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“Funny Dreams” mixed media by Dawn Quinones See page 10

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SERVING BIXBY KNOLLS, CALIFORNIA HEIGHTS, LOS CERRITOS, WRIGLEY AND THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

Vol. 35 No. 38

February 21, 2014

Your Weekly Community Newspaper

Third Long Beach Community Studies Conference to explore research on ‘Neighborhoods Past & Present’

Sean Belk Staff Writer

CJ Dablo/Signal Tribune

Municipal workers attended the Council Chamber on Feb. 18 to voice opposition to a plan that would allow private contractor Athens Services to take over street sweeping for the City of Long Beach. The plan acknowledges that 19 full-time employees may be displaced from their jobs but does offer alternatives for the city workers affected by the change. The Council removed the item from Tuesday’s agenda and plans to discuss the matter during a meeting in March.

City workers criticize proposal to privatize street-sweeping services

CJ Dablo Staff Writer

Discussion of a proposal to hire a private contractor to take over Long Beach’s street-sweeping services will be delayed until March now that city leaders decided to remove the item from the Feb. 18 City Council agenda. However, that didn’t stop a number of city workers from turning up in the Council Chamber Tuesday night to voice their concerns about the possibility of losing their municipal jobs. In a cost-saving effort, Long Beach officials are reviewing several municipal services for potential contracting, according to a staff report from the city-manager and the financial-management offices. As part of the bidding process, city staff last year issued a request for proposal (RFP) to find qualified contractors who could offer street-sweeping services. Officials eventually selected Athens Services as their preferred vendor. Athens offers significant savings to the City, according to the staff report. One analysis calculated that Long Beach’s annual cost to sweep the streets totals more than $5.39 million. It also determined that contracting the service would only cost more than $4.52 million. The report stated that the switch to an outside vendor could save $1.3 million annually to the General Fund. Athens also committed to buy the existing fleet of vehicle equipment. According to the report, this purchase would save the City an additional amount of more than $1.77 million in its General/Fleet Fund. The report acknowledged that although the proposal would displace 19 full-

Long Beach is recognized today as one the most ethnically diverse large cities in America, but that wasn’t always the case, says Julian DelGaudio, Ph.D., history professor at Long Beach City College (LBCC). Historical census data shows that, starting in the 1940s, Long Beach was once considered “one of the whitest urban areas in the country,” with a racial makeup of more than 90 percent Caucasian, he said. At the end of World War II and the start of the Cold War era, new jobs in war industries drew a flood of people into the area, spurring mass construction of housing in east Long Beach and Lakewood, DelGaudio said. Defense contractors created a new population of workers that drove the need for new suburban homes, but Courtesy HSLB private real-estate developers An issue of the Long Beach Press-Telegram from the Historical Society of had certain protocols of just Long Beach’s archive collection shows an advertisement promoting Lakewho could live there, often wood in 1940. implementing “restrictive covenants” to prevent certain ethnicities, in those days considered minorities, from buying property, he said. “If you were trying to buy on the east side and you were a minority, you basically weren’t allowed,” said DelGaudio, who further explained that, up until about the 1970s, the area of east Long Beach and Lakewood could be considered an “extraordinary model of racial purity.” The subject is the basis for his latest research paper titled “War and Race in the Making of East Long Beach,” which DelGaudio plans to present during the third Long Beach Community Studies Conference scheduled for Saturday, April 26 at LBCC’s Liberal Arts Campus, building T-1200 at 4901 E. Carson St. The Historical Society of Long Beach (HSLB) and LBCC’s community studies program, which DelGaudio helped to create, is organizing the conference that will feature a panel of presenters, covering an array of research about the area’s history. The deadline for submissions was Feb. 15. This year’s conference, which has a theme titled “The City’s Courtesy LBCC

LBCC history professor Julian DelGaudio, Ph.D.

Signal Hill Council votes unanimously to oppose ‘Right to Know and Vote’ initiative

Sean Belk Staff Writer

During an emotionally charged and highly contentious meeting, the Signal Hill City Council voted unanimously (5-0) on Tuesday, Feb. 18 to pass a resolution in opposition to the controversial “Taxpayers’ Right to Know and Vote” that will be on the June 3 election ballot. If passed by voters, the initiative would “fundamentally alter the management of the city’s municipal finances and budget planning,” said City Manager Ken Farfsing, who signed a staff report supporting the opposition to the initiative.

Citing a report from an independent consultant that was presented to the Council last November, Farfsing said the initiative would shift power for managing city finances from city staff and the elected Council to voters, adding that, over time, the law would “impact the City’s ability to recover costs for services and potentially erode public safety.” “The expert found that voters would be responsible for making many complicated, technical and interrelated fiscal decisions,” Farfsing said. “If it were to pass, the initiative would reduce the ability of the elected City Council and

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city staff to manage the city’s budget and fiscal affairs.” Carol Churchill, a lawyer, former councilmember and member of Signal Hill Community First, who drafted the initiative, denied claims made by the consultant and city staff, stating that the City is running a “fear campaign” in an attempt to “mislead the public.” During public comment, Mayor Michael Noll imposed a three-minute time limit for speakers, however Churchill said the limit was an attempt to stifle the opposing side. “Is there a reason why you have a three-

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minute [time limit] other than to shut me up?” she asked the mayor. “You just want to go home early?” Sponsored by the watchdog group Signal Hill Community First, the initiative proposes to amend the City Charter to require a two-thirds majority vote for all city fees, taxes and assessments. In addition, all taxes and fees would sunset every 10 years, and all assessments would sunset every 20 years, requiring another twothirds vote for re-authorization, according to the staff report.

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FEBRUARY 21, 2014

NEWS

The Campaign Trail

Long Beach Police Chief Jim McDonnell has announced garnering the following endorsements in his bid to become Los Angeles County Sheriff: the California Police Chiefs Association Board of Directors, the California Peace Officers Association and the Los Angeles County Police Chiefs Association.

Former Undersheriff Paul Tanaka has announced receiving the following endorsements in his bid for sheriff of Los Angeles County: former State Assemblymember Warren Furutani; Walnut Councilmember Eric Ching; and Alhambra Mayor and Immediate Past President of the Chinese-American Elected Officials Stephen Sham.

Second District Long Beach Councilmember Suja Lowenthal has announced that she has received the endorsement of the Los Angeles County Young Democrats in her campaign to represent the 70th District in the State Assembly. Damon Dunn, candidate for Long Beach mayor, has announced receiving the following endorsements: Charles Parks, retired Long Beach police commander; Long Beach Firefighters Local 372 and LBUSD Board of Education member Jon Meyer.

Long Beach Vice Mayor Robert Garcia has announced garnering the following endorsements in his campaign to become the city’s next mayor: the United Association Local 250, the Long Beach Democratic Club and the Los Angeles County Young Democrats.

Long Beach mayoral candidate Doug Otto has received the endorsements of former Governor George Deukmejian and former California First Lady Gloria Deukmejian, according to Otto.

James Johnson, candidate for Long Beach city attorney, has announced receiving the following endorsements: Congressmembers Alan Lowenthal and Janice Hahn, Los Angeles City Attorney Mike Feuer, Patricia Phillips (former president of the Los Angeles County Bar Association), Seth Hufstedler (former president of the California State Bar and the American Bar Foundation), Treasurer Bill Lockyer, Assemblymember Isadore Hall, and Long Beach representatives Senator Ricardo Lara and Assemblymember Anthony Rendon. Johnson also recently announced that he has been endorsed by the MexicanAmerican Bar Association Political Action Committee and the Los Angeles County Young Democrats.

Charles Parkin, candidate for Long Beach city attorney, has announced that he has received the following endorsements: former California Governor George Deukmejian, former Long Beach Mayor Beverly O’Neill, 3rd District Councilmember Gary DeLong and former 3rd District Councilmember Frank Colonna. The Long Beach Area Chamber of Commerce political action committee has announced the endorsement of Laura Doud for city auditor in the April 8 election.

In an email to the Signal Tribune, former 9th District Councilmember Val Lerch said he will not seek another write-in campaign and will instead support Ben Daugherty for the 9th District seat.

Rex Richardson, candidate for the 9th District Long Beach Council seat, has announced that U.S. Representative Janice Hahn (44th District) has endorsed him.

The Long Beach Group of the Angeles Chapter Sierra Club has announced that they are endorsing the following candidates in the April election: Assemblymember Bonnie Lowenthal for Long Beach mayor, Lena Gonzalez for Long Beach Council District 1, Joan Greenwood for District 7 and Rex Richardson for District 9.

On Thursday, Feb. 13, the Long Beach Democratic Club conducted its 2014 Citywide Endorsement Meeting at the Laborers Hall at 3919 Paramount Blvd. in Lakewood and chose to make the following endorsements: LBCC District 1– Marshall Blesofsky; LBCC District 3– no endorsement; LBCC District 5– Gregory Slaughter; LBUSD District 1– Uduak Ntuk; LBUSD District 3– Juan Benitez; LBUSD District 5– no endorsement; Long Beach City Council District 1– Lena Gonzalez; Long Beach City Council District 3– Suzie Price; Long Beach City Council District 5– Carl Kemp; Long Beach City Council District 7– Roberto Uranga; Long Beach City Council District 9– Rex Richardson; city auditor– no endorsement; city prosecutor– Rosemary Chavez; city attorney– James Johnson; and mayor– no endorsement.

Jeff Kellogg, who is vying to be re-elected to the Long Beach City College Board of Trustees, Area 1, has announced receving the following endorsements: Former Governor George Deukmejian; Former Mayor and LBCC President Beverly O’Neill; Los Angeles County Supervisor Don Knabe; Long Beach 8th District Councilmember Al Austin; Long Beach 9th District Councilmember Steve Neal; Long Beach Unified School Board member Mary Stanton and Long Beach City College Trustee Roberto Uranga.

Former State Superintendent of Public Instruction Delaine Eastin, Signal Hill Councilmember Larry Forester and 2nd District Long Beach Councilmember Suja Lowenthal have endorsed John McGinnis for re-election to the Long Beach Unified Board of Education, according to McGinnis.

Megan Kerr has announced receiving endorsements in her campaign for the Long Beach Unified School District Board of Education’s 1st District from Unite Here Local 11 restaurant and hotel workers union and National Women’s Political Caucus of California. Uduak-Joe Ntuk has announced receiving endorsements in his bid for the Long Beach Unified School District Board of Education’s 1st District from: the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSME) District Council 36; Unite Here Local 11 restaurant and hotel workers union; and the Los Angeles County Young Democrats.

