Issuu on Google+

SIGNAL

WINNERS Page 4

T

R

I

B

U

N

“Not Forgotten” origami by Blake Derksen

See page 10

E

SERVING BIXBY KNOLLS, CALIFORNIA HEIGHTS, LOS CERRITOS, WRIGLEY AND THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

Vol. 35 No. 37

February 14, 2014

Man stabbed, woman shot in domestic dispute in Signal Hill

Your Weekly Community Newspaper

Cory Bilicko/Signal Tribune

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

In-N-Out Burger (far right) overlooks a 14-acre former redevelopment property on Spring Street between California and Atlantic avenues that Signal Hill Petroleum plans to acquire for a mixed-use development, including a hotel, medical offices and retail.

Signal Hill awaits State approval on revised plan for former redevelopment properties Sean Belk Staff Writer

It could take up to a year for Signal Hill to receive final approval from the State Department of Finance (DOF) on a revised plan for the sale and/or development of former redevelopment properties, according to city officials. Acting as the successor agency to the former Signal Hill Redevelopment Agency (RDA), the City Council approved on Jan. 21 revising its long-range property-management plan, which was submitted to the State for final approval this month. Elise McCaleb, the City’s economic develop-

ment manager, said during the successor agency meeting in January that it may take a while to receive final approval, adding that the State is backed up with working on the state budget and approving recognized obligation-payment schedules for cities across the state. As of last month, 23 property-management plans had been approved by the State, according to McCaleb, who added that she heard of one plan that wasn’t approved until about 11 months after it was submitted. “It may be that it takes up to a year for the Department of Finance to approve the plan,” she

Police officers cordon off an area at a residence in the 3300 block of Myrtle Avenue Wednesday morning after two people were injured during a domestic dispute. Cory Bilicko

Managing Editor

Two people were injured during a domestic dispute at a residence in the 3300 block of Myrtle Avenue in Signal Hill Wednesday morning, according to police. Shortly after 9am on Wednesday, Feb. 12, the Signal Hill Police Department (SHPD) received a 911 call from a man who said his male neighbor, who was standing outside, was bleeding from his neck and holding a gun. SHPD and Long Beach Police Department officers arrived on the scene a few minutes later, according to the SHPD. Officers contacted the injured man, whom the SHPD described as “non-confrontational,” and he appeared to have a neck wound caused by a sharp-edged object. A female was later found inside the home with a single gunshot wound to her foot. Both the male and female were transported to a local hospital for medical treatment. Police recovered a firearm and a knife. “We know through our investigation, the female, Chardonnai Smith, age 26, of Victorville, was the dominant aggressor, and she was subsequently arrested for attempted murder,” said Senior SHPD Officer Kelli Brown in an emailed statement later that day. “The male victim remains at the hospital and is in stable condition.” The investigation remains ongoing, according to the SHPD.

LB mayoral candidates weigh in on health of their funds, state of campaign-finance reform see REDEVELOPMENT page 11

CJ Dablo Staff Writer

The latest statements that describe the year-end financial health of the Long Beach mayoral campaigns reveal at least one thing about April’s municipal election: there’s a great disparity in the size of the nest eggs among those vying for that soon-to-be-empty seat at the center of the Council dais. In the crowded field of 10 candidates who seek to become Long Beach’s next mayor, Damon Dunn has so far raised the most money for the calendar year ending Dec. 31. For that full-year period, Dunn raised $279,908 for his campaign and spent $243,942. Doug Otto raised about $255,413 and spent about $112,267. Vice Mayor Robert Garcia raised $206,641 and spent $41,332. Assemblymember Bonnie Lowenthal raised $175,320 and spent $71,146. Fifth District Councilmember Gerrie Schipske raised $61,397 and spent $38,440. Jana Shields raised $6,000 and spent $5,073. All amounts are rounded to the nearest dollar and reflect the contributions and expenditures for the calendar year. No reports are available from the city clerk office on the campaign finances of Richard Camp, Mineo Gonzalez, Steven Paul Mozena and Eric Rock. They did not raise or spend more than $1,000 for that calendar year. There is a provision under the municipal law that allows candidates with less money to seek financial assistance from the City to help fund their campaign. Under Long Beach’s Campaign Reform

Source: Reports filed on City of LB City Clerk web page

see FINANCE page 13

The Long Beach candidates for mayor have submitted reports to the city clerk’s department detailing the contributions and expenditures for their campaigns. This chart reflects the total amounts reported for the periods January through June and July through December 2013. The amounts are rounded to the nearest dollar.

Weekly Weather Forecast Friday

Saturday

80°

72°

Mostly sunny, very warm Lo 54°

Sunday

69°

Partly sunny

Clouds breaking for sun

Lo 53°

Lo 50°

February 14 through February 18, 2014

Monday

65° Partly sunny Lo 51°

Tuesday

64° Partly sunny Lo 49°

This week’s Weekly Weather Forecast sponsored by:

Nino’s Ristorante Italiano Since 1958 3853 Atlantic Avenue, Bixby Knolls (562) 427-1003 or (562) 427-9111 w w w. N i nos Long Be ach . com

Approved Watering Schedule Watering is approved on the following days:

Monday, Thursday, & Saturday before 9am and after 4pm

For more information, call the Water Conservation Hotline:

562-989-7350

2 SigNaL TriBuNE

NEWS

FEBruary 14, 2014

Long Beach on track to end homelessness among veterans by 2015, health officials say Sean Belk Staff Writer

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Veterans line up on Tuesday, Feb. 11 at the Veterans Affairs hospital in Long Beach for an orientation and screening to apply for housing vouchers through the federal Housing and Urban Development/Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) program.

!"#$%&'("#

)*+,$-."*/0$,'#$&"./#. 1"/2$3#-&'4$5-$67'87

!"!#$%&$'())*+*%"$ ",-%$.-#"(%/$ .-"*+0$

Stacie Mello, 44, graduated from nursing school last Friday. About two and a half years ago, however, she was in a much different situation: drunk most of the time and living either in her car or a shed. Sometime after serving in the U.S. Marine Corps as an administrative clerk during the 1990s at the now former air base in Tustin, Mello became an alcoholic, she said. To get back on track, Mello took advantage of mental-health services through the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). For 60 days, she lived in a sober-living facility at the Villages at Cabrillo in Long Beach dedicated to housing homeless veterans and other homeless populations. But, after she was convicted of a felony, Mello lost her job at a realestate insurance firm and fell back into her addiction, becoming homeless for about a year, she explained. “I lost everything,” Mello said. “I lost my home, my car and my job… I started drinking and realized that I had a problem. I called the VA, they took me in, and I’ve been sober ever since.” Mello’s story is similar to many veterans throughout the country who have made a new life for themselves through a joint program provided by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the VA. The program, known as HUD-VASH (Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing), provides vouchers for rental subsidies along with case-management and clinical services. The program has been hailed by the federal government, which in 2009 made it a top priority to support veterans who lack safe and secure housing. Last December, President Barack Obama recognized the fact that Phoenix, Ariz. became the first city in the nation to reduce its chronically homeless veteran population to zero, a significant milestone in the federal government’s goal to end homelessness among veterans by the end of 2015. Long Beach, which also has had a long history of homeless veterans in the city, is on the same path as Phoenix and has already made great strides in just the last few years, said Bob Cerince, homeless-services officer for the Long Beach Department of Health & Human Services, in a phone interview. By coordinating resources, Long Beach has been able to track the

number of homeless veterans in the city, and, as of the last count, there were 164 homeless veterans in Long Beach in 2013, which is a nearly 46percent drop from the 309 homeless veterans reported in 2011, he said. By the end of next year, he said Long Beach is “poised” to meet the federal government’s goal of assisting all qualified veterans with permanent and transitional housing. “We are well on that trajectory to find out what it means when we can say that we’ve ended chronic and veteran homelessness in Long Beach,” Cerince said. “When you get to the 2015 count, you should be able to see us getting pretty close if not reaching that zero. It doesn’t mean that we won’t have veterans who are homeless anywhere, but it means we’ll have the resources for anyone who is willing and ready to receive that assistance. We’ll have the ability to respond. It won’t be a matter of supply. We’ll have the supply to meet the need.” This week, a screening and orientation took place on Feb. 11 and 12 for veterans to apply for the federal HUD-VASH program at the VA hospital in Long Beach. Mechel Stanley, program coordinator and nurse manager at the hospital, said the purpose of the two-day event was to gather as many cases as possible to decide who receives vouchers. She said the program mainly gives priority housing assistance to the most vulnerable– chronically homeless veterans who have been homeless for at least a year or more than four times in the past three years. Cerince pointed out that veterans who are dishonorably discharged are not eligible for the housing program. Though the Long Beach program has a total of 950 vouchers, the federal government provided an extra 210 this year, she said. Stanley said there are about 150 vouchers left to provide housing assistance to homeless veterans. Over time, however, more vouchers will open up as veterans graduate from the program and are able to live on their own without assistance, she said, adding that veterans can also apply during the week as walk-ins. “This is kind of like a mass screening, because we’re trying to get as many people housed in a short amount of time as possible,” Stanley said. “Then, if there are any openings that will happen over time then we’ll work with that, because people graduate… We have people graduating, so there’s always some sort of opening that we try to backfill.” She said the event, which was communicated to the public through fliers provided to various community partners, such as homeless shelters and the Long Beach Multi Service Center, also provides an opportunity for veterans to work with VA case managers. In addition to helping with housing assistance, the case manager is able to assist veterans with finding legal support for expunging criminal records, educational services and supportive services for families. The program also helps veterans with getting access to free mental-health services, medical services, Social Security benefits, reconnecting with family members and basic life skills. “We’re doing everything from basic stuff to teaching individuals how to grocery-shop and pay bills,” Stanley said. “They haven’t done it in 15 to 20 years, and that’s where the case-management program comes in.” The goal of ending homelessness see HOMELESS page 15

NEWS California State University, Long Beach selects its first-ever female president

FEBruary 14, 2014

Scott Bosco

Contributing Writer

This July will mark the beginning of a new chapter for California State University, Long Beach (CSULB) as Jane Close Conoley will officially step in as its first female president, and the seventh president overall in CSULB’s 65-year history. The selection of Conoley as the new president of CSULB by the California State University (CSU) Board of Trustees came as a surprise even to Conoley. At the time the position opening was announced, she was not considering applying for the job. Conoley, who is currently serving as dean of the Gevirtz Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), said the position typically would be awarded to someone who is or has been a provost or president. But after CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White had called Conoley personally to recruit her, she knew it was an opportunity that she needed to explore. “Recruiting me for this was somewhat of an unusual pick,” Conoley said. “Usually you go for another president or somebody who’s been a provost, but [White] took the chance on recruiting me based on what I had accomplished at [University of California, Riverside] (UCR).” Part of why Conoley was so potent a candidate for president was her ability to fundraise. She has advocated for research money with members of Congress and different agencies in both Washington D.C. Courtesy CSULB and Sacramento. During her eight months as interim Jane Close Conoley will become the first female president of Cal State Long chancellor at UCR, she gained a commit- Beach in July. ment of $15 million per year toward UCR’s medical school so it could upgrade from a two-year program to a four-year one. She also increased multimillion-dollar endowments while at Texas A&M. “Since I became dean at Texas A&M, fundraising has taken up half my time,” Conoley said. “To be a successful fundraiser, you have to know what the strengths of your school are.” Conoley said that she is unable to elaborate on her plans for CSULB but instead said that her primary focus will be on student success, as well as maintaining the CSU’s mission to increase the number of graduates through access to education. “This will be fabulous opportunity for me because [CSULB] has been doing great things for the last 10 years,” Conoley said. “The last two presidents have been remarkable in terms of establishing a specific identity for the school and its focus on student success.” Conoley came from humble beginnings. She and her three siblings grew up in low-income tenement buildings in the Bronx. She attended Mount St. Ursula, an all-girls Catholic school, until she graduated high school. She then enrolled at the College of New Rochelle in New York, where she played basketball and earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology. She continued her education at the University of Texas at Austin, where she earned her doctorate in psychology and met her husband, Collie Conoley. After she received her doctorate, Conoley began working in both higher education and clinical psychology. Conoley said that the experience of working in a clinical environment was beneficial both in her career and as a communicator. “I went to psychology school, so I’ve been a therapist; I generally know how to talk to people,” Conoley said. “You know that really helps you understand both your strengths and your limitations when you’re dealing with people.” In higher education, Conoley has worked at several universities, including Texas Woman’s University, University of Nebraska at Lincoln, Texas A&M University and, most recently, University of California, Santa Barbara. She said that ultimately her draw to Long Beach was its diversity as well as its central location in Southern California. “Cal State Long Beach is renowned for its quality, diversity and global mission, and it is an honor to be selected as the university’s next president,” Conoley said. “This is a vibrant university that plays a key role in Southern California, and I embrace the opportunity to work with the outstanding students, faculty, staff and Long Beach community to reach even greater heights.” Conoley will replace CSULB interim-president Donald J. Para, who A N T I QU E M A L L has had the position since June 2013. Para succeeded F. King Alexander, who left the campus last June to become president of the Louisiana State University system and chancellor of Louisiana State University A&M. ß

Grandma Darling’s

Sunroof Everything

Feel the breeze while you drive Avoid costly repairs— have your sunroof serviced today!

