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“Climax” Acrylic on canvas by Annie Clavel See page 18

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SERVING BIXBY KNOLLS, CALIFORNIA HEIGHTS, LOS CERRITOS, WRIGLEY AND THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

Vol. 35 No. 29

Your Weekly Community Newspaper

New north LB library to be built in spring 2014; Atlantic Theater to be demolished in late January

December 20, 2013

Signal Hill Council grants police pay raises as union agrees to make ‘full employee share’ toward pensions

Sean Belk Staff Writer

Planned for more than a decade, a project to construct a new north Long Beach library– anticipated as the “largest branch library” in the city and an “anchor” for the community– will begin in late spring next year, city officials said. The library will be built on the site of the abandoned, historic Atlantic Theater, which for more than 70 years has File Photo been a local landmark with its The Atlantic Theater, which first opened in 1942 on the 5800 block of Atlantic tall spire on the 5800 block of Avenue, will be demolished in late January to make way for a new library that city officials anticipate will be an “anchor” for the north Long Beach area. Atlantic Avenue. Seyed Jalali, project officer for the Long Beach Development Services Department, said the theater will be torn down in late January to make way for the public facility. Ninth District City Councilmember Steven Neal is sponsoring an event on Jan. 25 to herald the launch of the long-awaited project, after which work on tearing down the theater will commence. The more than $16-million project is continuing after the State Department of Finance gave

see THEATER page 14

Courtesy City of LB

A rendering by architect and designer LPA, Inc. shows what the new north Long Beach library will look like once completed. Construction is expected to start in spring 2014.

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Signal Hill city officials gave a presentation at the Dec. 17 Council meeting to acknowledge that the newly built Signal Hill Police Station and Emergency Operations Center was recognized as “Project of the Year” by the Southern California Chapter of the American Public Works Association. From left are Deputy City Manager Charlie Honeycutt, City Attorney David Aleshire, Mayor Michael Noll and Police Chief Michael Langston. Sean Belk Staff Writer

After going without cost-of-living salary increases for five years, Signal Hill police officers are getting pay raises as part of an agreement reached by the City and the Signal Hill Police Officers Association (POA) on a two-year labor contract. The pay raises, however, don’t come without some “give and take,” city officials said. As part of a memorandum of understanding (MOU) that was unanimously approved by the City Council at its Dec. 17 meeting, the City has agreed to give police officers a 6-percent pay raise for this fiscal year, effective retroactively as of last July 1, and a 5-percent pay raise in Fiscal Year 2014-15. In return, POA members have unanimously agreed to pay their “full employee share” toward their California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS) pension costs. Under the contract, police officers will contribute an additional 3 percent of their pay (for a total of 7 percent) toward CalPERS pension costs this fiscal year and an additional 2 percent (for a total of 9 percent) of their pay toward pension costs next fiscal year. The pension-reform provisions are expecting to generate more than $175,000 in savings for the City during the two-year period. After the savings are added in, the net cost of the pay raises is estimated to be $651,200, according to a city staff report. The City will make a budget adjustment for Fiscal Year 2013-14 to cover the costs of the first round of pay raises through General Fund reserves, according to a city staff report.

Long Beach City officials push to increase wages for food-concession workers at airport, convention center CJ Dablo Staff Writer

New food-concession businesses at the Long Beach Airport and the Long Beach Convention Center may soon be required to pay a higher starting wage. The Long Beach City Council voted in favor of asking the city attorney to draft an ordinance that would require future food-concession businesses at the airport and convention center to pay their workers a higher minimum wage consistent with Measure N, a law passed last year by Long Beach voters. At the time it had taken effect last year, Measure N was originally intended to apply only to the hotel industry, but with nearly the full support of the Council, food-concession workers at the airport and convention center may soon join the hotel workers in that ability to earn that bigger paycheck.

Praised by some community advocates and councilmembers Tuesday night, Measure N guaranteed what has been dubbed a “living wage” to hotel workers in the city. At the time it was passed in 2012, this initiative ordinance required hotels with 100 rooms or more to offer employees $13 per hour in addition to paid sick leave. Measure N’s language also allowed for regular increases. As of July 1, hotel workers are now entitled to a minimum wage of $13.26, according to the city clerk website. As previously reported, the measure, supported by a hotel-worker union, stipulated that hotels that unionize would be exempt from the provisions. Fourth District Councilmember Patrick O’Donnell co-sponsored the agenda item with Vice Mayor Robert Garcia and 7th District Councilmember James Johnson, calling for the recommendation to draft the ordinance. O’Donnell said that when

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see SH COUNCIL page 6

a worker is paid a living wage, he or she would not need to rely on the government to provide basic necessities such as housing, healthcare, transportation and food. “So,” he concluded, “in essence, such a policy is fiscally prudent and morally correct.” The Council voted unanimously (8-0) for the city attorney to draft the ordinance. Third District Councilmember Gary DeLong was absent for the vote. A few councilmembers emphasized the advantages of offering better pay to employees in this segment of Long Beach’s tourism industry, particularly since the airport and convention center are highly visible. “I think… we are having positive conversations and thoughtful dialogue about what a living wage really does for workers and what see LB COUNCIL page 17

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COMMUNITY

2 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Signal Hill public library turns 85

Sean Belk Staff Writer

Signal Hill’s public library turned the page on another chapter of history– officially turning 85 years old on Tuesday, Dec. 17. To commemorate the occasion, city officials and library staff served a birthday cake and beverages to the public. Later that evening, Mayor Michael Noll and the City Council presented a proclamation to recognize the library’s long history in the Courtesy City of SH city. From left, City Librarian Gail Ashbrooke, Vice Mayor Ed Wilson, Councilmember Lori Woods, Today, the 4,234-square-foot Mayor Michael Noll, Councilmember Larry Forester and City Manager Ken Farfsing attend facility is located at 1770 E. Hill St., the celebration of the Signal Hill public library’s 85th Anniversary on Tuesday, Dec. 17.

