Issuu spring2018

Page 1

Gateway To The

Copper Corridor Visitors Guide For • Clifton • Morenci • Safford • San Carlos • Globe • Miami • Superior • Florence • Queen Valley • Gold Canyon • Apache Junction • Apache Trail • Payson • Pine • Strawberry

Spring 2018

Free



Table of Contents

Apache Junction

Superstition Mountain Museum welcomes families.............4&5

Gold Canyon

Hieroglyphic Trail in Gold Canyon............................................6 Spring in Gold in Gold Canyon..................................................7

Queen Valley

Spring and summer traditions Queen Valley Style....................9

Superior

Boyce Thompson Arboretum.............................................10&11

Roosevelt

Plenty to enjoy around Roosevelt.............................................15

Young

Visit Bruzzi’s Vineyard, located in scenic Young.....................16 Young Guns passion/Phoenix Wilderness Adventures.............17

Miami

Copper Corridor’s rich history..........................................18&19

Copper Corridor Map .......................................20&21 Globe

Get ready for the annual STEMFest.........................................23 Famous Mexican food in Globe-Miami............................24&25 Stay in a bed and breakfast.......................................................26 15th annual Sunrise Challenge.................................................27 Lend me a Tenor........................................................................28

San Carlos

Explore the beauty of San Carlos.............................................29

Safford

Riggs Flat Lake on top of Pinaleno Mountains........................31 Tour the Mount Graham International Observatory.................32 Visit Roper Lake State Park.....................................................33

Clifton-Morenci

The rich history of Clifton, Arizona.........................................34 Coronado Trail Scenic Highway...............................................35 Upcoming events in Greenlee County......................................35

Pine-Strawberry

Feel the love at Pine Creek Lavender Farm.............................36 Pine-Strawberry blooms in Spring...........................................37

Payson

Gary Hardt Memorial Spring rodeo..........................................38

Gateway Staff

To advertise in the Gateway to the Copper Corridor, contact: Sales Representatives, Kathy Riley, kriley@silverbelt.com, Sue Lewin, slewin@silverbelt.com Publisher Editorial Composing Sherri Davis David Abbott, Cassie Tafoya Eileen Terry

Arizona Silver Belt PO Box 31 298 N. Pine St. Globe, AZ 85502 928-425-7121 www.silverbelt.com

Cover wrap photo

Copper Country News PO Box 1692 298 N. Pine St. Globe, AZ 85502 928-425-0355 www.coppercountrynews.com

Pine Creek Canyon Lavender Farm in Pine, Arizona. See page 36 for full story.

3


Apache Junction

Superstition Mountain Museum welcomes families

L

ow cost or free family-oriented activities take center stage this spring and summer at the Superstition Mountain Museum, located just east of Apache Junction among the many attractions on the Apache Trail (SR 88), one of Arizona’s most scenic highways. The museum is offering free admission to the museum exhibit gallery to all moms on Mother’s Day, May 13. Children under 17 get in free with an adult, so practically the whole family can view the gallery exhibits for free. Admission for others is $2 for students over the age of 17, $4 for seniors and $5 for adults. Even though the Lost Dutchman may not have been a father, he certainly had a dad,

4

and in honor of all fathers, the same deal will be available to fathers and kids on Father’s Day, Sunday, June 17. Bring the grandparents, too, because as fathers and mothers they also will get in free to view the exhibits and artifacts in the gallery, along with the original Ted DeGrazia paintings currently on display. The Superstition Mountain Museum is a destination that family members of all ages will enjoy. The museum is situated on a scenic 15-acre site just beneath the west end of Superstition Mountain, and is loaded with historic buildings and artifacts pertaining to the history of the area, including numerous maps to the Lost Dutchman Mine.Stroll-

Priceless family memories can be captured through photos taken at the Superstition Mountain Museum. ing the grounds and nature and Movie Ranch that burned trails, peeking into the Old down in 2004, is free for all West streetfront buildings, and offers wonderful photo and visiting the barn and the opportunities. chapel from historic ApachelContinued, next page

Gateway- Spring 2018


Apache trail

Superstition Mountain Museum welcomes families

continued from previous page ...

The restored 20-stamp ore mill. The restored 20-stamp ore mill is a piece of living history. The General Store in the barn offers icy cold sarsaparilla, and the museum gift shop/bookstore offers

Gateway - spri 2018

Photo by Jack Olson

unique items and a full range of southwest book titles for all ages. Bring your cameras. Families are even invited to bring a picnic and enjoy it at one of the picnic tables

under the shady trees on the grounds. Spread the word to friends and relatives and help them plan special holiday celebrations this spring. Through its participation as a Blue Star Museum, active duty military families are invited to visit and enjoy free exhibit gallery admission all summer, beginning on Memorial Day, May 28, through Labor Day, Sept. 3. The gesture is a “thank you� to U.S. military personnel and their families for their service and sacrifice. It also affords military families a way to spend quality time together without worrying about the budget. Watch for the announcement of which Old-Tyme Western movies will be

Photo by Jack Olson

Elvis Chapel at sunset.

shown free in the air-conditioned chapel on Saturday afternoons during June and July. The museum address is 4087 N. Apache Tr. (SR 88). Hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. every day. For more information, go to www.superstitionmountainmuseum.org or call 480-983-4888.

5


Gold Canyon

Hieroglyphic Trail in Gold Canyon By David Abbott Staff Writer

I

n January this year, my wife and I visited the area to decide if we wanted to relocate to the Copper Corridor to take the job as editor of the Arizona Silver Belt. Of course, the first thing I wanted to do was to check out the desert trails in the Superstition Mountains, one of my favorite places on earth. Although I was fine with scrambling over rocks on barely marked trails to high elevations, I thought it would be a good idea to find something a little less daunting so as not to put my wife off to the outdoor Arizona experience. My search finally led me to

6

the Hieroglyphic Trail in Gold Canyon, a 1.5-mile trail that winds gently through a classic Sonoran Desert canyon to a place with seasonal pools and carvings on the rocks that go back to a civilization that existed as much as 1,500 years ago. This was a special place to the ancient Hohokam and it remains a special place to this day for modern-day desert explorers. The Hieroglyphic Trail is one of the shortest and most popular hikes in the area around the Superstition Mountains. The trailhead is at the southern end of the range, beginning at the large parking lot at the east end of Cloudview Avenue in Gold Canyon.