-Annual Service -Repairs -New Installations

BUD’S

Auto Upholstery

Beach Cities

Sunroofs

www.budsrestyling.com

562-595-6370

2637 St. louis Ave. Signal Hill

Presidents Day Sale 3 days:

Feb 15, 16, 17 STOREWIDE SALE

10%-40% OFF

BARGAINS GALORE!

Vintage & Retro • Furniture • Antiques • Jewelry • Collectibles HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 11am-6pm Sat. 10am-6pm, Sun. 11am-5pm

562-498-2704

1819 Redondo Ave., SH

North of PCH - Next to Panini’s

SigNaL TriBuNE

3

OPPOSITES ATTRACT? What Movie screening Who Hosted by Long Beach Cinematheque and Lola’s Mexican Grill Where Sunnyside Cemetery, 1095 E. Willow St. When Friday, Feb. 14 at 6:30pm More info The event will feature a presentation of Hal Ashby’s film Harold and Maude. Guests are encouraged to bring low-back chairs and blankets for comfort. Picnic baskets are welcome. Ticket cost is $10.

FOR FURRY FRIENDS What Free mobile animal clinic Who Fix Long Beach Where McArthur Park, 1321 Anaheim St. When Saturday, Feb. 15 from 7am to 4pm More info Event will offer free spay and neuter procedures to those who have made appointments. Microchipping, deworming and flea-control products as well as nail-trimming will be offered at discounted prices. Appointments are not necessary to get required shots for dogs and cats. Visit fixlongbeach.com .

PUT YOUR WALKING SHOES ON What Downtown Long Beach Walking Tour Who Hosted by Long Beach Heritage When Saturday, Feb. 15 from 9am to 11:30am Where Meet at WPA mural at 3rd Street and the Promenade More info Cost is $10. Tickets can be purchased in advance through PayPal at lbheritage.org and will be distributed at meeting site.

WHO ARE YOU? What Monthly meeting Who Questing Heirs Genealogical Society Where Resurrection Lutheran Church Parish Hall, 1900 E. Carson St. When Sunday, Feb. 16 at 1pm More info The meeting will focus on Civil War presentations, history and research. Visit qhgs.info or call (562) 598-3027.

KIDDING AROUND What Kidical Mass Neighborhood Bike Ride Who Hosted by the Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association (BKBIA) Where Georgie’s Place, 3850 Atlantic Ave. When Sunday, Feb. 16 at 1pm More info Children and adults will bike for roughly four and a half miles, beginning and ending at Georgie’s Place. For the bike ride, participants will deliver and pick up “packages” just like bike messengers. Email krista@bixbyknollsinfo.com, visitbixbyknollsinfo.com/kidicalmass.html or call (562) 595-0081.

RACE TO THE TOP What Mayoral candidate forum Who Hosted by Junior League of Long Beach and League of Women Voters When Wednesday, Feb. 19 from 5pm to 6:30pm Where The Grand, 4101 E. Willow St. More info The event is free, no reservation is required, and free parking will be provided by The Grand.

BIXBY KNOLLS BY THE NUMBERS What State of the District Who Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association When Thursday, Feb. 20 from 7pm to 9pm Where Long Beach Petroleum Club, 3636 Linden Ave. More info The event will include food, entertainment and news about the latest projects and progress in Bixby Knolls. $5 entry fee at the door. Call (562) 5950081 or email info@bixbyknollsinfo.com .

NOW HEAR THIS What Hearing-aid check-ups Who Sponsored by The Hearing Loss Association of America Long Beach/Lakewood Chapter Where Weingart Senior Center, 5220 Oliva Ave. in Lakewood When Friday, Feb. 21 from 10am to noon More info Sam Moghadam, a hearing-instrument specialist from Ascent Hearing, will help visitors with their hearing aids for free. Call (562) 438-0597 or visit hlalongbeachlakewood.org .

MAKE MORE MONEY What Business-plan program Who Hosted by CSULB When Saturday, Feb. 22 and continues on Saturdays through March 15 Where College of Continuing and Professional Education More info Participants do not need to be enrolled students at CSULB. To register, visit ccpe.csulb.edu/Entrepreneurship . Class size is limited.

HEART OF THE MATTER What Women’s Heart and Stroke Seminar Who Long Beach Memorial Where Long Beach Memorial, 2801 Atlantic Ave. When Saturday, Feb. 22 from starting at 7:30am More info Full day of women’s heart and stroke lectures. Blood pressure, carotid ultrasound, cholesterol and blood glucose (non-fasting) screenings will be provided throughout the day. Visit MemorialCare.org/LBHeart .

SEE THE SHOW What Theater performance Who The Friends of Music at California Heights United Methodist Church Where 3759 Orange Ave. When Saturday, February 22 at 6pm More info The Simply Sondheim event will serve as a fundraiser for the church’s choir. The performance will include selections from Company, Into the Woods, West Side Story and more. Dinner tickets cost $20. RSVP at (562)-595-1996.

IMPROVE YOUR WAY OF LIFE What Seminar Who The Braille Institute Where Bixby Knolls Towers, 3737 Atlantic Ave. When Monday, Feb. 24 from 10am to 11:30am More info The goal of the seminar is to help people cope with the effects of vision loss. Visit brailleinstitute.org .

4 SigNaL TriBuNE

Thoughts from the

Publisher

by Neena Strichart

Today is a day to celebrate romance with those you love. With that said, we wish a very happy Valentine’s Day to all of our sweet readers. Now that our Sweetheart Sweepstakes is over for another year, it is time to congratulate all 18 lucky winners and to thank all the advertisers and generous prize sponsors. This year we received a total of over 800 entries– that’s 300 more than entered last year! With that kind of participation I know that we accomplished what we set out to do, and that was to entice our readers to visit local merchants, restaurants and service providers. During the process of prize pick-up and bucket drop-off/retrieval, the staff at the Signal Tribune did some Valentine’s Day shopping of our own. That’s what I call practicing what we preach! I hope all of readers are remembering to shop locally so we can keep our local economy stimulated. Buying online and/or out of the area are status quo for some folks. However, those of us who want to keep our local businesses thriving do spend our dollars in our own neighborhoods. Whether it’s buying a gift at About U Boutique in Bixby Knolls, flowers at Signal Hill Florist or baked goods at Alsace Lorraine, please do your best to shop and dine in your own back yard. I feel the same way about dining out. We have some nice eateries in Bixby Knolls, California Heights and Signal Hill. Whether you’re in the mood for Sunday brunch at Delius; comfort food at Café Bixby; Chinese cuisine at Le Yen or Panda Garden; Mexican food at City Mex, Patricia’s or Guadalupe’s; or sushi at Kashiwa, Atun, Your House or Bamboo Teri; please think twice before leaving the area. These restaurateurs want and need your business. And don’t forget about those who have been serving us for decades like Nino’s Italiano Ristorante. Getting back to the subject of Sweetheart Sweepstakes… I hope those who entered enjoyed the process as much as we enjoyed putting it all together. Winners were contacted by phone Wednesday evening and Thursday afternoon. Who won? I’ve included their names and what they won below!

How is it that the Long Beach Early Childhood Education Committee and others can hold a mayoral forum on early education but not one or two LBUSD-LBCC Board of Trustees forums? [“Early-childhood education committee to host mayoral forum,” Jan. 31, 2014] These candidates will oversee our children and students. We hear that parents and community members don’t take part and vote the way they should, but then you hear so little about the race or candidates. Where are our “education leaders,” and why don’t they do more to change the way people take part in our children and students when it comes to voting for LBUSDLBCC Board of Trustees candidates? John Kindred Long Beach

ULTIMATE PRIZE– RING-A-DING DINING Maria Weston/Long Beach • $100 gift card for dinner from Delius Restaurant • Two custom-fit Tungston Rings from Jonathan Marc Jewelers in Bixby Knolls (valued at $360) • Champagne Basket from Wine Country • Pair of tickets for LB Playhouse • Mini cakes from Bundts on Melrose • Tax Preparation from Liberty Tax/Lakewood – up to $350 value SUPREME PRIZE– RIDING ROMANCE Shelia Johnson/Long Beach • PEDIWAGON Belmont Shore excursion for party of 14! (lbpediwagon.com) $370 value! • Empower Yourself gift basket from Jumpstarter Bodyfuel Bars • Disposable Camera, film developing & album from Tuttle Cameras • Two pair red sunglasses from Signal Tribune • Box of Chocolates from Fresh & Easy/Signal Hill • Tax Preparation from Liberty Tax/Lakewood – up to $350 value

GRAND PRIZE– FORBIDDEN LOVE Jeanne Webb/Long Beach • $100 Gift Card from Forbidden City Restaurant •Two tickets to Musical Theatre West • Bottle of Sake/ two glasses from Kashiwa Restaurant • Mini cakes from Bundts on Melrose • Tax Preparation from Liberty Tax/ Lakewood – up to $350 value

A SPORTY KIND OF ROMANCE Kim Clary/Long Beach • Two tickets to the Anaheim Ducks (Honda Center 2/28/14) $200 value • Combo B Gift Certificate from Bixby Knolls Car Wash & Detail Center • Disposable Camera, film developing & album from Tuttle Cameras • Tax Preparation from Liberty Tax/Lakewood – up to $350 value • 2 Flamebroiler bowls/Bixby Knolls • Giant chocolate bar/ Fresh & Easy, Signal Hill

I’LL TAKE ROMANCE Emily Lloyd/Long Beach All courtesy of The Undershirt in Signal Hill: •Two Tickets to South Coast Repertory Theater (third row center) •Ogio brand carry case for Ipad/Nook/E Reader • Cozy Fleece Throw and tote • Bath Salts • Candles

FEBruary 14, 2014

• Steve Tyrell's autographed CD "I'll take Romance" • Wine and 2 glasses • Chocolates

ANOTHER SPORTY ROMANCE roy Vidal/Long Beach • Two tickets to the Anaheim Ducks (Honda Center 3/2/14) $200 value • Two skating passes at The Rinks/Lakewood Ice • Disposable Camera, film developing & album from Tuttle Cameras • Tax Preparation from Liberty Tax/Lakewood – up to $350 value • 2 Flamebroiler bowls/Bixby Knolls • Giant chocolate bar/Fresh & Easy, Signal Hill

INSURING YOUR LASTING LOVE Jill Fiala/Long Beach All courtesy of Brenda Soto Bryan Insurance Agency: •1 lb. box See's Candy Gift Certificate • (2) AMC Movie Tickets • $50 gift card to California Pizza Kitchen

SO HAPPY TO BE IN LOVE andre Blakely/Long Beach • Dinner for two at Buono’s Authentic Pizzeria •Wine & glasses from Signal Tribune • Two skating passes for The Rinks/Lakewood Ice • Gift Certificate for $25 Gift Certificate for Andy Liz/Bixby Knolls •Italian Praline Candy from Fresh & Easy • Tax Preparation from Liberty Tax/Lakewood – up to $350 value

A DAY OF DELIGHT Joan MacKnight/Signal Hill •Gift certificate for his & her haircuts at Donato’s Hair Salon • Two passes for The Rinks/Lakewood Ice • Pancake Mix & Maple Syrup from Fresh & Easy • Coffee basket courtesy of It’s A Grind in Signal Hill •Italian Praline Candy from Fresh & Easy/Signal Hill • Tax Preparation from Liberty Tax/Lakewood – up to $350 value

CUPID’S CHOICE Stan Peacock/Long Beach • Dinner for two at Your House ($40 value) • Bottle of Sake/ glasses from Kashiwa Restaurant • Pair of tickets for LB Playhouse • Mini cakes from Bundts on Melrose

see SWEEPSTAKES page 6

COMMENTARY

We need a ‘living wage,’ higher minimum wage and lower taxes on small business By Peter Mathews

COMMENT FROM OUR WEBSITE

getting schooled

OPiNiON

Political science professor, Cypress College

The Long Beach City Council recently voted for a “living wage” of $13.26 per hour for Long Beach Airport and Convention Center workers, including their retail workers. Minimum wage has lost 20 percent of purchasing power since 1973, and President Obama recently called for cities across the nation to raise the minimum wage, since Congress will not. Since 1973, the top 1 percent of the population has captured over 70 percent of the new income. Since 2009, the top 1 percent has captured 93 percent of the new income generated. Since 1973, the rich have gotten richer, the poor have gotten poorer, and the American middle class has shrunk by 10 percent. In 1980, the average CEO was making 40 times the income of the average American worker. Today, the average CEO is making 400 times the income of the average worker. Poverty and hunger have increased significantly among low- and moderate-income Americans. We must commend the Long Beach City Council for trying to uplift the plight of these specific workers, by guaranteeing them a “living wage.” If minimum wage had kept up with increased worker productivity since the 1970s, it would be $21 per hour. If it had kept up with inflation it would be $16 per hour. However, such a steep, sudden increase may place an unbearable burden on small business. We know that Ameri-

PuBLiSHEr/EdiTOr-iN-CHiEF

Neena R. Strichart

aSSOCiaTE PuBLiSHEr

Stephen M. Strichart

STaFF WriTErS

CJ Dablo Sean Belk CuLTurE WriTErS

Daniel Adams Vicki Paris Goodman Gregory Spooner

can small businesses employ two- thirds of American workers. That’s why the local, state and federal governments must reduce the tax burden on small businesses as they create a living wage or raise minimum wage, for millions of poor and middleclass Americans. Governments must also reduce many of the burdensome, unnecessary and unproductive regulations on small businesses, while keeping the necessary ones. This approach is the most balanced, and the only one that will work to benefit American workers and entrepreneurs. Two prominent Founders of the United States of America– James Madison and Alexander Hamilton– helped establish a “commercial Republic.” An important part of the business of America was going to be business. Another Founder, Benjamin Franklin, an amazing inventor and business entrepreneur, wanted other Americans to be able to do the same: create new ideas, new products, new services and new jobs so all could prosper. However, President Abraham Lincoln put the concept of entrepreneurship in perspective when he noted, “Labor is prior to, and independent of, capital. Capital is only the fruit of labor and could never have existed if labor had not first existed. Labor is the superior of capital and deserves much the higher consideration.” Lincoln’s vision, and the vision of Madison,

SIGNAL T

R

I

B

U

N

E

adMiNiSTraTiVE aSSiSTaNT

Tanya Paz

Jennifer E. Beaver

Hamilton, and Franklin, were complementary and gave birth to the American Dream. Without adequately paid workers, the guarantee in the American Declaration of Independence of the rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness would be empty. Without well paid workers and a large middle class, there would be no one to help produce and buy the products that guarantee adequate profits for successful business entrepreneurs, and the quality of life for 99 percent of Americans would deteriorate. As will American democracy. To some extent even Henry Ford knew this. He increased his workers’ pay so they could afford to buy his cars, which generated more profits for him, and a better life for them. When will our political and corporate leaders of today start re-applying these practical and ethical principles? The Long Beach City Council has lessened the burden on some workers. It, and other levels of American government, must now act to lighten the burden on other workers and to liberate the genius and energy of small businesses.

