Issuu on Google+

SIGNAL T

R

I

B

U

N

E

“Desert Day Dream” Acrylic on paper by Alex Garcia See page 8

SERVING BIXBY KNOLLS, CALIFORNIA HEIGHTS, LOS CERRITOS, WRIGLEY AND THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

Vol. 35 No. 43

Your Weekly Community Newspaper

March 28, 2014

Wilson High School’s first mayoral candidate forum offers students a taste of local politics CJ Dablo Staff Writer

Students at Woodrow Wilson Classical High School had the chance to witness a sliver of the political process last week. At a forum hosted by the school on Thursday evening, March 20, all 10 candidates who hope to become Long Beach’s next mayor gathered together on the auditorium’s stage to voice their opinions on a variety of issues affecting the city. The event was moderated by Bea Antenore of the League of Women Voters. It wasn’t the first (and certainly wasn’t going to be the last) chance for the mayoral hopefuls to meet with the public, but according to teacher Wendy Salaya, the event was a “first” for her students– her school has never before hosted a mayoral-candidate forum. Salaya teaches classes in government and macroeconomics at Wilson. In a telephone interview on Wednesday, she described how her students are now very enthusiastic for the municipal election next month. “They can’t wait to vote,” Salaya said of her students who are over the age of 18 and eligible to cast a ballot. “They’re really excited…to be able to participate and to be able to have an opinion and actually express their opinion by voting.” She described how, in the days leading up to the forum, the students wrestled over which topics to cover. They eventually developed two questions which would be posed to all of the candidates. Other questions, written down by members of the audience during the event, were handed to the organizers who would, in turn, assign a random question to each of the candidates. Each candidate answered the same number of questions. see FORUM page 12

Courtesy CGS

This tsunami-inundation map created by the California Geological Survey (CGS) shows the area of Long Beach (in red) that would be submerged in a scenario in which a large tsunami would be caused by a 9.1 earthquake off the Alaska coast.

Experts say Long Beach and other low-lying beach cities should be prepared for tsunamis

Sean Belk Staff Writer

CJ Dablo/Signal Tribune

Wilson Classical High School hosted a forum in their auditorium on March 20 for the Long Beach candidates who are running for mayor. It’s the first time Wilson has hosted such an event, and, according to one teacher, it’s generated some excitement for a local election among the students…whether or not they are old enough to vote.

State officials, emergency responders and earthquake analysts warned this week that Long Beach and other lowlying beach cities of Southern California would be hit the worst if a large tsunami were to strike the coast. Rare but plausible, the worst-case scenario would be a 9.1 earthquake off the Alaskan peninsula causing the local region’s sea level to suddenly rise five to 10 feet within just a few hours, according to a study released last September by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The fast-moving wave would cause major flooding in low-lying areas, such as Long Beach and nearby cities in Orange County, where waterfront homes and commercial

City asks residents to ‘think big’ during community-wide planning workshops

Ashley Fowler

Contributing Writer

The City of Signal Hill invited residents to the first of two workshops March 19 designed to update the City’s 2006-2011 strategic plan. The first of the strategic-plan visioning workshops featured presentations from the police department, Los Angeles County Fire and Public Works. The last time the City updated its strategic plan was in 2006 and is “overdue” for an update, City Manager Ken Farfsing said. “This is part of a series of workshops and information that we’re collecting to help guide strategic planning,” he said. The purpose of the workshops, Farfsing explained, is for residents to help the City provide a vision and goals for the community. The City will also be using the results of the see WORKSHOP page 11 resident-satisfaction survey conducted at the end of last year.

Ashley Fowler/Signal Tribune

During the first of two visioning workshops hosted by the City of Signal Hill, on March 19, consultant Bill Kelly explains where the City’s money comes from and where it goes, with the general fund total revenues equaling $16,990,760.

Weekly Weather Forecast Friday

Saturday

Low clouds, then sunshine

68°

Low clouds, then sunshine

Low clouds, then sunshine

Low clouds, then sunshine

Lo 55°

Lo 54°

Lo 53°

Lo 51°

70°

Sunday

70°

Monday

March 28 through April 1, 2014

69°

Tuesday

68° Mostly sunny Lo 52°

This week’s Weekly Weather Forecast sponsored by:

Electronic Cigarettes, Vaporizers, Tanks and Accessories 2139 Bellflower Blvd. @ Stearns

Long Beach | 562-494-1442 w w w. t h e v a p e d e p o t . c o m

development are most vulnerable to tsunamis because of the lack of cliffs. Strong currents would also devastate harbors and marinas. Luckily, people within the tsunami-inundation zone would only have to walk a few blocks to reach dry land, according to the study. Still, experts say residents and visitors should be prepared for such an event that the study estimates would force some 750,000 people to be evacuated statewide and cause one-third of the boats in California’s marinas and harbors to be damaged or completely sunk, resulting in $700 million in losses. The study estimates the state’s total damages, including business interruptions, would be $5 see TSUNAMIS page 15


NEWS

2 SigNal TribuNE

An evening honoring Vice-Mayor Larry Forester

March 28, 2014

Rep. Lowenthal hosts community coffee, gauges area’s attitudes

We are celebrating his accomplishments living with AIDS for twenty years. He was elected to Signal Hill City Council in 1998 — serving as Mayor twice. He also serves on numerous boards, non-profits and government agencies.

Please join us at e Grand on March 31, 2014 (corner of Willow & Grand) 6:00 p.m. cocktails, 6:30 p.m. dinner Tickets: Per person: $100 Table of 8: $750 Donation to AIDS Food Store For ticket information, contact AIDS Food Store at (562) 434-3425 or Ellen Ward at (562 597-5963.

To r e a d p r e v i o u s i s s u e s o f t h e S i g n a l Tr i b u n e , v i s i t

w w w.s ig na ltr ib un e. com

Ashley Fowler/Signal Tribune

U.S. Rep. Alan Lowenthal (center) addresses concerns from his constituents about the Affordable Care Act at his “community coffee” on March 22 at the Expo Arts Center. Ashley Fowler

Contributing Writer

U.S. Rep. Alan Lowenthal (D-Long Beach) hosted a “community coffee” March 22 at the Expo Arts Center to update constituents on recent congressional actions and answer their questions. “I am so grateful about how many people showed up on a Saturday morning just to talk about what interests them in government,” Lowenthal said. “It’s wonderful.” About 50 people attended the Saturday-morning event. He has hosted close to 100 community coffees in his 20-year career in Long Beach politics, Lowenthal said. “One of the biggest problems that we have in our country is that people feel government is not responsive to their needs,” Lowenthal said. “The ordinary person feels like they are not listened to, that only big interests are listened to, and it’s meetings like this that you get a chance to sit down and hear what people are thinking.” Lowenthal was elected last November to represent the 47th Congressional District, which encompasses Long Beach, Signal Hill, Lakewood, Cypress, Los Alamitos, Rossmoor, Garden Grove, Westminster, Stanton and Buena Park. In 1998, he was elected to the State Assembly, representing the 54th District. Then, he represented the 27th District from 2004 to 2012 as a member of the State Senate. “I didn’t come to ask for support for any particular plan, but I did want to hear how people feel about the issues before Congress: the budget, the debt, Affordable Care Act, immigration reform and minimum wage,” Lowenthal said. “Not because I’m going to change my vote, but I wanted to know how my community felt on those critical issues.” The forum became the most heated during a discussion regarding the Affordable Care Act. There were concerns addressed about the initial increase in premium fees some mem-

Remember to Vote April 8, 2014

City of Long Beach Primary Nominating Election www.longbeach.gov/elections www.facebook.com/LBCityClerk www.twitter.com/LB_CityClerk

Questions? Call 562-570-6101

FREE

DOWNLOAD

Vote LB 2014 Election App App Election

see COFFEE page 5 “A Gour- ting met Gif ing & Bak Company”

Decadent • Seductive • Addictive Tuesday-Saturday 11am-7pm Sunday 11am-5pm; Closed Mondays Call in advance for catering!

4147 Long Beach Blvd. at Carson St. in Bixby Knolls

(888) 9BUNDTS www.bundtsonmelrose.com


NEWS

March 28, 2014

SigNal TribuNE

Appeals court rejects petition on Measure U

Lowenthal seeks to compel House vote regarding immigration reform

Congressmember Alan Lowenthal joined nearly 160 of his colleagues in Congress on Wednesday in signing a “discharge petition” that would force a House vote on H.R. 15, a bipartisan comprehensive immigration reform legislative package that he cosponsored, according to a press release issued by his office on March 27. “We demand a vote because the American people are tired of living under a broken immigration system and seeing families broken apart,” Lowenthal said. “Today I stand with millions of families across our country to call for comprehensive immigration reform. We have a bipartisan bill with wide support from the American people. Now we simply ask Speaker John Boehner to bring H.R. 15 to the floor of the House for a vote. This bill secures our borders, provides an earned pathway to citizenship, and increases economic opportunity for all Americans. I look forward to voting yes on comprehensive immigration reform this Congress.” When 218 members of the House sign the discharge petition, it will trigger a floor vote on the bill, according to the press release. As of Thursday morning, 157 House members had signed the discharge petition, with more expected. Cosponsored by 199 member of Congress, including three House Republicans, H.R. 15, the “Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act” is a comprehensive immigration reform package introduced in October 2013 by Congressmember Joe Garcia (D-FL). The Senate version of this bill, S. 744, passed the Senate on June 27, 2013 by a bipartisan vote of 68-32. The House of Representatives has failed to vote on any comprehensive immigration reform legislation during the course of the 113th Congress, despite numerous calls from members of Congress, President Barack Obama, and the American people, according to Lowenthal’s press release. Source: Rep. Lowenthal’s office

incomplete and results in bias against the citizen initiative.” “In preparing the ballot, the city clerk relied word for word on the ballot label that appeared in the citizen petitions and was circulated by Signal Hill Community First in gathering signatures to place Measure U on the ballot,” said Signal Hill City Manager Ken Farfsing. “We were not surprised that both Judge O’Brien and a threejudge panel agreed to leave the ballot label as is.” At press time, a second lawsuit brought by Signal Hill Community First was scheduled for a court hearing on Thursday, March 27. That lawsuit alleges that the city attorney has a conflict of interest and cannot prepare the impartial legal analysis. The petition also alleges that the impartial legal analysis submitted by the city attorney is prejudicial and biased. The proponents are requesting that the court supplant the city attorney’s analysis with their own legal analysis, according to the City. In a written statement to the Signal Tribune, Harris said the appeals court decision has nothing to do with the substance of Measure U and that the City of Signal Hill statement on the Appeals Court action is “wrong and misleading.”

“What Carol Churchill and I did was ask the appeals court to hurry the procedures the courts use to hear these election problems,” Harris said. “Usually these types of election problems go from the Superior Court to the appeals court. But, since the City is doing everything it can to delay the Superior Court process, we decided to ask the appeals court for ‘extraordinary relief’ from it.” Harris said she and Churchill asked the appeals court to skip the Superior Court entirely and hear their challenge to the City’s wording on the ballot label and impartial analysis prior to the deadline for printing. “It was a long shot,” Harris said. “Courts do not like to step on each other’s toes. We had to do this because the City is deliberately using up time with delays in order to stop us from getting accurate and unbiased descriptions of the Taxpayer’s Right to Know and Vote initiative in the sample ballot booklet and on the ballot itself. We’re not discouraged. We still have remedies available to us at the appeals level and will continue to work to get printed material to the voter that truly is impartial and balanced.” Sources: City of Signal Hill, Signal Hill Community First

Public Hearing on Proposed Fare F Changes

Attend A Public Hearing on Proposed Fare Changes To continue reliable service of LA County’s expanding Metro must consider gradually transportation network, M increasing fares. Metro’s approach would make the system easier to use by including free transfers on a single fare. There’s a public hearing to gather comments on Saturday, March 29 at 9:30am at Metro Headquarters. Sign up in person by 11:30am to speak at the hearing. Details at metro.net/newfares.

DAMES, DOLLS AND FLAPPERS What Fashion show Who Assistance League of Long Beach Where Long Beach Convention Center, 300 E. Ocean Blvd. When Saturday, March 29 at 10am More info The theme will be “Dames, Dolls and Flappers.” The event will feature a luncheon with complimentary wine, a fashion show, live and silent auctions and more. Ticket cost is $115. Proceeds will fund the Assistance League's mentor programs. Call (562) 627-5650 or visit AALB.org .

JAZZ IT UP What 9th Annual Jazz Showcase Who Millikan High School’s Orch-a-Band parent booster club Where 2800 Snowden Ave. When Wednesday, April 2 from 3pm to 9pm More info The event will showcase the musical talents of Long Beach students. Entrance fee is $4 per person, and children under 5 are free. Refreshments will be available. Call (562) 425-7441 ext. 4142 or email RBhatia@lbschools.net .

Go Metro to Dodger Stadium Want to reach Dodger Stadium faster this season? Go Metro to Union Station and connect with the Dodger Stadium Express. You’ll avoid tra;c and make a speedier trip to the stadium, thanks to a dedicated bus lane. For more information, visit metro. etro.net.