Juan Benitez, 3rd District Long Beach school board candidate, has announced that he has received endorsements from: Long Beach Vice Mayor Robert Garcia; State Senator Ricardo Lara, who represents the 33rd District; the California School Employees Association; and Unite Here Local 11 restaurant and hotel workers union.

Sunny Zia has announced that she has received the endorsement of the Los Angeles/Orange County Building and Construction Trades Council in her campaign to represent Area 3 on the Board of Trustees of the Long Beach Community College District.

For more information regarding the April election, visit longbeach.gov/ cityclerk/elections .

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NOW HEAR THIS What Hearing-aid check-ups Who Sponsored by the Hearing Loss Association of America Long Beach/Lakewood Chapter Where Weingart Senior Center, 5220 Oliva Ave. in Lakewood When Friday, Feb. 21 from 10am to noon More Info Sam Moghadam, a hearing-instrument specialist from Ascent Hearing, will help visitors with their hearing aids for free. Call (562) 438-0597 or visit hlalongbeachlakewood.org .

MAKE MORE MONEY What Business-plan program Who Hosted by CSULB When Saturday, Feb. 22 and continues on Saturdays through March 15 Where College of Continuing and Professional Education More Info Participants do not need to be enrolled students at CSULB. To register, visit ccpe.csulb.edu/Entrepreneurship . Class size is limited. HEART OF THE MATTER What Women’s Heart and Stroke Seminar Who Long Beach Memorial Where Long Beach Memorial, 2801 Atlantic Ave. When Saturday, Feb. 22 from starting at 7:30am More Info Full day of women’s heart and stroke lectures. Blood pressure, carotid ultrasound, cholesterol and blood glucose (non-fasting) screenings will be provided throughout the day. Visit MemorialCare.org/LBHeart .

LET IT SNOW What 4th District Snow Day Who Long Beach City Councilmember Patrick O’Donnell Where Whaley Park, 5620 Atherton St. When Saturday, Feb. 22 from 11am to 3pm More Info Event is free and will include snow, sled runs, bouncers and food. Parking will be available at CSULB’s Lot 14. Call (562) 570-6918.

CELEBRATE What Candlelight Ceremony Who Long Beach Unity Where 935 E. Broadway St. When Saturday, Feb. 22 at 5:45pm More Info The ceremony will honor the church’s 73 years of community service. Hot chocolate will be served. SEE THE SHOW What Theater performance Who The Friends of Music at California Heights United Methodist Church Where 3759 Orange Ave. When Saturday, February 22 at 6pm More Info The Simply Sondheim event will serve as a fundraiser for the church’s choir. The performance will include selections from Company, Into the Woods, West Side Story and more. Dinner tickets cost $20. RSVP at (562)-595-1996.

EGGS WITH THE ELKS What Monthly breakfast Who Bellflower/ Long Beach Elks Lodge 888 Where 16426 Bellflower Blvd., Bellflower When Sunday, Feb. 23 from 8am to noon More Info Breakfast costs $6.50 per person and includes eggs, bacon, sausage, hash browns, biscuits with gravy, orange juice, assorted fruit, Belgian waffles and coffee. Call (562) 866-3027 or visit elks.org .

MEET YOUR CANDIDATES What 7th District candidate forum Who The Wrigley Area Neighborhood Alliance and the League of Women Voters Where Social Hall at Vets Park, 101 E. 28th St. When Monday, Feb. 24 from 7:30pm to 8:30pm More Info Attendees will meet the candidates and learn where each candidate stands on different issues. Call Maria at (562) 427-5021 or email wrigleyalliance@gmail.com .

IMPROVE YOUR WAY OF LIFE What Seminar Who The Braille Institute Where Bixby Knolls Towers, 3737 Atlantic Ave. When Monday, Feb. 24 from 10am to 11:30am More Info The goal of the seminar is to help people cope with the effects of vision loss. Visit brailleinstitute.org .

JOIN THE CAMPAIGN TRAIL What Mayoral forum Who The Ocean Residents Community Association and the Downtown Residential Council Where Bogart & Co. at the Long Beach Convention Center, 300 East Ocean Blvd. When Monday, Feb. 24 from 6pm to 9pm More Info The event will offer attendees a chance to hear the mayoral candidates on different issues. Attendees will also get the opportunity to speak with the candidates on an individual basis. Damon Dunn, Robert Garcia, Bonnie Lowenthal, Doug Otto, Gerrie Schipske and Jana Shields have all confirmed attendance. Call (562) 435-7155 or email rsvp@orcalb.org .

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SHOP FOR A GOOD CAUSE What 5-Percent Day Who Whole Foods and Friends of Long Beach Animals Where Whole Foods Market,6550 E. Pacific Coast Highway When Thursday, Feb. 27 from 7am to 10pm More Info Whole Foods Markets will be donating 5 percent of the store’s daily proceeds to Friends of Long Beach Animals.

TALKING POLITICS What Luncheon Who Long Beach Lincoln Club Where 6201 E. Appian Way When Thursday, Feb. 27 at noon More Info Club will have a talk by Shawn Steel, Republican National Committeeman from California. Cost is $35 for non-members. RSVP required. Email dkla1@verizon.net or call (562) 439-9390.


NEWS

4 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Anaheim Street renovation project now focusing on two northern lanes on east-west thoroughfare Reconstruction of West Anaheim Street in west Long Beach has moved into a new phase concentrating on the two northern lanes and sidewalk on the east-west thoroughfare, while leaving two lanes of Anaheim open in each direction, according to the Port of Long Beach. Access to Anaheim from the north is limited now, however, to just Harbor, Santa Fe or East I avenues. The latest phase is part of a 14-month Anaheim Street improvement project from the 710 Freeway to 9th Street at the western city limit that started in September 2013. The City of Long Beach Harbor Department is overseeing the work to improve the street, which is the northern boundary of the harbor district. In addition to roadway resurfacing, the project includes new sidewalks, bus stops, medians, access for the disabled and landscaping. Businesses in the West Anaheim Street area with questions about construction, traffic and access issues can contact the Port of Long Beach at (562) 283-7715 or anaheimstreet@polb.com . For more information, visit polb.com/anaheimstreet .

Source: Port of LB

Thoughts from the

Publisher

by Neena Strichart

I was visiting with Aunt Jeraldine last weekend when the topic of 12-step programs came up. We had just been dining at a restaurant in The Americana at Brand “shopping experience” in Glendale and were commenting about how, in spite of the recession, some people still seem to be shopping at levels that could be categorized as overindulgence. Everywhere we looked, we saw beautiful people carrying armloads of bags sporting logos from various chic shops in the center. Nordstrom, Tiffany & Co., Apple, Juicy Couture, Calvin Klein and other such well-known brands were emblazoned across the handled paper satchels being paraded through the shopping area’s courtyard. During our drive back to Auntie’s home, she mentioned that she wondered if there are any groups who catered to the issues of compulsive shopping for the poor dears who seemed to suffer from overspending. I assured her that yes, indeed there are. I then remembered that I had written a column several years ago about the different 12-step programs that are available to help those in need. Looking through our archives I found the article from April 11, 2007 and have reprinted a large portion of it below. Who knows, maybe one of our readers will find comfort in the following information:

Although most everybody knows about Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and maybe even Narcotics Anonymous (NA), most folks don’t realize there are more than 50 other recognized 12-step programs and most of them have meetings within our Long Beach/Signal Hill area. If you have any questions regarding the individual programs, call Richard at Easy Does It at (562) 621-1042. He’ll be happy to help. According to wikipedia.org, the 12-step program has been adopted by other fellowships for individuals who

PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Neena R. Strichart

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Stephen M. Strichart

STAFF WRITERS

Sean Belk CJ Dablo CULTURE WRITERS

Daniel Adams Vicki Paris Goodman Gregory Spooner

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

EYE ON CRIME

Crimes reported by LBPD Council Districts 6, 7 & 8

Wednesday, Feb. 19 Commercial burglary 8:09am– 100 block E. Willow St.

Thursday, Feb. 13 Garage/residential burglary 7:30am– 3900 block Pine Ave.

Crimes reported by SHPD • Citywide

Grand theft auto 12:45pm– 1900 Maine Ave.

Thursday, Feb. 13 Unauthorized use of ID to obtain goods 8am– 2700 block Walnut Ave.

Grand theft auto 5pm– 1900 Cedar Ave.

Grand theft auto 10pm– E. 45th St./Linden Ave.

Grand theft auto 8:52am– 2100 block E.21st St.

Friday, Feb. 14 Personal robbery 6pm– 2400 block Elm Ave.

Grand theft auto (recovered) 11:56am– 1900 block St. Louis Ave.

Saturday, Feb. 15 Grand theft auto 5pm– 4400 block E. Park Dr.

Identity theft 2:15pm– 1400 block E. 23rd St. Non-injury hit-and-run 3:38pm– 1600 block E. Hill St.

Tuesday, Feb. 18 Residential burglary 6am– 3500 block Lemon Ave.

Saturday, Feb. 15 Indecent exposure 8:32am– Junipero Ave./E. 19th St.

Residential burglary 12:30pm– 1000 block E. 36th St.

OPINION

deal with the powerlessness over people, places or things. The requirement for membership in each of the groups is the desire to stop using either a substance or quit a behavior which has caused such powerlessness. The powerlessness over a substance or behavior has to be self-diagnosed by each member. There is no cost for membership or to attend meetings. Some of the 12-step programs available include: • AA–Alcoholics Anonymous • ACOA–Adult Children of Alcoholics • Al-Anon/Alateen–support for families of alcoholics • CA–Cocaine Anonymous • CDA–Chemically Dependent Anonymous • CEA–Compulsive Eaters Anonymous • CLA–Clutterers Anonymous • CMA–Crystal Meth Anonymous • CoDA–Codependents Anonymous • COSA–Codependents of Sex Addicts • DA–Debtors Anonymous • DA–Depressed Anonymous • DDA–Dual Diagnosis Anonymous • EA–Emotions Anonymous • EAA–Eating Addictions Anonymous • FA–Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous • GA–Gamblers Anonymous • MA–Marijuana Anonymous • MA–Methadone Anonymous • NA–Narcotics Anonymous • Nar–Anon–family groups of addicts • NicA–Nicotine Addicts Anonymous • OA–Overeaters Anonymous • OLGA / OLG-Anon-OnLine Gamers Anonymous • PA–Pills Anonymous • PIR–Pagans In Recovery • Procrastinators Anonymous • RCA–Recovering Couples Anonymous • SA–Spenders Anonymous • SARA–Sexual Assault Recovery Anonymous • SLAA–Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous • SMA–Self-Mutilators Anonymous • VA–Vulgarity Anonymous • WA–Workaholics Anonymous

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ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

Tanya Paz

Jennifer E. Beaver

Unauthorized use of ID to obtain goods 10am– 900 block Nevada St.