Peter Mathews is a full-time professor of political science at Cypress College and adjunct professor of sociology at Long Beach City College. He is a featured political analyst and contributing partner on the “Head-On” show on KEIB AM 1150 radio on Saturdays between noon and 2pm. Visit epetermathews.com . dESigN EdiTOr/PrOduCTiON MaNagEr

MaNagiNg EdiTOr

Leighanna Nierle

Cory Bilicko

adVErTiSiNg CONSuLTaNTS

Barbie Ellisen Ashley Goodsell COLuMNiSTS

Kenneth McKenzie Shoshanah Siegel

Carol Berg Sloan, RD

The Signal Tribune welcomes letters to the editor, which should be signed, dated and include a phone number to verify authenticity. Letters are due by noon on the Tuesday before desired publication date. The Signal Tribune reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, language and space requirements. Letters should be 400 words or less. The Signal Tribune will publish no more than one “pro” letter and one “con” letter on a particular topic in a single issue. The Signal Tribune does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other publications or otherwise presented in a public forum. Letters to the editor and commentaries are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Signal Tribune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, letters to the editor and commentaries are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. Letter-writers will be identified by their professional titles or affiliations when, and only when, the editorial staff deems it relevant and/or to provide context to the letter. We do not run letters to the editor submitted by individuals who have declared their candidacies for public office in upcoming races. This policy was put in place because, to be fair, if we publish one, we would have to publish all letters submitted by all candidates. The volume would no doubt eliminate space for letters submitted by other readers. Instead, we agree to interview candidates and print stories about political races in an objective manner and offer very reasonable advertising rates for those candidates who wish to purchase ads. The Signal Tribune is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. yearly subscriptions are available for $50.

939 E. 27th St., Signal Hill, Ca 90755 (562) 595-7900

www.signaltribune.com newspaper@signaltribune.com

FEBruary 14, 2014

Long Beach police say shooting death of man possibly gang-related

Long Beach police are investigating a recent shooting death as possibly gangrelated. According to the Long Beach Police Department (LBPD), on Monday, Feb. 10, at approximately 1:50pm, police responded to the area of Artesia Boulevard and Myrtle Avenue regarding shots fired. When officers arrived, they discovered a male adult down on the street after sustaining multiple gunshot wounds to the upper torso. He was transported to a local hospital and pronounced deceased. The victim has been identified as 22-year-old Robert Anthony Proano of Long Beach. No suspect information is available at this time, and the investigation remains ongoing. Those with information regarding this incident are urged to contact Long Beach Police Homicide Detectives Mark McGuire and Greg Krabbe at (562) 5707244. Anonymous tips may be submitted by calling 1-800-222-TIPS (8477), texting TIPLA plus the tip to CRIMES (274637) or visiting lacrimestoppers.org . Source: LBPD

LB man convicted of murdering neighbor

A jury has found a man guilty of fatally shooting his neighbor in Long Beach, the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office announced on Feb. 7. Deputy District Attorney Patrick O’Crowley said the jury deliberated for about a day and a half before finding Mark Stephen Thurwachter, 58, guilty in the first-degree murder of Marvin Williams. They also found true the allegation that the defendant personally and intentionally discharged a firearm causing death. At the outset of the trial, the defendant pleaded no contest to a charge of possession of a firearm by a felon and proceeded to trial on the remaining count of murder. Thurwachter is scheduled to be sentenced on Feb. 26 at the Los Angeles County Superior Court in Long Beach before Judge James B. Pierce. He faces a maximum sentence of 50 years and eight months to life in state prison. The prosecutor said the defendant and the victim were neighbors at Arbor

Mobile Village in Long Beach. Although initially friendly with each other, Thurwachter came to believe Williams had stolen money from him, O’Crowley said. On the evening of Feb. 1, 2012, people living in the mobile home community heard a shot and found Williams fatally injured in front of his residence. The defendant, who had been there moments before, never returned to his home, the prosecutor said. A warrant was issued for Thurwachter’s arrest on Feb. 6, 2012, and he was apprehended several months later in Ohio. He was subsequently held on $2 million bail. During the trial, a Long Beach Police crime lab expert testified that a shell casing found at the murder scene was linked by forensic evidence to ammunition discovered in the defendant’s vehicle. The case was investigated by the Long Beach Police Department.

Source: LACDA’s Office

Four suspects in identity theft, fraud ring arrested in downtown LB hotel

On Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014, Long Beach police officers were dispatched to the Hotel Maya– a DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel in the 700 block of Queensway Drive in downtown to investigate a possible stolen credit card, according to the Long Beach Police Department (LBPD). The investigation led officers to a hotel room where they located an identity theft and fraud operation underway. Police seized several items used to create fictitious credit cards and identity profiles. The investigation also led officers to a stolen vehicle, which is now recovered. Four suspects were arrested, and charges are pending. Source: LBPD

NEWS

SigNaL TriBuNE

Pine Avenue street-improvement project set to begin

The City of Long Beach will soon begin work on a substantial street improvement project on Pine Avenue between Seaside Way and Anaheim Street. “This important infrastructure project continues the revitalization of Pine Avenue and our Downtown core,” Mayor Bob Foster said. “It is yet another investment in our city’s future that will have a positive impact for years to come.” The work will involve: street resurfacing; replacing damaged sidewalks and curbs; installing a traffic signal (Pine Avenue and 9th Street) and three “scramble” (diagonal) intersections (Pine and 1st, Pine and 4th, Pine and 5th); planting new street trees and shrubs; and adding new street lighting, benches, bike racks, signage and striping. “This project will build upon earlier improvements throughout the area,” said Vice Mayor Robert Garcia, who represents the 1st Council District. “I am very proud of the work we have already done, and I look forward to the increased pride the revitalization will bring to Downtown Long Beach.” This project will be completed in phases to minimize impacts on the community, and traffic controls will be in place to provide safety for motorists and workers, according to the City of Long Beach. Businesses will remain open during construction, and parking is available in many nearby parking structures and lots. “We have worked very closely with the community and our partners so this rehabilitation will benefit residents, businesses and visitors, while adding to the appeal and vibrancy of our wonderful Downtown,” said Councilmember Suja Lowenthal, who represents the 2nd District. The project is expected to last approximately one year, and the schedule requires the contractor to minimize public inconvenience while maintaining productive work hours. There will be a “no work” period for Grand Prix week, from April 7–15, from Seaside Way to 7th Street. “The DLBA is proud to be partnering with the City of Long Beach on the Pine Avenue Improvement

Project,” said Kraig Kojian, president and CEO for Downtown Long Beach Associates. “As a financial contributor and a stakeholder advocate, we are pleased to be kicking off one of the largest Downtown public infrastructure projects in recent memory.” The project will also correct some minor drainage issues, and upgrade intersections, sidewalks and pedestrian areas to meet current disabled access regulations. According to the City, the old asphalt material to be removed under this contract will be recycled into new asphalt concrete, or utilized as base material on other street projects. The street will be resurfaced with asphalt containing up to 15-percent recycled material. Additionally, 675 tons of road base made from recy-

Lives Lived Patricia Calciano 71 Peggy Mc Fawn 77 Heinz Kunoth 73 Frank Camacho Jr 79 Ann Sinclair 95 Elaine Starkman 81 Luisa Dijamco 63 Rina Momi 86 Georgia Williams 79 Edith Del Proposto 92 Loreen Malaxa 86 Elizabeth Hodges 63 Joe Tanaka 69 Lawrence Scherter 89 Joel Utu 76 Francis Fillipow 92 Elsa Mc Williams 93 Manuel Vetanze 98 Margaret Lucero 95

cled concrete, rock, sand and asphalt will be utilized in this project and all concrete work will include recycled waste ash, diverting these materials from our landfills. Pedestrian scramble intersections, also known as a diagonal crossings, improve pedestrian circulation by stopping all vehicular traffic and allowing pedestrians to cross an intersection in every direction, including diagonally, at the same time, according to the City. The $6-million project is funded through a variety of sources, including the Downtown Long Beach Associates ($550,000), the Gas Tax, ComDevelopment Grants, munity Tidelands funds, Transportation Mitigation Funds, and one-time infrastructure funds. Source: City of LB

From the creator of

CRUISE DIARY Love Boat:

By Jeraldine Saunders

A beautiful hard-bound book filled with cruising tips, trivia, space for diary entries, port lecture notes, names & addresses of your new shipboard friends, and photos!

CRUISE D IARy The Perfect ‘Bon Voyage’ Gift

10

$

AVAiLABLe excLusiVeLy AT

URbAn COTTAGE 4121 LOnG bEACH bLVD.

e families were assisted by McKenzie Mortuary. For more details on service dates and times, contact (562) 961-9301

562-997-4121

Rest in Peace

Louis Dare 1919 – 2014

Louis Dare was born in September 1919. He served in the US Army during World War II. He drove a motorcycle across the country from West Virginia and established a manufacturing business in Signal Hill in the 1950s. In the 1980s, he became involved in local politics and was elected to serve on the Signal Hill City Council. He was a fiscal conservative and helped walk door to door to defeat a proposed new utility user tax. He was a founding member of Signal Hill Community First, an association of local residents that encouraged participation in local government through attendance at city council meetings. He was survived by his brother Frederick Dare of Corvallis, Oregon, and several nieces and nephews. A memorial service will take place Friday, Feb. 21 at 10am at St. Anthony Catholic Church, 600 Olive Ave. It will be a memorial mass, and the public is invited to attend.

5

GET 4 WEEKS OF HOME DELIVERY 99 $ FOR ONLY ONLY 19 Subscribe now and get a $10 Target GiftCard ®

The Bullseye Design and Target are registered trademarks of Target Brands, Inc. Target is not a participating partner in or sponsor of this offer.

Call: 866-710-1150, code R9090 Online: lbrsubscribe.com/specialoffer enter code 9090

After the 4-week promotional term, subscription will continue at $1.00 per day day, unless notified otherwise.

COMMuNiTy

6 SigNaL TriBuNE

CSuLB program offering free tax-return help to public Accounting majors at Cal State Long Beach (CSULB) are offering free income-tax preparation for students and members of the community through the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program, which runs through Friday, March 28, at the university. Offering free e-filing for federal and state tax returns, VITA is a cooperative effort by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to provide income-tax assistance to low- and moderate-income individuals, the handicapped, the elderly and limited English proficient individuals. Every year CSULB’s student volunteers prepare hundreds of returns for individuals both on and off campus, according to the university. Sponsored by the IRS but funded through the campus’s Beta Alpha Psi and Accounting Society, VITA helps students on campus and people from the community who cannot afford to go to paid preparers to get their taxes filed. At the same time, the program gives student volunteers valuable experience that can further help them to attain full-time employment in the accounting field. “The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program is a rewarding experience for our student volunteers,” said Jennifer Mae Formeloza, this year’s student VITA coordinator. “They learn valuable lessons outside the classroom. Students have the opportunity to interact face to face with members of the community and make a direct impact. Our profession is based on ethics. It takes a lot of trust to share something so personal, and that’s why I think this program helps students further understand their responsibilities to the public.” This year’s program has 60 volunteers who have been trained and certified by the IRS to prepare and e-file basic income-tax returns and foreign student tax returns. They also are qualified to answer many tax questions or concerns people might have. There are limitations to those who can use the service, however. VITA program volunteers do not prepare business tax returns, and they do not do

Try our House SpeciaLS! LONA’S ALBONDIGAS Breakfast served 6am to high noon authentic mexican meatball soup 5.95

FAJITAS SUPREME

tequila-marinated beef, chicken, & shrimp, served with flour tortillas 11.95 beef, chicken or shrimp 9.95

BORDER BURGER

cilantro aioli, smoked gouda, fried egg, bacon 8.95

FEBruary 14, 2014

Lunch & dinner served all day long MEXICAN- & AMERICAN-STYLE FOOD

Watch all the NFL games here!