FROM SHEEP TO SHIPS What Special presentation Who The Sierra Club Where Environmental Services Bureau, 2929 E. Willow St. When Wednesday, April 2 at 7:30pm More info During the meeting, Larry Rich, the City of Long Beach’s sustainability coordinator, will show the city’s transformation through Long Beach history and its changing landscape and environment. The goal of the event is to provide the audience will get a better sense of place of Long Beach through a new understanding of the natural environment and waterways prior to urbanization.

Whittier Soundwall Projec oject Completed Metro recently held a ribbon cutting ceremony to mark the completion of three miles of soundwalls on the I-605 Freeway. reeway. The $19 million Meetro-funded project in the City of Whittier tooktwo years to complete and extends from Slauson Avenue to Obregon Street.

FA-LA-LAAAA What Concert Who Long Beach Camerata Singers Where California Heights United Methodist Church, 3759 Orange Ave. When Friday, April 4 at 7:30pm More info The singers will perform Bach’s Goldberg Variations. Tickets cost is $30. Visit longbeachcameratasingers.org .

Turnstiles Latched on Greeen Line Metro is latching turnstiles at several Metro Green Line stations. Tap the target on the t right side of the turnstile with TAP card to pass through. All Metro Blue, Red, your valid TA ons now have latched gates. More Purple and Gold Line statio info formation at metro.net/ t/lattching.

GIVE FOR A GOOD CAUSE What Donation drive Who Habitat for Humanity Where Bixby Knolls Christian Church, 1240 E. Carson St. When Saturday, April 5 from 9am to 3pm More info Appliances, electronics, exercise equipment, furniture, hardware and home decor will be accepted. Items must be in sellable condition. Items will benefit Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore. Visit shophabitat.org .

New Metro Buses Start Seervice The >rst of Metro’s 550 new 40-foot buses went into service last enice Boulevard between downtown month on Line 33 along Venice LA and Santa Monica. The new models will be phased in during the next 18 months, replacing vehicles that have reached their retirement age.

facebook.com/losangelesmetro

RE-IMAGINE THE PARK What Bixby Park workshops Who Hosted by 2nd District Councilmember Suja Lowenthal and the Department of Parks, Recreation & Marine Where Bixby Park Community Center, 130 Cherry Ave. When Saturday, March 29 from 9am to 11am More info Attendees will work with architects and park staff to update the existing park master plan, redesign the playground and prioritize over $1.2 million in onetime funding set aside for high-priority park and playground projects.

EGGS WITH THE ELKS What Monthly breakfast Who Bellflower/ Long Beach Elks Lodge 888 Where 16426 Bellflower Blvd., Bellflower When Sunday, March 30 from 8am to noon More info Breakfast costs $6.50 per person and includes eggs, bacon, sausage, hash browns, biscuits with gravy, orange juice, assorted fruit, Belgian waffles and coffee. Call (562) 866-3027 or visit elks.org .

GATEWAY GA GATEWA TEWAY TEWA Y CITIES

@metrolosangeles

WHEN THE SAINTS GO RUNNING IN What 5th Annual 5K Run/Walk Who St. Anthony High School Where Shoreline Village in Downtown Long Beach When Saturday, March 29 at 8:30am More info Cost is $15 for people 18 years and under, $30 for those over 18. Registration will begin at 7am. The money raised will go to undeserved families in greater Long Beach. Visit longbeachsaints.org .

COME CELEBRATE What Birthday celebration Who Boys & Girls Clubs of Long Beach Where John C. & Alice Wallace Petrolane Center, 1920 Lemon Ave. When Saturday, March 29 from 2pm to 4pm More info Cake and refreshments will be served. Call (562) 595-5945.

Metro M etro Briefs etr

metro.net

GOT STUFF? What Donation drive Who Meals on Wheels and Rock for Vets Where Long Beach Scottish Rite Parking Lot, 855 Elm St. When Saturday, March 29 and Sunday, March 30 from 8am to 3pm More info The donation drive aims to collect clean and gently used furniture, clothing, housewares, accessories, small appliances and toys. Call (562) 439-5000.

STEP IT UP What 23rd Annual Long Beach State Step Show Who The National Pan-Hellenic Council at CSULB Where Walter Pyramid, 1250 N Bellflower Blvd. When Saturday, March 29 at 2pm More info Fraternity and sorority members will participate in the largest studentproduced step show in the western United States. This year’s theme is “Beach Daze...Kicking it Old School.” The annual event attracts over 4,000 spectators, ranging from high school students to families of all ages. Email zion.smith@csulb.edu .

14-1684ps_gat-ne-14-010 ©2014 lacmta

A three-judge panel of the Second Appellate Court has unanimously denied a petition brought by Signal Hill residents Carol Churchill and Maria Harris alleging that the ballot label for Measure U, also known as the Taxpayer’s Right to Know and Vote initiative, was misleading and fraudulent, according to a press release issued by the City of Signal Hill on March 25. The press release indicates that the court found that Measure U’s proponents had failed to demonstrate entitlement to extraordinary relief. If approved, Measure U would amend the Signal Hill City Charter to require that all new and increased taxes, fees and assessments be approved by a two-thirds vote of the electorate. The appeals court denial follows a decision made by Judge Robert O’Brien on March 20 finding that the proponents had “not shown by clear and convincing evidence that the label must be amended.” The judge ruled that it was “not clear the subject ballot label is impermissible, false, misleading or incomplete.” Churchill and Harris, who are members of the organization Signal Hill Community First, had alleged that the ballot label prepared by the city clerk was “inaccurate, misleading,

3

CALLING ALL ART-DECO BUFFS What Loft Walk of the Walker Building and Big Red Bus Tour Who Long Beach Heritage Where 115 W. 4th St. When Saturday, April 5 at 4:30pm, 5:30pm and 6:30pm More info The event will feature an Art Deco tour of downtown Long Beach on the Big Red Bus with historian John Thomas. The tour will be followed by a walking tour of the Walker Building. The event will end at the Federal Bar’s Art Deco exspeakeasy, where wine and appetizers will be available to attendees. Cost is $55 for adults, $35 for students. Tickets will be held at registration the night of the event, and no tickets will be sold at the door. Call (562) 492-7019 or visit LBHeritage.org .


OPiNiON

4 SigNal TribuNE

houghts from the Publisher T by Neena Strichart

March 28, 2014

allowing Pat to voice his/her concerns. I too am a cat- and bird-lover– always have been and always will be. Note to readers: I will not make this a habit, so please don’t send me anonymous letters– this is a one-time exception! See below for Pat’s message to me…

This is written in regard to a letter to the editor from a David Czapiewski, titled ‘Amazing Graci,’ that appeared in the March 14, 2014 edition of the Signal Tribune. I feel compelled to write this response, specifically in regard to the two most concerning sentences, and I paraphrase, “Over the years she (Graci) would provide us with many presents to show her love for us: assortment of birds, frogs, lizards, garden snakes, doves, finches, and even a hummingbird! She was diligent of keeping our yard free of…… and opossum intruders.” It is sadly ironic that as adept a predator as Graci apparently was, was given such a name, as there was not a shred of mercy, forgiveness, nor graciousness in her dreamstime.com when it came to maiming and killing innocent backyard birds and reptiles. Yes, cats are natural hunters; however, one can only hope that Mr. Czapiewski did not have children in his home to teach and take part in his apparent glee each time Graci proudly brought in yet another mangled and lifeless bird, lizard or other animal. If there are indeed children in the Czapiewski household, did they jump up and down with voracious merriment when Graci brought in the tiny, dead hummingbird? Or did they mourn for it, before they quickly and unceremoniously flushed it down the toilet? One could dismiss this disturbing occurrence as “the circle of life” or “the law of the jungle,” or even, as Woody Allen once said, that “nature is just one big restaurant.” However, nothing could be further from the truth in regard to domestic cat owners who deliberately encourage such rapacious behavior. Intentionally allowing and encouraging a cat, or a child, for that matter, to maim and kill guileless native animal species, or any other animal, (and, take pleasure in it) is, frankly, beneath contempt. And, readers, do not fool yourselves into thinking that this occurrence, as so joyfully described by Mr. Czapiewski, is an anomaly– far from it. According to the Smithsonian Institution Conservation Biology Institute (Science News, 2/23/2013, ‘The Impact of Free-ranging Domestic Cats on Wildlife in the U.S.), statistical findings have shown that “Domestic cats kill more than one billion birds each year, many of them song birds”– and that is billion, not million (which is horrid enough). In addition, animals, (including opossums, who are, by the way, not related to rats, but are the United States’ only marsupial (like koalas and kangaroos), are protected under California Penal Code 597(a), which states that it is unlawful to maliciously maim, harass or kill any animal within the state of California (which, obviously covers the city of Signal Hill). As a child growing up during the early 1960s, (when humans were less aware of the damage that their pet cats can do when allowed to wander outside), our cat Crackerjack once brought in a beautiful little Goldfinch– dead, of course. I vividly remember my mother woefully and respectfully wrapping it up in cellophane and putting it in the freezer so that we could take it to the Natural History Museum’s Department of Ornithology for preservation and educational purposes. This careful attention taught me an important lesson– to be mindful of the existence of other living beings, not only ourselves. God help, protect and respect our native backyard birds, reptiles, and mammals from domestic predator cats like Graci and their owners.

Since starting the publication of this newspaper 14 years ago, I have faced many dilemmas. Some challenges I have faced include what stories to run, whether or not to endorse candidates, which employees to hire and which to fire, what policies to put in place when it comes to advertising and how to deal with letters to the editor. Recently, I found myself with a dilemma facing the latter. Earlier this week, I received a call from one of our readers, who I will from this point forward refer to as “Pat” in order to protect the actual person’s name and gender. Pat was very polite during our discussion, but nevertheless made it very clear that he/she was quite concerned about a letter to the editor that I had allowed to be printed in last week’s issue– March 21, 2014. The subject of that particular letter was the demise of a cat that had belonged to one of our readers. According to the letter, the cat had been recently been killed by a coyote. Pat wasn’t upset or unhappy about words bemoaning the loss of a pet being printed on the opinion page, although I can understand why some readers might have felt that it was a glorified pet obituary, rather Pat’s concern was that the letter contained comments about what a shrewd bird hunter the cat had been. During our phone chat, I told Pat that I believe cats should be kept indoors and that my focus on the letter was how sad I thought it was that the cat had been allowed to go out where it could face such dangers from roaming wildlife. Pat agreed that the death of the kitty was indeed sad, but his/her take-away from the letter was the death and carnage of our feathered friends caused by that very cat. When I suggested Pat write a letter to the editor, he/she hesitated out of fear of retaliation. Knowing that our policy for letter writers has always been to print the writer’s name, Pat declined my offer. I could sense by Pat’s tone of voice that a short conversation with me was not going to bring him/her satisfaction, so I came up with this idea: write me a letter to my personal email, and I will include it in my column. I will not use your name or gender, and I will carry your identity with me to the grave. Bless Pat’s heart; he/she did just that. I thank Pat for being such a concerned and loyal reader. Now, do not mistake my allowing Pat’s letter as a scolding by me to the letter writer who shared the story of his darling kitty’s tragic ending. I believe he wrote the letter in the first place in order to warn others to keep their cats indoors. I am simply Public domain

LETTERS, EMAILS, and WEBSITE COMMENTS

War stories

Congratulations to Mike and the amazing Long Beach/Rio Hondo chapter volunteers [“LB Chapter of American Red Cross records most veteran interviews in nation”]. They, along with the support of the chapter, are making history by preserving it. The Long Beach area should be very proud of their community and volunteers. Way to go, Mike. Four hundred is just around the corner. We’re proud of you. ian Whyte (website comment)

‘a’ is for...

Long Beach taxpayers are literally being taxed to death in the form of Proposition A. This tax measure is exorbitant and will place an egregious burden on people with cancer, AIDS, multiple sclerosis, seizures, PTSD, various disabilities, etc. No other physician-prescribed medicine in California faces such punitive measures. Additionally, it creates a precedent for any business to be taxed at prohibitive rates that will drive them to more business-friendly cities. And, it will empower the black market in providing cheaper, untaxed medicine to desperate patients. Revenues from this proposal may well end up fattening slush funds for the greedy politicians that have proposed it. Haven't Long Beach citizens been bled enough? A “no” vote on Prop A will let City Hall know that we taxpayers want less frivolous spending and no more excessive taxes. Diana lejins advocates for Disability rights long beach PubliShEr/EDiTOr-iN-chiEf

Neena R. Strichart

aSSOciaTE PubliShEr

Stephen M. Strichart

STaff WriTErS

Sean Belk CJ Dablo culTurE WriTErS

Daniel Adams Vicki Paris Goodman Gregory Spooner

Voluntary commentary

What comes to your mind when you think of volunteers? Dedication? Commitment? Long hours? I am a volunteer. I have volunteered at Hughes Middle School for over seven years. I still volunteer there even though my last child moved on to high school a year ago. I would venture to guess that I have logged over 10,000 hours at Hughes. According to Mr. Uduak-Joe Ntuk, candidate for school board, the thousands of hours I have spent at Hughes were the indulgence of a privileged person. Last Monday, I attended the LBCC candidates forum at which Mr. Ntuk told the crowd that his opponent, Megan Kerr, attended over 60 school board meetings because she had the “privilege” to do so. He seemed dismissive of the value of volunteerism. He seemed to suggest that Ms. Kerr, like me, and like so many parents in the LBUSD who can volunteer to coach, run clubs, raise money [and] write grants are somehow less qualified or knowledgeable than a person with a 9-to-5 job. When I volunteer at Hughes, it is to help make it the best school it can be. The fact that I have “the privilege” to volunteer does not in any way taint my efforts, the quality of my work or my ability to create and maintain programs that serve students with excellence. The fact that I have “the privilege” to spend 12 hours a week working directly with students does not make me less informed about the school, the students, and their needs– it makes me more so. Mr. Ntuk is foolish to dismiss the contributions of volunteers who “have the privilege” to support our schools. Programs live and die on the efforts of volunteers who raise millions of dollars for schools each year– PTA, boosters, festivals, fundraising sales, silent auctions, grants. Anyone running for the LBUSD school board should honor and appreciate all volunteers. I suspect that Ms. Kerr, who has attended these 60 school board meetings, deserves appreciation and respect rather than disdain– but I guess that’s politics.