The drive from the Superstition Freeway is tricky, with about a half dozen turns, but there are signs posted along the way to guide the vigilant hiker to the northwestern corner of the remote, suburban residential neighborhood. Although there is ample parking, the lot fills up fast on the weekends, so an early start can make it easier to find parking and the trail will not be as crowded. Carvings beleived to be made by ancient The entry has a se- Hohokam adorn the rocks at the end of ries of gates and a Hieroglyph Trail in Gold Canyon. short way in, there is Mountains, rising up 2,000 a junction with the Lost Gold- feet above to the northeast. mine Trail, a 9-mile, multi-use The trail ends beneath path that heads east to Peralta a small cliff overlooking Road. smooth volcanic rocks around Unlike many trails in the the streambed, which holds Superstitions, this short trail water well into summer, alhas a modest elevation gain though they can be murky and of 650 feet, up a gentle slope filled with algae during the winding through a cactus filled summer. canyon that becomes more The steep slopes above are rugged as it makes its way dotted with barrel cactus and north to a rocky landscape and saguaro and the petroglyphs the petroglyphs themselves. are found mostly on the far Along the way, desert lov- side of the stream. ers will be treated to forests of The rock carvings are saguaros and other Sonoran somewhat faded after being Desert natives, such as teddy exposed to centuries of harsh bear cholla, prickly pear, bar- desert weather but are still rel cactus and non-native flora quite impressive considering as well. when they were created. The basalt cliffs above the Beyond the official trail, pools offer a beautiful pan- the canyon gains height more oramic view of Gold Canyon sharply and becomes overand the Gila River plain to the grown, though the canyon can southwest, as well as the ma- be followed all the way to the jestic outcroppings and jag- Superstition Mountain ridgeged slopes of the Superstition line at about 4,600 feet. Gateway- Spring 2018


Spring in Gold Canyon

Gold Canyon

health and appearance, you’ll find CJ Miller and her NutritionScience.life team yearhere is plenty round at 6589 S. Kings to see and do in Ranch Rd., Ste. 104. spring in Gold Visitors and locals Canyon for visitors and alike will enjoy the locals alike. variety of attractions Situated at the foot of within a short drive the Superstition Mounfrom Gold Canyon, tains, the unincorporated including the SuperPinal County commustition Mountain Munity of Gold Canyon proseum, Goldfield Ghost vides stunning views of Town, Dolly Steamthe mountains and close boat, Tortilla Flat, proximity to the SuperBoyce Thompson Arstition Wilderness area. boretum. Gold Canyon is a great Historic Downplace for hiking, biking, horseback riding, campPhoto by Jack Olson town Superior, with its unique shops, resing, photography, bird- Beneath the Superstition Mountains. taurants and galleries, ing and wildlife watchis also a fun day-trip ing, and off-road vehicle tures a number of nice golf Ranch Rd. And, if you’re inuse. Trails may be accessed courses, restaurants, and spe- terested in improving your from Gold Canyon. from the Peralta Trailhead off cialty businesses. Peralta Road or from nearby Although Flaire! will be Lost Dutchman State Park. closing for the season at the For information on area end of April, fans of the boutrails, visit www.fs.usda.gov/ tique can get their Flaire! fix tonto. The Superstition Wil- year-round at the Pinetop derness area also features store, located at 1684 E. the Apache Lake Marina and White Mountain Blvd. Resort, which provides yearBoutique fans will be hapround opportunities for boat- py to know that The Mercaning, fishing, water skiing and tile at Superstition Mountain other activities. will reopen on May 1 at its The community also fea- new location at 6140 S. Kings By Sue Lewin Staff Writer

T

Gateway - Spring 2018

7



Queen Valley

Gateway - Spring 2018

9


Superior

Boyce Thompson Arboretum upcoming events

T

he Boyce Thompson Arboretum is an Arizona State Park located at Highway 60 milepost 223 near the historic copper mining town of Superior, 55 miles due east of Phoenix. Bring your own lunch: visitors are welcome to use the tables and grills shaded by trees in our picnic area. Please be aware of seasonal fire restrictions; call our staff at 520-689-2723 during daytime business hours to verify whether charcoal is allowed in our picnic area charcoal grills. Most special events are included with paid admission $12.50 for adults, $5 for ages 5-12. Summer hours resume May 1 and continue through June, July, August and September.

10

The arboretum is open daily 6 a.m. to 3 p.m., no entry after 2 p.m., so our final visitors each day have one full hour to enjoy and explore the trails and gardens.

Pictures From Our Past: Slideshow and History Talk, Sunday, May 6 at 10 a.m Phoenix historian and author Sylvia Lee guides monthly walking tours, narrating nuggets of Arboretum history while placing her anecdotes in perspective next to 1920s structures, and the very first trees planted here. We’re excited to have Sylvia host another slideshow of vintage photos projected on our big screen. During an hour inside our air-conditioned Lecture Room, Sylvia will show images of vintage historic

structures and arboretum gardens while sharing her behind-the-scenes knowledge from spending the past decade researching the history of Boyce Thompson Arboretum.

Butterfly Walk, Saturday, May 26 with Marceline VandeWater at 9 a.m. Photograph and learn about Arizona’s diverse butterfly species, such as the Empress Leilia, the Queen, and Spring Azure to name a few. Your guide, and regional butterfly expert MarceSwallowtail butterfly. line VandeWater will plore our Hummingbird-Butlead guests on a leisurely, slow-paced tour down wheel- terfly Garden, Demonstration continued, next page chair accessible paths to ex-

Gateway- Spring 2018


Superior

Boyce Thompson Arboretum upcoming events

continued from previous page

Superior

Smith Interpretive Center & Display Greenhouses

Australian Pavilion

B

D

Hig h

Tra

il

A Hummingbird &

Outback Bridge

Ba rk

Tr ail

e Blu

op Lo sh Salt Pan Bu

Aboriginal Seep Eucalyptus Forest

Telephone Picnic Area Map not to scale Please Recycle

South American Desert Exhibit

as gW

Quincho

Upland Sonoran Natural Area

Dock

Ri

Picket Post House

Cistern

dge

Magma Ridge

Pumphouse

Wing Memorial Herb Garden

Q ue

Butterfly Garden

B Heritage Rose Garden

First Aid Station

Cactus & Succulents Garden a gm Ma

Australia Desert Exhibit

il

Drover’s Wool Shed

in rK

Boojum Trees

C

Wa lka bo u

ra tT

Queen Creek

ve Sil

Chihuahuan Desert Exhibit

Gloria Wing Ong Children’s Learning Center

A

Drinking Water

Shade Gazebo

Curandero Trail

Demonstration Garden

Restroom

Steep Trail Not Accessible Difficult Trail Segment River/Wash No Hiking

Visitors’ Center & Gift Shop Sonoran Desert Exhibit

Gum

Learn Your Lizards: Summer Guided Tours, June 9, Aug. 11 at 8 a.m. Do you know the difference between tree, sideblotched, and greater earless

(520) 689-2811 Phoenix

Legend Main Loop Trail

Please help us protect the Arboretum • Stay on designated trails at all times. • All pets must be on a leash. Pet owners are responsible for cleanup. Please do your part to preserve this privilege. • Children must be closely supervised by an adult at all times. • Smoking is strictly prohibited except in the Main Parking Lot. • Do not pick flowers, fruits, or and plant parts from any plant. • Do not remove anything from the Arboretum grounds including plants, leaves, flowers, fruits, sticks, rocks, feathers or wildlife. • Do not damage or harm any plant or animal.

k rac ide T Adela

History Walking Tour with Sylvia Lee, Sunday, June 2 at 10 a.m. You may have walked through Arboretum gardens and trails a dozen times and never crossed paths with the

37615 U.S. Hwy 60 Superior, AZ 85173

ous species that call the the desert home. Casa Grande based outdoor educator Phil Rakoci will guide event participants on a walk through the amazing Arizona lizard habitat of Boyce Thompson.

h

Garden and Children’s Garden collections. Ron Rutowski returns June 23 to guide our popular butterfly walks. He will also guide on July 28 and Aug. 25.

lizards? Can you easily identify their behavior differences and specie specific Sonoran Desert adaptions? Join us at the Arboretum for an Arizona Lizard workshop to learn all about numer-

Tr ail

Greater earless lizard

Galapagos Tortoise pens. Take a moment to scan the horizon above Picket Post Mountain, can you imagine cavalry soldiers camped in this region in the late 1800s? Phoenix historian Sylvia Lee narrates this two-hour walking tour focused on the life and times of Colonel William Boyce Thompson, and his Arboretum. Read more Arboretum history; confirm event dates and times at arboretum. ag.arizona.edu.