Commercial burglary 1:50pm– 2400 block Cherry Ave.

Discharging firearm In negligent manner 11:06pm– 2800 block Walnut Ave. Sunday, Feb. 16 Assault with great bodily injury 2:29pm– 2100 block Cherry Ave. Monday, Feb. 17 Stolen vehicle 6:58am– 3200 block E. 19th St.

Commercial burglary 2:35pm– 700 block E. Spring St.

Injury hit-and-run 3:57pm– 900 block E. 33rd St.

Embezzlement by employee 6:50pm– 1500 block E. Spring St.

Tuesday, Feb. 18 Stolen vehicle 12:59am– 2100 block E. 21st St.

Residential burglary 7:30am– 1800 block Stanley Ave. Stolen vehicle recovered 9:05am– 1900 block Temple Ave. Forgery 1:35pm– 2900 block Cherry Ave. Commercial robbery 5:56pm– 900 block E. 33rd St.

Wednesday, Feb. 19 Vandalism ($400 or more) 2:22am– 2700 block Cherry Ave.

DUI 2:27am– Wall St./Temple Ave. Suspect in custody.

Scavenging 10:38am– alley in 1900 block St. Louis Ave.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Changes of heart?

I attended the Feb. 18, 2014 [Signal Hill] City Council meeting and heard very interesting information and opinions about the proposed City’s Resolution Opposing The Taxpayers’ Right to Know and Vote initiative. The most interesting and meaningful things that I heard were Councilwoman [Lori] Woods and City Treasurer [Emerson] Fersch explain how they had signed the original initiative based on their then understanding of the proposal and now they have changed their minds based on more information and City service experience. They were now opposing the initiative. It is difficult and probably embarrassing to do this in front of audience members that you had once supported. I applaud both Councilwoman Woods and Treasurer Fersch for doing the right thing and making such a change in front of previous supporters and for presenting an intelligent discussion why they made the change. Let’s hope that the majority of people that signed the original initiative will also listen to the information presented by the City and change their vote to “no” on the initiative in the June 3, 2014 election. Gary Dudley Signal Hill

Something on your mind? Visit our website and leave a comment!

www.signaltribune.com DESIGN EDITOR/PRODUCTION MANAGER

MANAGING EDITOR

Leighanna Nierle

Cory Bilicko

ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS

Barbie Ellisen Jane Fallon COLUMNISTS

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Carol Berg Sloan, RD

The Signal Tribune welcomes letters to the editor, which should be signed, dated and include a phone number to verify authenticity. Letters are due by noon on the Tuesday before desired publication date. The Signal Tribune reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, language and space requirements. Letters should be 400 words or less. The Signal Tribune will publish no more than one “pro” letter and one “con” letter on a particular topic in a single issue. The Signal Tribune does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other publications or otherwise presented in a public forum. Letters to the editor and commentaries are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Signal Tribune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, letters to the editor and commentaries are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. Letter-writers will be identified by their professional titles or affiliations when, and only when, the editorial staff deems it relevant and/or to provide context to the letter. We do not run letters to the editor submitted by individuals who have declared their candidacies for public office in upcoming races. This policy was put in place because, to be fair, if we publish one, we would have to publish all letters submitted by all candidates. The volume would no doubt eliminate space for letters submitted by other readers. Instead, we agree to interview candidates and print stories about political races in an objective manner and offer very reasonable advertising rates for those candidates who wish to purchase ads. The Signal Tribune is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. Yearly subscriptions are available for $50.

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NEWS

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

Police find 36 kilograms of cocaine in home of Long Beach man after routine traffic stop A Long Beach man suspected of possessing 36 kilograms of cocaine, with a street value of approximately $2.8 to $3.6 million, was arrested in north Long Beach after a routine traffic stop Monday, Feb. 17. After North Division DirectedEnforcement officers stopped a vehicle in the 6900 block of Atlantic Avenue for a traffic-related violation, they noted that he seemed unusually nervous and was found to be driving without a license, according to police. While conducting an inventory search of the vehicle, officers located packaging material that is similar to

that used to store large quantities of narcotics. Officers found this to be suspicious and deemed it possibly related to drug sales. The investigation led officers to the driver’s home in the 1100 block of E. 72nd Street in Long Beach. Officers and Drug Investigations Section detectives served a search warrant and seized the following items: • approximately 36 kilograms (79.20 pounds) of cocaine • more than three pounds of methamphetamine • one handgun and ammunition • over $3,000 cash

• one stolen vehicle The driver, 28 year-old Hildefonso Angulo, was arrested and booked for possession of narcotics for sales and is being held at the Long Beach Jail on $1,000,000 bail. Those wishing to report illegal drug activity should contact the Long Beach Police Department’s Drug Investigations Section at (562) 570-7221. Anonymous tips may be submitted by calling 1-800-222TIPS (8477), texting TIPLA plus the tip to CRIMES (274637), or visiting lacrimestoppers.org .

Source: LBPD

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

5

A handgun and ammunition were among items confiscated during the search of a Long Beach man’s home on Feb. 17.

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Long Beach Police Department officers found 36 kilograms of cocaine at a local man’s residence after arresting him during a routine traffic stop Monday.

Occupant sustains minor burns in apartment fire

At approximately 6:20pm on Saturday, Feb. 15, the Long Beach Fire Department responded to an apartment fire in the 100 block of Bonito Avenue, according to Long Beach Fire Department Captain Jim Arvizu. The first arriving unit found a three-story apartment building with fire smoke coming from the second

floor. Firefighters quickly extinguished the fire in the involved unit and kept it from spreading to adjacent units, Arvizu said. The involved unit sustained moderate fire and smoke damage. The occupant in the involved unit sustained minor extremity burns and was transported by Long Beach Fire Depart-

LBFD extinguishes garage fire

Local firefighters extinguished a garage fire on Bellflower Boulevard on Friday, Feb. 14. According to Long Beach Fire Department Captain Jim Arvizu, at approximately 7:37pm that day, the Long Beach Fire Department responded to a reported garage fire at 4413 Bellflower Blvd., where a well-involved one-story, four-stall detached garage was on fire. “Firefighters made an aggressive attack on the fire and were able to keep it from spreading,” Arvizu said. “The detached garage sustained moderate fire damage. No injuries were reported.” The cause of the fire is under investigation, and no other details were available regarding the incident, according to Arvizu.

SHPD arrests LB man for negligently discharging firearm, carrying concealed/loaded weapon

Soure: LBFD

Signal Hill Police arrested a Long Beach man last weekend for discharging a firearm in a public place. A Signal Hill Police Department (SHPD) patrol officer heard multiple gunshots coming from the area of 2800 Walnut Avenue around 11:05pm on Saturday, Feb. 15, according to police. Officers responded to the area and saw a man near the parking lot of Fantasy Castle adult-entertainment club get into a vehicle and begin driving away. The officers stopped his vehicle and detained him for further investigation. Officers located a revolver behind the driver’s seat of his vehicle and arrested him. He has been identified as Shane Peters, 23, of Long Beach. Police indicated that Peters and two other male subjects had gone to the club earlier that evening, and, after drinking too much, were asked to leave. While outside the club, Peters is believed to have pulled the revolver from his waistband and fired six rounds into the air. Peters was arrested and booked for discharging a firearm negligently and carrying a concealed/loaded weapon. Police checked the area and determined that there were no injured victims and no property damage, according to SHPD. Those with further information about this crime are asked to contact the SHPD Detective Bureau at (562) 989-7200. Source: SHPD

ment paramedics to a local hospital in stable condition. The cause of the fire is under investigation, and no other details were available regarding the incident, according to Arvizu. Soure: LBFD

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6 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

COMMUNITY

LBCC appoints new dean of Career Technical Education

Long Beach City College (LBCC) has announced the appointment of Kenneth J. Starkman as the new dean for the School of Career Technical Education (CTE). Starkman will oversee the majority of the college’s 38 technical instructional programs offered at the Liberal Arts and Pacific Coast campuses. “The addition of Ken Starkman demonstrates our commitment to design career and technical education programs that provide our students with the experience and knowledge required to meet the technical demands of growing career fields,” said Long Beach City College President Eloy Ortiz Oakley. “With Ken’s guidance, I look forward to taking on the challenge of developing and launching new programs and improving upon current offerings that give our students an opportunity to change careers, learn new skills to advance in their current employment situation or obtain skills to enter into the workforce for the first time.” Formerly the dean of Madison Area Technical College in Wisconsin for six years, Starkman was also a state supervisor/educational consultant with the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction and spent 16 years in the technology education field after teaching at the middle, high school and post-secondary levels. “I am excited and pleased to take on the challenges of supporting and expanding LBCC’s CTE programs,” Starkman said. “My goal is to support programs that are in place, while developing new programs with greater effectiveness in areas where the market is in need of qualified individuals.