Kimberly Peterson hughes green Team parent adviser long beach

Weekly reader

Signal Tribune, the biggest little paper in the West. I look forward to Fridays because I know I will be getting a copy of “all the news that’s fit to print” in the Signal Tribune. What a fun little paper you have– information about all the things that should interest and concern the people living in your delivery area. I know a lot of hard work goes into the making of your weekly paper, and I applaud that hard work and appreciate all the information provided by it. I discovered several businesses I frequent just from reading your paper and recognize the quality provided. Keep up the good work, and stay busy. Vivian c. Nelson

SIGNAL T

R

I

B

U

N

E

aDMiNiSTraTiVE aSSiSTaNT

Tanya Paz

Jennifer E. Beaver

long beach

DESigN EDiTOr/PrODucTiON MaNagEr

MaNagiNg EDiTOr

Leighanna Nierle

Cory Bilicko

aDVErTiSiNg cONSulTaNTS

Barbie Ellisen Jane Fallon cOluMNiSTS

Kenneth McKenzie Shoshanah Siegel

Carol Berg Sloan, RD

The Signal Tribune welcomes letters to the editor, which should be signed, dated and include a phone number to verify authenticity. Letters are due by noon on the Tuesday before desired publication date. The Signal Tribune reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, language and space requirements. Letters should be 400 words or less. The Signal Tribune will publish no more than one “pro” letter and one “con” letter on a particular topic in a single issue. The Signal Tribune does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other publications or otherwise presented in a public forum. Letters to the editor and commentaries are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Signal Tribune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, letters to the editor and commentaries are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. Letter-writers will be identified by their professional titles or affiliations when, and only when, the editorial staff deems it relevant and/or to provide context to the letter. We do not run letters to the editor submitted by individuals who have declared their candidacies for public office in upcoming races. This policy was put in place because, to be fair, if we publish one, we would have to publish all letters submitted by all candidates. The volume would no doubt eliminate space for letters submitted by other readers. Instead, we agree to interview candidates and print stories about political races in an objective manner and offer very reasonable advertising rates for those candidates who wish to purchase ads. The Signal Tribune is published each friday with a circulation of 25,000. Yearly subscriptions are available for $50.

939 E. 27th St., Signal hill, ca 90755 (562) 595-7900

www.signaltribune.com newspaper@signaltribune.com


NEWS

March 28, 2014

EYE ON CRIME

Crimes reported by LBPD, Council Districts 6, 7 & 8

friday, March 21 Battery 3:51am- Atlantic Ave./Del Amo Blvd. Saturday, March 22 Grand theft auto 3:53am- E. PCH/Cherry Ave.

Robbery of person 12:24pm- 3400 block Long Beach Blvd. Residential burglary 11:04pm- 2800 block Golden Ave.

Sunday, March 23 Robbery of person 12:49am- Long Beach Blvd./W. PCH Battery 10:27am- Pacific Ave./W. PCH

Grand theft auto 2:16pm- 2100 block Myrtle Ave.

Residential burglary 7:17pm- 2400 block Atlantic Ave. Assault 8:42pm- Earl Ave./E. 25th St.

Robbery of person 11:44pm- 2700 block Pacific Ave.

Monday, March 24 Residential burglary 9:48am- 2800 block California Ave.

Coffee

SigNal TribuNE

DUI 2:35am- Orange Ave./E. 23rd St. Suspect in custody.

Residential burglary 10:49am- 2000 block Pacific Ave.

Stolen vehicle 6:37am- Obispo Ave./E. PCH

Tuesday, March 25 Residential burglaries (2) 8:51am- 2000 block Pacific Ave.

Monday, March 24 Residential burglary 9:15am- 2100 block E. 21st St.

Robbery of person 9:03pm- 3700 block Locust Ave.

Crimes reported by SHPD, Citywide

Thursday, March 20 DUI 11:56pm- E. Hill St./Temple Ave.

Injury hit-and-run 6:46pm- E. PCH/Coronado Ave. Residential burglary 7:04pm- 2000 block E. 21st St.

Saturday, March 22 DUI 2:15am- E. Hill St./Gundry Ave.

Harry Fisher 68 Andre Oppenheim 79 Ethel Somers 95 Anna Lechuga 44 Louis Monroy 60 Carol Jean Mike 61 William Cooney 61 Jessie Creamer 101 Marie Coha 88 Antoinette Fenello 100 Rodrigo Guardado 61 Rosemary î‚Šompson 85 Karen Servin 48 Carlton Schurman 61 Carmelo Centeno Jr 61

Residential burglary 9:47am- 2800 block California Ave.

Petty theft 1pm- 1800 block E. Willow St. Named suspect.

Non-njury hit-and-run 1:11pm- 2500 block Orange Ave.

friday, March 21 Petty theft 1:38pm- 900 block E. 33rd St.

Under influence of alcohol or drugs 3:03pm- 2100 block Cherry Ave. Suspect in custody.

Lives Lived

Petty theft with prior 5:41pm- 2200 block E. Willow St.

Stolen vehicle recovered 7:28pm- 1800 block Henderson Ave.

Forgery 2:47pm- 2800 block Junipero Ave.

Residential burglary 9pm- 2200 block St. Louis Ave.

Auto burglary MA268404 11:30pm- Molino Ave./E. 20th St. Ontario, CA Engagement City: Tuesday, March 25 Newspaper Ad - B&W Media: DUI

FELD ENTERTAINMENT

Job No.:

Insertion Date(s):

îƒŤe families were assisted by McKenzie Mortuary. For more details on service dates and times, contact (562) 961-9301

Residential burglary 6:36pm- 2000 block E. 21st St.

Disney characters and artwork ŠDisney, Disney/Pixar characters ŠDisney/Pixar.

continued from page 2

(FU5JDLFUT5PEBZ

APR. 16 – 20

$*5*;&/4#64*/&44 BANK ARENA

2OFF

Not valid with any other offer. Expires 4/20/14. one per customer. BK store only.

Expert Care • Gentle Grooming • Walk-Ins Welcome*

* AS SPACE PERMITS

-0/(#&"$) ARENA

#VZ5JDLFUT 0OUBSJP "94DPN t7FOVF#PY0GGJDF 268404

MORE INFORMATION (562) 436-3828

APR. 23 – 27

Buy Tickets (Long Beach): Ticketmaster.com t7FOVF#PY0GGJDF

5OFF

#DisneyOnIce

Ad Size

Section

1:50am- E. 29th St./Walnut Ave.

bers of the community are seeing. There were also the suggestions from others that premiums will stabilize once more young people enroll. “We get people here from the furthest conservative to the furthest liberal,â€? Lowenthal said. “Some want more programs, some want no programs, some want government out of health insurance, others are just grateful they can’t get kicked off for having a pre-existing condition.â€? The tone in these meetings is always the same, Lowenthal said. It’s having someone to listen that he says his constituents appreciate most. One of Lowenthal’s constituents, Nasser Sharif, said he attended the community coffee because he cares about what is going on in the district as well as in the Iranian community. Sharif said he wanted to meet Lowenthal and share his community’s concerns. “I think [the event] is very important because most of the time, people don’t get a chance to meet face-to-face with members of Congress,â€? Sharif said. “It’s a great opportunity to come and share their stories and concerns. Not everyone is able to get an appointment with their members of Congress. So these meetings are very important, not just for the constituents, but for the Congressman to hear their stories as well.â€? Sharif said that the issue he was most interested in Lowenthal address was global human rights abuses. “Our foreign affairs issues are particularly important to me,â€? he said. “Especially human rights issues in Iran.â€? “They know they are not going to get their way every time, but it’s through meetings like this that they get to hear all the different kinds of issues and get to express what they feel gets ignored,â€? he said. Helene Ansel, senior field representative for Lowenthal, said that these community coffees also draw in people who need help solving a specific problem. “A lot of times we get questions that really have nothing to do with the federal level, and they just don’t know, but we can point them in the right direction,â€? Ansel said. Sometimes, there are issues addressed that he can help with, and Ashley Fowler/Signal Tribune Lowenthal says its also just helpful After U.S. Rep. Alan Lowenthal’s “community coffeeâ€? event on March 22, members for him to know what folks are fac- of the public pulled the Congressmember aside to seek his counsel more privately. ing. “Half the folks like one side of GROOMING • FOOD • SUPPLIES • SELF-SERVICE WASH the argument, and the other half of 4102 Orange Ave. the folks were on the other side,â€? Self-Service #113 $ Lowenthal said. “And that’s what’s Pet Wash at Carson St. so good about it, to listen to what’s Not valid with any other offer. Expires Open Tues–Sun 4/20/14. one per customer. BK store only. going on.â€? 562-427-2551 Lowenthal plans to continue these community coffees so he has Full-Service $ access to as many residents as posGrooming on first visit or $3 off next visit. $25 min. sible.

5

disneyonice.com


cOMMuNiTY

6 SigNal TribuNE SHPD plans ‘zero tolerance’ of distracted driving this April

As part of April’s Distracted Driving Awareness Month campaign, the Signal Hill Police Department (SHPD) will be joining over 200 other lawenforcement agencies and the California Highway Patrol in a month-long “zero tolerance” enforcement and education campaign to curb those texting or operating hand-held cell phones while driving. Officers will be on alert throughout the month for those who break the cellphone laws, and special high-visibility enforcement operations to cite cell phone violators will take place every day during the month of April, according to the SHPD. The increased enforcement and education aims to persuade drivers to recognize the dangers of distracted driving and reduce the number of people impacted by this perilous behavior. The “It’s Not Worth It!” theme emphasizes that a phone call or text isn’t worth a hefty fine or a collision. The current minimum ticket cost is $161, with subsequent tickets costing at least $281. “Driving a vehicle is operating ‘heavy equipment’ and requires the use of all of our senses to do so safely,” said SHPD Chief Michael Langston. “Talking on a cell phone or texting distracts the driver both mentally and physically from focusing on operating the vehicle safely. We take distracted driving very seriously. Is that cell phone call or text message really worth $161, or worse, someone’s life?” Source: SHPD

March 28, 2014

Signal Hill Petroleum sponsors high-school robotics team

Signal Hill Petroleum sponsored the Epic Robotz, a team of students from Valley Christian High, in the 14th annual FIRST Robotics Competition at the Long Beach Arena. The competition, which took place on March 21 and 22, featured 66 teams from around the country vying for a chance to go to the national championship in St. Louis later this year. The Valley Christian High team featured 23 students on the team as well as 13 adult mentors that help the students with their experience. The students designed and built their own robot in six weeks, specifically to compete in this competition. This Courtesy SHP year’s competition featured robots that were Signal Hill Petroleum communications specialist Stefanie Gillett (back row, built to throw large balls through a goal or fourth from left) with the Valley Christian High School Epic Robotz team during over a scaffolding to score points. Valley the 14th annual FIRST Robotics Competition at the Long Beach Arena Christian High finished 13 of 66 teams. In addition to sponsoring the team, Signal Hill Petroleum provided them with a trailer as a mobile workshop and transportation for the robot to the competition. Signal Hill Petroleum’s communications specialist Stefanie Gillett attended the event. “One of Signal Hill Petroleum’s core values is STEM: science, technology, engineering and mathematics programs, especially in our youth,” Gillett said. “By supporting an event like this, we help more children become aware of STEM careers and open the door to more intelligent young minds joining the oil industry. A program like this encompasses so much of what Signal Hill Petroleum believes in.” Source: SHP

The

Tile Zone Ceramic & Porcelain Tiles Custom Design & Installation

3677 Atlantic Avenue

562-988-8429 W W W .T H E T I L E Z O N E . C O M

Educational Opportunity Center offering free program to help adults meet educational goals

HUNDREDS OF LOCAL REFERENCES OVER 35 yEARS ExPERIENCE BIxBy KNOLLS RESIDENT LICENSED • INSURED “A-rated”on angieslist.com Contractor’s License #629882

(562) 427-0688 Call Dennis Bartlett:

The staff at Educational Opportunity Center (EOC) in Long Beach is looking for adults who want to go back to school or who need advice in road-mapping their educational goals. The EOC staff, who have knowledge in GED testing, postsecondary advisement, financial-aid information and vocational education, are offering their services free of charge upon eligibility. The EOC program is funded by the Department of Education and is designed to assist adult participants who want to enter or re-enter high school or pursue postsecondary education. Eligible participants are US citizens or permanent residents who live within the target areas of the program and are 19 or older. The program’s target areas include Signal Hill, Long Beach, Compton, Harbor City, Lomita, Lynwood, Paramount, Willowbrook and Wilmington. The EOC office provides financial-aid workshops every Thursday from 1pm to 2pm that are open to those who are interested in learning more about the program. The Educational Opportunity Center is located in the Career Transition Center, 3447 Atlantic Ave., 2nd floor. For more information, contact Curglin Robertson at (562) 570-3715 or visit csulb/eoc.edu . Source: EOC

Boys & Girls Clubs of Long Beach aim for ‘over-the-top’ fundraiser The Boys & Girls Clubs of Long Beach will hold their annual fundraising effort at the Marine Stadium in Long Beach on Saturday, April 5. To celebrate 75 years of “positively impacting youth,” the event committee will attempt an unprecedented challenge of raising $1,000,000 to help fund programs after school, when adolescents experience the highest risk of crime, and to contribute to the endowment fund created in 2013, according to a press release issued by the organization.