Clevenger House

C Children’s Horticultural Garden

n Cree Q uee

D Taylor Family Desert Legume Garden High Trail

k

en

Cr

k ee

arian Area Rip

Suspension Bridge

Montrose Canyon Montrose Canyon

LEGEND

Shade Structure

200 feet

Gateway - Spring 2018

11



Superior

The Arizona Trail through the Superstitions

T

he Arizona National Scenic Trail is a complete path, stretching 800 miles across Arizona from Mexico to Utah. It links deserts, mountains, canyons, forests, communities and people. The Arizona Trail is divided into 43 passages. One local hiker tackled the Superstition Wilderness passage and it took three days and two nights for him to complete. Superstition wilderness passage changes from Sonoran desert vegetation consisting of: prickly pear, saguaro, jojoba, cholla, ocotillo, agave, palo verde, brittlebush, barrel cactus, to tall pine trees and grassy meadows as you hike. Preparing for a hike of this extent is extremely important. Gear fitting properly may not seem like a big deal, but on long hikes, you can develop hot spots which will turn into blisters, so spending the money on proper gear and pre-walking will help you find the right

Gateway - Spring 2018

fit. Traveling light is another component for a successful hike. Water is one resource that’s not readily available in the desert, so most of your weight will be in water. Every ounce makes a difference, especially on your feet. A hike of this extent would require some studying of the trail. This hiker spent about three months doing his homework. Learning the aspects of the trail, the different environments and temperature variations from day to night. Also, wear pants and long-sleeve shirts, while not absolutely necessary, they are recommended. If you don’t wear them, you run the risk coming home with a variety of scratches on your arms and legs. Not to mention the sun exposure that adds to dehydration, which is something hikers can’t afford. Along the path there are signs that are well main-

Gilbert De La Torre hiked through the Superstition Wilderness which is just one of the passages of the 800mile long Arizona Trail that travels from Mexico to Utah.

tained to help you keep your way. It was suggested doing this hike in the cooler months of the year, while temperatures are still tolerable. Be sure to check the weather before hiking in Arizona for heat advisories and especially during the monsoon season. The desert is a beautiful

dry place, but during Monsoons, the dry, hard packed ground can turn into a flash flood zone in seconds. This passage of the Arizona Trail is his favorite hike because of the beauty you can’t find anywhere else in the world. You can visit www.aztrail.org to see all the history and passages of this amazing trail.

13


Tonto Basin


Plenty to enjoy around Roosevelt

T

he beautiful Roosevelt Lake is situated 20 miles northwest of Globe, Arizona. The lake boasts both scenery as well as many recreational activities, including fishing, boating, swimming, kyaking, camping, hiking, and picnicking, among other things. At high water, Roosevelt Lake is approximately 25 miles long and up to two miles wide, with 112 miles of shoreline, making it the largest lake in central Arizona. Be sure to stop by the Visitor Center/Ranger Station, located 1.5 miles east of Roosevelt Dam. It is open seven days a week from 7:45 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and houses exhibits on both the native animals of the area as well as the building of the Roosevelt Dam. Over the past decade, the National Forest Service has worked to improve campsites and boating ramps around the lake. Facilities include 12 developed sites with more than 1,500 camp units, 80 picnic units, as well as several paved boat ramps, parking and fish cleaning stations at various loGateway - Spring 2018

cations. For more information about camping, fishing, hiking, mountain biking, wildlife viewing, cultural and natural resources, or other National Forest opportunities, contact the Tonto Basin Ranger Station, 28079 N. Arizona Hwy. 188, Roosevelt, Arizona 85545, call 928-467-3200, or go to www.fs.usda.gov/tonto. The Roosevelt Lake Marina offers a range of boat rentals, from 18-foot fishing boats to deluxe and sport pontoons to sport ski boats. The Marina is located near the visitor center, and is marked with signs. Nearby Roosevelt Resort offers more comfortable accommodations for those who want to take in the scenery, but not necessarily sleep under the stars. For those interested in the history of Roosevelt Dam, a visit to Roosevelt Cemetery is an insider’s tip. The cemetery, located at the end of Cemetery Trail, is 1.5 miles southeast of Roosevelt Dam on State Highway 188. The parking lot is accessed from Lakeview Trailer Park across from the Roosevelt Lake Visitor Cen-

Roosevelt

ards resting in the shade of a prickly pear. While snakes and scorpions are less common, be aware that this is a natural desert habitat. Park rangers are on site at both the dwellings and the visitor center located at the bottom of the path to help visitors and answer questions. The path to the lower dwellings is one-mile round trip, paved, and somewhat steep in areas. Those interested in visiting the upper cliff dwellings will be led by a ranger from the visitors’ center. Tours are offered on weekends and several weekdays from November through April. The tours leave at 10 a.m. and return at 2 p.m. and are limited to 15 persons and reservations are required. You can make a reservation by calling 928-467-2241, ext. 8450. Tonto National Monument is open daily except Dec. 25 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The trail to the lower cliff dwellings closes at 4 p.m. The visitor center offers information, exhibits, a video, bookstore, and gift shop. Facilities include restrooms and picnic areas.

ter. The trail to the cemetery consists of 250 yards of paved pathway, proceeding up a fairly steep hill. For ambitious walkers, an additional threemile, round-trip hike from the cemetery extends west along the Arizona Trail and boasts scenic views of Roosevelt Lake and the bridge. Other nearby attractions include Tonto National Monument, historic cliff dwellings of the Salado Indians, and an informative visitor center with exhibits and a bookstore. In spring, the hike up to the prehistoric ruins is a particularly enjoyable and photographable one. Desert blossoms line the paved walkway up to the lower dwellings and Arizona’s signature Saguaros tower over the visitors on all sides. It is not uncommon to see eagles and hawks soaring above in the bright blue sky, Cliff Dwellings at Tonto National or to see liz- Monument in Roosevelt, Arizona.

15


Young

Visit Bruzzi’s Vineyard located in scenic Young

B

ruzzi Vineyard is located in scenic and historic Young, Arizona. It is the first vineyard in Gila County, and their winegrapes are expertly crafted into some of the finest wines in the state. Shop their exceptional wines and fine farm products at their tasting room and farm stand at the vineyard. About the owner: James Bruzzi is the owner of Bruzzi Vineyard. A graduate of Johnson & Wales University in Providence, Rhode Island with a bachelor’s degree in International Hotel and Tourism Management, James has

16

owned several businesses before his current venture ranging from coffee shops to landscaping. James loves to travel and has been around the

world. He also does volunteer work in Haiti at every opportunity. James brings a passion for agriculture and customer service to lead our team at

Bruzzi Vineyard. About Young, Arizona: The little town of Young is one of Arizona’s best kept secrets. Located in a beautiful mountain valley, we are connected to the outside world by dirt roads and completely surrounded by the Tonto National Forest. A very historic place, Young was the setting for the Pleasant Valley war and the surrounding area has many Native American ruins dating back to the Anasazi. With our cozy inns, great restaurants, interesting shops and variety of outdoor activities, Young is an ideal place to spend a day, a week or a lifetime.