Karaoke! Wed/Thurs/Fri/Sat

8pm

1174 Wardlow Rd., LB (West of Orange Ave.) 562-427-4630 | Like us on Facebook!

itemized returns. In addition, the CSULB program can only assist those who made $51,567 or less in 2013. Those interested in having their 2013 tax returns prepared through the VITA program should bring the following: proof of identification; Social Security cards, including spouse’s and dependents’ (or a Social Security number verification letter issued by the Social Security Administration); birth dates, including spouse’s and dependents’; current year’s tax package; wage and earnings statements (W-2, W2G, 1099-R, from all employers); and interest and dividend statements from banks (1099 forms). Additionally, clients should try to bring a copy of their federal and state returns from last year, if available; bank routing numbers and account numbers for direct deposit; total paid for day-care provider and the daycare provider’s tax identifying number (the provider’s Social Security number or the provider’s business employer identification number); and, if a client paid rent for at least half of 2013 for property in California, he or she should have the rental dates and landlord’s information (name, address, phone number). It is also important to note that when filing taxes electronically on a married filing joint tax return, both spouses must be present to sign the required forms. The CSULB VITA program operates out of Room 237 on the second floor of CSULB’s College of Business Administration (CBA) Building off of Bellflower Boulevard. Volunteers will prepare returns from 8am to 5pm Mondays through Thursdays and 9am to 3pm on Fridays. (The site will be closed Feb. 14 and 17.) Members of the community are advised to use the metered parking in Lot 15, adjacent to the CBA Building. The cost is $2 per hour. Walk-ins are welcome. For more information, contact Formeloza via e-mail at vita.csulb@gmail.com.

Source: CSULB

Walk for Kids event to raise money for ronald Mcdonald House Ronald McDonald House Charities of Southern California (RMHCSC) will host Walk for Kids, a non-competitive 5K (3.1mile) pledge event for individuals at all fitness levels. The event will take place at four locations simultaneously to help raise funds for and awareness of RMHCSC and its six Ronald McDonald Houses, including the Long Beach Ronald McDonald House, two Ronald McDonald

Sweepstakes

Family Rooms and Camp Ronald McDonald for Good Times. Those interested in supporting the walk by participating or making a donation may visit walkforkids.org . Participants are encouraged to collect donations for RMHCSC programs, like the Long Beach Ronald McDonald House. No minimum donation is required. The walk will take place Sun-

continued from page 4

• Scented candle from Capital Investment Advisers • Tax Preparation from Liberty Tax/Lakewood – up to $350 value

BEARY COZY VALENTINE Nelson Cole/Long Beach Dinner For Two from Black Bear Diner ($25 Bear Bucks) • Black Bear Diner His & Hers Fleece Vests • Two Black Bear Diner Coffee Mugs • Black Bear Diner His & Hers T-Shirts • Black Bear Diner Lotion • Black Bear Diner Soap

ROMANCE ON YOUR MIND? Marsha Hatchett/Long Beach • Dinner for two at Buono’s Authentic Pizzeria • Pair of tickets for LB Playhouse • Scented candle from Capital Investment Advisers • Wine & glasses from Signal Tribune • Italian Pralines from Fresh & Easy/Signal Hill • Tax Preparation from Liberty Tax/Lakewood – up to $350 value

OH SO UTTERLY ROMANTIC Betty Blaylock/Long Beach • Dinner for two at Atun Restaurant in Bixby Knolls • Pair of tickets for LB Playhouse • Sake & glasses from Kashiwa Restaurant • Mini cakes from Bundts on Melrose •Combo B Gift Certificate from Bixby Knolls Car Wash & Detail Center • Tax Preparation from Liberty Tax/ Lakewood – up to $350 value SO ROMANTICALLY INCLINED greg & Martha Czopek/Long Beach • Dinner for two at Your House ($40 value) Bottle of Sake/ glasses from Kashiwa Restaurant • Pair of tickets for LB Playhouse Box of Truffles from Fresh & Easy/Signal Hill • Scented candle from Capital Investment Advisers • Tax Preparation from Liberty Tax/Lakewood – up to $350 value

day, April 6 at 8am at: Shoreline Park (200 Aquarium Way in Long Beach; Exposition Park, 700 Exposition Park Dr. in Los Angeles; the Honda Center, 2695 E. Katella Ave. in Anaheim; and Citizens Business Bank Arena, 4000 E. Ontario Center Pkwy. in Ontario. MORE INFORMATION rmhcsc.org Facebook.com/RMHCSoCal

FOR A DELIGHTFUL DUO Tiffany Minter His and Hers gift certificate for Goldhill Hair Salon • Combo B Gift Certificate from Bixby Knolls Car Wash & Detail Center • Two passes for The Rinks/Lakewood Ice • Pancake Mix & Maple Syrup from Fresh & Easy/Signal Hill • Coffee basket courtesy of Our Coffee Corner & Signal Tribune • Scented candle from Capital Investment Advisers • Tax Preparation from Liberty Tax/Lakewood – up to $350 value

TASTY LOVIN’ FOR TWO Steven Liivoja/Cypress • $25 gift card at Applebees/Signal Hill •$50 gift certificate from Orozco’s Auto Service for service or repair •Combo B Gift Certificate from Bixby Knolls Car Wash & Detail Center • Two passes at The Rinks/Lakewood Ice • Box of Swiss chocolates from Signal Hill Fresh & Easy • Tax Preparation from Liberty Tax/Lakewood – up to $350 value

SO TOTALLY IN LOVE Joy Martin/Moorpark • Dinner for two at Le Yen Restaurant • Two skating passes at The Rinks/Lakewood Ice • Three-month P.O. Box rental at UPS Store #4466 •Scented candle from Capital Investment Advisers •Box of truffles from Signal Hill Fresh & Easy • Tax Preparation from Liberty Tax/Lakewood – up to $350 value

FOR THOSE WHO ARE SMITTEN S.W. dorrell/Signal Hill • Dinner for two at Bamboo Teri House • Pair of tickets for LB Playhouse • Bottle of Sake/ glasses from Kashiwa Restaurant • Combo B Gift Certificate from Bixby Knolls Car Wash & Detail Center • Mini cakes from Bundts on Melrose • Tax Preparation from Liberty Tax/Lakewood – up to $350 value

COMMuNiTy

FEBruary 14, 2014

From Holy Land to Sons and Lovers: Bixby literary group reads their 72nd title

SigNaL TriBuNE

7

Cory Bilicko

Managing Editor

On Wednesday of this week, when the Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association’s (BKBIA) Literary Society examined D.H. Lawrence’s Sons and Lovers at Elise’s Tea Room, the group was not only celebrating their sixth anniversary– they were discussing the 72nd book in their repertoire. The Bixby Knolls Literary Society, a “book club” that is open to the public and meets monthly, focuses on those tomes considered to be the best of the 20th century, with a few contemporary novels thrown into the mix. The group, which is based on open membership with no dues or commitment, has hosted guest speakers such as crime-fiction writer James Ellroy, Edgar Awardwinning author Wendy Hornsby, Los Angeles Times book critic David Ulin, World War II veteran and Purple Heart recipient Ivan Houston, and Father Greg Boyle– a Jesuit priest who founded Homeboy Industries, a free youth program that assists highrisk youth, former gang members and the recently incarcerated. When he began to organize the Literary Society six years ago, Blair Cohn, executive director of the BKBIA, looked close to home for the individual who would lead the group. “I asked my father (Gordon) to lead the first session and hadn’t figured out what to do from there,” Cohn said. “He is now six years into this and 72 books strong.” The inaugural title was D.J. Waldie’s Holy Land: A Suburban Memoir, which presents a history of Lakewood’s first major suburban housing development after Courtesy BKBIA World War II. Gordon Cohn, who hosts the monthly Literary Society meetings for the Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association, and Cohn said his father relies on “best of” compilations and his own experience Los Angeles Times book critic David Ulin during one of the book club’s events in choosing the titles the group will read and discuss. “My dad has a few lists of the best-100 selections of American literature from the last century,” Cohn said. “He picks mostly from that or from authors on that list. “A Gourmet We also sprinkle in some current novels too. He is a voracious reader and familiar with a ton of literature.” Gifting Cohn said that each month the BKBIA purchases a copy of the selected book and donates it to the Dana Branch Library. “The library has now received 72 books from & Baking Company” the BKBIA,” he said. “Librarian Jennifer Songster has created a ‘BK Literary Society Selections’ area in the library.” Gordon Cohn sees the Literary Society as yet another valuable asset of the diverse culture of the business district. “Bixby Knolls is replete with dining, shopping, exercising, and such entertainment opportunities as First Fridays’ monthly celebrations of art, music, food, and camaraderie,” he said. “The Literary Society adds a cultural component to the panoply of activities available not only to residents of Bixby Knolls but also to anyone Decadent sweets who chooses to participate. It affords people who love reading the opportunity to become involved in an always-rich and meaningful exchange with others who love reading. It is one thing to enjoy a book alone and quite another, and always rewarding, to share reactions with thoughtful people who see and interfor your ❤ pret an author’s intent and achievement differently.”

❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ sweetie! ❤

The next meeting of the Bixby Knolls Literary Society will be Wednesday, March 12 at Elise’s Tea Room, 3924 Atlantic Ave. The selected book will be Go Tell It on the Mountain by James Baldwin.

Call & make a reservation for Valentine’s Day!

Tues.-Thurs.: 5pm to 9pm • Friday: 5pm to 9:30pm • Sat.: Noon to 9:30pm Lunch Tues.-Fri.: 11:30am to 3pm • Closed on Sunday & Monday

2201 East Willow St., Suite G in Signal Hill 562.595.0210 | Sushi, Tempura, & Traditional Favorites

Tues-Sat 11am-7pm; Sun 11am-5pm Closed Mondays. Call in advance for catering!

4147 Long Beach Blvd. LONG BEACH LOCATIONS 250 W. Ocean Blvd. | (562) 432-2211 401 W. Willow St. | (562) 595-6138

at Carson St. in Bixby Knolls

(888) 9BUNDTS www.bundtsonmelrose.com

cooking Demo Saturday, Feb. 22

2:30pm–4pm

$40 per person

Dishes will be demonstrated— call for menu details During the hour and a half, you will see several dishes made from beginning to end. One glass of wine is included and samples of each dish will be passed around. Questions will be answered as we go along and a full set of recipes will be yours to take with you. (Payment will be taken when the reservation is made. Cancellations must be made at least 1 week in advance for a full refund. A cancellation with less than a week's notice will not be refunded.)

2951 CHERRY AVENUE, SIGNAL HILL 562.426.0694 • www.deliusrestaurant.com

8 SigNaL TriBuNE

COMMuNiTy

FEBruary 14, 2014

SHPD to conduct DUI checkpoint

The Signal Hill Police Department (SHPD) traffic unit will conduct a DUI/driver’s license checkpoint on Tuesday, Feb. 18 from 8pm to 2am at an undisclosed location within the city limits. Officers will be looking for signs of alcohol and/or drug impairment while checking drivers for proper licensing, according to the SHPD. When possible, specially trained officers will be available to evaluate those suspected of drug-impaired driving. Funding for the checkpoint is provided to SHPD by a grant from the California Office of Traffic Safety, through the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Source: SHPD

Ten Long Beach students among those nominated by rep. Lowenthal’s office for admission to service academies

Congressmember Alan Lowenthal (CA-47) has nominated 23 students from the 47th Congressional District for appointments to U.S. Service academies for the 2014-2015 academic year. “It is my distinct honor and privilege to nominate these outstanding students,” Lowenthal said. “Everyone in the 47th District can be proud that we have so many talented, high-achieving students who wish to serve our nation as future leaders of the armed forces.” Entrance to four of the five U.S. service academies requires nomination by a member of Congress or the vice president, however the United States Coast Guard Academy does not require a nomination. Acceptance at an Academy involves at least a five-year obligation to the service after completion of four years at the academy. Appointments in the 47th District are very competitive, according to Lowenthal’s office, and the members of his Service Academy Nomination Panel– composed of military veterans and academy graduates– were instrumental in the interview and selection process. Final decisions will be made by the U.S. Military, Naval, Air Force, and Merchant Marine academies as they consider each of the nominees from the 47th District for admission. The academies base admission on many factors, including: the applicant’s grade-point average and class rank; extracurricular activities; SAT scores; motivation; and performance in the interview with Lowenthal’s Service Academy Nomination Panel. The nominees from Long Beach are: Madeline Carlson, from California Academy of Mathematics and Science; Vincent O'Reilly, from Los Alamitos High School; Armand de Armas, from Mater Dei High School; John Huson, from Long Beach Polytechnic High School; Evan Schmitz, from Woodrow Wilson High School; Emmanuel Tanap, from Lakewood High School; Kathleen Ahearn, from California Academy of Mathematics and Science; Brett Baldwin, from St. John Bosco High School; James Martin, from Millikan High School; and Moises Orozco, from Connections Academy High School. Students who reside in the 47th Congressional district and are interested in attending a service academy in the future can get more information and nomination application forms at lowenthal.house.gov . Source: Alan Lowenthal’s office

GROOMING • FOOD • SUPPLIES • SELF-SERVICE WASH

Pet Wash 2OFF Self-Service

$

Not valid with any other offer. Expires 3/5/14. one per customer. BK store only.