There is a great team already in place at LBCC to move the CTE programs to the next level and I look forward to working with faculty members, local industry and corporate partners to advance our programs.” LBCC’s CTE programs prepare students for a wide selection of vocational choices including child development, computer and office studies, culinary arts, fire science, advanced transportation technology, electrical technology, math and engineering and LBCC’s latest programs, cyber security and mechanical maintenance that lead students directly into a career, according to the LBCC. “The knowledge Ken brings in both the education and career development spaces will enhance our existing CTE programs and drive and evolve innovative processes and collaborations that will benefit those students who enroll in any one of our many CTE programs,” said Dr. Meena Singhal, associate vice president at the Pacific Coast Campus. “The experience Mr. Starkman has in emerging technologies and developing programs around growing industries gives our programs, and thereby our students, an advantage in the manner in which they will learn and be trained.” LBCC’ School of Career Technical Education, which encompasses the majority of the CTE training programs, continues to grow as the need from specialized industries to hire qualified graduates remains high in a variety of fields. Source: LBCC

Mortuary vocabulary 101 A Matter of Life

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

Courtesy LBCC

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When completing tasks around the mortuary, it is not unusual for me to blurt out something to an apprentice such as “get me a church truck.” Typically, I can overlook the fact that a new apprentice would have no idea of what I am talking about. A church truck is a wheeled device that expands like an accordion and is used to move a casket around, whether it is through a door, down a hallway or in and out of a church. When moving a casket from place to place using the church truck, we typically do not place the casket spray (flowers) on top of the casket until the casket is in place, as the movement and vibrations can cause the flowers to slide off the casket. Once the casket is situated, it is opened, and the casket spray is placed just prior to the family arriving, keeping the flowers looking fresh. One afternoon, while working with an apprentice, I told him it was okay to open the casket, where to put the lamps and where to place the floral arrangements that had arrived. I then asked him to “get me the casket spray.” He was gone quite a while, and I had finished all the last-minute details, when he came screaming with a towel in hand and a frantic look on his face. He then said “Ken, I’m sorry. I couldn’t find the casket spray but I did find the Windex.” McKenzie is the owner of McKenzie’s Mortuary in Long Beach.

FOLBA offering to cover pet-adoption costs in honor of World Spay Day In honor of the 20th anniversary of World Spay Day on Tuesday, Feb. 25, the nonprofit Friends of Long Beach Animals (FOLBA) will pay the adoption fees for any animal whose application for adoption they receive on Saturday, Feb. 22 and Sunday, Feb. 23 for any animal in their custody. This offer is for individuals and families with a limit of one subsidized adoption on these two days. World Spay Day shines a spotlight on spaying and neutering as proven means of saving the lives of companion animals, community (feral and stray) cats and street dogs

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Grand Prix kickoff party to benefit Long Beach Police Foundation In honor of the 40th Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach, the nonprofit, volunteer-driven Committee of 300 will present a kickoff party with a preview of the

lives lived $

who might otherwise be put down in a shelter or killed on the street. World Spay Day is presented by The Humane Society of the United States and Humane Society International. For more information, contact Bob Carlton, FOLBA president, at (562) 988-7647 or info@folba.org , or Alex Macias, adoption coordinator, at (562) 590-3061 or alexandra.macias@longbeach.gov .

bobby Locke 78 gary McCracken 69 Linda sonday 74 Delfino Mendez-rodriguez 78 Philip reilly 73 narciso neri 64 Anastasia hahalis 44 eresa escareno 85 elma sharkey 80 ralph hill 86 Jerry Maddux Jr. 75 enriqueta sierra-navarro 90 earl rogers 95 sylvia Zimmerman 98 Arturo Marquez 66 gerald brandon 55 Don henriques 77

e families were assisted by McKenzie Mortuary. For more details on service dates and times, contact (562) 961-9301

Paddock Club at the Gaslamp, 6251 E. Pacific Coast Highway, on Thursday, Feb. 27 starting at 6pm. The Gaslamp will provide free appetizers along with a no-host bar. The public is invited. Each year the “Redcoats,” as this allvolunteer group is known, start the racing festivities off with an event geared to introduce the public to aspects of the race, and this year will provide a sneak peak at what goes on in the VIP Paddock Club at the race. After Party, one of the bands playing throughout race weekend, will provide music while attendees browse through a portion of the Hall of Fame, highlighting 40 years of racing in Long Beach. Past queens and princesses will be available to autograph posters, and the Sultans Car Club will have several cars on display along with the Indy show car

from the Toyota GPALB. There will also be a silent auction with a large assortment of items including trips, restaurant meals, spa treatments and tickets to the Grand Prix Foundation Ball. Also included will be a signed lithograph of the Dan Wheldon tribute picture “Godspeed” by artist Holden Van-Howe created in memory of Dan who was killed October 16, 2011 at the Las Vegas Speedway. Each year the Committee of 300 picks a community charity to support by donating to it all the proceeds from the silent auction. This year’s charity is the Long Beach Police Foundation. MORE INFORMATION (562) 981-9200 redcoat.com


FEBRUARY 21, 2014

COMMUNITY

Long Beach College Promise trio among 31 new partners of 100Kin10 with goal of training 100,000 STEM teachers by 2021

The Long Beach College Promise partnership– which includes Cal State Long Beach (CSULB), Long Beach City College (LBCC) and the Long Beach Unified School District (LBUSD)– is among the list of 31 new partner organizations aligned with 100Kin10. Established in 2011, 100Kin10 is a networked approach to providing America’s classrooms with 100,000 excellent STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) teachers by 2021 while supporting tens of thousands more. Through unique, ambitious commitments, more than 150 partners are together fueling the creation of the next generation of innovators and problem solvers, according to CSULB. Network organizers note that more and better-trained STEM teachers are essential to prepare America’s students to fully participate in our democracy and to understand and respond to complex national and global challenges. To compete in the global marketplace and provide opportunity to all young Americans, all students– not just those fortunate enough to attend certain schools– must have basic STEM skills and knowledge. “Many children grow up imagining themselves as solving one or more of our nation’s most pressing problems. While they don’t conceptualize things as adults do, they do encounter problems they want to fix,” said CSULB Interim President Donald J. Para. “A fifth-grader who loses her mother to cancer may dream of someday curing this widespread disease. Yet, the challenge we face today is that too many students are not persisting in science either because they view the content as uninspiring or the math too difficult. “I’m pleased the Long Beach College Promise partnership has joined the 100Kin10 network and will help produce more science educators and equip teachers with strategies to retain students so they may persist to achieve a STEM related college credential.” CSULB has committed to preparing an additional 970 K-12 teachers by 2018. This includes working with LBCC and making sure that some 250 community college transfers are ready to enter the university’s elementary credential program with a STEM specialization with its rigorous math and science coursework. “Investment in the STEM fields is critical to our nation’s ability to remain competitive in a global econ-

City of Signal Hill seeking residents born in 1920s for anniversary events

In honor of its 90th anniversary, the City of Signal Hill is seeking residents who were born in the 1920s, particularly in 1924, who are willing to share their memories. “We are also seeking older adults who lived in Signal Hill for a significant period in their lives, even if they are now living somewhere else,” said Pilar Alcivar-McCoy of the City’s Community Services Department. “We would like to recognize them at the April 1 City Council meeting and interview them for a display to be featured at the April 22 birthday celebration.” Those interested in participating may contact the Community Services Department at (562) 989-7330 or comservices@cityofsignalhill.org by Friday, March 14. Source: City of SH

omy, replicate innovative teaching practices at the local level and motivate our students to view research and development as a career pathway,” said LBCC President Eloy Ortiz Oakley. “We are proud to participate in the 100Kin10 initiative. We know that producing qualified STEM teachers through advanced training programs will result in students and graduates with the capacity to build a new economy for our nation in growth industries.” Organizations are accepted as 100Kin10 partners following a vetting process conducted by a team of partner reviewers and the University of Chicago. Reviewers are looking for organizations that bring innovation, boldness, and a proven track record to their commitment(s) toward expanding, improving and retaining the best of the nation’s STEM teaching force or building the 100Kin10 movement. “The Long Beach Unified School District sees the 100Kin10 network as a practical way to address a national issue, and we’re pleased to be part of this important effort,” said LBUSD Superintendent Christopher J. Steinhauser. “Our participation in the network is a logical extension of the work we have done for years with LBCC and CSULB to support teachers and prepare new ones for successful careers in science, technology, math and engineering education.” As partners fulfill their commit-

ments and work together to spark innovation, they have access to exclusive opportunities– including competitive research opportunities, solution labs, collaboration grants, a growing research and learning platform, and a funding marketplace. Each of these is designed to foster collaborative problem-solving and support partners in fulfilling their ambitious commitments. In the first two years of the effort, 100Kin10 partners who have committed to increase the supply of great STEM teachers have recruited and prepared 12,412 teachers. They are projected to prepare just shy of 37,000 teachers by 2016, five years into the project’s 10-year timeline. The network’s continued growth will add to this total number. In addition, nearly 75 partners are working to support and improve existing teachers so that more of them stay in the profession with the goal of reducing the need for so many new teachers entering the workforce. The Long Beach College Promise was established in 2008 with a focus on providing a number of guarantees to help all local students prepare for, enter and succeed in college. It is an extension of the Long Beach Education Partnership that was launched in 1994 by local civic leaders to ensure that all students would progress smoothly through the education systems and into the workforce.

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Community Hospital Long Beach Foundation announces new Board

Community Hospital Long Beach Foundation (CHLBF) recently announced its new Board of Directors for 2014. John Koenig, of The Koenig Companies, is the new chair of the 22member Board. Serving with Koenig on the seven-member executive committee will be: Vice Chair Ross Riddle, South Coast Shingle Company; Treasurer Jeff Wimbish, Kensington Investment Counsel; Secretary Kit Katz, St, Mary Medical Center; Andrea Caballero, Catalyst For Payment Reform; Brendan Diette, Northwest Mutual and Suzanne Nosworthy. Other Board members are: Andrew Barber, Crisell & Assoc.; Gayle Clock, CHLB Auxiliary President; Beverly Cook, CHLB Las Damas de la Plaza President; MJ Dornford, Zim Lines; Jean Graham; Mary Lockington, Lockington Law Group; Dennis McConkey, Jalate Inc.; Brad Miles, INCO Commercial Realty Services; Jan Miller, Convention Visitors Bureau; Joel Napalan, Citizens Trust; Mark Taylor, LBCC; Machelle Thompson, Keen Home Care.; Rick Trice; Paul Valesco, Esq; and Linda Wallace, Financial & Insurance Solutions. The goal of CHLBF is to seek and provide financial support for Community Hospital Long Beach. Source: CHLBF

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New york Times best-selling Author visits signal hill Public Library

Christina baker Kline Monday, February 24 at 7pm signal hill Public Library 1770 east hill st. is is a Free event. guests who bring a new clothing item or pair of shoes for a child aged 5-17 years old will have a chance to win a Free copy of Orphan Train signed by the author. items will be donated to local foster children in need. is is the perfect time to talk to Christina about her interviews with train riders and the historical, cultural, and geographical research that went into the writing of Orphan Train.