Gateway - Spring 2018


Young Guns passion is his profession

T

urning a passion into a profession is a dream for many. But for Young Guns owner Mike Beltran, it’s a vibrant reality. Mike is originally from California and raised in a small, logging and ranching town in the Sierra Nevada of Northern California. His father, a law enforcement officer and avid hunter, influenced Mike’s interest in firearms and hunting at an early age. Receiving formal gunsmith education at Colorado School of Trades in 1996, he continued to immerse himself in the firearm industry over the subsequent years. He had the unique opportunity to work under the tutelage of Ted Yost at Gunsite Academy in Paulden, Arizona. In addition,

Gateway - Spring 2018

he gained significant experience building custom Ruger revolvers while working for Gary Reeder Custom Guns in Flagstaff, Arizona. In his own shop, located in Young, Arizona, Mike specializes in the building of custom carry guns, in particular, 1911s, Ruger revolvers and Encores. You’ll find his expertise covers a wide range of firearm skills and abilities from action jobs, rifle rebarreling, muzzle brakes and more. He holds a Federal Firearms License through the ATF since 2007. Stop by, give Mike a call or shoot him an email for any questions you may have. He’s here to help with all your gunsmith needs.

Young

Phoenix Wilderness Adventures

B

ased in the Sierra An- ing experience where you do cha Mountains on the something real. eastside of Roosevelt Salome is six miles with Lake, we are a fully insured two repels, two to three watercompany permitted to operate slides (depending on the water by the U.S. Forest Service. levels and time of year) You All of our guides are quali- decend 1,000 feet in and out. fied Wilderness Medical First A sweet touch of nature for Responders and have years the experienced at heart and a of experience guiding in Ari- refreshing splash of challenge zona’s canyons. for beginners. They offer guided canyoneering, rock climbing, kayaking and adventure ranch tours will provide you with memories that will last a lifetime and that bring families and couples together through sharing an amaz- Salome Jug water slides

17


Miami

The Copper Corridor’s rich history

T

By Holly Sow he Copper Corridor earned its name from its rich mining history that spans over a century. The cities of Globe, Miami, Superior and Safford are still thriving thanks to their copper mines, but it was the discovery of silver in the hills of Globe and Miami in the 1870s that first caused settlers to set up camp. Globe was founded in 1873 as a mining camp as a result of the Globe Ledge silver claims discovered nearby and incorporated in 1876. According to local legend, Globe is named after a large spherical nugget of silver that resembled a globe found on land now belonging to the San Carlos

18

Apache Reservation. Two years after the Globe Ledge silver claims were made, the Miami silver claim was discovered a little further west. The Miami Mining Company bought the claim, but by the late 1880s the silver in the area had run out. However, the abundance of copper in the hills of GlobeMiami kept the camps alive. The town of Miami was officially incorporated in 1909 four miles west of its sister-city of Globe. In 1882, the Old Dominion Copper Mining Company purchased the Old Globe Cop-

per Company and began mass producing copper extracted from the original Globe Ledge silver claims and treated at its smelter. The mine had its ups and downs throughout the decades. In 1919, it employed over 1,400 men. The mine closed down in 1931 as a result of declining ore grades, the Great Depression, and water flooding the deepest level of tunnels. In 1940, the Miami Copper Company purchased the Old Dominion properties to gain access to the water for its own mining operations in Miami. Today the Old Dominion

Mine site is open to the public as a park thanks to current owner, BHP Billiton, Inc., the City of Globe, and many volunteers. Follow the trails of the Old Dominion Mine Park and see up close many of the artifacts once used by the early miners. Plaques throughout the park provide historical background information on the displayed tools as well as the history of the mine. Across the street from Old Dominion you will find the Gila County Historical Museum, which was originally the Mine Rescue Station. continued, next page

Gateway - Spring 2018


Miami

The Copper Corridor’s rich history continued from previous page The museum has a variety of displays pertaining to local history, including mining, ranching and Native American artifacts. It also houses a full-size stage coach and a large collection of minerals found locally. In nearby Miami, the Miami Copper Company and the Inspiration Consolidated Copper Company quickly expanded operations. In 1915, the International Smelting and Refining company smelter was erected, one of only five copper smelters nationwide still in operation. Stroll through the quaint downtown area and you will see small streets lined with what were once the singleperson—later single-family— homes of the miners. By the 1950s, the town of

Gateway - Spring 2018

Miami was a bustling place with a population of more than 4,000.

antique shops. It is worth it to spend a day mining the hidden treasures in each shop. Look

Bullion Plaza Museum located at 150 N. Plaza Cir. in Miami, Arizona has many exibits and hosts programs throughout the year.

Today, it is much quieter. Many of the historic buildings along Miami’s main street, Sullivan, now house

closely and you will still see the remnants of the town’s tough mining past. The Keystone stairs tucked

away in the slope that leads from Sullivan Street to the tailings above have led the way to work for generations of miners. A must see in Miami is the former Bullion Plaza Museum, located at the town’s west end. The former school was built in 1928 for the community’s children. Today, it houses an array of exhibits, including the Rose Mofford Exhibit, the Slavic Museum, the Dignitaries’ Room, and informative mining, mineral, and ranching displays. Today more than 20 percent of the employment in Globe and Miami is related to mining and production of copper. The area’s open pit mines change hands to this day with new technology opening new possibilities for the industry.

19


Gateway to the C Queen Valley Golf Course

1

87

queenvalleygolfcourse.com (520) 463-2214

Boyce Thompson Arboretum

2

Jake’s Corner

arboretum.ag.arizona.edu/

Superior Chamber of Commerce

3

Punkin Center

188

superiorazchamber.net

Bullion Plaza Museum

4

Tonto National Forest

Butcher Hook

Tonto Basin

21 Plaza Circle, Miami, AZ (928) 473-3700

Globe-Miami Chamber of Commerce

5 6 7

Cobre Valley Center for the Arts

8

Besh-Ba-Gowah Archeological Park

Yo

Apache Trail

globemiamichamber.com

Gila County Historical Museum

To Payson, Pine-Strawberry

11

88

28

globeaz.gov

1

Superstition Mountain Dolly Steamboat

cvarts.org

88

globeaz.gov

12

Round Mountain Hiking Park

9

globeaz.gov

10

Old Dominion Park globeaz.gov

To East Valley

13

14

Apache, Canyon & Saguaro Lakes

Superstition Mountain Museum

Miami’s Bullion Plaza

Queen Valley Top of the Superior World 1

Apache Junction

60

Tortilla Flat

4

60

Mia

Antique

3

2

79 Florence

177 Kearny, Hayden & Winkelman

Besh Ba G


Copper Corridor White Mountains

11

Roosevelt Lake & Visitor Center www.fs.usda.gov/tonto www.fs.fed.us

Show Low, Pinetop

12

Superstition Mountain Museum

superstitionmountainmuseum.org

Salt River Canyon

Roosevelt Lake

60

Tortilla Flat

16

tortillaflataz.com

Apache Gold Casino and Resort

San Carlos Rec. & Wildlife scatrwd.com

17

188

e Dist.