$

4102 Orange Ave.

#113

at Carson St. Open Tues–Sun 562-427-2551

Grooming 5OFF Full-Service

on first visit or $3 off next visit. $25 min. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 3/5/14. one per customer. BK store only.

Expert Care • Gentle Grooming • Walk-Ins Welcome*

* AS SPACE PERMITS

Searching for true Love? Saint Valentine’s Day and every day ...

Christ Jesus’ spiritual foundation of healing brings answers as you discover more about God’s Love and presence in your daily life.  9 oVER

N CoP MIllIo

olD IES S

!

You are invited to learn more about God and His Beloved Son:

All are welcome!

Sunday morning service........11AM Sunday School..........................11AM Sunday evening service..........5PM Wednesday Service...................7PM

E” K FOR LIF O O B E C EN “A REFER

The Reading Room/Library is open to visitors:

Mon. - Fri........................10AM - 5PM

Visit www.Spirituality.com, a website based on the ideas in this book.

Fourth Church of Christ, Scientist 3629 Atlantic Avenue, Long Beach (562) 424-5562

FEBruary 14, 2014

COMMuNiTy

9

SigNaL TriBuNE

LB Transit implements changes to bus service

Long Beach Transit implemented the following new service changes on Feb. 9. Last buses All last buses that previously left the Transit Gallery at 12:30am will now depart at 12:35am. routes 1, 21, 22, 71 & 72 Minor weekend schedule adjustments routes Passport, 45, 46, 61, 181, 182 & 176 ZaP Minor weekday schedule adjustments. route 81 All trips will now serve the loop east of CSULB. The layover on Atherton Street at Studebaker Road will be moved to Studebaker at Anaheim Street. Schedule changes occur due to timepoint change. routes 91, 92, 93 & 94 In order to improve service, one eastbound 94 trip has been added between 6am and 6:30am. A round-trip on Saturday mornings will be added on Route 91. Service during peak travel times will be adjusted from eight to 10 minutes. Evening departures from the Transit Gallery will now begin at :00 and :35 starting at 8:35pm. route 131 The first trip heading northbound Monday through Friday will start on 2nd Street at Marina Drive at 5:07am. This is a correction to the Feb. 9, 2014 Long Beach Transit Route and Schedule Guide that shows the starting point at Alamitos Bay Landing at 5:01am. route 121 To improve service, the morning layover has been moved from PCH at Park (Beachside College) to Atherton at Ximeno. One additional trip has been added leaving CSULB Monday through Thursday at 4:45 p.m. Also, service frequency for early evening trips have been increased from 30 minutes to 20 minutes. route 171 The 11:55 a.m. westbound trip at Market Place (on PCH, west of Studebaker) will now leave at 11:50 a.m. This is a correction to the February 9, 2014 Long Beach Transit Route and Schedule Guide. routes 172, 173 & 174 Minor weekday schedule adjustments. Route 173 northbound weekday morning service frequency will increase from 30 minutes to 20 minutes to improve service. routes 191 & 192 To improve connections with Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA) Routes 30 and 38, the following route changes will occur: the first northbound 191 weekday trip will now leave five minutes earlier at 4:34am and begin on Del Amo at Long Beach Boulevard; weekday late-night service will be added to Route 191 to Bloomfield at Del Amo; and trip times on Routes 191 and 192 will be adjusted for better interagency connections.

EXTENDED HOURS:

Now open Thursday 9am to 9pm FULL-SERVICE SALON OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

Source: LB Transit

Heart health through the ‘invincible’ years Nutrition Columnist

I am now a preceptor for the Individualized Supervised Practice Pathway at Cal State San Bernardino. In working with dietetics students, I encourage them to translate science into practical language for consumers. Bailey Fisher is a dietetic intern there and is the guest columnist for this issue.

a look at heart health in young adults from a nutritional standpoint by Bailey Fisher

Walnuts are full of plant omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin E, magnesium, folate and fiber. They work to lower cholesterol and increase “good” cholesterol (HDL).

Black beans are full of B-complex vitamins, niacin, folate, magnesium, calcium and soluble fiber. The magnesium in beans, legumes, and lentils acts as a calcium channel blocker that actually fights hypertension. Talk about a one-two punch!

Whole grains such as brown rice and oatmeal are packed full of Bcomplex vitamins, fiber, niacin, magnesium, fiber, phytoestrogens and phytosterols. These nutrients help lower risk of heart disease and help to reduce “bad” cholesterol (LDL).

dark chocolate is packed full of flavonoids that improve the flexibility of blood vessels. The higher the cocoa content the better!

Instead of always eating out or grabbing fast food, try having friends over to cook a healthy meal and sit as a group. Slowing down your eating time frame and actually enjoying a healthy meal will allow you to still socialize but be healthconscious at the same time. No time to sit down? Think ahead before leaving home, and pack a nutritious lunch or healthy snacks. Lastly, young adults, and adults in general, should get a minimum of 30 minutes of physical activity a day, five days a week. Doing this will help you maintain a healthy weight, lower your cholesterol, reduce your blood pressure and prevent diabetes. Simple changes and lifestyle choices and habits will allow you to live a happier and more fulfilling life. Use your “invincible” outlook and attitude in a positive way. Go live it up, explore, find your independence, but do so in a responsible and beneficial way. Don’t let your heart down now, and it won’t let you down later.

Heart-healthy chili Ingredients 1 pound lean ground turkey 1 large white onion, diced 1/4 cup water 2 14-ounce cans diced tomatoes 2 Tablespoons chili powder 2 15-ounce cans black beans, rinsed Optional: shredded cheddar cheese and cilantro

Directions 1. In large pot, cook the turkey and onions. 2. Drain the mixture, put back into the pot and add chili powder. 3. Add the beans, water and diced tomatoes to the pot and bring to a slow boil. Cover and reduce the heat to low; simmer for 20 minutes. 4. Ladle chili into bowls and serve hot. Top with a little cheddar cheese and cilantro, if desired.

Valentine ’ s Jewelry for Her! Make Valentine ’ s Day Special! Bring this ad & receive 20% off any jewelry item! (one per customer)

Exclusive Murano Italian Glass Jewelry, Handbags, Home Elements, Fine Art, Sterling Silver Jewelry, Costume Jewelry, and accessories

2 FREE

4340 Atlantic Ave., Uptown Bixby Knolls (310) 200-0298 | Dealer Spaces Available! www.facebook.com/aboutuboutique

COUPON

VALENTINE SPECIAL FULL SERVICE CAR WASHES

Purchase a Meguiars Hand Wax (Reg. $50*) and receive 2 FREE Full Service Car Washes

COUPON

The optimal time to adopt healthy lifestyle habits is in your early adulthood. Young adults (here defined as age 18 to 30) tend to think that they are “invincible.” It’s great to think that you can take on the world and live carefree regardless of your actions, but in reality, our behaviors and choices come along with repercussions and consequences. This article shares ways young adults can protect their heart and prevent disease with good lifestyle habits. As a young adult you have the freedom to make your own choices, especially when it comes to food. You are no longer told what to eat, and you buy and prepare your own food. Now is the time to stop and actually think: What should I buy? What is healthy? What will satisfy my hunger? Need some heart-healthy ideas? Here are five delicious yet nutritious foods to help you maintain a healthy heart.

Oranges, with their great aroma and juiciness, are packed full of betacryptoxanthin, beta- and alphacarotene, lutein (carotenoids) and flavones (flavonoids), vitamin C, potassium, folate, and soluble fiber. The soluble fiber that this fruit contains actually soaks in the cholesterol from food and prevents it from being absorbed. In addition, the vitamin C helps boost your immune system, and the potassium helps keep blood pressure in check.

COUPON

Carol Berg Sloan, RD

*Trucks, Vans, SUV's extra charge. Both FREE washes expire 90 days from day of wax. Washes can be upgraded to all combo packages. Must present coupon for hand wax. Coupon Expires March 14, 2014.

We have the most polite and friendliest employees, & best of all...

THE BEST CUSTOMERS IN THE WORLD!

Bixby Knolls Car Wash

Shell & Sheldon Grossman

– Bixby Knolls owners for 36+ years

& Detail Center 577 E. Wardlow Rd. @ Atlantic Avenue • 562-595-6666 COUPON

CuLTurE

10 SigNaL TriBuNE

Group art exhibit to examine birds and their habitats

The exhibit On Silvered Wings will open at Greenly Art Space, 2698 Junipero Ave., Suite 113, on Saturday, Feb. 22 from 6pm to 10pm. Kimberly Hocking of Greenly and artists Traci Durfee and Jamie Kivisto have curated a collection of 50-plus local artists that explores the concept of birds and the ways they inspire people. The

show features paintings, sculpture, origami, photography, mixed media, printmaking and more, focusing on avian habitats, flight and associated symbols, such as eggs, nests, feathers, wings and cages. “My work reflects the idea of the journey– away from or returning to home,” said Gail Werner, one of the par-

ticipating artists. “As a member of the Cupeño/Luiseño/Diegeño tribes located in southern California, I am inspired by our traditional ‘bird songs.’ As I understand it, the songs tell of a time after the creator dies. In turmoil, the people scatter in all directions. Although the songs are about the people, they are from the standpoint of the birds and follow their migra-

FEBruary 14, 2014

tion. The songs tell about what they see: the mountains, deserts, the night sky and other landmarks. The birds suffer hardships on their journey and realize it is better to be home and return to their place of origin.” On Silvered Wings will be a fundraising event for Greenly Art Space, a 501(c)3 nonprofit that focuses on “enriching lives and cultivating community through art” through creating contemplative art shows, bringing art to community schools and providing a space for art making, mentoring, and art therapy, according to Hocking. In addition to supporting Greenly’s cause, this show will also be donating a portion of the event proceeds to South Bay Wildlife Rehab (SBWR) of Rancho Palos Verdes. SBWR representatives will

be in attendance at the opening with an educational booth that features live birds that have been rescued and rehabilitated but are not able to re-enter the wild. There is a $10 admission fee for the event, which includes the art exhibit, live music by Victoria Bailey, performance art by Juan Sanchez Diaz, educational booth by SBWR (with live hawks and owls), gourmet popcorn bar & nacho bar and free parking. After the opening, the exhibit will be open for free public viewing Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 11am to 2pm or by appointment by calling (562) 533-4020. The show will run through March 22. MORE INFORMATION GreenlyArtSpace.com

“Not Forgotten,” origami by Blake Derksen

New york Times best-Selling Author Visits Signal Hill Public Library

Christina baker Kline Monday, February 24 at 7pm Signal Hill Public Library 1770 East Hill St.

“Waiting,” etching by Vinita Voogd

is is a FREE event. Guests who bring a new clothing item or pair of shoes for a child aged 5-17 years old will have a chance to win a FREE copy of Orphan Train signed by the author. Items will be donated to local foster children in need. is is the perfect time to talk to Christina about her interviews with train riders and the historical, cultural, and geographical research that went into the writing of Orphan Train.

SIGNAL T

R

I

B

U

N

E

Signal Hill Public Library: (562) 989-7323 Signal Hill Community Services Department 2175 Cherry Ave. (562) 989-7330 w w w. c i t y o f s i g n a l h i l l . o r g

AbOUT THE AUTHOR christina Baker Kline is the New york Times-bestselling author of five novels – Orphan Train, Bird in Hand, e Way Life should Be, Desire Lines and sweet Water – and the author/editor of five nonfiction books. Writer-in-Residence at Fordham university om 2007-2011, Kline is a recent recipient of a Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation Fellowship and several research fellowships (to ireland and Minnesota), and has been a Writer-in-Residence at the Virginia center for the creative Arts.