SIGNAL T

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signal hill Public Library: (562) 989-7323 signal hill Community services Department 2175 Cherry Ave. (562) 989-7330 w w w. c i t y o f s i g n a l h i l l . o r g

About the Author christina Baker Kline is the New york Times-bestselling author of five novels – Orphan Train, Bird in Hand, e Way life should Be, Desire lines and sweet Water – and the author/editor of five nonfiction books. Writer-in-Residence at Fordham university om 2007-2011, Kline is a recent recipient of a Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation Fellowship and several research fellowships (to ireland and Minnesota), and has been a Writer-in-Residence at the Virginia center for the creative Arts.


8 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Conference

continued from page 1

Neighborhoods Past & Present,” will be at LBCC’s newly remodeled campus after the last two conferences in 2010 and 2012 took place at the Historical Society of Long Beach. Past presenters included independent scholars, community researchers, faculty members, archivists, librarians and students. “It’s really a dynamic conference and brings a lot of people together who are doing work and all contributing to history of the area,” said Julie Bartolotto, executive director of HSLB, who helped launch the conference. DelGaudio, who moved to Lakewood in 1977 from the San Fernando Valley, decided in 2005 that he wanted to write a book about the history of Long Beach. “One of the motivations behind launching this was that I decided that I wanted to know more about the community I live in,” he said. In doing so, DelGaudio joined other faculty members to develop a community-based research program at LBCC with the goal of enabling honor students to research the local community. Delving into quality-of-life issues, the college students then presented their reports to the City Council, DelGaudio said. Based on the success of the program, LBCC agreed to create a community-studies website, where researchers are allowed to publish their work online.

COMMUNITY

Since the program’s inception, students and faculty from such disciplines as sociology, political science, anthropology, history and economics have participated, he said. “Our honors program is not a large program,” DelGaudio said. “We only have a couple hundred students, but we have a highly motivated student population there, and they are the most skilled students. This would be one way for us to offer them a more attentive curriculum that would be more appropriate for what we do in the program.” Faculty and students have since been able to connect to different archives and museums in the area while making contacts with academics at Cal State Long Beach and other institutions, he said. “We want to bring together a community of researchers, writers, academics and scholars to raise the level of analysis of our communities,” DelGaudio said. Unlike some books on Long Beach history that are mainly “pictures with captions,” DeGaudio said he hopes to dig deeper into specific stories, striving for archived-based, detailed analysis of the documentary record. In researching subjects that will later become chapters of his book, DeGaudio has visited the national archives, records in Washington D.C., HSLB’s archives and regional planning documents at the Huntington Beach Library. For his latest research, DelGaudio’s

next step is to visit Long Beach’s hall of records, where he expects to uncover deeds with restrictive covenants that once prohibited minorities from buying homes in east Long Beach. “We really have two cities,” he said. “We have the east side, and we have the west side, and the populations of those two halves are quite distinct. So we’re trying to explain, historically, how that happened.” So far, DelGaudio has discovered that before 1940 there were restrictive covenants in some areas of Long Beach, including the affluent Virginia Country Club neighborhood. In one instance, he described how a black family was able to buy a house in the Bixby Knolls area and move into the neighborhood in the middle of the night. This enraged their white neighbors, who circulated a petition to have them kicked out since there wasn’t a restrictive covenant on the property, DelGaudio said. Residents gathered hundreds of signatures and turned them into the City Council, hoping for an ordinance to prevent blacks from living there, but it was later determined that such an ordinance would have been a violation of the 14th Amendment, he said. DelGaudio is co-authoring the book with retired LBCC history professor Craig Hendricks, Ph.D., who is also presenting a research paper at the conference. This year, Hendricks is focusing research on Signal Hill, with a paper, called “Signal Hill: The Neighborhood that Got Away.” He said the research paper, which will later become a chapter on oil in the book, describes “three views from the Hill,” referring to three waves of economic growth that have shaped Signal Hill’s history. Aside from the oil boom, which the city is most known for from 1921 to the 1960s, Hendricks touches on the fact that Signal Hill was once a major agricultural producer. Before Signal Hill incorporated as its own city in 1924 to avoid being annexed by Long Beach, the area was

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

Courtesy HSLB

A promotional advertisement from the Jan. 2, 1940 issue of the Long Beach Press-Telegram shows a proposal to build an ice rink at Lakewood Village.

first known for a cheese factory and farms of black berries, watermelons and cucumbers from the 1890s to 1920, he said. Hendricks said Japanese-Americans and Mexican-Americans, who were eventually taken over by oil prospectors, did most of the farming on small, one-acre plots. The produce was then put on Pacific Electric red cars, which would then take it to the Southern Pacific Railroad for the East Coast. After domestic oil production was surpassed by foreign oil, developers began looking at Signal Hill for commercial real-estate development because of its open land and scenic

views. Thousands of condo units were built from 1965 to 1985, turning Signal Hill into a “very desirable real-estate market,” Hendricks said. DelGaudio said such local research helps to shine light on how Long Beach and surrounding communities have changed throughout the years. “It’s so ironic, because you see all these flips in terms of what Long Beach was and what Long Beach is,” he said. “And that’s a measure I think we can take pride in. This is a community that has undergone tremendous transformations.” MORE INFORMATION hslb.org (562) 424-2220


FEBRUARY 21, 2014

Council

continued from page 1

Proponents had petitioned for the initiative as a way to increase transparency and give taxpayers more say in fiscal decisions, primarily after the Council passed a resolution seeking to provide economic incentives to future developers after the State abolished the City’s redevelopment agency. However, city officials argue that the initiative’s language is too broad and goes far beyond its intended purpose, requiring costly special elections at $75,000 per election for fees that are routinely voted on by the Council, ranging from water rates to charges for library books to false burglar-alarm fees to vehicle-impound fees and recreation fees. Farfsing pointed out that the City Charter already requires that the City conduct public hearings and reviews for any economic-incentive proposals. Proponents of the initiative, on the other hand, said the initiative is only meant to apply to “new fees, assessments and taxes,” adding that many of the fees and assessments would be exempt from the two-thirds voterapproval requirement under state laws, including propositions 218 and 26. Still, City Attorney David Aleshire said it’s unclear whether certain fees and assessments would apply under the proposed initiative, adding that, since Signal Hill is a charter city, the City has the ability to impose more restrictions than what state laws require. Regardless, city officials point out that if voters pass the initiative, it would most likely lead to increased legal fees for the City since there would likely be lawsuits brought forward to clarify interpretation of disputed provisions. City officials pointed out that there are currently no legal precedents or cases that deal with such an initiative to help interpret the law. Farfsing said independent consulting firm Urban Futures Inc., which was hired by the City to give an unbiased report on the initiative’s fiscal impacts on the city, concluded that the measure, if passed, would financially impact nearly every city department, primarily police, public works and community services. The consultant found that the initiative has the potential to impact $2.1 million, or 13 percent, of the City’s General Fund and $3.5 million, or 100 percent, of the City’s water department. The consultant also found that the initiative would require the City to drastically change its budget process from a two-year budget cycle to a six-month budget cycle because of the “uncertainty created by the voting require-

ments for fees and assessments,” Farfsing said. Moreover, the consultant indicated that the initiative would force the City to pay nearly $400,000 in additional staffing costs annually and would limit the City to 20-year bond payments instead of 30-year payments, in addition to creating other financial challenges for the City. Another concern is whether the initiative would force a citywide vote on the California Crown Landscape and Lighting District, an area of 90 singlefamily homes that agreed to annual maintenance assessments. Maria Harris, a member of Signal Hill Community First and proponent of the initiative, said Proposition 218 exempts the property-assessment district from the initiative, however city officials say the initiative “appears to broadly apply to the City’s assessment authority.” Farfsing noted that many residents feel the City has done a good job with its finances and residents aren’t asking for any radical changes, citing the results of a community-satisfaction survey of 249 registered Signal Hill voters conducted between November and December of last year. The survey results indicated that 75 percent of the residents interviewed agreed that the city is “going in the right direction.” Signal Hill received higher marks for resident satisfaction than most surrounding cities, according to the survey results. While Churchill, Harris, Gloria Nava and Bob Mendoza, who are all members of Signal Hill Community First, spoke in favor of the measure, two residents spoke out against it, including Larry Blunden and Gary Dudley, who serves as a parks and recreation commissioner. “It seems to me that this whole thing is taking the power and then turning it upside down,” Blunden said. “We elect you guys to make decisions for us, and not everybody has the ability to make decisions and knows all the details about running government. It just doesn’t make sense to me.” Mayor Noll said the initiative, if passed by voters, would be the most restrictive initiative for a city government in California and the United States, adding that it would “paralyze” the city. Vice Mayor Ed Wilson said the initiative would be “adding bureaucracy to bureaucracy,” since the proponents admit that Proposition 218 already requires that city governments conduct public hearings and permit residents to protest any tax increases. He said the last tax increase in Signal Hill was proposed for raising funds for a new

NEWS

municipal library that went to the voters and failed to pass. Councilmember Tina Hansen agreed, stating that the initiative would put the city in “ruin.” Councilmember Lori Woods, who had originally signed the petition along with family members to support the initiative before she was elected last year, said she has since recanted her decision, adding that many of the initiative’s goals are already covered under city and state laws. Woods, who appeared to hold back tears, said it’s been a “difficult journey” and “humbling” experience. City Treasurer Emerson Fersch, who said he also signed the petition, stated that he now opposes the initiative primarily because it would likely create more legal fees for the City in interpreting provisions of the initiative. However, Fersch spoke out against Mayor Noll imposing the three-minute time limit for speakers. Discussion continued, however, even after the Council meeting was adjourned. During the meeting of the successor agency to the former redevelopment agency, Matt Simmons, a member of Signal Hill Community First, stated that he agrees with the Council’s position.

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

The program was developed to enable prospective manufacturers, developers, real-estate agents and others to identify available locations in the region where new or expanding businesses could potentially locate. In addition to incorporating 98 percent of all commercial and industrial property listings, the program provides various layers of geographic and demographic information as well as “dynamic mapping” to assist business owners free of charge. To access the site, visit gatewaycogsiteprospector.org .

9

properties with CUPs, including the Majestic Golf Course, which, according to city officials, has received concerns from residents of golf balls overshooting the fence. Improvements to the site to rectify the situation are expected by April.

Review of institutional permits The Council adopted a resolution, conditionally approving annual institutional permits for the Courtyard Care Center and the Las Brisas Child Care Center. Both establishments submitted applications to obtain permits for calendar year 2014.

