renowned Photographers Gallery just off Oxford Street. They have numerous and regular talks and discussions, including one every Friday lunchtime, where professional and enthusiastic amateur photographers visit to discuss "My Favourite Photo". They have a camera obscura on the top floor during the summer and every 3 - 4 months they host 'Folio Forum'. Professionals, Amateurs or Students can submit a small portfolio of work to them, and if selected you will get personalised advice and feedback about the next step from someone respected in the field. It can be really interesting even if your work is not chosen. Watch their website for the next session date and for further details on all their events. Their current exhibition should be of interest too, "Fresh Faced and Wild" opened on the 15th September, also made up of work submitted online. It’s their annual exhibition showcasing the work of recent graduates, catch it while you can to see what you are up against. MEET UP www.meetup.com Their site contains details of groups and when they...well, when they meet-up! Including ‘Just Photography! The London Photography Group’. A group of friendly enthusiasts who visit festivals, photography exhibitions and walks centered around photography locations. Have a look for events in your area.

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Silverprint FOUR CORNERS Located in Bethnal Green, Four Corners facilities include black and white darkrooms, 32”RA4 colour print processing, thirteen DeVere enlargers for 35mm to 10x8 formats and a self contained, fully accessible colour darkroom. Alternative printing facilities, workshops, courses, studio space for hire. Four Corners 121 Roman Road London E2 0QN T: 0208 9816111 www.fourcornersfilm.co.uk PHOTOFUSION Brixton based, Photofusion offers darkroom hire (4 b&w and 3 colour enlargers), RA4 colour machine (prints up to 20x24’). B&W and C41 film processing from 35mm to 5x4. Analogue and digital courses. Photofusion 17a Electric Lane London SW9 8LA T: 0207 7385774 www.photofusion.org RAPID EYE Located near Old Street and apart from offering services like C41 and B&W film processing and C-type printing, they also have a colour and black and white darkroom for hire, with 50% student discount on all darkroom services,

FOTOSYNTHESIS Fotosynthesis is a great community initiative led by Ingrid Guyon and Valentina Shivardi. It is located in the old Lilian Baylis school, the facilities include a black and white darkroom for hire as well as a studio. It also runs a variety of courses and workshops in film processing, printing and alternative processes. Fotosynthesis CIC Lilian Baylis Old School Lollard Street London SE11 6PY T: 07814 642076 www.fotosynthesiscommunity.org.uk DOUBLE NEGATIVE Located near Homerton station and offers a range of brilliant courses focused mainly on alternative traditional printing techniques including wet plate Collodion, Van Dyke and pinhole. They offer darkroom hire at very competitive prices. Double Negative Darkroom 178a Glyn Road London E5 0JE T: 07936 522513 www.sebsussmann.co.uk NORTH LONDON DARKROOM Located in Tottenham Hale and offers professional community photographic darkroom and film editing suites. North London Darkroom Milmead Industrial Estate, Tottenham Hale London N17 9QU

Rapid Eye 79 Leonard Street London EC2A 4QS T: 0207 7299292 www.rapideye.uk.com CAMERA CLUB Founded in 1885, The Camera Club based in Kennington and is one of the oldest and most distinguished photographic clubs in the world, it offers studio, darkroom and digital facilities as well as variety of events and workshops.

DOWNTOWN DARKROOM Bring all your black and white films for top quality processing and prints to Silverprint – Sharon from Downtown Darkroom offers traditional hand processing of black and white film in all sizes, as well as superb quality prints on Resin and Fibre based papers.

The Camera Club 16 Bowden Street London SE11 4DS T: 0207 5871809 www.thecameraclub.co.uk

Downtown Darkroom 12 Valentine Place London SE1 8QH T: 07712 401701 E: enquiries@downtowndarkroom.co.uk

Darkroom

Workshops & Courses

Film Processing

Studio Facilities Printing Services

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THE IMAGE The Image is located in the West End and specializes in the production of black and white fine art photographic printing and high quality black and white film processing.

LABYRINTH Located at Four Corners, Labyrinth offers C41 Processing (35mm 10x8), Analogue Printing up to 30”x40”, Film Scanning Hasselblad Flextight up to 5x4,Flat Bed Scanning.