SIGNAL TRIBUNE’S FOCUS ON BUSINESS Name of business: American Gymnastics Academy Name of owners: Shane and Carol McIntyre Address: 1901 Obispo Ave. Signal Hill Phone: (562) 494-0087 Hours: M-Th 9am to 8pm, F 9am to 7pm, Sat 8am to 2pm Social Networks: Facebook, Yelp, Instagram What type of business: Gymnastics school, in business 25 years Unique features of your business: We offer gymnastics lessons to 1.5 through 18 year olds. Not only do we offer recreational instruction, but we are also a nationally ranked team program. What do you want new customers to know? We practice safety and positivity while teaching boys and girls of all ages. Website: American-gymnastics.com Email: AGAlongbeach@verizon.net

FEBruary 14, 2014

Redevelopment continued from page 1

told the Council. The plan is a critical step for the City to dissolve leftover redevelopment properties and carry out enforceable obligations as mandated by the State Legislature, which abolished redevelopment nearly two years ago as a way to fix a budget deficit. Out of nine former redevelopment properties in Signal Hill, three would be transferred to the City for “government purpose,” and the remaining six would either be sold to a specific developer or put on the market, according to a staff report. During the successor agency meeting last month, City Manager Ken Farfsing noted that proceeds from property sales would first go to the Los Angeles County Auditor Controller, which would then distribute the proceeds among taxing entities. Signal Hill would only get a fraction (0.6 percent) of the profits since it’s a “no/low propertytax city” while a majority of the proceeds would go to the County of Los Angeles and the Long Beach Unified School District, he said. Still, Farfsing pointed out that some of the properties planned for future development have the potential to generate new sales tax or hotel-bed tax revenues for Signal Hill. “I think it’s incumbent upon the City, as we develop these properties, to maximize the other potential revenues, which would be sales tax, hotel-bed tax [or] other types of revenues that could come out of these properties,” he said. The largest property on the list is a 14-acre site on Spring Street between California and Atlantic avenues. The City plans to sell the vacant site, known as 700 Spring St., to Signal Hill Petroleum, which is planning a mixeduse development that may include a new hotel, medical offices and retail, according to staff reports. City officials have indicated, however, that some of the former redevelopment properties will be sold at prices lower than when they were first purchased at because of site deterioration, market conditions and costly environmental-remediation requirements. According to the original property-management plan that the Council approved on Sept. 17, city officials estimate that envi-

ronmental remediation of the Spring Street site may cost up to $4.8 million, with oil-well reabandonment alone costing $2.7 million. The plan states that the site currently has five active wells, seven idle wells and 28 abandoned wells, adding that 18 of the abandoned wells need to be excavated, leak-tested and potentially re-abandoned to meet State standards. Signal Hill Petroleum officials have expressed commitment to acquiring the property in hopes of luring new businesses that would complement the property owner’s other development– a new Chipotle restaurant, a new drivethrough Starbucks and a new Sprint retail store at the adjacent Gateway Center. Signal Hill city officials, however, have stated publically during subsequent Council meetings that the City should come up with new “mechanisms” to help incentivize developments, since redevelopment, which previously funded most of the environmental remediation and oil-well cleanups for projects, is no longer available. Another former redevelopment property slated for future development is a site that includes various parcels on the 2400 block of Gardena Avenue near the Fresh & Easy Neighborhood Market. The site is zoned for commercial retail and is part of the Crescent Heights Historic District Plan. Though city officials indicate that “no specific developers” have come forward, the City plans to market the property for a “mixed-use commercial center and new retail” to support the Fresh & Easy store. Plans also call for a “drugstore, view restaurant and related uses” in addition to the “promotion of historic and cultural resources.” Other properties that the City is planning for future development include: a site at Cherry Avenue and 27th Street (location of former Giant Grinder Deli) slated for retail or an auto dealership; a site at 1850 E. 28th St.; a 6,250 square-foot site at 859 Patterson St. that is being sold to EDCO Disposal; and a 3.15-acre site being sold to Glenn E. Thomas Dodge for the development of a new, permanent Fiat

NEWS

SigNaL TriBuNE

11

EYE ON CRIME Crimes reported by LBPd Council districts 6, 7 & 8

Stolen vehicle recovered 6:52am– Cerritos Ave./E. Willow St.

Thursday, Feb. 6 Stolen vehicle recovered 9pm– 3200 block Cherry Ave.

Grand theft auto 3pm– 2700 block Cherry Ave.

Friday, Feb. 7 Grand theft auto 3pm– 3300 block E. Willow St.

Friday, Feb. 7 Robbery of person 3:39am– 3300 block Atlantic Ave.

Sunday, Feb. 9 Under influence of drugs/alcohol 2:01am– 3500 block E. PCH

Monday, Feb. 10 Grand theft auto 1:40am– 1800 block Henderson Ave.

Contempt of court 2:17pm– 2000 block Ohio Ave.

Grand theft auto 8am– 3900 block Cherry Ave.

Unauthorized use of ID to obtain goods 2:48pm– 900 block E. 33rd St.

Stolen vehicle recovered 9:22am– 1900 block Atlantic Ave.

Stolen vehicle 9:11pm– E. 19th St./Stanley Ave.

Grand theft auto 9pm– 2100 block Locust. Ave.

Tuesday, Feb. 11 Commercial burglary 9am– 3200 block E. PCH

Tuesday, Feb. 11 Grand theft auto 7am– 1000 block Ridgewood St.

Residential burglary 5:50pm– 1800 block Raymond Ave.

Stolen vehicle recovered 11:51am– 4100 block Elm Ave.

Possessing ID to commit forgery 7:57pm– E. PCH/Temple Ave.

Crimes reported by SHPd Citywide

Wednesday, Feb. 12 Stolen vehicle recovered 3:53am– 3000 block California Ave.

Thursday, Feb. 6 Injury hit-and-run 6am– E. Willow St./California Ave.

Attempted murder 9:03am– 3300 block Myrtle Ave.

Injury hit-and-run 6:51am– E. Willow St./Myrtle Ave. dealership. Once the State approves Signal Hill’s property-management plan, the City would be able to start marketing the properties through a request-for-proposals and begin negotiations for purchase agreements, which would also require State approval. Properties being retained for “government purpose” include: a 12-space parking lot at 2621 St. Louis Ave.; the new Signal Hill Police Station at 2745 Walnut Ave.; and a site at 3100 California Avenue that the City plans to turn into a dog park. ß

Mainstage

F O L BA

The

Tile Zone

HUNDREDS OF LOCAL REFERENCES OVER 35 YEARS EXPERIENCE BIXBY KNOLLS RESIDENT LICENSED • INSURED

Ceramic & Porcelain Tiles Custom Design & Installation

“A-rated”on angieslist.com Contractor’s License #629882

3677 Atlantic Avenue

(562) 427-0688 Call Dennis Bartlett:

562-988-8429 W W W .T H E T I L E Z O N E . C O M

Signal

Sign up for your subscription & receive the Signal Tribune by first-class mail!

T

R

I

B

U

N

E

Your Weekly Community Newspaper

The Signal Tribune is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. SERVING BIXBY KNOLLS, CALIFORNIA HEIGHTS, LOS CERRITOS, WRIGLEY AND THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

To purchase an annual subscription, send this form and a check for $50 to:

939 E. 27th St. Signal Hill, Ca 90755

Pet of the Week:

Tesla

Tiny Tesla was found by an electric worker. She was all set to go on the job—see her working gloves? Tesla’s about 3 months old and is a female brown tabby polydactyl, which means that she has an extra toe on each front paw. Thumbs rule! Meet Tesla at the shelter side of the Companion Animal Village at 7700 East Spring St., (562) 570-PETS. Ask for ID#ID512001. Sponsored by:

NAME_____________________________________________________ ADDRESS_________________________________________________

“Th t... for for a wickedly ckedly ffunny ho'll-do-it.” e ttrap rap iis s se wicke u n ny w “The set... who'll-do-it.”

Jan. 18 Feb. J an. 1 8-F eb. 15 15 Friday Saturday att 8 8pm, Sunday F riday & Sa turday a pm, Su nday at at 2pm 2pm

www.lbplayhouse.org w ww.lbplayhouse.org 562-494-1014 5021 Anaheim St.. 5 62-494-1014 * 5 021 E. An aheim St 5021 5021 E. AN ANAHEIM, AHEIM, LB LB 562-494-1014 WWW.LBPLAYHOUSE.ORG 562-494-1014 - W WW.LBPLAYHOUSE.ORG

CITY______________________________________________________ STATE & ZIP CODE__________________________________________

Support Your Local Newspaper also online: www.signaltribune.com Questions or comments? (562) 595-7900

12 SigNaL TriBuNE

FEBruary 14, 2014

www.readingclubfun.com

Annimills LLC © 2014 V11-05

This week’s puzzle page sponsors are:

Bookkeeping & Tax Services

Certified QuickBooks Pro Advisors/Training Business & Personal Bookkeeping

Cambodian & Spanish Speaking

CTEC Registered Tax Preparers

1640 E. Burnett Street Phone: 562-264-5114 www.MadKatinc.com

PIZZA

FAST DELIVERY • 562•498•8788 DOUBLE TROUBLE

WWW. BIGEPIZZA .COM

open 7 days a week

SUNDAY - THURSDAY 10AM-1AM FRIDAY - SATURDAY 10AM-3AM

No checks, please

PIZZA

$

SUPER SIZE IT FOR ONLY $2.00 MORE PER PIZZA

NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS. LIMITED TIME ONLY.

+TAx

MD.

E +TAx

lG.

562-498-8788 • 3225 E. Pacific Coast Highway • LB

13

WHAT A DEAL • 1 lARGE PIZZA with 2 toppings

• 2 liter Coke

SUPER SIZE IT FOR ONLY $2.00 MORE

$

.49 +TAx

PIZZA

+

E

562-498-8788 • 3225 E. Pacific Coast Highway • LB

PICK-UP SPECIAL

9

$ .99 +TAx

BIG

3225 E. Pacific Coast Hwy Long Beach

E

16.99 $21.99

• 2 PIZZAS (M or l) & 2 toppings

NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS. LIMITED TIME ONLY.

We cater to any occasion!

only candidates with lots of money should be taken seriously. “It’s something that we’ve already trained ourselves to believe that you can’t make it without collecting all [those] donations or special-interest money,” he said. Camp did not like the premise of offering matching funds to a political candidate. “I think it’s an egregious abuse of City fiscal policy,” he said. “I don’t think that the City should be contributing one nickel to anyone’s political aspirations.” Camp said he opted out of fundraising. His campaign has focused on talking to residents in person and over the Internet. Rock wrote in an email that he wasn’t concerned whether there is a perception that he isn’t a serious candidate because he hasn’t raised a lot of funds. “If people are investing money in a candidate, they are expecting a return on investment,” Rock wrote. “These expected returns could influence a politician in the form of unethical decisions or decisions that favor the few instead of the many. The larger a candidate is fundraising, the larger their debt to their investors. I don’t owe any investors. My commitment is to the population that chooses to call this metropolis their home. In other words, I want your vote, not your money.” Mozena agreed. He said that he was making inroads with his campaign now, and he confirmed that he was in the process of opening a bank account now with the expectations that he will raise more money. He did agree in advance to the spending caps in order to accept matching funds, however he didn’t want to have to use the city funds, partly because of his background as a self-made man with his own business. “It’s interesting that where credibility lies is in the dollar, and that sometimes maybe it shouldn’t,” he said. He acknowledged the reality of the need for money. “It’s sad in a way that money really drives politics at this point…It would be great if it wasn’t such a big part of it,” Mozena said, adding that the mayor only gets paid over $100,000. ß

• lARGE PIZZA up to 3 toppings SUPER SIZE IT FOR ONLY $2.00 MORE

PICK-uP oNly

NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS. LIMITED TIME ONLY.

PIZZA

+TAx

JIMMY’S CHOICE

E

20.99

BIG

BIG

E

reform laws of any city.” She acknowledged that she had an advantage over many of the other candidates because of her name-recognition as a councilmember. She criticized how the other campaigns have been raising and spending an extraordinary amount of money. “They shouldn’t be spending that kind of money on this kind of race,” Schipske said. “It doesn’t cost that much unless you are hiring an inordinate amount of staff and spending an inordinate amount of money, and I think that candidates need to be as fiscally prudent as elected officials need to be.” Shields agreed with Schipske in her phone interview. She says that she uses a volunteer crew for her campaign. Shields had another reason why she didn’t seek contributions from certain large donors. “I did not seek any labor-backing,” Shields said, “I did not seek specialinterest groups because I am running on the ticket that we need serious pension reform, and…I don’t want any backing from something that would compromise that.” Shields already agreed to a cap in expenditure, and since she has raised significantly more in the last two months since the last financial statement, she says she is also close to qualifying for the matching funds under the campaign-reform law. She also favored the matching-funds provision. “The purpose of it is to bring… a little more balance so that candidates with a whole bunch of money don’t automatically get elected, so I see it as a positive thing,” Shields said. She wondered aloud how anyone could spend an estimated $200,000 and upwards on a campaign. “I don’t know how these politicians spend so much money,” she said. “Good for the economy though.” The other candidates who raised less than $1,000 through Dec. 31 agreed with Shields’s sentiment. Gonzalez has been paying for his campaign out of his own pocket. “I just don’t feel that they should be collecting that much money to run for an office in Long Beach,” he said. He didn’t agree with the perception that

13

$

• 1 lARGE PIZZA w/1 topping • 1 DoZEN CHICKEN WINGS • 2 lARGE SoDAS SUPER SIZE IT FOR ONLY $2.00 MORE NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS. LIMITED TIME ONLY.

PIZZA

+TAx

E

562-498-8788 • 3225 E. Pacific Coast Highway • LB

MANAGER’S SPECIAL

• 1 lARGE PIZZA with 1 topping • Spaghetti & Meatballs, 2 garlic breads & 2 large sodas SUPER SIZE IT FOR ONLY $2.00 MORE

21

$

NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS. LIMITED TIME ONLY.