Conditional-use permit properties The Council received and filed a report on the annual inspection of properties with conditional-use permits (CUPs). The report included a review of 49

The next Signal Hill Council meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, March 4 at 7pm in the Council Chamber.

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Other Council highlights: Zoom prospector program Long Beach city officials Victor Grgas and Daniel Payan gave a presentation on the “Zoom Prospector” EconomicDevelopment program, an online database developed through the Gateway Cities Council of Governments (COG).

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AZTECA M R

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

Trio of local artists represent different mediums in Funny Dreams

“Funny Dreams,” mixed media by Dawn Quinones

Les Jolis Trésors, 3226 E. Broadway, is hosting an exhibit entitled Funny Dreams through March 30, and the gallery will host an artist reception on Saturday, March 1 from 5pm to 8pm. Funny Dreams features the work of three local artists: Dawn Quinones and her intricate paintings on paper or canvas; M.C. Armstrong and her whimsical insects made of clay and found objects; and gallery owner Annie Clavel with her new aerial paintings. “When you are a ceramist, what do you do with the detritus of past lives? Send it to the landfill? Let it collect dust? Use it in your art? In this case the use of found objects as insect legs and antennae lend themselves perfectly because in clay these skinny parts would break,” Armstrong said. “These sculptures combine my love of clay, my interest in insects and the creative challenge of reusing fascinating objects.” MORE INFORMATION (562) 735-4060

“Something In The Air,” mixed media by Annie Clavel

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“Searching for the Way,” mixed media by Dawn Quinones

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SIGNAL TRIBUNE

LB Symphony Orchestra to perform free concerts geared to local families

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Source: LB Convention & Visitors Bureau

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panic, Cambodian and African-American communities featuring works by Cuban jazz artist Paquito D’Rivera and award-winning Cambodian composer Chinary Ung’s Khse Buon for solo viola. Also, the Bob Cole Conservatory at CSULB World Percussion Ensemble, with director Dave Gerhart, will be performing West African-style works for Ewe Orchestra by local composer Derrick Spiva. The 2014 Sounds and Spaces season will culminate with a performance at Farmers & Merchants Bank’s main location in downtown on June 8. Listeners will hear Joseph Haydn’s “Quartet in G, Opus 76, No. 1,” written during Haydn’s return to supervising musical life at Prince Esterhazy’s gilded Austrian palace, and Antonín Dvořák’s lyrical “String Quartet No. 12, The American.” Sounds and Spaces performances are made possible by funding from the Los Angeles County Arts Commission, the Hennings Fischer Foundation, Long Beach Navy Memorial Heritage Association and individuals who pledged their support after experiencing the program last year. For more information, visit lbso.org .

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Violinist Mei Chang

Photos courtesy LBSO

Soprano soloist Elissa Johnston

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and love, places where they like to gather, and places for which they have an affinity. We also want to extend our commitment to music education beyond the confines of our school programs and make it possible for families to experience great music together.” The atmosphere at Sounds and Spaces is casual, and seating is on a first-comefirst-served basis. Since concerts usually fill up quickly, people are urged to arrive early to claim a seat and enjoy light refreshments at pre-concert receptions with the musicians, according to LBSO. Everyone who attends and signs the Symphony mailing list will receive a voucher for two free balcony-seating tickets at an upcoming Long Beach Symphony Classical or POPS! concert of choice. The first performance, on Sunday, Feb. 23 at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 525 East 7th St., will celebrate the venue’s newly rebuilt Austin organ with the music of Johann Sebastian Bach. Acclaimed soprano Elissa Johnston will join St. Luke’s music director and organist Dr. Johannes Müller-Stosch, the Symphony’s principal flutist Heather Clark, trumpeter Marissa Benedict, and an intimate string ensemble led by Mei Chang. On March 23, Sounds and Spaces will celebrate Temple Israel’s new facility with music inspired by 1,000 years of Jewish life in Eastern Europe. David Schiff’s Divertimento for Violin, Clarinet, Cello and Piano is drawn from his acclaimed opera Gimpel the Fool, based on Isaac Bashevis Singer’s short story. Long Beach Symphony will then partner with the Homeland Cultural Arts Center on May 18 to celebrate diversity at the Manazar Gamboa Community Theater at MacArthur Park, near Cambodia Town. To accommodate as large an audience as possible in this intimate space, musicians will present two back-to-back performances, one at 3pm and another at 5pm. The program is drawn from music honoring His-

The Arts Council for Long Beach’s (ACLB) search for a new executive director is underway, and it is anticipated that the position will be filled in early March, according to a press release issued by Bob Maguglin, director of Public Relations for the Long Beach Convention & Visitors Bureau. “This timing fits well with the organization’s current strategic planning process,” said ACLB President Marco Schindelmann,. “On Feb. 22, the Board of Directors will meet to review and finalize our 18-month planning process. As we begin to implement our exciting vision for the future, we will have our new executive director in place. Visionary leadership will be critical in order to support artists and promote the best of arts and culture, throughout our local communities and the region.” The search committee is in the process of reviewing applications for the position. In addition to board and staff members, the composition of the committee includes various leaders from artist and nonartist organizations: Michele A. Dobson, Long Beach native, third-term member of ACLB Board of Directors; Mike Donelon, former Long Beach Councilmember, FOLBA executive director of ASK Foundation; Kathy Fishkin, CPA, CFO Rich Development Enterprises, LLC and treasurer of ACLB; Gigi Fusco Meese, Long Beach resident, first-term member at large, ACLB, former executive director/producer of the Long Beach Playhouse, and current executive Pet of the Week: director of the Anaheim Performing Arts Center Foundation; Michele Roberge, Tax time is coming upon us, and if executive director, Carpenyou can use some help—well, you know how rabbits multiply. Except ter Performing Arts Center, for Brandon—his rescuers saw to it Cal State University Long that there won’t be any unwanted Beach; Andrew Vonderbaby bun-buns hopping around on schmitt, executive and prohis account. Brandon’ll bring you ducing artistic director, good luck with your return—he has four rabbit’s feet—and he’ll also be a Long Beach Playhouse; heck of a sweet, cuddly pet. Meet Kylee Yocky, director of him on the shelter side of CompanArts Learning, ACLB; and ion Animal Village at 7700 East Marco Schindelmann, artist Spring St., (562) 570-PETS. Ask for ID#A515024. professor, University of Sponsored by: Redlands, and ACLB president.

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The Long Beach Symphony (LBSO) will offer four free chamber-music performances at various community locations throughout Long Beach through June. The performances are part of the symphony’s Sounds and Spaces program, which was originally conceived by a group of musicians from the orchestra as a means for the symphony to better connect with the diversity of the Long Beach community. To assure convenience for a broad spectrum of the population, including families, the series will take place on Sunday afternoons at 4pm, and venues span a wide geographic and cultural focus: St. Luke’s Episcopal Church on Feb. 23, Temple Israel on March 23, Homeland Cultural Center on May 18, and F&M Bank on June 8. Programming will run the gamut, from Bach to Cuban jazz. “The Symphony wants to deepen its relationship with the diverse neighborhoods of Long Beach,” said LBSO Executive Director Kelly Ruggirello. “We want to take classical music outside the concert hall to venues that people know

11

Arts Council for LB commences search for its executive director

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12 SIGNAL TRIBUNEwww www.readingclubfun.com .r oo! Yah

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FEBRUARY 21, 2014

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Winter Olympics 2014 I’m crazy about the Winter Olympic Games! Ice skating, skiing and snowboar ding are are some of my snowboarding favorite cold season sports. W atching people from from all Watching over the world compete in the Games is such a thrill. What do you know about the Winter Olympics? Read the clues and fill in this cr ossword to find out! crossword

Sochi, “Swifter,, “Swifter Russia! Ice Higher Higher,, be rg Str onger.” S Stronger.”

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1. Over 2,500 ________ ar aree competing. 2. They come frfrom om about 90 ________. 3. 2014 is the first year that athletes frfrom om seven 6 largely lar gely ______ countries (including Paraguay and Zimbabwe) are are competing in Winter Olympics. snowboarding snowboarding 11 8 4. Athletes frfrom om ________ have qualified for the luge. 3 5. A team frfrom om Jamaica is going to compete in the ________ again this winter. winter. 15 USA 2 group 6. The United States team of 230 athletes is the ________ gr oup ever sent. countries 12 figure figure skating 7. For the first time, ________ will be able to compete in ski jumping. 5 Russia’ss favorite sports is ______ ______, so Russians ar aree sure 8. One of Russia’ sure to tune in! medals Winter country. 4 moree medals in ________ than any other country. 9. The USA has won mor athletes 10. ______ _____ is beloved all over the world; a widely viewed sport. 7 13 11. About 1,300 ________ have been made for the Winter Olympics! India 1 largest Some of the gold ones will have a bit of the lar gest meteorite Norway warm to hit the earth rrecently ecently (landed in Russia on Feb. 15, 2013). bobsled 14 12. Over the years, the athletes frfrom om ________ have won 10 the lar gest number of medals at the Winter Games. largest ice hockey women Cross-country Bjornn Daehlie (Norway) held the 13. Cr oss-country skier Bjor Free ________ rrecord ecord for most medals won going into Sochi. S t uf f 9 world 14. Speed skaters Apolo Ohno (8 medals) and Bonnie Blair Come to print out frfree ee puzzles: Winter Olympic Sports and (6 medals) had won the most medals for Team Team ________. largest lar gest Presidents Day! www Hooray for Presidents www.readingclubfun.com .readingclubfun.com 15. The 2018 ______ Olympics will be held in PyeongChang, South Kor ea. Korea.

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Shaun W hi t e Todd Lodwick, Todd a skier skier,, is the first American 10 to compete in 6 seasons of the Winter Games.