14

dollysteamboat.com

apachegoldcasinoresort.com

88

ami

Dolly Steamboat

15

oung

0

13

Discovery Park Graham Observatory visitgrahamcounty.com

10 5

7

9

To Clifton, Morenci

Globe

Antique Dist.

6

15

San Carlos 16

8

Gowah Archaelogical Park

77

70

191 17

18

18 19

Graham County Chamber graham-chamber.com

Clifton County Chamber visitgreenleecounty.com

To Safford

To Tucson Gila River

Roper Lake



Globe

Get ready for the seventh annual STEMFest

C

elebrating its seventh year in Globe-Miami, the Gila County STEMFest is back showcasing a variety of new and exciting activities and demonstrations. This year, Gila County will once again host STEMFest at the beautiful Gila Community College in conjunction with GCC’s annual Arbor Day Celebration at its beautiful Six Shooter Canyon Campus in Globe. Discover the many ways water works in our world. Plant a tree with GCC and enjoy art displayed around campus. Learn about soil and watch how the GHS robotics

Gateway - Spring 2018

club designs, constructs and operates one of its inventions. Learn from law enforcement how math is used in investigations and take the opportunity to tour the GCC campus. STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) is everywhere. Join us on Saturday, April 28 at Gila Community College, located at 8274 S. Six Shooter Cyn Rd. in Globe for this signature event of the Arizona SciTech Festival. The Pinal Mountain Foundation for Higher Education will be selling food to raise money for scholarships, and the Gem and Mineral Society will sell raffle tickets to raise

money for scholarships. STEMFest is a free community event that celebrates STEM and the many ways STEM affects our daily lives. STEMFest is for everyone — families, children, students, teachers and community members alike. STEMFest offers an interactive, hands-on experience that leaves lasting impressions on festival goers. With numerous demonstrations and fun activity booths, there is something for everyone. Gila County School Superintendent Roy Sandoval invites everyone to attend this fun and educational event. “Participating in the STEMFest activities and demonstrations is a great way to spend a

Saturday morning,” Sandoval said. “Come on out and join in the fun — there really is some-thing for everyone, and there is always more to learn about how and why things work the way they do.” STEMFest is sponsored by the Gila County School Super-intendent’s office and Gila Community College. It is made possible by the many organizations, businesses, agencies, clubs, and civic groups that come together to bring STEM alive in Gila County. For more information on this year’s STEMFest and Arbor Day Celebration, contact the Gila County Schools Office at 928-402-8788 or btarango@gila-countyaz.gov.

23


Globe

Famous Mexican food in Globe-Miami

M

By Elsie Ramos exican food is nothing new to the Globe-Miami area, in fact it’s been here for more than 75 years, and it all started with three sisters: Josephine Picazo, Salustia Reynoso and Pilar Esparza and their determination to break the Mexican tradition of staying home and raising a family while their husbands worked. Josephine started it all when she moved from a small Texas town to even smaller Miami. She began working small jobs to help bring her sisters back to the United States. In between the small jobs, Josephine would make burros, enchiladas and tamales for the wife of a doctor and her friends. The town of Mi-

24

ami was getting a taste of something they never had before, and they could not get enough. After encouragement from her brother, help from her brother-in-law and a loan from a local market owner, El Rey Café and a legacy was born. El Rey Café opened its doors in 1938 on Sullivan Street in Miami. The local mines were booming, Globe and Miami were thriving and people were eating everything the Picazos served. Josephine’s husband Anselmo quit his job at the mine to come work at the restaurant. But the Picazos saw the Miami restaurant as a starting point, and soon, Josephine and Anselmo decided to take

their success to the Valley and opened up La Palma Café in 1947. In 1957, they closed La Palma, and a year later,

opened Los Compadres in Phoenix, which still stands today. Continued, next page

Gateway - Spring 2018


Globe

Famous Mexican food in Globe-Miami continued from previous page When the Picazos left for Phoenix, they left El Rey to Josephine’s sisters, Salusita and Pilar. Josie Ramos, Josephine’s niece and Salustia’s daughter, calls Josephine a woman before her time. In the late 1930s, women, especially Mexican women, were not supposed to work, and for a husband to quit his job to help his was wife run a business was something unheard of. “What Auntie Josephine did is something we can never forget,” Josie says. “She taught us to work hard.” Soon after Josephine left, her mother became ill and Salustia accompanied back to Mexico. When she returned, she lost partnership in El Rey Cafe and had to begin again.

Gateway - Spring 2018

Salustia worked hard to help her husband maintain the family. She ran a kitchen at an east Globe truck stop and she always made sure all seven of her children had food on the table. It didn’t matter how many hours she worked during the day. In 1947, Salustia opened her own restaurant, La Casita in downtown Globe, where it still stands. La Casita, which means “little house” in Spanish, grew into something that was anything but little. There are currently six La Casita’s operating throughout Arizona, all run by descendants of Salustia. There are two in Globe, one in Mammoth, one in Show Low, one in Thatcher and one in San Manuel. Josie helped her sister, Cuca

Villalobos, run La Casita in downtown Globe for 10 years, and in 1969, her brother Gonzalo Reynoso opened Chalo’s Casa Reynoso in Globe. Her sister Irene Gutierrez, who died in 2012, opened Irene’s Real Mexican Food, and it is still being run by her daughterin-law. “We are all strong women,” Josie says. “We are all strong willed, and that was passed down to us from my mother and her sisters. They taught us to be honest, and if we were honest, our word was worth more than any money.” Today there are 15 restaurants that can be traced back to Josephine Picazo and her sisters, including, Guayo’s On The Trail, in Globe; Guyao’s El Rey, in Miami; a second

Los Compadres, in Phoenix; Casa Reynoso, in Tempe and Chandler, and Xavier’s Casa Reynoso in Mesa. Each restaurant has its own signature salsa and its own signature dishes, but the root of the cooking all comes from the same place. Josie says something that she will never forget is how her mother’s cooking made her the envy of all the children at Miami’s Buillon Plaza. “She would make us burritos stuffed with chorizo, and all the tortillas were freshly made. My mom was the backbone of our family.” Salustia was the backbone of her family, but all three sisters helped develop what became the backbone of a community: authentic Mexican restaurants.