Setting the Course for the Future...

City of Signal Hill

Strategic Plan Visioning Workshop Please come – your input is important!

Wed., April 2, 2014 at 7:00pm Topics Discussed:

Community Services • Community Development Economic Development • Finance

Signal Hill Community Center 1780 E. Hill Street, Signal Hill Questions: (562) 989-7379

This will be the first major charitydriven event in Long Beach targeting a more youthful demographic through a reimagined event format and program, according to the event’s organizers. As the board’s youngest elected event chair, Trent Bryson aims to create an over-thetop experience for local residents and corporate sponsors not traditionally linked with fundraising events. The evening will feature specialty sunset cocktails, silent and live auctions, “decadent” cuisine and a live performance by the Spazmatics. To bring this year’s “All That Glitters” theme to life, the Boys & Girls Clubs have enlisted Ryan Choura of Choura Events, a boutique event rental and tenting agency, to transform Marine Stadium into an exclusive tented affair for the 500 expected guests. The event will use the same tent used at the Golden Globes’ Harvey Weinstein after-party. “We’re putting a ballroom on the water and building something that’s never been done in Long Beach,”

Choura said. “I think people would be disappointed if they weren’t a part of this historic event.” For 75 years, the Boys & Girls Clubs of Long Beach have helped over 220,000 at-risk and in-need youth reach their full potential, according to the organization. “Events like this are invaluable to the future success of B&G Clubs in our community and will ultimately deliver a more self-sustaining method for funding alternative, safe places for our kids to go,” said Barbie Barker, Boys & Girls Clubs of Long Beach Board president. “There will be plenty of surprises,” Bryson said. “We aim to create an unforgettable evening that will propel the Boys & Girls Clubs into the next 75 years.” To purchase individual tickets, tables, or VIP cabanas, visit bgclublb.org/ events . Sponsorship opportunities are still available. Contact Joy Lodevico at JoyL@ bgclublb.org .

Source: Boys & Girls Clubs

Harbor Commission meeting open to public

The Long Beach Board of Harbor Commissioners will have its next regular meeting at 6pm on Monday, March 31 at the Miller Family Health Education Center, 3820 Cherry Ave. The meeting will be open to the public and will also be available online via live and archived webcast at polb.com/webcast . The meeting agenda is available at the same webpage. “This allows us to conduct the important business of the Port in the community until our board room is completed,” said Dr. Noel Hacegaba, acting deputy executive director and chief operating officer for the Port of Long Beach. The City of Long Beach Harbor Department recently moved its headquarters from its previous administration building in the Port of Long Beach to interim administrative offices near Long Beach Airport. A board meeting room is being prepared at those offices but is not yet ready for use. The Harbor Commission directs the 450-person staff of the City of Long Beach Harbor Department in development and promotion of the Port of Long Beach. Source: Port of LB

New hours now in effect:

Tues.-Thurs.: 5pm to 9pm • Friday: 5pm to 9:30pm Sat.: Noon to 9:30pm • Lunch Tues.-Fri.: 11:30am to 3pm Closed on Sunday & Monday

2201 East Willow St., Suite G in Signal Hill 562.595.0210 | Sushi, Tempura, & Traditional Favorites


March 28, 2014 In Living Color

cOMMuNiTY

SigNal TribuNE

7

Putting ‘spring’ in your steps for cleaning house Shoshanah Siegel Columnist

The idea of doing spring cleaning has always felt overwhelming and daunting. In order to relieve the anxiety, this year my husband and I have started tackling a few cleaning projects each weekend. Ready to tackle your projects? Where to begin? I would suggest tackling the interior first. your list may differ from mine, but it will give you a starting point. you might be reminded about places that may have not made it on your list. I hope that my article will give you a game plan, and in the end you will feel like you have lightened your load and can see your home sparkle. a room with a view Wash your windows. I suggest that you pick a cloudy day to wash them. If it is too sunny, the cleaning solution will dry too fast and you will have streaks. My office is south-facing and gets bombarded by heat. Last weekend we put a film on the windows to reflect the sun’s rays. The job took a little longer because it was not a cloudy day and the solution kept drying out. I am happy to report that my office was a lot cooler and I didn’t need my window air conditioner even though it was hot outside. Don’t let it slide your sliding glass doors are probably not the first spot you’d think about cleaning, but you’ll appreciate that you have done so once outdoor entertaining begins. One tool I use to clean many surfaces is a dry toothbrush to loosen debris, then a vacuum hose to remove it and, finally, a wet sponge to finish the job. Now your doors are shiny-clean. For safety, you might apply a fun decal so that your guests can see that the door is closed. refresh your window treatments To really feel like spring is here, change out heavy fabric window treatments for ones that are lighter and brighter. However, if you have the same window treatments year round, you can either have them cleaned professionally or clean them in your own washing machine. They might only need a good going over with a vacuum. For the sheer curtains, Donna Small, the author of Cleaning Plain & Simple, suggests putting them in the dryer on low with a fabric-softener sheet. For window shutters or blinds, I suggest cleaning them first with a duster or vacuum, then for a finishing touch, use a damp sponge. Surfaces that may need yearly Tlc Take this opportunity to really clean surfaces that you may not have done on a daily basis. These include baseboards, door frames, walls and hardto-reach places. If they are really worn and damaged, after a good washing, you might need to repaint the surface. Down under Unless I am moving or need to replace a new appliance, I usually don’t see under my refrigerator or stove. Spring cleaning might be the time to address those areas. I have found the lost sock and even money under my washer and dryer. While you have someone to help you move your appliances, it might also be the optimum time to get help cleaning under sofas and chairs. refresh where you sit Restore your leather and fabric furniture with the suggested cleaners. Rotate seat cushions and replace those that have seen better days. This is a time to really clean your wood furniture. However, be sure to check that you are using the right product for the job.

No need to tread lightly From the foot traffic of winter, now is the time to refresh carpets, rugs and floors. Wash or dry-clean rugs, hire a carpet-cleaning service or do it yourself by renting the equipment you will need from a home-improvement store. Replace any worn pieces of wood or tile. Wash and wax floors. lighten it up Use micro fiber or lint-free cloth to dust fixtures and bulbs. An extendable duster is great for hard-to-reach places, like ceiling fans. To clean grimy bulbs, make sure they are cool to the touch. Use a lightly dampened cloth with vinegar to do the job. Making the switch Clothing: Consider sending items that you will not be using until next year to the cleaners and/or store them away, leaving room for spring and summer apparel. Bedrooms: Rotate and flip mattresses. Wash blankets, duvet covers, mattress pads and bed skirts. Have pillows professionally cleaned or think about replacing them if needed. clean areas that you use most The two areas that seem to get used the most are bathrooms and kitchens. For bathrooms, go through your medicine cabinet and safely discard any outdated products and medications. Clean out drawers and rearrange items. Replace worn bath mats, shower curtains and liners, or if they don’t need replacing, they may benefit from a good wash and dry. To avoid purchasing duplicate items in your kitchen, take the time to empty out drawers and cabinets. We recently cleaned out our catch-all utensil drawer and found about 30 pairs of corncob holders, cutlery we forgot we had and knives that were dull and worn. Wipe the areas out and line with fresh shelf paper. Store what you use infrequently and donate items that you no longer use. Discard old spices and items, like baking powder. Clean the refrigerator and freezer. Throw away those items that are covered in frost and you are not able to identify. We call these items UFOs (unidentified food objects). While you have the refrigerator pulled out from the wall, this is a great time to dust or vacuum the cooling coils behind the refrigerator. Safety first If you have difficulty remembering when to change the various filters in the house, or the last time you checked the batteries in your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors, the day you change the clocks for daylight-saving

time might be the perfect time to do these tasks. Take your cleaning tasks outdoors The first task I would conquer is the gutters. Spring usually brings showers. So clean out gutters and downspouts, allowing the water to have a place to go to, other than staying stagnant on your roof or down your walls. Clean and repair patio furniture, your deck, porch, barbecues, and other items you will be using in the upcoming seasons. My wish is that you feel a little more confident about your spring cleaning. Take it step by step. your goal is to have a healthy and happy environment for family and friends to enjoy.

Shoshanah Siegel provides color consulting as well as space planning, remodeling, upgrading and staging through her firm Your Color Diva. She can be contacted at (562) 427-0440, shoshanah.siegel@gmail.com, and at her new website, yourcolordiva.com .

Shoshanah Siegel/Signal Tribune

Some tools for combatting the sometimes daunting task of spring cleaning

!"#$%"#&$'()"#%*+'"($*,"-+$.*+&#$-/&$0#"1','+'"(/2$3'/'+$"-#$.&,/'+&$*+ ...45,.*+&#4"#67.*+&#8-/&80#"1','+'"(/$


culTurE

8 SigNal TribuNE

Imitating Life

March 28, 2014

A portrait of local artist Alex Garcia

Cory Bilicko

Managing Editor

Since I began profiling local artists in June of 2011, I’ve found these folks in various ways: referrals from friends, press releases from local galleries and museums, Google searches, exhibit openings and so on. I met Alex Garcia at a downtown Long Beach wine bar while a friend and I were enjoying a few glasses before a concert. I don’t recall which of us mentioned our creative endeavors first, but, at some point, he referred to his art, and I asked to see some of it. It amused me that this young guy’s point of view was so reminiscent of 1960s-1970s psychedelia and that his influences seemed rooted in the rock bands of that era. Born in Danbury, Connecticut on Aug. 11, 1983 and having lived there until high school, he later moved to Greenville, North Carolina. After serving in the U.S. Marine Corps from May 2008 to April 2012, he moved to Long Beach in September 2012. “I have always wanted to live on the

The artist with an acrylic painting he did on a helicopter tail blade as a gift to his commanding officer while stationed in Okinawa in 2009

sons he enlisted in the armed forces. For one, between 2006 and 2008, it was very difficult to find a job as a recent college graduate. “I had graduated from HampdenSydney College in Virginia in 2006,” he said. “I had been living with my mother for about a year, and a recent college graduate’s résumé just wasn’t much of an asset for me at the time. This does not mean the military was my last resort; my mother and I have always got along very well, and she loved having me live there. I also had plenty of time to do some artwork, but I am a very restless individual if I don’t have a job to go to.” Throughout his life, he’s always liked the idea of the Marine Corps. “you’ve seen all the movies, I’m sure, and I am a bit of a glutton for punishment, and the armed forces were hiring,” he said. “I had an overwhelming sense that I was just too young to be working in an office, and I love the USA. I figured it was time to serve before I spend the rest of my life wondering, ‘What if?’” how would you describe yourself and what you do as an artist? I would first describe myself Reproduction of the album cover of Led Zeppelin’s Physical Graffitti, graphite pencil on paper West Coast,” Garcia said. “I love sunny weather. I can’t stand rain and snow. I love how there are so many different people and cultures. And mainly, I moved here to try and get my art off the ground and make a career out of it.” Garcia said there are numerous rea-

Forecasters say:

???

Just in case, we have a 48-hour rain check policy. Remember: The best way to fight rain & inclement weather is to keep your car protected with frequent polishing & detailing.