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Athletes at the Winter Olympics ar aree competing in 98 events in 15 sports to win and to ear earnn gold, silver or br onze medals. Read the clues to fill in bronze my puzzle with the Olympic sports! 1. average “flight time” is less than 10 seconds break beforee returning shuffleboard 2. had a 52-year br eak befor returning in 1992; a lot like shuf fleboard 3. started as a mix of skiing and acr obatics acrobatics cross-country 4. combination sport of cr oss-country skiing and rifle shooting, skills first used by hunters and soldiers 5. started in the Summer Olympics (1908), now: singles, pairs, ice dancing 6. partly enclosed vehicle on steerable blades racing on iced tracks Europe 7. done in the Alps in Eur ope for many years; Olympic sport since 1936; includes the downhill event, which is the longest with highest speeds, and the slalom, which has the shortest course with the quickest tur ns turns 8. special skates, tight racing suits to lower friction, helmet, eyewear 9. Olympic-style toboggan: steering and speed ar aree important 10. flexible or stif boards, boots, hard hard plastic helmets stifff boards, 11. stick, skates, helmet, pucks, pr otective gloves, shin guards, guards, jersey protective 12. one of the fastest Olympic sports; athletes go up to 100 miles per hour Annimills LLC © 2014 v11-05

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FEBRUARY 21, 2014

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$25 per person, or $20 for ‘13/’14 dues-current members. Check-in begins at 11:45am. Lunch will begin at 12:00pm. lunch prepared by the hotel’s catering staff

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14 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

TST4561 / Case No. NS028464 oRDER To SHoW CAuSE FoR CHANGE oF NAME, SUPeRIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF LOS ANGeLeS, 275 Magnolia Ave., Long Beach, CA 90802. PeTITION OF Marlene Amanda Gonzalez. TO ALL INTeReSTeD PeRSONS: 1. Petitioner MARLeNe AMANDA GONzALez, filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name: MARLeNe AMANDA GONzALez. to Proposed Name: MARLeNe AMANDA MONJI. 2. THe COURT ORDeRS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, shy the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICe OF HeARING: Date: MARCH 4, 2014; Time: 8:30 am.; Dept. S26, Room 5500. The address of the court is the same as above. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, THe SIGNAL TRIBUNe, 939 e. 27th. Street, Signal Hill, CA 90755: January 31, & February 7, 14, 21, 2014. ___//ss//___ Michael P. vicencia, Judge of the Superior Court Dated: January 24, 2014

TST4569 / 2014 023798 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: FUN TOUCH PHOTO exPReSS, 2510 e. willow St. Unit 101, Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrants: ALOHI eNTeRPRISeS INC., 2510 e. willow St. Unit 101, Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Kelly M. James, Secretary. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 29, 2014. NOTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 31, & February 7, 14, 21, 2014.

PUBLIC NOTICES

TST4562 / 2014 001109 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: LONG BeACH BRewING COMPANY, 1520 Ohio Ave., Long Beach, CA 90804. Registrant: MeLANIe MeLeNDRez, 1520 Ohio Ave., Long Beach, CA 90804. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Melanie Melendrez. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 3, 2014. NOTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 31, & February 7, 14, 21, 2014.

TST4563 / 2014 019197 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: BRew LBC, 1131 e. 4th St., Long Beach, CA 90802. Registrants: 1. MeLANIe MeLeNDRez, 1520 Ohio Ave., Long Beach, CA 90804, 2. LLOYD MITCHeLL III, 1187 e. 3rd St. #112, Long Beach, CA 90802. This business is conducted by: Copartners. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Melanie Melendrez. The registrants have begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrants began using this fictitious business name on January 23, 2014. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 23, 2014. NOTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 31, & February 7, 14, 21, 2014.

TST4575 NoTICE INVITING BIDS A-1 Sealed bids will be received at the office of the City Clerk, City of Signal Hill, California, until 10:00 a.m. on March 18, 2014, and on the same day shortly thereafter, they will be publicly opened and read for the “Signal Hill Community Gardens Project, No. 738”, in accordance with the Specifications therefore. Bids must be made on the forms provided for this purpose, addressed to the City Clerk, City of Signal Hill, marked "Bid for," followed by the title of the project and the date and hour for submitting bids. Bids are required for the entire work as described in the Bid Schedule and the Specifications. The work to be accomplished under this contract includes the construction of a Community Garden including but not limited to grading, walls and fences, P.C.C. improvements, polymer coated crushed stone pathway, planter boxes and irrigation system at 1917 e. 21st Street. A-2 All work must be completed within thirty (30) working days after receipt by the Contractor of the notice to proceed from the City. The contract documents, which include the Specifications, may be obtained at the City of Signal Hill Department of Finance for $25, or $30 if requested by mail. The documents are entitled “Signal Hill Community Gardens Project, No. 738.” A-3 Bids will not be received unless they are made on a proposal form furnished in the Contract Documents by the City of Signal Hill. each bid must be accompanied by cash, certified check, cashier's check or bidder's bond, made payable to the City of Signal Hill for an amount equal to at least ten percent (10%) of the amount bid, such guarantee to be forfeited should the bidder to whom the contract is awarded fail to enter into the Contract. A-4 All bids are to be compared on the basis of the lump sum or itemized bid items shown in the Bid Schedule(s). Bids will not be accepted from the contractors who are not licensed in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 9, Division III of the Business and Professions Code of the State of California. The Contractor shall be required to possess a Class A or Class B license at the time the contract is awarded. A-5 Attention is directed to the provision in Section 1777.5 of the labor Code concerning the employment of apprentices by the Contractor of any subcontractor under the Contractor. A-6 Before a Contract is entered into with the successful bidder, the bidder shall present evidence in writing to the City Clerk, City of Signal Hill, that he has a current combined single limit liability policy with aggregate limits for Bodily Injury and Property Damage in the amount of two million dollars ($2,000,000). A-7 Pursuant to the provisions of Section 1773.2 of the Labor Code of the State of California, the minimum prevailing rate of per diem wages for each craft, classification or type of workman needed to execute the contract shall be those determined by the Director of Industrial Relations of the State of California which are on file with the City Clerk of Signal Hill and copies will be made available to any interested party on request. A copy of the Contractor's certified payroll, as well as those of all subcontractors shall be submitted with each invoice. A-8 Attention is directed to Public Contract Code Section 22300 permitting the substitution of specified and approved securities for contract retention of funds. All such securities shall be subject to the review and approval of the City Attorney of the City of Signal Hill. A-9 The successful bidder will be required to furnish a payment bond in an amount equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the contract price and a faithful performance bond in an amount equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the contract price, and said bonds shall be secured from a surety company satisfactory to the City Attorney of the City of Signal Hill. A-10 The City of Signal Hill reserves the right to reject any and all bids, or delete portions of any and all bids or waive any informality or irregularity in the bid or the bid procedures and shall be the sole judge of the bids received. By order of the City of Signal Hill. Posted at Signal Hill City Hall on: February 14, 2014 Published in the Signal Tribune on: February 14 and 21, 2014

TST4564 / 2014 018732 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: BLACK LABeL, 6216 e. Pacific Coast Hwy. Unit 97, Long Beach, CA 90803. Registrant: JOHNPAUL NeLSON, 6216 e. Pacific Coast Hwy. Unit 97, Long Beach, CA 90803. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: John-Paul Nelson. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 23, 2014. NOTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 31, & February 7, 14, 21, 2014.

TST4566 / 2014 000598 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: TeAM PURe FReeDOM eNTeRTAINMeNT, 41 Cedar walk #4406, Long Beach, CA 90802. Registrants: PUReFReeDOM MARKRAY, 41 Cedar walk #4406, Long Beach, CA 90802. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Purefreedom Markray. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 3, 2014. NOTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 31, & February 7, 14, 21, 2014.

TST4567 / 2014 020357 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: MISTeRCMT, 416 Orange Ave. Apt. 8, Long Beach, CA 90802. Registrants: GLeNN BACOLOR, 416 Orange Ave. Apt. 8, Long Beach, CA 90802. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Glenn Bacolor. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 24, 2014. NOTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 31, & February 7, 14, 21, 2014.

TST4568 / 2014 023348 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: APv PROTeCTION AND TRANSPORT, 819 e. 4th St. Apt. 12, Long Beach, CA 90802. Registrants: ASTeR veLASQUez, 819 e. 4th St. Apt. 12, Long Beach, CA 90802. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Aster velasquez. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 28, 2014. NOTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 31, & February 7, 14, 21, 2014.

TST4573 / 2014 031237 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: S A BRIGGS & ASSOCIATeS, 3833 e. 2nd St. #103, Long Beach, CA 90803. Registrants: SHIRLeY A. BRIGGS, 3833 e. 2nd St. #103, Long Beach, CA 90803. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Shirley A. Briggs. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed

herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 5, 2014. NOTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 7, 14, 21, 28, 2014.

TST4570 / 2014 026626 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: MAKe A DIFFeReNCe, 2510 e. willow St. Unit 101, Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrants: ALOHI eNTeRPRISeS INC., 2510 e. willow St., Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Kelly M. James, Secretary. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 31, 2014. NOTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 7, 14, 21, 28, 2014. TST4571 / 2014 0274496 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: BeACH DRAFTING AND DeSIGN, 6742 e. Los Arcos St., Long Beach, CA 90815. Registrants: RUSSeLL TURLeY, 6742 e. Los Arcos St., Long Beach, CA 90815. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Russell Turley. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 31, 2014. NOTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 7, 14, 21, 28, 2014.

TST4574 / 2014 033864 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: AMAzING CUTS, 5532 e. Del Amo Blvd., Lakewood, CA 90713. Registrant: LYDA LIN LAI, 9421 elm Ave., Fontana, CA 92335 This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Lyda Lin Lai. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 7, 2014. NOTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 14, 21, 28, & March 7, 2014. TST4535 / 2013 259946 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: 1. HIGH STYLe wINe, 2. HISHSTYLewINe.COM, 3. HIGHSTYLewINe, 3401 Claremore Ave., Long Beach, CA 90808. Registrants: 1. TAMMARA SHAGAN, 2. JeFFeY CHAGAN, 3401 Claremore Ave., Long Beach, CA 90808. This business is conducted by: a Married Couple. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Tammara Shagan. The registrants have not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on December 20, 2014. NOTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 10, 17, 24, 31, 2014.