25


Globe

Stay in a bed and breakfast

T

By Elaine Grant he bed and breakfast establishments of GlobeMiami are an important component among the precious minerals, stones and history that have long attracted visitors to the area. If you close your eyes and listen carefully enough, you can almost hear the frontier men and women carving their fortune from the mountains and building lives of hope and promise. Step into Copper Miner’s Rest in Miami and be greeted with an elegant sitting room. Cuddle into the comfortable sofas and enjoy being surrounded by beautiful antiques. It is no wonder that the house is included in the National Register of Historic Places. Each of the three guest rooms and studio apartment is furnished with antiques and reproductions, and outdoor terraces are equipped for grilling. Chrysocolla Inn, just a short walk from Globe’s historic downtown, was once a boarding house for miners. The sparse furnishings that once accommodated the hardworking men have been remodeled into beautiful enlarged rooms with lots of windows to let the sunshine in. Balcony porches embellish the house allowing guests the opportunity to watch hummingbirds or just enjoy a gentle breeze. An enormous brick lined basement houses a dining area with sliding glass doors that open up to a manicured floral yard. Dream Manor Inn is legendary to visitors and locals alike. Every room allows spectacular views of sunsets, sunrises and breathtaking vision of the Sonoran Desert. Guests are invited to climb up the four story bell tower to see 26

the constellations and watch for falling stars in the darkness. Dream Manor Inn is the perfect setting for weddings trimmed in magic and elegance. Intimate spaces featuring waterfalls and private garden sanctuaries can accommodate from 20 to over 125 people. Breakfast can be enjoyed on one of the patios, in the main dining room, breakfast nook, or the intimacy of your own room. Hosts Rebecca and Carl Williams are known for their fine catering and welcome the opportunity to discuss available packages. High atop Noftsger Hill in Globe, sits what appears to be a castle. The building was once a school for local children, including Arizona’s first woman governor and gifted athlete Rose Mofford. Generations of children were educated from 1907 until 1981. Now the old school house proudly welcomes guests as the Noftsger Hill Inn. The enormous windows overlook the Pinal Mountains on one side, and the historic Old Dominion Mine on the other. Spacious classrooms were left intact including the original chalkboards. Many guests, who visit the Noftsger Hill Inn, have left their own messages on the boards. Rooms are decorated with a collection of mining antiques and memorabilia and each room has its own private bath and sitting area. Whether you feel the desire to pamper yourself, host a gathering where you don’t have to do the work, or immerse yourself in Globe-Miami’s rich heritage, bed and breakfasts might be just what you’re looking for. Gateway - Spring 2018


Globe

15th annual Sunrise Challenge June 2

J

oin Globe Rotary for the 15th annual Sunrise Challenge. This Round Mountain Extreme 5K Challenge trail loops around Boulder Canyon. Sunrise Challenge is set for Saturday, June 2 at 6 a.m. at Round Mountain Park, located at South and Maple streets in Globe, Arizona. For all you athletes, runners, walkers and health nuts, here’s your chance to shine in the sun. The event includes a difficult 5K cross-country run as well as a 2-mile (less strenuous) walk or hike. Entry fee is $25 (postmarked by May 25); day of event, $30; family (parents/minor children) of 3 or

Gateway - Spring 2018

locations: Globe-Miami Chamber of Commerce 1360 N Broad St., Globe; American Family Insurance 1410 N Broad St. Globe; State Farm Insurance (Cami Lucero) 905 E. Ashe St. Globe; and Desert Oasis Wellness Center 138 S. Broad St. Globe. For more information, contact the Globe-Miami ChamRound Mountain is home to five different hiking loops. From ber of Commerce beginner to expert, there is something for everyone, from a at 928-425-4495 or leisurely walk or jog, to long distance and rocky terrain that will 800-804-5623, or go challenge even the most accomplished hikers. to www.globemiamichamber.com or visimore, one fee of $55. Chil- student rate, $20 per entrant. dren 11 and under must be Registration forms are torinfo@globemiamichamaccompanied by an adult; available at the following ber.com.

27


Globe

‘Lend Me a Tenor’ coming to Cobre Valley arts center

C

opper Cities Community Players have selected the three Tony Award winning play, “Lend Me a Tenor,” to be its spring event, scheduled for April 2629, and May 4, 5, and 12. This Ken Ludwig madcap, screwball comedy is set in the fall of 1934 in the city of Cleveland where the Grand Opera Company is primed to welcome world famous Tito Morelli, known as “II Stupendo,” the greatest tenor of his generation, to appear for one night only as Otello. The star arrives late and through a hilarious series of mishaps, it looks like he will not be able to perform. The efforts and actions of the opera company personnel and II

28

Stupendo to salvage the evening performance is guaranteed to leave audiences teary eyed with laughter. Save the dates and be sure to get your ticket for this wonderful comedic performance to take place at The Old Courthouse Theater in downtown Globe.

Thursday, April 26, 7-9 p.m. Friday, April 27, 7-9 p.m. Saturday, April 28, 7-9 p.m. Friday, May 4, 7-9 p.m. Saturday, May 5, 7-9 p.m. Saturday, May 12, 7-9 p.m. Tickets are $20-$25 each, available at the Cobre Valley Center for the Arts, located at 101 N. Broad St. Call 928-425-0884 or visit globearts.org

Tito Morelli and diva Diana in the play “Lend me a Tenor,” to take place at the Cobre Valley Center for the Arts.

Gateway - Spring 2018


Explore the beauty San Carlos has to offer

P

oint of Pines and Seneca lake were restocked with rainbow trout, and Cienega Tank has been stocked with catchable size rainbow trout from the Mescalero Tribal Fish Hatchery. So grab your fishing poles and head on out to the lakes. Permits are available at our San Carlos Recreation and Wildlife Department, located at Highway 70 Old Moonbase Rd., Peridot, Arizona 85550. The phone number is 928475-2343 and the website is www.scatrecreation.org. Their hours of operation are Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and Saturday from 8 a.m. to noon. Vendors who also sell permits are Circle K, 1950 E. Ash St. in Globe, Arizona or at the Good To Go

Gateway - Spring 2018

gas station, 1501 East Ash St., Globe, next to the Pizza Hut. You will need recreation permits for most of the Apache Nations, such as the following San Carlos Tribal Government. Rates are $10 per day to camp, picnic, hike, or venture onto backroads unless you have a fishing, hunting or special-use permit. Family permits include parents and kids 17 and under. Visitors to the Black and Salt rivers or Bear Wallow Creek must have a special permit. One-day permits are good for 24 hours from midnight to midnight. No permit is needed for driving through on US 60, US 70, Road 800 to San Carlos, or Road 500 to Coolidge Dam. Always check for latest

San Carlos

San Carlos offers year-round camping in a wide variety of styles. A camp can be as remote as a visitor wishes. The San Carlos Lake, Talkalai Lake, Seneca Lake and Point of Pines Lake provide established camping areas as well as great Fishing and Wildlife viewing.

permit costs at the Recreation & Wildlife Department in San Carlos. Avoid any rusty bar-

rels or drums that you may come across in the field or river beds.

29



Riggs Flat Lake on top of the Pinaleño Mountains

Safford

R

iggs Flat Lake the Galiuro Mountains is located at the to the west if you don’t end of Swift mind taking a short hike Trail, a road that winds to get to an overlook. along the top of the PiCamping is $10 per naleño Mountains. night. Picnicking or other It is a small picturday use in campgrounds esque lake, 11 acres in is $10 per day. size, set in alpine forest All fees are payable by and meadow. cash, check or money orIts cold waters are der at the time you occustocked during the sumpy the site. Make check mer with rainbow, brown or money order payable and brook trout, and anto the USDA Forest Serglers report that the fishvice. Riggs Flat Lake is a small 11-acre reservoir located near the top of ing is usually good. A valid Arizona fishBest baits for the rain- the Pinaleño Mountains, in the Coronado National Forest and Graham ing license and trout bows are corn, cheese, County. stamp are required to fish ted on the lake, but most fish views of the lake and the surgarlic cheese, salmon in Riggs Lake. rounding forest, West Peak is eggs and worms. The brown from the shoreline. For more information, conIf the big ones aren’t biting, visible from the vicinity of tact the Safford Ranger Disand brook trout are taken on there is always plenty of scen- the lake. artificial lures and flies as trict at 928-428-4150 or visit So are Aravaipa Valley and fs.usda.gov. well. Small boats are permit- ery to enjoy. In addition to the