We are the experts! oPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK, WEATHER PERMITTING

Bixby Knolls Car Wash

577 E. Wardlow Rd. @ Atlantic Avenue • 562-595-6666

& Detail Center

“Desert Day Dream,” acrylic on paper

as a person of habit and routine, and strongly individualistic. I am hard-working, motivated and dedicated to whatever job or mission is set before me. I believe my work ethic reflects in my art. No work of art is worthwhile taking on unless it shows that time, sweat and blood were put into it. What do you think of the art scene in long beach? I love the art scene in Long Beach very much. There are lots of creative people who respect and appreciate art, all forms of it. On the East Coast, my style just doesn’t get much recognition. It “Run Like Hell,” acrylic on paper seems people on the East Coast pay more attention to tame, Beach and settled into my routine, and I more traditional styles such as– I hate to came into contact with the gasket-making materials and tools we use at work. say it– “hotel art.” What is your greatest obstacle to mak- They are perfect, and I mean absolutely perfect, for making beer-can sculptures. ing art? My biggest obstacle, and I think the only And that’s what I’ve been doing for the obstacle I’ve ever encountered in my art- past year or so. But, really, all I needed was work, is time. I have never had a short- my own space, time and the right materiage of ideas. It seems I’m thinking of als, and I pretty much figured it out. I am new ideas every day, every hour! There not the only person in the world who just simply isn’t enough time to get them makes beer-can sculptures, but I like to all accomplished. But this is a very think I’ve got my own technique. I’d be superficial worry– of course there is lots glad to teach anyone in detail, because the of time in life, and there are many other possibilities are endless. things to do. Impatience is a young how much art did you create during your service? man’s game. I didn’t keep track of all the pieces I did Do you have a “day job?” Well, of course. I’m not that good at art in those four years. I’m estimating I did just yet. I work at Allied Packing and about 40 to 50 in total. Of those, about Rubber, which is near the Port of Long half were helicopter-blade paintings. Beach. We make and sell industrial pipe, They were very sought after. Ballpoint hose and gasket products, mostly for the pen became my favorite medium, just Port engineers and shipping companies. because I could take a drawing pad and What artistic training or education pens anywhere. how has your service in the military have you had? I don’t have any formal art education, I influenced your art work? never went to art school, I believe the last My time in the military influenced my art class I took was in my sophomore artwork profoundly. It really became my year in high school, about 15 years ago. sense of individuality and my sense of That is not to say my friends, family, freedom. And really became almost a teachers and professors did not notice bodily function. Since then, I just don’t and encourage me making art. In fact, I feel right unless I have piece in the works. am extremely fortunate to have had very It’s like coming home to a beautiful supportive people throughout my life. woman, just seeing my work in progress Without them I never would have pro- on my desk and spending some time on it. I met a lot of young individuals who gressed to the level I am at. how did you learn how to create your had joined for the same reasons I had, and beer-can sculpture? Was it trial and I made friendships that will last the rest of error, or did you learn the technique my life. And everyone I met influenced my art and encouraged me. through someone else? Beer-can art was all kind of serendipity. It started while I was staying with an aunt Garcia may be contacted at in Pasadena when I first came to Califor- garcia.alexd@gmail.com . nia and I visited a bar which had some silly-looking model airplanes made out of beer cans. Very childish, but they fit the atmosphere of the pub just fine. I thought to myself, “I know I could make those better!” A few weeks went by, and I found my “Neptuna,” beer cans and cork board job in Long


culTurE

March 28, 2014

SigNal TribuNE

Signal Hill nonprofit gallery honors bird-rescue group, Signal Tribune editor for community contributions

Greenly Art Space, a nonprofit gallery in Signal Hill, honored the contributions of two local entities during an awards ceremony on Saturday, March 22.

birds of a feather Kimberly Hocking, the director and curator of Greenly, presented a donation of $699.14 to South Bay Wildlife Rehab (SBWR), another nonprofit dedicated to caring for California native birds and educating the public about the natural world. Christina Jones, SBWR assistant director, accepted the check on behalf of the organization. Hocking said Greenly had preselected the bird-rescue organization to be the benefactor of the gallery’s first-ever fundraising exhibit. “At Greenly Art Space, we value community and look for ways to partner with other nonprofits to encourage

awareness through the arts,” Hocking said. “For our first annual fundraising art show, we wanted to explore the concept of birds and the ways they inspire us. As part of this, we invited South Bay Wildlife Rehab, a local nonprofit working to rescue birds, to join us at the opening and share their work with the community. They brought three beautiful rescue birds to the opening. We are thrilled to have been able to raise both funds and awareness for such a wonderful cause.” Each year, SBWR rehabilitates more than 1,000 sick, injured and orphaned birds for return to the wild and educates over 30,000 individuals about wildlife and environmental issues, according to the group’s website. “The opening was a very exciting event for us,” Jones said. “By partering with Greenly Art Space, we were able to meet many individuals who weren’t aware of our organization and what we do.” She said the monetary contribution will be used for some basic needs of her organization. “One hundred percent of all money received to South Bay Wildlife Rehab goes to the direct care of birds we take in,” she said. “It would include helping us with paying for food and medical care.”

Photos by David Hocking

(From left) Kimberly Hocking, director and curator of Greenly Art Space, and Christina Jones, South Bay Wildlife Rehab assistant director

State of the art The other honor Greenly bestowed that evening was to Cory Bilicko, managing editor of the Signal Tribune. Each week, Bilicko features a different local

artist in the newspaper, publishing a feature story or interview with the creative individual, as well as highlighting one of the artist’s works on the front page as the background image for the publication’s nameplate. “We are very excited to present the First Annual Greenly Art Space Fellowship Award to Cory Bilicko for outstanding service to artists in our community,” Hocking said. “At Greenly, we value building community among artists by encouraging them in their calling. Through his work featuring artists from our community, Cory is an example of what it means to honor the work of local artists. Cory’s work with the Signal Tribune newspaper to present art and artists in color with attention to artistic detail is commendable and does credit to the artists’ craft.” Bilicko has been featuring artists on the newspaper’s front page since June 24, 2011. “It was the proverbial necessity giving birth to invention,” Bilicko said. “We wanted an image for the front-page nameplate that was colorful– and legal to use. What better way to ensure you’re using an image that is copyright-safe than to use one of your own.” That week, the newpaper published a close-up of a painting of dragonflies that Bilicko had done for his very first art show, which had just occurred three weeks prior. That painting, entitled “Aflutter,” also happened to be the very first piece he’d sold. “Of course, I wasn’t going to feature my own work every week, and I wondered, ‘How can I make this work so that it has real value and benefit to the greatest number of people?’ Then the idea came to me that this could be a vehicle for promoting local artists,” he said. “I had learned the power of supporting creative individuals from my grandmother, who, anytime I would draw something, would say,

9

(From left) Cory Bilicko, managing editor of the Signal Tribune newspaper, and Kimberly Hocking, director and curator of Greenly Art Space

‘Oh, hon. This is beautiful.’ And she’d put it on her fridge with a magnet. That made me feel special, and it certainly encouraged me to foster my creative spirit.” Bilicko says that, since the Signal Tribune has been profiling a different painter, illustrator, muralist, ceramicist, sculptor, mosaicist, jewelry maker or tattooer each week for two years and nine months, to date, about 140 artists have graced the pages of the newspaper. “I thank our publisher, Neena Strichart, for trusting me and allowing me the freedom to pursue such an endeavor, and our design editor, Leighanna Nierle, for helping me

make sure the artists’ works look good when we publish them,” Bilicko said. Included in Greenly’s award to Bilicko were: a framed, handmade mosaic piece that Hocking created; a $50 gift certificate to a local art-supply store; a yearlong membership to Greenly; and the opportunity to cocurate an exhibit with Hocking based on Bilicko’s own concept. MORE INFORMATION greenlyartspace.com sbwr.org (310) 378-9921

Sources: Greenly Art Space, SBWR

Long Beach Chorale, Chamber Orchestra to perform ‘challenge’ of Mendelssohn’s Elijah LONG BEACH LOCATIONS 250 W. Ocean Blvd. | (562) 432-2211 401 W. Willow St. | (562) 595-6138

WE OFFERIC N ORGAO NS OPTI Courtesy LBCCO

The Long Beach Chorale and Chamber Orchestra will perform Felix Mendelssohn’s Elijah this weekend in two shows.

T

he Long Beach Chorale and Chamber Orchestra (LBCCO) will present two performances of Felix Mendelssohn’s Elijah Saturday, March 29 at 7pm and Sunday, March 30 at 4pm at Grace First Presbyterian Church, 3955 Studebaker Rd. The Chorale’s 70-plus voices will be accompanied by a full orchestra. In this work, regarded as one of the greatest choral-orchestral masterpieces in the repertoire, Mendelssohn tells the Old Testament story of the prophet Elijah, how he helped steer the people of Israel away from the idol Baal and back to God, and how he was eventually swept up to Heaven in a chariot of fire. LBCCO will be joined by a quartet of solo vocalists, with David Stoneman returning in the role of Elijah. “In recent years, we’ve been dreaming big, presenting concerts of a grander scope each season,” said Eliza Rubenstein, LBCCO artistic director. “Elijah represents one of our strongest efforts to date. The level of musicianship and stamina required for these performances sets a high bar, and the chorale has risen to the challenge.” Tickets, which are $25 for adults and $15 for students, are available at longbeachchorale.org or by calling (562) 427-1931.

Source: LBCCO

Receive a $5 gi certificate with your purchase of $25 or more! (with this ad) HOME OF THE WORLD’S FIRST

E-HOOKAH

Electronic Cigarettes, Vaporizers, Tanks and Accessories

2139 Bellflower Blvd. @ Stearns St. Long Beach | 562-494-1442 w w w. t h e v a p e d e p o t . c o m


10 SigNal TribuNE

cOMMuNiTY

Poly High School Parent-Teacher-Student Association donates $1,000 to homeless-children’s transitional center

March 28, 2014

Business organization establishes new board of directors

This year’s board for the Executives Association Long Beach include: (pictured from left) Craig Kotani (immediate past president) of Sawin & Kotani CPAs; Scott Williams, attorney at law; Machelle Thompson (secretary/treasurer) of Keen Home Care; Kelly Williams (president); Kellie Sherrill (vice president) of Knightling Web Design; Kolby Pabst of Pabst, Kinney & Associates; and John Berg of Transcom Telecommunications. (Not pictured is Rusty Deeble.) “Our board is on a two-year rotation,” Sherrill said. “Half are re-elected each year, and the others are carry-overs from the year before. We ask our board members to serve a minimum of six years, although most serve 9 Courtesy Kellie Sherrill years, and to progress through the ranks into the leadership positions of secretary/treasurer, vice president, president and immediate past president.” The Executives Association of Long Beach was founded in 1922, and its sole purpose is to facilitate the creation of business opportunities for its members, according to the organization’s website.

City of Signal Hill seeking vendors for pet event Courtesy Poly High PTSA

Stan Epstein, Long Beach Poly High Parent Teacher Student Association (PTSA) auditor; Sharifa Batts, PTSA president; Sharon Coudyser, director of Community Concerns at Long Beach PTA; and Rhonda Haramis, program facilitator/coordinator for the Bethune Transitional Center

The Parent-Teacher-Student Association (PTSA) at Long Beach Poly High donated $1,000 to the Mary McLeod Bethune Transitional Center, 2101 San Gabriel Ave., on March 18. PTSA President Sharifa Batts said her organization selected the center for the donation after hearing about its history of service to the community. Additionally, several of the high school’s students had benefited from the center’s services. On February 9, 2006, the Long Beach Unified School District (LBUSD) dedicated the center and its education of homeless children in the community to the legacy of Mary McLeod Bethune, an educator and civil-rights leader who started a school for African-American students in Daytona Beach, Florida and became an advisor to President Franklin D. Roosevelt. In addition to focusing on academics, the transitional center provides support with mental health, medical access, enrichment activities, school uniforms, and a variety of needed school supplies. Source: Poly PTSA

The City of Signal Hill Community Services Department will host its annual event for pets and their human friends, Hounds on the Hill, in Signal Hill Park on Saturday, June 7 from 11am to 2pm, featuring vendor booths, pet vaccinations, activities for children, music, demonstrations and more. The goal of the event is to raise awareness about responsible pet ownership, including current laws regarding pets. The City of Signal Hill is currently seeking pet-related vendors to promote their businesses. According to the Community Services Department, for “a small fee,” vendors will receive a 10-foot-by-15-foot space with a table and two chairs to display or sell their merchandise or services. Interested vendors should call (562) 989-7330.