.99 +TAx

PIZZA

E

562-498-8788 • 3225 E. Pacific Coast Highway • LB

13

MEDIUM 1 TOPPER • 1 MEDIuM PIZZA with 1 topping • Cinnamon Squares or Breadsticks • 2 large sodas

$

BIG

Act, a law that was passed by voters in the 1990s, candidates for office who agree to accept matching funds must also agree to a cap on their expenditures. For mayoral candidates, that spending cap has been set for $309,000. Depending on how much has been raised in a fundraising campaign, qualified candidates can receive up to $102,00 in matching funds. It isn’t easy to qualify for matching funds. There are several hurdles that a candidate must go through before he or she can receive the limited amounts of financial assistance. Relatively few campaigns for city office have been eligible to receive the matching funds. A full description of the stipulations on matching funds is available on the city clerk’s website. City Clerk Larry Herrera said in an interview on Feb. 7 that the matching funds are considered a one-time expense and are taken from any reserve amounts that the City has in the budget. The mayoral campaigns that have raised the most money, however, outright declined the need for any financial assistance, which means that, ultimately, these campaigns could raise and spend unlimited amounts of money. However, individual donors may only contribute up to $750 to a mayoral campaign. Mike Shimpock, a spokesperson for Lowenthal’s campaign, said that the assemblymember and former city official liked and supported the campaignreform law when it was initially proposed nearly 20 years ago, but he also acknowledged that the matchingfunds provision isn’t working on a practical level, especially if the City is not giving anyone financial assistance. He was not aware at the time that Schipske is currently applying for the matching funds. Shimpock described how campaigns must raise a significant amount of money to get their message out to voters. “Part of the burden of democracy here is that campaigns and candidates are left to their own devices to communicate [to] voters,” Shimpock said in a phone interview. He confirmed that Lowenthal was among those candidates

comment on these groups’ activities and would not discuss any history they may have had with the individuals behind these two committees. They also confirmed that they do not collaborate at all with these committees. Shimpock especially voiced alarm about these two supporting committees, and he also pointed to Dunn’s decision to give his own campaign $125,000, a move Shimpock acknowledges is a legal one. He also addressed opponents’ earlier concerns that Lowenthal’s campaign had the ability to use money left over from her campaign for her assembly office so that she could transfer it to her mayoral campaign. He said that transferring money from her assembly campaign to her mayoral campaign is illegal. “We never even considered doing that,” Shimpock said, “but yet we have all these other campaigns doing things that circumvent the very spirit of the law…that are essentially undermining and corrupting the effectiveness of campaign-finance [reform].” Dunn would not comment on his finances or his financial strategy, adding that his campaign would be transparent and that they comply with all requirements for posting reports. “I am more concerned about how to move Long Beach forward,” he said. “That’s it. That’s my only concern.” A spokesperson for Otto’s campaign also declined to discuss campaign finances in any detail. “Our campaign continues to grow, and so does our supporter list,” Katy Stanton wrote in an email to the Signal Tribune on Otto’s behalf. “I am very proud of the fact that almost 70 percent of our donations come from the Long Beach community. Fundraising is a major part of running for public office, and we are working very hard to meet our goals. We don’t discuss our campaign strategy with the press.” Schipske acknowledged that she has already applied for matching funds and hailed the policy as a positive one. “The voters of Long Beach wanted elections to be funded locally and not by special interests, and that was the purpose of that campaign-finance reform,” the 5th-district councilmember said. “And we have some of the most stringent campaign-finance-

SigNaL TriBuNE

BIG

continued from page 1

who outright rejected financial assistance. “If this were a properly funded campaign and all the campaigns were provided the set amount of money, that would be one thing. But what the campaign reform did, and laudably so, was place a limit on expenditures in exchange for providing matching funds to compensate for those limited funds.” Garcia also acknowledged the merits of the campaign-reform law and said he supported the rules because they do provide assistance to candidates who need it. He also rejected any kind of financial assistance through the campaign-reform provision. He doesn’t think that there is any disadvantage to refusing the matching funds. “In fact, it’s a show of how strong our fundraising is going,” Garcia said. “We feel great about our numbers.” Referring to the success of his campaign’s efforts in the last six months of 2013, Garcia said that he is the top fundraiser in the reporting period, adding that he had the most cash on hand. Garcia is the target of criticism by opposing mayoral campaigns. He and Dunn have an additional advantage that both candidates said they would not discuss. Two groups have raised significant amounts of money on behalf of their preferred candidates. These groups, named “Long Beach for Damon Dunn for Mayor 2014, Sponsored by Long Beach Chamber of Commerce” and “Friends of Long Beach, a Committee Supporting Vice-Mayor Robert Garcia for Mayor 2014,” are not controlled by Dunn and Garcia. These groups are identified by the city clerk as independent committees that are able to raise and spend unlimited amounts of money in support of a candidate. These committees have no restrictions on the amount an individual contributor may give. For the statements provided through Dec. 31, Long Beach for Damon Dunn raised $37,250 and spent $30,941. The Friends of Long Beach (the independent-expenditure group in support of Garcia) did not post a year-end statement through Dec. 31, however as of last month, the group did report contributions in the amount of $45,000. Both Dunn and Garcia have said in separate interviews that they would not

BIG

Finance

NEWS

BIG

FEBruary 14, 2014

SUPER SIZE IT FOR ONLY $2.00 MORE

NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS. LIMITED TIME ONLY.

.99 +TAx

PIZZA

+

WE DELIVER BEER & WINE

562-498-8788 • 3225 E. Pacific Coast Highway • LB

562-498-8788 • 3225 E. Pacific Coast Highway • LB

14 SigNaL TriBuNE

TST4565 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE Trustee Sale No. 736965CA Loan No. 0015334071 Title Order No. 3206-243385 ATTENTION RECORDER: THE FOLLOWING REFERENCE TO AN ATTACHED SUMMARY IS APPLICABLE TO THE NOTICE PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR ONLY. PURSUANT TO CALIFORNIA CIVIL CODE 2923.3 NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 07-12-2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN ExPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 02-21-2014 at 11:00 A.M., ALAW as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded 07-20-2006, Book N/A, Page N/A, Instrument 06 1599635, of official records in the Office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California, executed by: LILIA LOPEZ, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN, as Trustor, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., (MERS), SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR LENDER, ALLIANCE BANCORP, IT'S SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS, as Beneficiary, will sell at public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a cashier's check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a cashier's check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Sale will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to the Deed of Trust. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Place of Sale: BY THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED AT 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, POMONA, CA 91766. Legal Description: LOT 11, OF ORANGE BOULEVARD VIEW TRACT, IN THE CITY OF LONG BEACH, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MA RECORDED IN BOOK 11, PAGES 55 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $440,889.54 (estimated) Street address and other common designation of the real property: 2388 CERRITOS AVENUE SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 APN Number: 7211-019-010 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". In compliance with California Civil Code 2923.5(c) the mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent declares: that it has contacted the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure; or that it has made efforts to contact the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure by one of the following methods: by telephone; by United States mail; either 1st class or certified; by overnight delivery; by personal delivery; by e-mail; by face to face meeting. DATE: 01-23-2014 ALAW, as Trustee REGINA CANTRELL, ASSISTANT SECRETARY ALAW 9200 OAKDALE AVE. - 3RD FLOOR CHATSWORTH, CA 91311 (818)435-3661 For Sales Information: www.lpsasap.com or 1-714-7302727 www.priorityposting.com or 1-714-573-1965 www.auction.com or 1-800-280-2832 ALAW IS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, this information can be obtained from one of the following three companies: LPS Agency Sales and Posting at (714) 730-2727, or visit the Internet Web site www.lpsasap.com (Registration required to search for sale information) or Priority Posting and Publishing at (714) 573-1965 or visit the Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com (Click on the link for "Advanced Search" to search for sale information), or auction.com at 1-800-280-2832 or visit the Internet Web site www.auction.com, using the Trustee Sale No. shown above. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. A-4439975 01/31/2014, 02/07/2014, 02/14/2014

TST4561 / Case No. NS028464 oRDER To SHoW CAuSE FoR CHANGE oF NAME, SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, 275 Magnolia Ave., Long Beach, CA 90802. PETITION OF Marlene Amanda Gonzalez. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: 1. Petitioner MARLENE AMANDA GONZALEZ, filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name: MARLENE AMANDA GONZALEZ. to Proposed Name: MARLENE AMANDA MONJI. 2. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, shy the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: MARCH 4, 2014; Time: 8:30 am.; Dept. S26, Room 5500. The address of the

PuBLiC NOTiCES

court is the same as above. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, THE SIGNAL TRIBUNE, 939 E. 27th. Street, Signal Hill, CA 90755: January 31, & February 7, 14, 21, 2014. ___//ss//___ Michael P. Vicencia, Judge of the Superior Court Dated: January 24, 2014

TST4569 / 2014 023798 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: FUN TOUCH PHOTO ExPRESS, 2510 E. Willow St. Unit 101, Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrants: ALOHI ENTERPRISES INC., 2510 E. Willow St. Unit 101, Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Kelly M. James, Secretary. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 29, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 31, & February 7, 14, 21, 2014.

TST4549 / 2014 008179 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: FLAT TRACK TREATS, 2163 Oregon Ave., Long Beach, CA 90806. Registrants: MICHAEL L. BLEDSOE, 2163 Oregon Ave., Long Beach, CA 90806. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Michael L. Bledsoe. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on January 10, 2014. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 10, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 24, 31, & February 7, 14, 2014.

TST4558 / 2014 013569 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. CO CAL BONDED, 2. BONDED ROOFING, 2450 Orange Ave., Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrants: EUGENE S. LAYTON, 2450 Orange Ave., Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Eugene S. Layton. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on April 18, 2011. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 16, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 24, 31, & February 7, 14, 2014 . TST4559 / 2014 017245 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. BRICKS 4 KIDZ, 2. G2B LEARNING NETWORK, 15104 Colony Court, Paramount, CA 90723. Registrants: G2B LEARNING NETWORK LLC, 15104 Colony Court, Paramount, CA 90723. This business is conducted by: a Limited Liability Company. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Tenita Brown, Director. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on December 1, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 22, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 24, 31, & February 7, 14, 2014.

TST4552 / 2014 004291 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. SONNOCCO COMMERCIAL, 2. SONNOCCO REAL ESTATE GROUP, 3626 Long Beach Blvd., Long Beach, CA 90807. Reg-

istrants: SONNOCCO INC., 3626 Long Beach Blvd., Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: William Larson, CEO. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 7, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 24, 31, & February 7, 14, 2014.

TST4550 / 2014 004085 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: BELLFLOWER FAMILY SERVICE, 16704 Clark Ave., Bellflower, CA 90706. Registrants: 1. ED WALSH, 5832 Rosebay St., Long Beach, CA 90808, 2. DAVID PECORARO, 9594 Pettswood Dr., Huntington Beach, CA 92646, 3. RAMIRO GUEVARA, 26351 Wheat St., Sun City, CA 92585. This business is conducted by: a General Partnership. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Ed Walsh. The registrants have begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrants began using this fictitious business name on January 2, 2014. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 7, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 24, 31, & February 7, 14, 2014.

TST4551 / 2014 015263 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: PHOTO BOMB EVENTS, 1021 Loma Ave. #7, Long Beach, CA 90804. Registrants: 1. ADRIAN GALLEGOS, 2. CHRISTINA JIMENEZ 1021 Loma Ave. #7, Long Beach, CA 90804. This business is conducted by: a Married Couple. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Christina Jimenez. The registrants have begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrants began using this fictitious business name on December 1, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 17, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 24, 31, & February 7, 14, 2014.

TST4560 / Case No. NS028422 oRDER To SHoW CAuSE FoR CHANGE oF NAME, SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, 275 Magnolia Ave., Long Beach, CA 90802. PETITION OF Davyne Madison, for minor Lundan Jata Niara Wingfield. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: 1. Petitioner DAVYNE MADISON, filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name: LUNDAN JATA NIARA WINGFIELD. to Proposed Name: LUNDAN STARR NIARA WINGFIELD. 2. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, shy the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: February 27, 2014; Time: 8:30 am.; Dept. S26, Room . The address of the court is the same as above. A copy of this O--rder to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, THE SIGNAL TRIBUNE, 939 E. 27th. Street, Signal Hill, CA 90755: January 24, 31, & February 7, 14, 2014. ___//ss//___ Michael P. Vicencia, Judge of the Superior Court Dated: January 23, 2014 TST4562 / 2014 001109 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: LONG BEACH BREWING COMPANY, 1520 Ohio Ave., Long Beach, CA 90804. Registrant: MELANIE MELENDREZ, 1520 Ohio Ave., Long Beach, CA 90804. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Melanie Melendrez. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 3, 2014.

NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 31, & February 7, 14, 21, 2014.

TST4563 / 2014 019197 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: BREW LBC, 1131 E. 4th St., Long Beach, CA 90802. Registrants: 1. MELANIE MELENDREZ, 1520 Ohio Ave., Long Beach, CA 90804, 2. LLOYD MITCHELL III, 1187 E. 3rd St. #112, Long Beach, CA 90802. This business is conducted by: Copartners. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Melanie Melendrez. The registrants have begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrants began using this fictitious business name on January 23, 2014. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 23, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 31, & February 7, 14, 21, 2014. TST4564 / 2014 018732 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: BLACK LABEL, 6216 E. Pacific Coast Hwy. Unit 97, Long Beach, CA 90803. Registrant: JOHN-PAUL NELSON, 6216 E. Pacific Coast Hwy. Unit 97, Long Beach, CA 90803. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: JohnPaul Nelson. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 23, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 31, & February 7, 14, 21, 2014.

TST4566 / 2014 000598 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: TEAM PURE FREEDOM ENTERTAINMENT, 41 Cedar Walk #4406, Long Beach, CA 90802. Registrants: PUREFREEDOM MARKRAY, 41 Cedar Walk #4406, Long Beach, CA 90802. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Purefreedom Markray. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 3, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 31, & February 7, 14, 21, 2014.