Gateway - Spring 2018

31


Safford

Tour the Mount Graham International Observatory

M

ount Graham International Observatory is a division of Steward Observatory, the research arm for the Department of Astronomy at the University of Arizona. Scientific researchers from around the world make use of MGIO facilities. We serve the community, operating and maintaining facilities at the remote observing site located in the Pinaleño Mountains in southeast Arizona. This area is part of the Coronado National Forest, administered by the Safford Ranger District, U.S. Forest Service. Our office, the MGIO Base Camp, is located at the eastern base of Mount Graham, six miles south of Safford, Arizona. Eastern

32

Arizona College’s Discovery Park Campus is the the official visitor’s center for the telescopes on Mount Graham. They conduct weekend tours of the Mount Graham International Observatory. Weather permitting, the tours begin in mid-May and go through October. Because permits are required to enter the endangered red squirrel refugium, advance reservations are required. The tour features a trip up scenic Mount Graham, focusing on the mountain’s rich geology, history, and diversity of life; a lunch near the summit of the mountain, and a guided tour of the observatories, the Submillimeter Telescope, the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope, and the Large

Binocular Telescope. Contact Eastern Arizona College Discovery Park Campus 1651 W. Discovery Park

Blvd. Safford, Arizona 85546. For information, call 928-4286260, or got to www.eac.edu/ discoverypark.

Gateway - Spring 2018


Safford

Visit Roper Lake State Park in Graham County

T

he Roper Lake Visitor Center is open yearround. It features a gift shop, local area information, Junior Ranger programs, and restrooms. Park and Facility Hours: Gates are closed from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. Visitor Center/Park Store, open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Park entrance fee per vehicle, (1-4 adults), $10 (as of April 1); individual/bicycle, $3. Hot tub is open daily from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. The Park Store, located in the Visitor Center, has books, clothing, children’s toys, flora and fauna guides, fishing equipment and bait.

Gateway - Spring 2018

There are several picnic areas throughout the park near the fishing and swimming areas. Most of these areas include a picnic table, barbecue grill and a shade ramada Camping and RV sites, as well as cabins, are available by calling the reservation center at 877-MY-PARKS (697-2757). You can call seven days a week, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. MST. You may also make reservations online.

Roper Lake is an excellent place for bird watching. Species commonly seen are Gamble’s quail, redwing blackbird, yellow headed blackbird, great horned owl, cardinal, flycatchers, kingfisher, mallard duck, ruddy

duck, grebes, egrets, herons and mergansers. Mammals commonly seen are bobcats, raccoons, rabbits, squirrels, and coyotes. Damaging or removing the natural rocks, vegetation, or public property is prohibited.

33


Cliffton-Morenci

The rich history of Clifton, Arizona

T

he Spanish explorer Coronado was probably the first in a long line of intrepids to pass through what is now Clifton, Arizona. Coronado was looking for gold for the Spanish Crown. Although gold was found and is present today in the San Francisco River, the quantities are very small. Fur trappers arrived in the early 1800s, however it was not until after the civil war that things really got going. In the mid 1860s, gold prospector Henry Clifton came to Clifton. Instead of finding gold he found a rich vein of copper ore. In 1870 an Army officer, Captain Chase and the Metcalf brothers were tracking an Indian war party and camped near the confluence of the San Francisco River and what is called Chase Creek. For two years, the peace treaty with Chiricahua Apache Chief Geronimo (who was born in the area) and the Mining Act of 1872, enabled the

Chase Creek, early 1900s.

34

profitable process of establishing a mine in southern Arizona. Chase Creek, which takes it name from the adjacent dry wash, is an historical commercial area immediately south of what was the smelter area (present day Circle K). Many original buildings remain on Chase Creek, most in fair or poor condition, but still retaining historical significance. Chase Creek Street parallels the channelized Chase Creek. US Route 666 (now US Mine Site in background, Railroad depot and rail yard on the left. 191) separates Chase Foreground: Footbridge crossing the San Francisco River giving Creek business area miners access to businesses and homes on Park Avenue. from the smelter site and ruins of this site can be through Clifton is known locally as Coronado Boulevard. The original single-story building, at the northwest end of viewed directly behind Circle the facade, was constructed of slag bricks (waste after copper K. U.S. Route 666 continues has been extracted from ore from the local smelter). These slag south from the hill, parallel- bricks were widely used in construction of flood walls along the ing the west bank of the San San Francisco River Contributed article and photos by the Greenlee County Francisco. This portion of Route 666 Historical Society.

Chase Creek today

Gateway - Spring 2018


Coronado Trail Scenic Highway

A

rizona’s Coronado Trail stands out in a state full of scenic drives for its sustained beauty; over 120 miles of twisting roadway; its scarce traffic; the sharp contrast of the vistas stretching for miles on end, and an abundance of varied recreational opportunities and wildlife from Clifton to Springerville. At one end of US 191 is the high desert town of Clifton, with one of the world’s largest open-pit mines in the adjacent community of Morenci. Prepare to be astounded by the view at this modern mining operation in Morenci. It’s quite a sight to stare down into of one of the big-

gest open-pit copper mines in the U.S. At the other end of the Coronado Trail Scenic Byway, the road ascends to alpine forests at 9,000 feet in the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest on the way to Alpine, Eagar and Springerville. In between Clifton and Springerville, is a route of 460 curves that reveals everimproving mountain views and it’s an exhilarating drive. While eastern Arizona is pickup truck country, the Coronado Trail is ideal for motorcycles and sports cars. Drivers on US 191 are advised to pull off the road to enjoy the views during the three-hour road trip.

The Coronado Trail demands one’s attention and rewards driving enthusiasts with its challenges. U.S. 666, nicknamed the Devil’s Highway, was renamed US 191 in 1992. There are no vehicle re-

Cliffton-Morenci

quirements, but there are several sharp curves and steep drop-offs along this narrow road. In some cases, there are no guardrails, and in some areas, speeds may slow to 10 mph.

Upcoming events in Greenlee County

May 5 — Morenci High School-Clifton High School Cinco de Mayo festival celebration at the historic Clifton Train depot. A very special local holiday celebration full of fun, games, booths, food vendors and exciting entertainment for all. You truly have to experience this wonderful free event every year. Join us in honoring the Hispanic community’s many contributions during May to benefit the scholarship fund. For more information call 928-965-3313 or “Like” Greenlee County Chamber of Commerce on Facebook. May 19 — Reopening of the Clifton Splash pad. A fun outdoor experience for the Gateway - Spring 2018

whole family. The Clifton Splash Pad is a new, fun outdoor experience for the whole family. Open from May to September, the splash pad contains something for everyone to stay cool. Hours are 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. during the season. Free admission. Located on Park Avenue in Clifton. For information, call Clifton Town Hall 928-865-4146. June: Greenlee County: Coronado Trail Runs.