CITY OF SIGNAL HILL TST4580 NoTICE oF ElECTIoN

NOTICe IS HeReBY GIveN that a Special Municipal election will be held in the City of Signal Hill on Tuesday, June 3, 2014, at which there will be submitted to the voters the following measure:

ReQUIRING 2/3 vOTe FOR ALL TAxeS, ASSeSSMeNTS AND FeeS; exPIRATION OF TAxeS AND FeeS wITHIN 10 YeARS, ASSeSSMeNTS wITHIN 20 YeARS; ReQUIRING BOND RePAYMeNT IN 20 YeARS. INITIATIve CHARTeR AMeNDMeNT The polls will be open between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. _____________________________ Kathleen L. Pacheco City Clerk Dated: February 19, 2014

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

TST4579 / 2014 040247 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: C.R. TIReS, 8211 Circle M, Buena Park, CA 90621. Registrants: CeLICA RUIz SAYACHACK, 8211 Circle M, Buena Park, CA 90621. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Celica Ruiz Sayachack. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 13, 2014. NOTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 21, 28, & March 7, 14, 2014. TST4582 / 2014 044188 STATEMENT oF ABANDoNMENT oF uSE oF FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: DUNN FAMILY CHIROPRACTIC, located at 4028 Long Beach Blvd. #202., Long Beach, CA 90807. The fictitious business name referred to above was filed on February 19, 2014, original File No. 2010 1840146, in the County of Los Angeles. Registrant: HAROLD M. wexLeR, D.C., 5931 Oakdale Ave., woodland Hills, CA 91367. This business is conducted by: an Individual. Signed: Harold M. wexler, D.C. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 19, 2014. Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 21, 28, & March 7, 14, 2014.

TST4576 / 2014 040061 STATEMENT oF ABANDoNMENT oF uSE oF FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME. The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: eUROPeAN PIzzA , located at 4336 South St., Lakewood, CA 90712. The fictitious business name referred to above was filed on April 4, 2012, original File No. 2012 058133, in the County of Los Angeles. Registrant: KRYSTIAN wLODARCzYK, 4029 e. 4th St. #B, CA 90814. This business is conducted by: an Individual. Signed: Krystian wlodarczyk. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 13, 2014. Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 21, 28, & March 7, 14, 2014. TST4577 / 2014 039011 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: PePUL & ASSOCIATeS MORTUARY SeRvICeS, 921 Hedgepath Ave., Huntington Park, CA 91745. Registrants: 1. LUPe PULIDO, 921 Hedgepath Ave., Huntington Park, CA 91745, 2. PeDRO PULIDO JR., 3125 Folsom St., Los Angeles, CA 90063. This business is conducted by: a Married Couple. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Lupe Pulido. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 12, 2014. NOTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 21, 28, & March 7, 14, 2014.

TST4578 / 2014 037526 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. CONFIDeNT DeNTAL LABORATORY, 2. CONFIDeNT DeNTAL LAB, 2559 eucalyptus Ave., Long Beach, CA 90806. Registrants: SALvADOR AYALA, 2559 eucalyptus Ave., Long Beach, CA 90806. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Salvador Ayala. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 11, 2014. NOTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 21, 28, & March 7, 14, 2014. TST4558 / 2014 040831 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. SO CAL BONDeD, 2. BONDeD ROOFING, 2450 Orange Ave., Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: eUGeNe S. LAYTON, 2450 Orange Ave., Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: eugene S. Layton. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on April 18, 2011. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 16, 2014. NOTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 24, 31, & February 7, 14, 2014.


FEBRUARY 21, 2014

Street sweepers continued from page 1

NEWS

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

15

time employees, Athens has agreed to offer jobs to qualified employees at their current salary rates. There is also an option for those employees who don’t want to quit their positions with the City in order to work for Athens. The City may offer to transfer these people to other departments or provide transferfor-training opportunities to these workers, according to the staff report. “Every employee will be offered an alternate city position,” the report stated. However, this reassurance of continued employment isn’t enough for a number of the workers who showed up in the Council Chamber on Feb. 18. Long Beach resident and city employee Regina Savage, 51, is one of the 13 street sweepers responsible for cleaning the roads of Long Beach. During the public-comment period, Savage pointed out that she and the other employees in her department take pride in their work and that many of them live in the city. “I think once we go,” she told the Council Tuesday night, “you’ll do your best to contract everybody else…the city of Long Beach is built on people like us. We’re the people who are out there every day. We’re the people out there working. We’re the people out there taking care of the city.” CJ Dablo/Signal Tribune Savage noted that employees from other departments, including refuse, gas and public works, were also present in the Long Beach resident and city employee Regina Savage, one of the street sweepers facing the possibility of displacement from her job, spoke Council Chamber. A number of people in the audience held up out against a proposal to award a contract to Athens Services. Next month, city officials will be considering a plan to allow the company to take over street-sweeping services. signs that said “S.O.S. Save Our Sweepers.” Prior to the Council meeting, other street sweepers repeated City policy already requires that the equipment must be sold at Sterling said. “It’s a completely at-will position.” Savage’s concern for their jobs and the fear that an outside com- the end of its life span, whether or not the services are contracted. The Signal Tribune attempted to reach the city manager’s pany wouldn’t clean Long Beach’s roads as well as their depart- He added that there are other ways to save on costs, especially office to discuss several of the issues raised by Sterling, however ment could. if the City changed some of the fleet operations. He discussed the media contact did not respond to specific questions prior to Dimitri Crawford, 43, has served about 10 years with the the possibility of replacing some of the equipment with efficient press time. City. He pointed out that the City reported a budget surplus and cost-effective machines or modifying work schedules. Thomas Marshall, another city employee and Long Beach this year. Crawford criticized the choice of Athens and picked Sterling echoed workers’ concerns that Athens may not keep resident who has spent 20 years as motor-sweeper operator for apart the company’s commitment to offer jobs with the same its promise to employ the city workers who choose to transfer to the City, repeated the idea that the workers should be involved salary. He said he worried that his pension and medical ben- the private contractor. in the decision to outsource the work to a private vendor. efits would stop. “We don’t actually feel we’re getting a fair shake here,” MarHe stressed that Athens is not a union company. Sterling “They’re concerned about the bottom line of money,” Craw- offered a bleak possibility for the city employees who join shall said. “We haven’t been allowed to be part of this process, ford said of Athens. “They’re not going to take pride in the city Athens because of the promise that they would keep their current the RFP. We’ve been pretty much left out.” ß like we do, because we live here.” salary. He warned that they could be “farmed out as Crawford has lived in Long Beach for over 40 years. soon as possible to limit costs to the company.” Sexton Thompson has worked as a motor-sweeper operator The union spokesman emphasized that in this for about 11 years. When asked for his opinion on Athens’s offer scenario, workers would be without an organizato hire the sweepers, the 43-year-old asked how long the com- tion to represent them. pany would keep him employed. He feared that he would only “There’s no guarantee of any kind of rights,” be working for Athens for a temporary time and that he would lose his benefits. “It may be somewhere I don’t want to go,” Thompson said. “That’s TST4581 my concern.” NoTICE To VoTERS oF DATE AFTER WHICH No ARGuMENTS FoR The International Association of oR AGAINST A CITy MEASuRE MAy BE SuBMITTED To THE CITy Machinists and Aerospace Workers ClERK (also known as the Machinists NOTICe IS HeReBY GIveN that the Special Municipal election Union) represents many of the is to be held in the City of Signal Hill on Tuesday, June 3, 2014, at which affected employees. A union there will be submitted to the voters the following measure: spokesman acknowledged that the City did commit to offer employees ReQUIRING 2/3 vOTe FOR ALL TAxeS, ASSeSSMeNTS AND FeeS; other positions within the municipal exPIRATION OF TAxeS AND FeeS wITHIN 10 YeARS, ASSeSSMeNTS wITHIN 20 YeARS; ReQUIRING BOND RePAYMeNT IN 20 YeARS. INIorganization, however, he also conTIATIve CHARTeR AMeNDMeNT firmed that he didn’t think that this is a promise Long Beach would be able NOTICe IS FURTHeR GIveN that the City Council authorizes all to keep. members of the City Council to file a written argument against the measure, “There aren’t a lot of jobs availaccompanied by the printed name(s) and signature(s) of the author(s) subable,” Machinists Union representamitting it, in accordance with Article 4, Chapter 3, Division 9 of the California elections Code. not to exceed 300 words in length. tive David Sterling said in an interview Tuesday night. NOTICe IS FURTHeR GIveN for measures placed on the ballot by petition, He explained that many of the the persons filing an initiative petition pursuant to Article 4, Chapter 3, Diviemployees are classified as “sweeper sion 9 of the California elections Code may file a written argument in favor operators” and that no other city of the ordinance. departments operate sweeping equipNOTICe IS FURTHeR GIveN that arguments shall be signed, with the ment. printed name(s) and signature(s) of the authors submitting it, or if submitted “We’ve gone through numerous on behalf of an organization, the name of the organization, and the printed years of elimination of vacant posiname and signature of at least one of its principal officers who is the author tions and eliminations of salary savof the argument. ings [and] lay-offs of personnel,” he NOTICe IS FURTHeR GIveN that, based upon the time reasonably necessaid. sary to prepare and print the arguments and sample ballots for the election, Sterling added that the union has the City Clerk has fixed Friday, March 14, 2014, at the hour of 12:00 noon requested information from the City as a reasonable date prior to the election after which no arguments for or over the last two months, but it has against the City measure may be submitted to the City Clerk for printing and not received copies of the contracts distribution to the voters as provided in Article 4. Arguments shall be submitted to the City Clerk, City of Signal Hill, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, proposed by Athens or any of the CA 90755. Arguments may be changed or withdrawn until and including (Walking–18 years) other bidders. the date fixed by the City Clerk. He said that the union wants to be We do kids’ birthday parties, too! a part of the decision-making NOTICe IS FURTHeR GIveN that the City Council has deterprocess. He explained that the City is mined that rebuttal arguments, as submitted by the authors of the opposing direct arguments, may be filed with the City Clerk not more than ten (10) being “premature” to consider condays after the final date for filing direct arguments on Monday, March 24, tracting services because no one 2014, at the hour of 12:00 noon. attempted to review how to streamline the current operations and take NOTICe IS FURTHeR GIveN that any ordinance, impartial cost-effective measures. He argued to analysis, or direct argument filed under the authority of the elections Code keep the street-sweeping operation will be available for public examination in the City Clerk’s office for not less than ten (10) calendar days from the deadline for filing arguments. Any under city management. rebuttal argument filed under the authority of the election Code will be availHe pressed for transparency from able for public examination in the City Clerk’s office for not less than ten (10) the City. He criticized several aspects calendar days from the deadline for filing rebuttal arguments. of the analysis. Sterling especially scrutinized details of Athens’s offer _____________________________ Kathleen L. Pacheco to buy the City’s equipment and the City Clerk City’s conclusion that the purchase would generate a one-time savings of Dated: February 20, 2014 about $1.7 million. Sterling said that

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St3538 february 21 layout 1  

Signal Tribune Feb. 21, 2014

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