Source: City of SH

Cultural event aims to help orphaned, abandoned children born with HIV

The vintage store Warehouse 1333, 1347 Redondo Ave., will host a night of traditional Cambodian Art to benefit New Hope For Cambodian Children, a residential facility that is home to orphaned and abandoned children born with HIV, on Saturday, April 5. In addition to a silent auction of photographs taken at New Hope, there will be a dance performance by students from the Khmer Arts Academy, traditional music by Cheeravath Aphipunyo, food from Crystal Thai & Cambodian Cuisine, and a sampling of beers by Long Beachbased Khmer brewery, Stone Temple Beer Company. The event coalesced around Joe Love, a yoga instructor and gymnast who returned from New Hope For Cambodian Children (NHCC) with photos from his trip and inspiration. “Last spring, I did a sensitivity training with the Heart Touch Project,” Love said. “They offer compassionate touch and healing to terminally ill men, women and children in the Los Angeles area. When I found out they had an outreach program to NHCC, I did not hesitate to go. I went with a group of massage therapists, nurses, physical therapists and holistic practitioners. The kids had an eagerness to learn. They were physically strong and, like all kids, just wanted to play, laugh, and be free. By the end of my two weeks at New Hope, I had nearly every child that came to class in a handstand, which really is the ultimate pose of balance, strength, and flying.” NHCC was founded in 2006 by John and Kathy Tucker, an American couple who had previously founded the Little Sprouts program, which was the first to provide antiretroviral drug treat-

ment and residential care to Cambodian children infected with HIV. NHCC provides care to 240 orphans and abandoned children at its residential facility and also provides social support to more than 1,400 infected children and their families living throughout the country, according to a press release issued on behalf of Warehouse 1333. The fundraiser will include a silent auction of various donated items, and all food and beverage sales will go toward the effort, according to the press release. Also, all money raised from the sale of photos taken by the members of the Heart Touch Project will be donated to NHCC. Direct donations are also welcome. Award-winning dancer Prumsoduntras Surya Ok is associate artistic director of Khmer Arts Academy. “We will be presenting our Khmer Arts Salon Series, a program of demonstration and performance designed to introduce diverse audiences to the art of Khmer classical dance,” Ok said. “It is a great opportunity for our students to contribute to their community. It will help them to understand what role they may play using art to elevate the lives of others.” March Beagle, owner of Warehouse 1333, said she is thrilled that her space can serve as a community and cultural gathering place. “I'm glad that our store can help to bring our neighbors together in support of a great cause,” Beagle said. “Our goal is to raise $5,000 for NHCC, and have fun doing it.” The event, sponsored in part by the The LGBTQ Center of Long Beach, will begin at 5pm and end at 10pm.

Approved Watering Schedule Source: Warehouse 1333

Norma B. Hill, who made this silk scarf, is making another one specially for an upcoming art event to benefit New Hope For Cambodian Children, a residential facility that is home to orphaned and abandoned children born with HIV.

Watering is approved on the following days:

Monday, Thursday, & Saturday before 9am and after 4pm

For more information, call the Water Conservation Hotline:

562-989-7350


March 28, 2014

Workshop

continued from page 1

“It is really important for residents to really give us input at the City level,” Farfsing said. “If you really think about it, if we had not sat down with [the community] eight years ago to talk about strategic planning, we wouldn’t have had the idea that the community needed a new police station.” In the last strategic plan, the City set a goal to add a new police station, which was completed in 2011. “Strategic planning is really about developing a vision,” Police Chief Mike Langston said. “Our new police facility started as a vision over a decade ago when former Chief of Police Don Pederson brought together a group of concerned citizens, the blue-ribbon panel, who recognized the need for a new police facility and increased staffing levels within the police department.” Council took those recommendations, though it took some time to achieve them fully– it wasn’t until this fiscal year that the department added the last officer that the blue-ribbon panel had recommended back in 2001. Langston said that in 2012, the Police Department leadership team used input from community members, City Council, City leaders and police personnel to develop a three-year strategic plan to help guide the department. “We realize that there are things we need to work on internally to improve our services overall,” Langston said. Enhancing community relations was one of the department’s primary objectives, and Langston mentioned several outreach improvements implemented that made him proud. First, the police department reestablished the neighborhood watch program that had “completely fallen by the wayside,” he said. Second, the police station will hold its first open house in May. Annually, the public will be invited to visit the facility, take a tour and observe the inner workings of the police department. Third, it was a priority for the police department to develop a school resource officer program with the Long Beach Unified School District. “Especially with the new middle school,” Langston said. “We knew there would be traffic issues and issues with the students.” In addition, the police department implemented scheduling and payroll software and plans to deploy electronic ticketing, eliminating the time lost while manually inputting data. The police department also employed automated license-plate readers in the city. “We hope and we think we’ve been doing some things right,” Langston said. The results of a survey that the City conducted showed that the police department had a favorable rating of 84 percent. “We did take note of some of the areas that were of concern for the public,” Langston said. “Obviously, traffic safety and speed are always a concern, and we’re looking to see how we can better address those issues.” Langston noted that homelessness was also a concern for the community. He said that the police department has partnered with the Los Angeles Department of Mental Health to prepare a mental-health initiative, assigning a police officer to “provide direct services to the homeless and the mentally ill in hopes of getting them off the street.” Fortunately, violent crime in Signal Hill is “very low,” lower than the state average, Langston said. Property crimes, specifically larceny, are where residents and police are experiencing a problem. According to the resident-satisfaction survey, 72 percent of residents felt it was extremely important that the police department receive the funding they need. “If we were to lose any significant

NEWS

SigNal TribuNE

11

funding, it would severely impact our heart attacks requiring ability to serve,” Langston said. “We life-saving proviwere hit with a large budget cut, and it sions,” Lewis said. has certainly affected us.” Rescues also Langston expressed his concerns decreased from about about the department’s ability to main- 900 to 800, Lewis tain the quality of services they pro- said. He credited CPR vide. Currently, the department is classes and “other short-staffed by five or six officers. means of service In 2011, the police department had available to the puba collective 354 years of experience lic.” amongst 31 officers, an average of 11.4 “The public can years per officer. Today, the department intervene prior to us employs 36 officers with an average of getting there,” Lewis 8.4 years of experience per officer and said. “And that could two more officers are planning to retire mean saving a life or this year. preventing a more “They will take with them, collec- deadly outcome.” tively, 60 years of experience, and they The fire departPhotos by Ashley Fowler/Signal Tribune will be replaced by officers who don’t ment also provides During a March 19 visioning workshop, Signal Hill Police Chief Michael Langston describes some have any experience,” Langston said. tours of the station. of the police department’s improvements since the last time the community met to discuss strategic “Our experience level will go down to Residents can visit planning. 6.5 years per officer. Those are the anytime. They offer challenges that we are facing, but we free blood-pressure checks, and the sta- Director of Public Works Steve Myrter about half of that going to the water are training them and trying to help tion serves as a safe house, a place to shared with community members some utility. The Department of Public Works them get the experience they need to safely surrender an unwanted newborn. of his department’s goals and challenges. also implemented the Capital Improvesuccessfully do their jobs.” “We provide citizens with the The Public Works overall departLangston said it takes officers a opportunity to drop their infant off see WORKSHOP page 13 good five or six years to become fairly rather than drop them in the trash and ment budget is about $7.8 million, with confident in their jobs out on the leave them abandoned,” Lewis said. streets. After Lewis’s early departure, Battalion Chief Ricky Lewis of L.A. County Fire followed Langston with a brief update on the fire department before he had to depart the meeting early after receiving reports of a fire from his radio. Lewis explained that 75 to 85 percent of their calls are emergency-service related. The average response Property Works Inc. time for all calls is 4 minutes and 58 seconds. In 2012, the fire department received over 900 rescue and EMS calls, encompassing everything from “wrestling cats out of a tree, Los Angeles County Fire Battalion Chief Ricky Lewis wraps up to trauma and his presentation before being called out to a fire.

Need a reason to get up on the weekends? Menu brunch served 10am-3pm Join us for a mimosa! Entrées:

• Crème Brûlée French Toast with Vanilla Brown Sugar Syrup $11 • Meat Lovers’ Omelette $11 • Egg White Omelette $10 Asparagus, roasted tomatoes caramelized onions, feta cheese

• Green Eggs and Ham $14

Fried egg, sliced ham, pesto hollandaise with French fries on a brioche bun

• Smoked Salmon Wrapped Poached Eggs $15 • Your Choice of Eggs Benedict or Eggs Florentine $13 • Steak and Eggs $25 USDA Prime Flat Iron Steak, 2 eggs, homestyle potatoes

• Salad of Curried Chicken with Red Grapes, Cranberries and Celery on Baby Greens $12 • Delius Kobe Burger w/fries $14 • Teriyaki Chicken Burger w/Pineapple and Swiss Cheese $13 • Roasted BBQ Pork Belly Sandwich $13 Asian slaw, chipotle mayo, Italian roll

• Cheese Steak Sandwich w/fries $14 Choose beef or chicken

• Grilled Cheese Panini $11

Melted Provolone and Cheddar with Spinach and Pesto

• Pastrami Reuben Panini $12 • Tuna Salad and Boiled Eggs on Wheat w/Fries $10 • Monte Cristo Sandwich w/Fries $14

À la carte:

• Muffin of the Day $3.50 • Bagel with Smoked Salmon $9

Cream cheese, tomato, red onion, capers

• Rosemary & Mustard Sausage Patties $6 • Andouille Sausage $4 • Fresh Fruit Plate $9

Beverages:

• Bloody Mary $7 • Champagne $6 • Mimosa $7 • Multiple Refill Champagne $10

Reservations recommended but not 2951 CHERRY AVENUE, SIGNAL HILL required www.deliusrestaurant.com 562.426.0694 •


NEWS

12 SigNal TribuNE

Forum

continued from page 1

The candidates and public safety The candidates come from a variety of backgrounds, and many have different ideas about how to improve the city. When moderator Antenore asked all of the candidates how they would work with the police department to improve public safety and reduce gang violence, the candidates had the opportunity to set themselves apart from their competitors. The candidates were only allowed about two minutes to answer the question. Steven Paul Mozena emphasized his ability as a businessman to create jobs and internships to lower the crime rate. “Idle hands are the devil’s workshop,” Mozena said, describing how kids need to be productive and make money. “If kids are bored and they have nothing to do, they get into mischief… any Wilson High School student now can have a job or an internship. I can create those jobs.” Eric Rock said that the police already remove from parks those individuals who look like gang members. He said he is concerned about 22 recent law-enforcement shootings. Rock recommended that police officers should live nearby. “I would like for the law enforcement of Long Beach to reside within their jurisdiction, to reside within their cities,” Rock said. Mineo Gonzalez suggested that the next mayor travel with the police chief to the community every time a murder takes place to determine how they can help. He recommended communication with families of kids who are at risk of gang influence. “But that’s why we need a leader to… call them out on their parenting skills. We need to tell people, ‘This is your problem. This is your fault. This is your child,’” Gonzalez said, adding later, “We need to make sure that the leadership we have is in the community…letting the community know that we’re there for them and we’re not ignoring them.” Jana Shields said that her high-density neighborhood has dealt with a gang problem. She described how the area became safe again due to a cooperative partnership between the public, the police and other entities. “That sort of approach can be expanded citywide,” Shields said, “because people in neighborhoods need to take ownership, need to be proactive and need to work in good [relationships] with our public-safety officers.” Doug Otto lamented that, over the last four years, the City has reduced the number of police officers, a drop from 1,020 to 803. “As a result,” Otto said, “we can’t do the enforcement that we’ve done before.” He named areas in the police department that have felt the cuts: a youth-services division, a police-athletic league and a gang-enforcement division. Additionally, he said that there are only 20 officers in the Juvenile Investigations Section, suggesting that no staff are available to follow kids on their walk home after school to ensure their safety and to prevent youth from committing crimes. Damon Dunn said he agreed with Otto about the concern over the reduced number of police staff, but he challenged Otto’s estimate of the number of officers serving in the police department. Dunn said that the City is budgeted for 803 officers, but it really has only 770 sworn-police officers. He explained the discrepancy has to do with overtime pay. He did agree that the City needs to invest in more cops. Dunn also recommended a differ-

ent approach to addressing gang activities. “We have to start figuring out a solution to keep kids [from] going into gangs,” Dunn said, explaining that the City should not only rely on the police. He encouraged partnerships with either faith-based communities or nonprofit organizations to offer mentoring to kids. Assemblymember Bonnie Lowenthal praised the partnership between the Long Beach Unified School District and the Long Beach Police Department, explaining how every campus already has security personnel and staff assistance. Lowenthal remembered that there was a time when the police chief had advisory commissions to work with the community and that there were also youth programs. She recommended to restore those programs and to increase the number of law-enforcement personnel. She described how the department is really struggling without the 200 officers. “It’s very difficult to keep up the work with such a small force,” Lowenthal said, “and losing the gang unit has been very difficult.” Councilmember Gerrie Schipske said that neighborhood safety is the City’s first priority. She criticized a Council decision to reduce the police-department budget. She said her opponent, Vice Mayor Garcia, was part of that decision. “One of the worst votes that was taken at this City Council (and that Mr. Garcia participated in)… was to cut the gang unit, to cut detectives and to cut the…resources we needed to get those police back on the street,” Schipske said. Garcia said that the City had gone through an economic recession, yet at the same time, it also saw a 40-year low in crime rates. He said that although there is crime, the City is still headed in the right direction. He acknowledged that Long Beach needs more police officers and that the budget will grow. Like Dunn, Garcia advocated for other ways to address the gang problem. He recommended that the City additionally needs to have parks, activities, an investment in education, after-school programs and ways to identify people who need support and tutoring. “These are the types of things that get people together,” Garcia said, explaining that these areas are all part of public safety. Richard Camp suggested that “it’s good for business when the gangs run wild on the north side of town,” especially when eminent domain could be used to take over property. To address public safety, he suggested that the City hire more female officers. He remembered a particular officer in Belmont Shore who was effective at her job. “She was a very motherly figure with a gun,” Camp said, drawing a few laughs. There were other questions at the forum. The candidates tackled other topics including the breakwater, the controversy over whether to retrofit or rebuild City Hall, concerns over racial tensions between black and Latino students, the Southern California International Gateway Project and how to make the schools more comfortable.