The Image Lower Ground 24-25 Foley Street London W1P 7LA T: 020 75805020 www.imageblackandwhite.com

Labyrinth 121 Roman Road London E2 0QN T: 02087099961 www.labyrinthphotographic.co.uk

ISIS Isis London, located in Clerkenwell, offers E6, C41 and B&W film processing (up to 8 x 10”!), high quality scanning and printing services, as well as studio facilities hire. Isis London 14a Rosebery Avenue and 3 Warner Yard London EC1R 4TD T: 020 7833 8335 www.isislondon.co.uk ARTFUL DODGERS Based in Farringdon, Artful Dodgers offer film processing (E6 35mm, B&W 35mm-120, C41 35mm-8x10), fine art c-type hand prints, mounting & finishing, scanning (drum, imacon, flatbed), creative retouching. Artful Dodgers Studio B10 Hatton Square Business Centre 16-16a Balwdwins Gardens London EC1N 7RJ T: 0207 242 2250 www.artfuldodgersimaging.com LOMOGRAPHY Lomography stores, located in Soho and East London, offer a huge selection of cameras, accessories, books and fashion items, as well as cameras, accessories and books, as well as film processing services and various workshops and events. Lomography Store 3 Newburgh Street London W1F 7RE Lomography East London Store 117 Commercial Street London E1 6BG

PRINTSPACE The Printspace is one of London’s best places for quality printing, mounting and framing services. It is based near Old Street and offers C-type and Giclee prints on selection of quality papers, courses in digital printing and Photoshop, Hasselblad X5 scanner and retouching booths for hire. The Printspace 74 Kingsland Road London E2 8DL T: 0207 7391060 www.theprintspace.co.uk GENIE IMAGING Based in Wandsworth, Genie is a photographic laboratory specialising in printing, retouching, restoration and manipulation. B&W, C41 and E6 film processing and scanning (35mm - 5x4) at very competitive prices. Genie Imaging Unit 4d Jaggard Way London SW12 8SG T: 0208 7721700 www.genieimaging.co.uk BAYEUX Bayeux is the West End’s top place for printing (hand printing and digital), scanning (drum and flatbed), film processing (C41 and B&W 35mm - 5x4), mounting and framing (aluminium, foamex, etc). Bayeux 78 Newman Street London W1T 3EP T: 0207 4361066 www.bayeux.co.uk METRO IMAGING Metro Imaging is located in EC1 area, they offer high quality printing services, film processing, retouching, scanning, finishing and framing. Metro Imaging 32 Great Sutton Street London, EC1V 0NB T: 0207 8650000 www.metroimaging.co.uk


PHOTOGRAPHY COURSES IN CENTRAL LONDON

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3D We explore the new world of 3D. The future of cinema in the 80’s was cast aside when it was hailed as a commercial failure. The last few years though has seen it rise from the ashes and we’ll explore it’s true beginnings. SILVERPRINT WORKSHOPS We will be hosting a series of workshops at our London Store throughout Autumn. Colour Film Processing, Cyanotype, Silver Emulsion and Alternative Processes will all be covered so please keep an eye out on our website. We’ll give you a round up in the next issue. SECOND HAND CAMERAS Silverprint will launch a range of second hand cameras within our London Store. We’ll review the best cameras around for those looking to get their paws on a bargain. A BIG SHOUT! Finally thanks to Anna, Indie and Jojo for all their energy in getting this paper created, shot and locked off. The sound track to this Issue has definitely been Totally Enormous Extinct Dinosaurs “Trouble”, which has kept me company through a few too many late nights. Keep up, we’ve already started work on the next issue! SILVERPRINT.CO.UK FACEBOOK/SILVERPRINT

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the home of alternative photography www.silverprint.co.uk SILVERPRINT.CO.UK FACEBOOK/SILVERPRINT

SILVERPRINT+ CREATIVE#1  

Welcome to the first edition of Silverprint+ Creative. We are a photographic shop and online retailer based in Waterloo, London. We have a h...

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