Known by many names, Greenlee County welcomes thousands of motorcycles throughout our almost yearlong riding season. Join in one or all of June’s weekend annual motorcycle runs along the legendary Coronado Trail Scenic Highway (US 191) Old Route 666 “Devil’s Highway.” Enjoy more than 200 switchbacks and many hairpin turns, guaranteed to thrill. Bringing travelers from landscapes of high desert to evergreen forests, not unlike travelling from southwestern United States to Canada, the views are sure to please. Lodging, camping and RV sites are available throughout the county. Plan to stay the week between runs and fully experience all the

towns of Greenlee County have to offer. For more information, “Like” Greenlee County Tourism on Facebook or visit www.visitgreenleecounty. com. Wednesdays — Clifton Farmer’s Market every Wednesday through July 25 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Clifton Train Depot. Third Saturdays — Jam sessions every third Saturday each month at the A Frame Church in Morenci from 1-4 p.m. Bring your instruments, sheet music, CDs, listen, play or participate. Saturdays — Small Business Saturday every Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in stores in Duncan, York, Clifton and Morenci. 35


Pine-Strawberry

Feel the love at Pine Creek Lavender Farm

A

visit to the PineStrawberry area would not be complete without a stop at the Pine Creek Lavender Farm. Originally a c. 1880s pioneer farm settlement, the property was purchase a few years ago by Lavender Farm owners Terry Gorton and Rick Vesci, who fell in love with its bucolic setting and charming mountain community of Pine. Terry and Rick saw the potential in the property and knew they wanted to do something special there. When they learned that historic irrigation rights from Pine Creek conveyed with the property, they knew their vision would include some type of farming, so they began to research the types of plants that would be best suited for the local climate and soil and would be of little interest to the abundant elk, deer and other critters that like to dine on most everything growing in area gardens. Lavender turned out to be the ideal crop. Enlisting assistance from many community members who appreciated Terry and Rick’s vision for helping to create a new destination in Pine, they planted 5,000 lavender plants of mixed varieties, including Royal Velvet and Provence, which are both culinary varieties, and Grosso which is one of the most beautiful and aromatic lavender varieties. After months of watering and weeding, they were rewarded with an amazing, thriving crop—lavender turned out to be perfectly suited for the weather, soil 36

and water conditions of their property. Terry and Rick say they are “in love with lavender,” even referring to it as “lovender,” a term coined by a family member. The lavender has been thriving and providing a more abundant crop each season, and Terry and Rick have made numerous “lovender” friends in the beautiful mountain community they now call home. Since 2015, they have also done an amazing job restoring the property, doing much of the work themselves. The c. 1890 pioneer log

cabin now houses their lavender drying operation. They restored the old farmhouse as true as they could to honor the home of the original settlers (including their Lavender Kitchen, where Terry holds Saturday classes on heritage food techniques and food preservation as well as culinary lavender classes). They’ve also added a new wing for modern conveniences. The next project is a new store from which to sell their fabulous lavender bundles and products, a step up from

the current stand at the front of their property, which is currently under consideration as a National Historic Landmark. When visting Pine, Terry and Rick would love for you to stop by for a visit, learn more about their historic property, and check out their beautiful fields of lavender, and perhaps take home some dried bundles and lavender products. You can learn more about the Lavender Farm and also order the products on line at: pinelavenderfarm@gmail. com. Sign up for one of Terry’s classes or arrange for a photo shoot on the property by calling 602-772-6005 or sending your request via email to pinelavenderfram@gmail. com. Pine Creek Lavender Farm will open to the public this year starting May 5 and remain open until fall. The address is 4223 Pine Creek Cyn. Rd., just a bit east of SR87. They will be open Friday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and on Monday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Gateway - Spring 2018


Pine-Strawberry blooms in spring By Sue Lewin Staff writer

T

he Pine-Strawberry area experienced a mild winter this year, and spring has arrived right on schedule with the return of many species of wild birds and the bloom of a wide variety of spring flowers, including daffodils, forsythia and fruit tree blossoms. Spring is always a great time of year to visit the Pine-Strawberry area for its abundance of wildlife, numerous trails for hiking, biking, birding, horseback riding, and ATV/OHV riding, where permitted. Some of the more popular hiking destinations include the Pine Trailhead, located

Gateway - Spring 2018

along SR 87 at the south end of Pine, and the Strawberry Trailhead, located along SR87 between Pine and Strawberry, and the trails leading into the forest off the southwest end of Hardscrabble Road. The Fossil Creek recreation area is another great spot for hiking as well as swimming, but access from Strawberry is restricted, and a visit requires an advance reservation/permit from the U.S. Forest Service. As always, hikers are reminded to research trail routes and check weather forecasts in advance, wear proper footwear, bring plenty of water, remain on marked trails, and exercise caution. Off-road vehicle trails into the forest can be accessed

from both Pine and Strawberry. Visit the Tonto National Forest website for information on all public trails at www.fs.usda.gov/tonto. Whether you come to PineStrawberry for a day trip or a longer stay, there are a variety of dine-in and take-out options for every meal, as well as a few nice options for drinks and live music on weekends, including a local microbrewery. There are several area options for overnight accommodations, too, including the Beeline Guesthouse, an historic early settler property that was converted several years ago into a quality bed and breakfast, with three beautifully appointed guest rooms

Pine

and fantastic service and delicious breakfasts offered by Innkeeper Patrick Moore. Visitors should check out the Pine-Strawberry Historical Museum on SR87 in Pine, the Strawberry Schoolhouse on Fossil Creek Road in Strawberry, and the many fine antique, gift and specialty shops and galleries in Pine. In addition, the Pine-Strawberry Business Community, in partnership with several other community groups, hosts and/or supports monthly arts/ crafts and other festivals and events from May through November. For more information, see the Pine-Strawberry Business Community sponsored ad on Page 38 and visit www.psbcaz.com.

37



Payson

Gary Hardt Memorial spring rodeo

T

he Payson Pro Rodeo presents the Gary Hardt Memorial Rodeo with over 200 professional rodeo contestants. This is a PRCA sanctioned rodeo with all events from bareback riding to bull riding. Performances start at 7 p.m. each evening and the gates open at 5 p.m. for some pre-rodeo entertainment at Payson Event Center, 1400 S. Beeline Hwy., Payson, Arizona. Pre-sale tickets for adults age 12-64 are $16.10, seniors $13.80 and children 8-12 $11.50; 7 and under are free. All active military admitted at no charge. During its earliest years, Payson’s Spring Rodeo was part of the National Old-Tim-

Gateway - Spring 2018

ers Rodeo Association, now known as the Senior Pro Rodeo Tour. In 1987 it became the Gary Hardt Memorial Rodeo to honor the memory of the Pay-

son native who died in 1987. Hardt was a well-known roper. He was recognized throughout the Southwest for his bull riding and roping talents. His rodeo career began

in 1962 at the World’s Oldest Continuous Rodeo in Payson. As a member of the Rodeo Cowboys Association, Hardt rode bulls for about 20 years. During the last 10 years of his work in rodeo, he became a well-established roper as well. This memorial event benefits local youth with educational and athletic achievements. The event is coordinated by the Payson Pro Rodeo Committee, led by Bill Armstrong. Thursday, May 17, WPR barrel racing. Admission, one can of food. Friday, May 18, gates open at 5 p.m. — Tough enough to Wear Pink. Saturday, May 19, gates open at 5 p.m. — Special Patriotic Performance.

39



Millions discover their favorite reads on issuu every month.

Give your content the digital home it deserves. Get it to any device in seconds.