Student reaction The event was an eye-opening experience for a few of the students who talked with the Signal Tribune afterwards. Lukas Howe, a 17-year-old Wilson student and president of the Associated Student Body (ASB), won’t be able to vote in this April’s municipal election, but he does have the ability to talk to his family members who are eligible to cast their ballots. He said in a telephone interview on Wednesday that he took flyers home to share with his family and that he described to them his impressions of the candidates. Howe liked Otto best because of his involvement with the school and the community. He also had positive things to say about Garcia. Avoid costly repairs— have Howe was asked to describe how a mayor could your sunroof serviced today! really improve the lives of Wilson High School students. He said he hoped that a new mayor will -Annual Service invest in more after-school programs to keep stu-Repairs dents active. Howe said it is important for students to engage in their community, adding that, although -New Installations kids already do volunteer now, there is a general understanding that students feel that they must do it www.budsrestyling.com to graduate. Auto Upholstery “I want to see if we can stimulate the minds of Sunroofs students across the city at a younger age, or even 2637 St. louis Ave. Signal Hill during high school, to make them want to give back and make their community better,” Howe said. Miko Phillips, an 18-year-old senior at Wilson Bookkeeping & Tax Services and part of the ASB, plans to vote in the upcoming election. She still needs to register. She said in an Certified QuickBooks Pro Advisors/Training interview with the Signal Tribune that she’s planBusiness & Personal Bookkeeping ning to vote for Lowenthal. Phillips said she liked that the candidates were asked about racial tensions Cambodian & Spanish Speaking between black and Latino students. She explained that Long Beach has a diverse population and that CTEC Registered Tax Preparers she wanted peace for everyone. Phillips was one the volunteers at the forum who played host to the candidates. She was assigned to Shields. Phillips described how she familiarized herself with Shields’s campaign and that night assisted her with signs. Matthew Pearson, another 18-year-old Wilson student, hung around the auditorium just after the

March 28, 2014

Richard Camp

Damon Dunn

Robert Garcia

Mineo Gonzalez

Bonnie Lowenthal

Steven Paul Mozena

Doug Otto

Eric Rock

Gerrie Schipske

Jana Shields

Sunroof Everything

Feel the breeze while you drive

BUD’S

Beach Cities

562-595-6370

1640 E. burnett Street Phone: 562-264-5114 www.MadKatinc.com

forum ended. The event turned out differently than he had anticipated. “I [expected] a lot of verbal bloodshed from the candidates,” Pearson said in an interview with the Signal Tribune. “I was surprised they kept it very polite and organized.” He had hoped that the medical-marijuana-tax issue would have been addressed. Pearson also spoke freely about some of his other political ideas not related to the forum. That night, Pearson wore a National Rifle Association badge. He said there is misinformation about guns and automatic weapons in California, a state that is perceived to “not care much about the Second Amendment.” He hopes that a mayor could help gun lobbyists change that. He said his two favorite candidates from the forum are Camp and Rock. Sometimes during the interview, he could have been joking, but he never cracked a smile nor broke away from the matter-offact tone in his voice. As the interview was about to end, Pearson off-handedly remarked he isn’t going to vote. He was asked why. “I feel that although they sold me on certain issues,” Pearson said, “all together as a package, I don’t feel like I could throw in my vote with any one of them without feeling irresponsible.” He wasn’t asked what he meant by “irresponsible.” Blame the reporter. ß


March 28, 2014

Workshop

continued from page 11

regarding the challenges addressed in the workshop. The City of Signal Hill hired a facilitator to help guide and collect information and input from the workshop attendees. Bill Kelly of Kelly Associates Management Group is a retired city manager, and his firm does consulting for cities, counties, special districts and nonprofits with a focus on public service. He led a brainstorm at the conclusion of each department’s presentation and asked the residents how they would update the ‘06-‘11 strategic plan. “The world has changed a bit since the plan was done,” Kelly said. “And what I’ve been told is that we’re in the worst recession since the Great Depression in the 1930s, and that has had an impact on all cities in the US, especially California. Sales tax has taken a beating, your property taxes have probably taken a big beating, but more importantly, the third leg of the stool has fallen off, and that’s called no more redevelopment.” Kelly said most people think that property taxes pay for city services, but only six cents per dollar actually goes to the City of Signal Hill, about $770,000 annually. The police department spent $7.7

NEWS

million a year, which is 43 percent of the general fund budget, Kelly said. Another large portion is Public Works, about $4 million, 23 percent, and the remaining is allocated for other city services. Currently, sales tax produces only about $8.3 million. “When the economy goes bad, people don’t buy things, and revenue from sales tax goes down,” Kelly said. “That’s a huge impact. your sales tax basically only pays for your police department, now. What pays for Public Works, libraries, etcetera? you have a very fragile budget in terms of how you can put this whole thing together.” However, Kelly said that the strategic plan for the city is predicated upon dreaming big. He asked residents to think about the city’s strengths and weaknesses, opportunities for projects, and some threats that might get in the way. “Too many citizens in too many cities think they want to base their visioning on how much money they have, and that’s a mistake,” Kelly said. “Money can be found, but you have to create the vision first. Don’t think small. you’ve got to think big.”

ment Program. The City will receive $14.9 million, 95 percent of which was not funded from City sources. For example, $6.2 million of the program comes from grant funds from federal sources, intended mainly for road construction. “A lot of our program has been through our hard work in achieving and receiving grant money to help extend our capital dollars,” Myrter said. The Public Works Department oversees the maintenance and improvement projects in the city. The park-maintenance division is responsible for 29 acres, and the City trims over 2000 trees annually. Public Works also maintains playground equipment, grounds, public art, and in turn, graffiti removal. In addition, Myrter said his department manages more than 50 structures and 80,000 square feet of space. Public Works repairs and replaces sidewalks, maintains alleyways, manages the city’s sign inventory and updates street markings on a 35-mile network of streets and residential roads with 32 signalized intersections. Next week, the Signal Tribune will New environmental requirements provide information on the feedback on the paint used for street markings, for example, is one of the kinds of challenges that the Public Works Department is facing. “We used to use paint that lasts five years. Now it lasts two years,” Myrter said. “Our work only increases with every new regulation in terms of the paint we are able to use.” Myrter mentioned another new regulation that is proving to be a challenge for the City. Stemming from the Clean Water Act of 1972, MS4 stormwater permits are meant to decrease the Ashley Fowler/Signal Tribune toxicity of storm Director of Public Works Steve Myrter addresses some of the challenges his department faces due to water. Through the new environmental regulations. years, the acceptable levels of toxins in storm water have decreased. “Public works directors used to lose sleep worrying about large storm TST4607 NoTICE oF PUBlIC HEARING events. Will a storm event overwhelm our system? Will we able to protect NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Tuesday, April 8, 2014, the Planning Commission of the City of Signal Hill will conduct a public hearing at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council property?” Myrter said. “And it’s actuChamber at City Hall, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, to consider the folally more complicated now. Now we lowing: have to also worry about what’s in the NEW AUTOMOBILE DEALERSHIP storm water. Will the contaminants in our storm water get pushed down the SITE PLAN & DESIGN REVIEW 14-01 FOR A BMW AUTOMOBILE SALES AND drain? Will it violate the law?” SERVICE FACILITY AT 1660 E. SPRING STREET IN THE SP-4, AUTO CENTER SPECIFIC PLAN, ZONING DISTRICT. THE FACILITY DESIGN INCLUDES: Storm water hits the ground covered with contaminants, and it is swept • 31,996 SQ. FT. OF SHOWROOM AREA up into the storm drain. • 10,656 SQ. FT. OF PARTS STORAGE AREA • 35,158 SQ. FT. OF SERVICE/REPAIR AREA “This newest permit requires us to • 338 PARKING SPACES make sure the contaminants do not enter the storm drain,” Myrter said. APPLICANT: AHT Architects for Sonic Development, LLC “We are now required to come up with ALL INTERESTED PERSONS are hereby invited to attend this public hearing to presplans to remove these contaminants ent written information, express their opinions or otherwise present evidence on the over the next 10 to 20 years.” above matter. The risk of non-compliance to this If you wish to legally challenge any action taken by the City on the above matter, you law is real and very expensive. If a city may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public is found in non-compliance, it would hearings described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City be fined $10,000, as well as $10 per prior to or at the public hearings. gallon of storm water at unacceptable A NEGATIVE DECLARATION 03/14/14(1) has been prepared in conjunction with the toxin levels. subject project based on an initial study finding of no significant environmental impacts “you can imagine how many galassociated with the project. lons go down the storm drain, and how The Negative Declaration, as well as relevant material, may be inspected by the public quickly, so there are real consequences between the hours of 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and on Frito non-compliance,” Myrter said. days from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in the Community Development Department located on the lower floor of City Hall. Written comments may be submitted to the Community The City spends about $700,000 Development Department during the public review period from March 14, 2014 to April annually to improve storm water qual7, 2014. ity, now. And Myrter projects that over the next 10 years, this figure could THE FILE and associated documents for the proposed project may be reviewed by the public between the hours of 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday, triple. and 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Fridays, in the Community Development Department “Ultimately, we’re going to need at City Hall. some kind of water-treatment system FURTHER INFORMATION on this item may be obtained at the City of Signal Hill for storm water over the next 10 to 20 Community Development Department located at 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, years to meet the requirements as they California, or by emailing Selena Alanis, Assistant Planner, stand today,” Myrter said. at salanis@cityofsignalhill.org or calling at (562) 989-7341. Each department concluded that the Posted in accordance with S.H.M.C. Section 1.08.010 on: March 28, 2014 City needs to go into planning mode Mailed to property owners within a 100’ radius: March 28, 2014 and seek input from the community

ciTY Of SigNal hill

the community shared after the aforementioned presentations. The City will host its second visioning workshop at 7pm on Wednesday, April 2, at the Signal Hill Community Center, 1780 E Hill St., with topics including

SigNal TribuNE

13

community services, community development, economic development and finance. MORE INFORMATION (562) 989-7379

Try our House SpeciaLS!

Breakfast served 6am to high noon LONA’S ALBONDIGAS Lunch & dinner served all day long authentic mexican meatball soup 5.95

FAJITAS SUPREME

tequila-marinated beef, chicken, & shrimp, served with flour tortillas 11.95 beef, chicken or shrimp 9.95

BORDER BURGER cilantro aioli, smoked gouda, fried egg, bacon 8.95

MEXICAN- & AMERICAN-STYLE FOOD

Taco Tuesdays

$1

GROUND BEEF OR SHREDDED BEEF

TACOS

Domestic Pints - $2

Karaoke!

Wed/Thurs/Fri/Sat 8pm

1174 Wardlow Rd., LB (West of Orange Ave.) 562-427-4630 | Like us on Facebook!

Free to be... ß

YOU!

in Located t of r a e the h nolls, Bixby K each Long B

Clothing, Accessories, Sterling Silver Jewelry, Collectibles, Exclusive Murano Italian Glass Jewelry, & Local Long Beach Artists

NEW! Happy Hour on Saturdays & Sundays 1-4pm Wine, sangria, & special promotions!

Bring this ad & receive $20 off a purchase of $100 (one per customer)

Unique, Handmade, Creative

4340 Atlantic Ave., Uptown Bixby Knolls 562-612-3505 www.aboutuboutique.com

facebook.com/aboutuboutique • instagram.com @aboutuboutique

Mainstage

“The Battle of the Sexes has never been so Glamorous!”