TST4567 / 2014 020357 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: MISTERCMT, 416 Orange Ave. Apt. 8, Long Beach, CA 90802. Registrants: GLENN BACOLOR, 416 Orange Ave. Apt. 8, Long Beach, CA 90802. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Glenn Bacolor. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 24, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 31, & February 7, 14, 21, 2014. TST4568 / 2014 023348 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: APV PROTECTION AND TRANSPORT, 819 E. 4th St. Apt. 12, Long Beach, CA 90802. Registrants: ASTER VELASQUEZ, 819 E. 4th St. Apt. 12, Long Beach, CA 90802. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Aster Velasquez. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 28, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county

FEBruary 14, 2014

clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 31, & February 7, 14, 21, 2014.

TST4573 / 2014 031237 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: S A BRIGGS & ASSOCIATES, 3833 E. 2nd St. #103, Long Beach, CA 90803. Registrants: SHIRLEY A. BRIGGS, 3833 E. 2nd St. #103, Long Beach, CA 90803. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Shirley A. Briggs. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 5, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 7, 14, 21, 28, 2014.

TST4570 / 2014 026626 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: MAKE A DIFFERENCE, 2510 E. Willow St. Unit 101, Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrants: ALOHI ENTERPRISES INC., 2510 E. Willow St., Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Kelly M. James, Secretary. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 31, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 7, 14, 21, 28, 2014.

TST4571 / 2014 0274496 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: BEACH DRAFTING AND DESIGN, 6742 E. Los Arcos St., Long Beach, CA 90815. Registrants: RUSSELL TURLEY, 6742 E. Los Arcos St., Long Beach, CA 90815. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Russell Turley. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 31, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 7, 14, 21, 28, 2014.

TST4574 / 2014 033864 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: AMAZING CUTS, 5532 E. Del Amo Blvd., Lakewood, CA 90713. Registrant: LYDA LIN LAI, 9421 Elm Ave., Fontana, CA 92335 This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Lyda Lin Lai. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 7, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 14, 21, 28, & March 7, 2014.

TST4535 / 2013 259946 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: 1. HIGH STYLE WINE, 2. HISHSTYLEWINE.COM, 3. HIGHSTYLEWINE, 3401 Claremore Ave., Long Beach, CA 90808. Registrants: 1. TAMMARA SHAGAN, 2. JEFFEY CHAGAN, 3401 Claremore Ave., Long Beach, CA 90808. This business is conducted by: a Married Couple. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Tammara Shagan. The registrants have not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on December 20, 2014. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 10, 17, 24, 31, 2014.

FEBruary 14, 2014

Homeless

continued from page 2

among veterans is still a hefty order, as a new generation of veterans is now returning from Afghanistan and Iraq. According to health officials, many of the new veterans are dealing with some of the same problems as Vietnam War-era veterans, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance-abuse issues, leaving some to become homeless. Bill Compton, 28, a combat engineer for the U.S. Marines who served in Iraq in 2005 and 2006, said he attended the event in Long Beach on Tuesday in hopes of being provided permanent housing for him and his two children. He said he currently lives at his friend’s house but is hoping that will change soon. After working in construction during his service, Compton said he hasn’t found the right career path and has been just “floating” for the last several years in community college in Arizona, adding that he no longer wants to work in the same field as his military service, mostly because of injuries he acquired on the job. He pointed out that many younger veterans who have volunteered to enlist in the military with hopes of securing a future and tuition benefits may return home without much experience, especially if they are applying for a job that doesn’t correspond to their military service. “Well, it’s been pretty difficult,” Compton said. “When you’re getting out, they make it seem that, just because you are a veteran and just because you served, that every person is just going to want to hire you based on the ethics you learned, but that’s completely false,” he said. “It’s been really helpful just to be able to support yourself while you go to school and try to find a direction, but, even then, finding that direction is not always easy as most any student would know. It’s hard to figure out what you want to do for the rest of your life.” As for Mello, she said her long-term goal, now that she has had her felony expunged, is to someday work for the VA hospital, adding that she plans to soon work as a volunteer in emergency rooms. “I’m ready to go back to work,” said the Stanton resident. “This program works, and it’s unfortunate that some people might take advantage of it, but my goal is to get on and get off, and I’m almost there.” MORE INFORMATION longbeach.va.gov portal.hud.gov/hudportal/hud

TST4575 NoTICE INVITING BIDS A-1 Sealed bids will be received at the office of the City Clerk, City of Signal Hill, California, until 10:00 a.m. on March 18, 2014, and on the same day shortly thereafter, they will be publicly opened and read for the “Signal Hill Community Gardens Project, No. 738”, in accordance with the Specifications therefore. Bids must be made on the forms provided for this purpose, addressed to the City Clerk, City of Signal Hill, marked "Bid for," followed by the title of the project and the date and hour for submitting bids. Bids are required for the entire work as described in the Bid Schedule and the Specifications. The work to be accomplished under this contract includes the construction of a Community Garden including but not limited to grading, walls and fences, P.C.C. improvements, polymer coated crushed stone pathway, planter boxes and irrigation system at 1917 E. 21st Street. A-2 All work must be completed within thirty (30) working days after receipt by the Contractor of the notice to proceed from the City. The contract documents, which include the Specifications, may be obtained at the City of Signal Hill Department of Finance for $25, or $30 if requested by mail. The documents are entitled “Signal Hill Community Gardens Project, No. 738.” A-3 Bids will not be received unless they are made on a proposal form furnished in the Contract Documents by the City of Signal Hill. Each bid must be accompanied by cash, certified check, cashier's check or bidder's bond, made payable to the City of Signal Hill for an amount equal to at least ten percent (10%) of the amount bid, such guarantee to be forfeited should the bidder to whom the contract is awarded fail to enter into the Contract. A-4 All bids are to be compared on the basis of the lump sum or itemized bid items shown in the Bid Schedule(s). Bids will not be accepted from the contractors who are not licensed in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 9, Division III of the Business and Professions Code of the State of California. The Contractor shall be required to possess a Class A or Class B license at the time the contract is awarded. A-5 Attention is directed to the provision in Section 1777.5 of the labor Code concerning the employment of apprentices by the Contractor of any subcontractor under the Contractor. A-6 Before a Contract is entered into with the successful bidder, the bidder shall present evidence in writing to the City Clerk, City of Signal Hill, that he has a current combined single limit liability policy with aggregate limits for Bodily Injury and Property Damage in the amount of two million dollars ($2,000,000). A-7 Pursuant to the provisions of Section 1773.2 of the Labor Code of the State of California, the minimum prevailing rate of per diem wages for each craft, classification or type of workman needed to execute the contract shall be those determined by the Director of Industrial Relations of the State of California which are on file with the City Clerk of Signal Hill and copies will be made available to any interested party on request. A copy of the Contractor's certified payroll, as well as those of all subcontractors shall be submitted with each invoice. A-8 Attention is directed to Public Contract Code Section 22300 permitting the substitution of specified and approved securities for contract retention of funds. All such securities shall be subject to the review and approval of the City Attorney of the City of Signal Hill. A-9 The successful bidder will be required to furnish a payment bond in an amount equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the contract price and a faithful performance bond in an amount equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the contract price, and said bonds shall be secured from a surety company satisfactory to the City Attorney of the City of Signal Hill. A-10 The City of Signal Hill reserves the right to reject any and all bids, or delete portions of any and all bids or waive any informality or irregularity in the bid or the bid procedures and shall be the sole judge of the bids received. By order of the City of Signal Hill. Posted at Signal Hill City Hall on: February 14, 2014 Published in the Signal Tribune on: February 14 and 21, 2014

NEWS

SigNaL TriBuNE

15

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Richard Sells (second from right), a licensed clinical social worker at the VA Long Beach hospital, talks to a veteran waiting in line during an orientation and screening on Tuesday, Feb. 11 for a program that provides housing assistance and case-management services for veterans. TST4572 NoTICE INVITING BIDS A-1 Sealed bids will be received at the office of the City Clerk, City of Signal Hill, California, until 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, March 11, 2014 and on the same day shortly thereafter, they will be publicly opened and read for construction of SIGNAL HILL POLICE STATION DEMOLITION PROJECT NO. 867 in accordance with the Specifications therefore. Bids must be made on the forms provided for this purpose, addressed to the City Clerk, City of Signal Hill, marked "Bid for," followed by the title of the project and the date and hour for submitting bids. Bids are required for the entire work as described on the Specifications and as described in the Bid Schedule. The work to be accomplished under this contract consists of demolition of the existing police building and associated site improvements, including but not limited to the following; footings, foundations, site paving, landscaping, irrigation, underground utilities, and removal of demolition debris. The project also includes site grading for storm drainage plus provisions of run-off controls, restoration and construction of site asphaltic concrete paving and Portland cement concrete curbs, gutters, paving, switchback walkways with guardrails and handrails, surface sealing of new and existing asphaltic concrete paving, pavement markings, traffic and parking control signage, and temporary chainlink fencing with gates, signage and privacy windscreen to remain in place at Contract Closeout. The Contract duration is sixty (60) calendar days.

A-2 The contract documents, which include the Plans and Specifications, may be purchased for $50.00 at the City of Signal Hill Finance Department. The documents are entitled “SIGNAL HILL POLICE STATION DEMOLITION PROJECT NO. 867"

A-3 Bids will not be received unless they are made on a proposal form furnished in the Contract Documents by the City of Signal Hill. Each bid must be accompanied by cash, certified check, cashier's check or bidder's bond, made payable to the City of Signal Hill for an amount equal to at least ten percent (10%) of the amount bid, such guarantee to be forfeited should the bidder to whom the contract is awarded fail to enter into the Contract.

A-4 All bids are to be compared on the basis of the estimate of quantities shown in the Bid Schedule(s) and as stipulated herein. Bids will not be accepted from the contractors who are not licensed in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 9, Division III of the Business and Professions Code of the State of California. The Contractor shall be required to possess a currently active Class C21 license at the time the bid is submitted. The Contractor or their subcontractors shall hold the appropriate licenses to perform other work in the contract. A-5 Attention is directed to the provision in Section 1777.5 of the Labor Code concerning the employment of apprentices by the Contractor or any subcontractor under the Contractor.

A-6 Before a Contract is entered into with the successful bidder, the bidder shall present evidence in writing to the City Clerk, City of Signal Hill, that he/she has a current combined single limit liability policy with aggregate limits for Bodily Injury and Property Damage in the amount of two million dollars ($2,000,000.00).

A-7 Pursuant to the provisions of Section 1773.2 of the Labor Code of the State of California, the minimum prevailing rate of per diem wages for each craft, classification or type of workman needed to execute the contract shall be determined by the Director of Industrial Relations of the State of California which are on file with the City Clerk of Signal Hill and copies will be made available to any interested party on request. These rates shall be the minimum wage rates for this project. A copy of the Contractor's certified payroll, as well as those of all subcontractors, will be required to be submitted with each invoice. A-8 Attention is directed to Public Contract Code Section 22300 permitting the substitution of specified and approved securities for contract retention of funds. All such securities shall be subject to the review and approval of the City Attorney of the City of Signal Hill.

A-9 The successful bidder will be required to furnish a payment bond in an amount equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the contract price and a faithful performance bond in an amount equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the contract price, and said bonds shall be secured from a surety company satisfactory to the City Attorney of the City of Signal Hill. A-10 The City of Signal Hill reserves the right to reject any and all bids, or delete portions of any and all bids or waive any informality or irregularity in the bid or the bid procedures and shall be the sole judge of the bids received.

A-11 It is estimated that this contract will be awarded on March 18, 2014 by the City Council. It is desired that work begin no later than the week of April 7, 2014.

A-12 A mandatory pre-bid site meeting and walk through will be held on Monday, March 3, 2014 at 10:00 a.m. The meeting place will be at the project site located at 1800 East Hill Street, Signal Hill, CA 90755. The City of Signal Hill will note any contractor that arrives late at the pre-bid site meeting. If any of the noted late contractors turn out to be the low bidder, the City of Signal Hill would determine if their bid would be reviewed as responsive. Failure to attend this mandatory pre-bid meeting will render the bid non-responsive. If you have any questions, please contact Paul Buckley at (562) 7439400. The City reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to waive any irregularities or informalities of any bid received.

BY ORDER of the City of Signal Hill.

Published in the Signal Tribune Feb. 7 and 14, 2014

SigNaL TriBuNE

FEBruary 14, 2014

16

PRESIDENTS’ DAY WEEKEND

SALE *

TAX FREE STOREWIDE OR

24 MONTHS EQUAL PAYMENTS, NO-INTEREST FINANCING***

4 DAYS ONLY! FRI., SAT., SUN., MON.

FEBRUARY 14, 15, 16, 17 PLUS

50% OFF ALL MATTRESSES

**

HOUSE TO HOME FURNITURE – 2 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU 2198 N. LAKEWOOD BLVD. LONG BEACH 562-597-3225

Munro Family – Your Furniture Experts since 1965

1703 E. 17TH ST. SANTA ANA/TUSTIN 714-210-3888

*House to Home will pay and self-report all the sales tax on all taxable transactions. Event good through February 17, 2014. This offer does not apply to open or prior sales and cannot be combined with any other offer. Excludes Ekornes products. **Off M.S.R.P. ***O.A.C. with minimum purchase. See store for complete details.


St3537 february 14 layout 1