March 1 - 29 Friday & Saturday at 8pm, Sunday at 2pm

www.lbplayhouse.org 562-494-1014 * 5021 E. Anaheim St. 5021 E. ANAHEIM, LB 562-494-1014 - WWW.LBPLAYHOUSE.ORG


14 SigNal TribuNE

TST4595 APN: 7217-013-038 T.S. No. 005932-CA NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 2/11/2009. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER On 4/3/2014 at 9:00 AM, CLEAR RECON CORP., as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 2/24/2009, as Instrument No. 20090256340, in Book N/A, Page N/A, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of CALIFORNIA executed by: JOAQUIN O. VELASCO, UNMARRIED MAN OSCAR VELASCO AND REGINA VELASCO, HUSBAND AND WIFE WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, SAVINGS ASSOCIATION, OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE: VINEYARD BALLROOM, DOUBLETREE HOTEL LOS ANGELES - NORWALK, 13111 SYCAMORE DRIVE, NORWALK, CA 90650 all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED ON SAID DEED OF TRUST The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1918 ORIZABA AVENUE SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition, or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $617,924.17 If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (800) 280-2832 or visit this Internet Web site WWW.AUCTION.COM, using the file number assigned to this case 005932-CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR SALES INFORMATION: (800) 280-2832 Date: 2/28/20 14 CLEAR RECON CORP. 4375 Jutland Drive Suite 200 San Diego, California 92117 TAC: 968017 PUB: 3/14 3/21 3/28/14

TST4605 TSG No.: 7354658 TS No.: CA1200248173 FHA/VA/PMI No.: APN: 7148-001-030 Property Address: 3300 CALIFORNIA AVENUE SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 09/15/2003. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 04/17/2014 at 10:00 A.M., First American Title Insurance Company, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 09/22/2003, as Instrument No. 03 2782876, in book , page , , of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of LOS ANGELES County,

Public NOTicES

State of California. Executed by: NICHOLAS L. LIDDI JR. AND DIANE P. LIDDI, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (Payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States) Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN THE ABOVE MENTIONED DEED OF TRUST APN# 7148-001-030 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 3300 CALIFORNIA AVENUE, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 he undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $283,409.18. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust has deposited all documents evidencing the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and has declared all sums secured thereby immediately due and payable, and has caused a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be executed. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (916)939-0772 or visit this Internet Web http://search.nationwideposting.com/propertySearchTerms.aspx, using the file number assigned to this case CA1200248173 Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Date: First American Title Insurance Company 6 CAMPUS CIRCLE WESTLAKE, TX 76262 First American Title Insurance Company MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE FOR TRUSTEES SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL (916)939-0772NPP0228668 To: SIGNAL TRIBUNE 03/28/2014, 04/04/2014, 04/11/2014

TST4596 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF CANDY D. NALL aka CANDICE D. NALL Case No. BP150083 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of CANDY D. NALL aka CANDICE D. NALL A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Edward H. Nall in the Superior Court of California, County of LOS ANGELES. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that Edward H. Nall be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent's will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented

to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 9, 2014 at 8:30 AM in Dept. No. 5 located at 111 N. Hill St., Los Angeles, CA 90012. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: DAVID D. HISKEY, ESQ. SBN 110679 HISKEY LAW FIRM A PROF CORP 414 N PLACENTIA AVE PLACENTIA CA 92870

TST4604 APN: 7211-026-150 Property : 2599 Walnut Ave Unit 329, Signal Hill, CA 90755 Title Order No. : 130228193 Trustee Sale No. : 2200-010550-F00 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED July 01, 2004. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On April 10, 2014, Sage Point Lender Services, LLC, as duly appointed Trustee WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT drawn on a state or national bank, cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state, or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (Payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN BELOW MENTIONED DEED OF TRUST Executed by: RICHARD ECHAVARRI A Single Man Recorded on July 08, 2004, as Instrument No. 04 1736989, of Official Records, in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, California Date of Sale: April 10, 2014 at 09:00 AM Place of Sale: at the Vineyard Ballroom of the Doubletree Hotel Los Angeles-Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2599 WALNUT AVE UNIT 329, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 APN# 7211-026-150 The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of this Notice of Sale is $248,450.74. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to the return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee’s Attorney. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if appli-

cable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (800) 280-2832 or visit this Internet Web site WWW.AUCTION.COM, using the file number assigned to this case 2200010550-F00. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: March 10, 2014 Sage Point Lender Services, LLC 400 Exchange, Suite 110 Irvine, CA 92602 949-265-9940 David Garcia FOR TRUSTEE'S SALE INFORMATION PLEASE (800) 280-2832 or visit CALL WWW.AUCTION.COM SAGE POINT LENDER SERVICES, LLC MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NPP0228078 To: SIGNAL TRIBUNE PUB: 03/14/2014, 03/21/2014, 03/28/2014

TST4591 / 2014 050923 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: CASA LA DERA, 1106 E. La Dera Dr., Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: BRUCE G. ALTON, 1106 E. La Dera Dr., Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Bruce G. Alton. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 25, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: March 7, 14, 21, 28, 2014. TST4592 / 2014 055971 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: RABID BLACK, 2116 E. 64th St., Long Beach, CA 90805. Registrants: 1. BRITTNEY YUEN, 2. REGINA DELREAL, 2116 E. 64th St., Long Beach, CA 90805. This business is conducted by: a Joint Venture. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Brittney Yuen. The registrants have not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on March 3, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: March 7, 14, 21, 28, 2014.

TST4597 / 2014 040370 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: HALCON CATERING, 818 W. Gardena Blvd., Gardena, CA 90247. Registrant: SUYAPA A. FLORES, 1602 W. 218th St. #15, Torrance, CA 90501. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Suyapa A. Flores. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on February 13, 2014. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 13, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: March 14, 21, 28, & April 4, 2014.

TST4598 / 2014 066173 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: BILL'S TOP SHOP, 1929 E. 28th St., Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrants: PATRICIA VANWINKLE, 1929 E. 28th St., Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Patricia Vanwinkle. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name in 1929. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on March 12, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: March 14, 21, 28, & April 4, 2014.

TST4585 / 2014 048562 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: COCAH JEUELS, 2147 1/2 Myrtle Ave., Long Beach, CA 90806. Registrant: SHAMEKA LATISH ANDERSON, 2147 1/2 Myrtle Ave., Long Beach, CA 90806. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Shameka Anderson. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 24, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 28, & March 7, 14, 21, 2014.

March 28, 2014

TST4599 / 2014 068641 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: DUTCH BOY BOOKKEEPING, 3218 Faust Ave., Long Beach, CA 90808. Registrants: DAVID GOODWIN, 3218 Faust Ave., Long Beach, CA 90808. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: David Goodwin The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on March 13, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: March 21, 28, & April 4, 11, 2014.

TST4600 / 2014 059637 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: R.M. WELDING & FABRICATION, 8504 Firestone Blvd. #320, Downey, CA 90241. Registrant: RONDY ROSHA MASON, 8504 Firestone Blvd. #320, Downey, CA 90241. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Rondy Rosha Mason. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on March 5, 2014. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on March 5, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: March 21, 28, & April 4, 11, 2014.

TST4601 / 2014 060136 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: HONEYSUCKLE, 3199 E. Pacific Coast Hwy., Suite 101, Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: VICHITRA MADY, 1923 E. Luray St., Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Vichitra Mady. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on March 6, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: March 21, 28, & April 4, 11, 2014.

TST4603 / 2014 073673 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: LOAN DOC CLOSERS, 15911 La Forge St., Apt. C, Whittier, CA 90603. Registrant: MARIO RAMIREZ, 15911 La Forge St., Apt. C, Whittier, CA 90603. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Mario Ramirez. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on March 19, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: March 21, 28, & April 4, 11, 2014.

TST4608 / 2014 074294 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: TURBO AUTO REPAIR, 1752 Pine Ave., Long Beach, CA 90813. Registrant: DENYSSE LOPEZ, 1752 Pine Ave., Long Beach, CA 90813. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Denysse Lopez. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on March 20, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: March 28, & April 4, 11, 18, 2014.

TST4606 / 2014 073507 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: MOBILE MATH TUTOR, 6615 Monlaco Rd., Long Beach, CA 90808. Registrant: RODNEY BREMER, 6615 Monlaco Rd., Long Beach, CA 90808. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Rodney Bremer. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on March 19, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: March 28, & April 4, 11, 18, 2014.


March 28, 2014

Tsunamis

continued from page 1

billion to $10 billion. “It is a very plausible event … it’s not that frequent, but it’s also not really crazy,” said Lucy Jones, a USGS scientist who headed the study, known as the Science Application for Risk Reduction (SAFRR) Tsunami Scenario. Jones, who also led the first “ShakeOut” earthquake scenario in 2008, spoke during a lecture on tsunamis at the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach on Monday, March 24. The sold-out event, which included a panel of experts, coincided with Tsunami Preparedness Week. The event also took place just days before the 50th anniversary of the Great Alaska Earthquake, which triggered a tsunami on March 27, 1964, killing a total of 16 people in California. About three years ago, teams of scientists, first responders and other experts began modeling the tsunami scenario after the Alaska earthquake. The study, however, was later extended to take into account the 2011 tsunami that was triggered by the Tohoku, Japan earthquake that resulted in the

Fukushima nuclear disaster. That tsunami didn’t produce much flooding in California but caused millions of dollars in damages to marinas, particularly in the Crescent City Harbor, according to experts. A tsunami causing the sea level along California to suddenly rise five feet is rare and only happens about every 100 to 200 years, Jones said. However, she noted that such an event would damage harbors and marinas, spreading debris throughout the area. Jones said a tsunami would also impact the ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles, which receive 40 percent of the nation’s imports. “This isn’t just a Long Beach issue,” Jones said. “This isn’t even just a California issue. It’s of incredible importance for the whole United States.” Patrick Lynett, an associate professor at USC’s department of civil and environmental engineering who analyzed ocean currents for the study, said large vessels, such as container ships and cruise liners, will be “mostly safe.” He added, however, that it would cause major disruptions at the ports because of strong currents and smaller boats at

NEWS

SigNal TribuNE

15

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

A panel of experts conduct a lecture at the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach on March 24 regarding the threat of a large tsunami hitting the California coast. Pictured, from left, are: Lucy Jones, scientist with the U.S. Geological Survey; Patrick Lynett, associate professor with USC; Jeff Reeb, director of emergency management for the County of Los Angeles; and Rick Wilson, senior engineering geologist for the California Geological Survey.

marinas would be the most damaged. “Along the West Coast in 2011, we had a lot of damage in harbors, but you didn’t have a lot of flooding,” Lynett said. “The reason that you have all this damage in harbors is because, even if the water doesn’t go very high, it still goes very fast.” He said the worst place for a boat to be during a tsunami is navigating in and out of the harbor “gates,” where there would be the strongest currents. “That’s a particularly bad area to be,” Lynett said. “you really don’t want to be a ship making your way through the gate because the currents there are tremendously strong and they’re swirling … If you have time to get out of the harbor before the wave comes, great, get out. If you don’t, stay in the harbor, tie your boat up, straighten the lines and just leave. you don’t want to be in the water while the tsunami is happening.” He added that the Long Beach breakwater won’t make much of a difference in a tsunami, since it’s “quite permeable” and the displaced water would still rush Courtesy CGS through it. Coastal cities across the state This photo taken by staff of the California Geological Survey shows the devastation to boats and marinas left behind from the tsunami caused by the Tohoku, Japan earthquake are currently preparing evacuation in 2011. Though the tsunami did not produce much flooding, the fast-moving surge did plans in the event of a tsunami cause millions of dollars in damage to boats and marinas along California, particularly while maritime officials are working with new maps developed by in the Crescent City Harbor.

the California Geological Survey (CGS) that outline maximum tsunamiinundation zones. Rick Wilson, senior engineering geologist for the CGS, said the study concluded that neither of California’s nuclear power plants would likely be damaged by such a tsunami. However, he said a large tsunami still would impact other power plants and facilities. Wilson added that the State has posted blue signs on some beaches and coastal communities to make people aware that they are in a tsunamiinundation zone. “It doesn’t happen often, but when [a tsunami] does happen, especially when there’s a high tide, we see the potential for more flooding,” Wilson said. In Long Beach, the inundation zone extends from the Queen Mary to just south of Ocean Boulevard. Under the scenario, areas submerged would be the Aquarium, the Long Beach Convention Center, Shoreline Village, the Pike and the Alamitos Bay Marina. Jones said more than 20,000 residents in Long Beach who live in the inundation zone would have to be evacuated, adding that the zone includes some schools, daycare centers and adult centers that should have adequate evacuation plans in place. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has two hours from the time the earthquake hits to issue a tsunami warning,

she said. Thereafter, residents have two hours before the tsunami touches down to evacuate the area, which in most causes means moving about three blocks inland. “If we handle the warnings right, nobody will die,” Jones said. “… you survive a tsunami by not being in a tsunami.” Jeff Reeb, director of emergency management for the County of Los Angeles, said it’s important to encourage the public, particularly people with disabilities, to be prepared for a major tsunami in order to minimize any loss of life. He said people should stay connected through cell-phone notification systems, such as Alert LA and Nixle, as well as social media. Reeb added that residents and business owners should learn the appropriate steps to take when tsunami warnings come forward, such as preparing go-to kits with important records and other valuables. “What we encourage everyone to do is, of course, be aware of your surroundings, whether you’re visiting our Aquarium or down in one of our coastal areas,” Reeb said. “When the warning comes, it is time to move. Whether you walk or run or ride, it’s time to go.” MORE INFORMATION conservation.ca.gov usgs.gov


SigNal TribuNE

March 28, 2014

SALE SAVE UP TO 40% on all Amish Bedrooms M.S.R.P.

HOUSE to HOME

16

is proud to feature

BEDROOM COLLECTIONS Handcrafted in America House to Home now offers Daniel Yoder’s American-made Amish bedroom collections. Amish-handcrafted in the hill country of Ohio, the hardwoods are carefully harvested, then graded, cured, and selected before handcrafted into heirloom furniture– built to last a lifetime.

Daniel’s Amish Solid Wood Queen Handcrafted Bed

SPECIAL PRICE $599 (Compare at $999)

2 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU

6 MO. SAME AS CASH FINANCING AVAILABLE O.A.C. (SEE STORE FOR DETAILS) 1703 E. 17TH ST. 2198 N. LAKEWOOD BLVD. SANTA ANA/TUSTIN LONG BEACH 714-210-3888 562-597-3225

www.house-to-home-furniture.com

The Munro Family – Your Furniture Experts since 1965


St3543 march 28 layout 1