WISHING

YOU AND YOUR FAMILY A JOYOUS HOLIDAY SEASON!

DECEMBER 20, 2013

next door to the former Signal Hill Police Station, but the library has gone through many changes over the years. The original Signal Hill library, which was first a part of the Los Angeles County library system, operated out of a ramshackle building in 1924. A black-and-white photograph of the library’s original home was on display during the anniversary celebration. “If you go over there and look at the picture of the original library, it looks like cardboard boxes,” Mayor Noll joked while giving a brief history of the library during the Council presentation. “Ours is beginning to get like that because there’s so many people using it.” Noll said, a year after first opening, a board of trustees for the library felt it was in the best interest of the city and the residents to withdraw from the county system. The board then took action to establish the first and only city-operated Signal Hill public library. After a new position of city librarian was formed and appointed, an official city ordinance was adopted in 1928, establishing the City’s maintenance of the public library and further outlining the duties of the board of trustees. In 1934, the Signal Hill library was relocated to the basement below the then-newly developed City Hall at Hill Street and Cherry Avenue. Then, in 1978, the library moved again to its current location, which is a former fire department building. “After 85 years, the Signal Hill public library continues to offer the public fiction and non-fiction publi-

cations, current periodicals, newspapers and technology-related services,” Noll said. City Librarian Gail Ashbrooke, who is Signal Hill’s seventh city librarian, said the fact that the City decided to opt out of the county system to operate its own library is a testament to the City’s responsibility to its community. “That, for me, just shows the commitment that the City has to provide its citizens with an active, thriving library, because it’s much easier to control the library when it’s under a city jurisdiction rather than a county,” she said. Ashbrooke and Mayor Noll also eluded to the City’s efforts to build a new library, which is currently being held up due to the State’s dissolution of redevelopment. The $8.6-million project involves building a state-of-the-art, nearly 15,000 square-foot facility. “I really appreciate [the] aspect that the library is a city library, and I look forward to another 85 years in a new building,” Ashbrooke said. According to the City’s website, the library circulates approximately 90,000 items annually with a book collection of more than 28,000 volumes. Library hours are: from noon to 8pm on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays; from 10am to 5pm on Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays; from 7:30am to 4:30pm on city holidays and closed on Sundays.

The Long Beach Department of Parks, Recreation and Marine is offering a series of classes for children during the winter season. The “Misfit Toys Workshop” on Saturday, Dec. 21 from 10am to noon at Averyboo Arts Studio, 3908 Atlantic Ave. is available for children age 7 to 12 to invent a

new toy or create an artistic sculpture using pieces and parts from discarded misfit toys. Students will learn about abstract art and proper use of adhesives and paints. For children looking to do better in school as a New Year’s resolution, the “Persuasive Paragraphs” enrichment course encourages children to have fun with creative writing and discover the persuasive power of the written word. Students are encouraged to arrive 10 minutes early for exercises. Classes start on Jan. 9 and Feb. 6 at the Cypress Community Center, 5700 Orange Ave. in Cypress. The “Wellness and Changing Health Behaviors” course offers a chance for participants to examine their health behaviors, motivations and limitations. Participants will also set “realistic health goals and achieve them through stress reduction, exercise and nutrition.” Sessions start on Jan. 15 at College Estates Park. For an extra push, “Tabata Bootcamp” engages participants in high intensity interval training to lose weight and build muscle. Classes begin on Jan. 13 at Wardlow Park. To register for all classes, call (562) 570-3111 to get a password and be set up for the regular registration service or online registration, mail to 2760 Studebaker Rd, Long Beach, CA 90815, fax to (562) 570-3113 or walk in at the El Dorado Park Administration Building, 2760 Studebaker Rd. Office hours are Monday to Friday from 9am to 5:30pm. MORE INFORMATION lbparks.org

MORE INFORMATION cityofsignalhill.org (562) 989-7323

LB Parks and Rec. offers winter classes for children

Best wishes! Congressman Alan Lowenthal & Debbie Lowenthal

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DECEMBER 20, 2013

NEWS

The Campaign Trail

Long Beach City Auditor Laura Doud announced on Monday, Dec. 16 that she will seek re-election to a third term as city auditor. Doud was first elected in 2006 and re-elected to a second four-year term in 2012. • Carl Kemp, a candidate for Long Beach City Council’s 5th District, announced that the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local 11 has endorsed him. IBEW Local 11 joins the Laborers’ Union Local 507, which endorsed Kemp last week. • Rex Richardson, a candidate running for the 9th District City Council seat, announced he has received endorsements from Betty Karnette, a former state assemblymember and senator, and the California Coalition of Law Enforcement Associations. • Megan Kerr, a candidate running for Long Beach Unified School District (LBUSD) Board of Education District 1, announced she has been endorsed by LBUSD Board President John McGinnis and Delaine Eastin, retired California Superintendent of Public Instruction who was California’s first female state superintendent. • Uduak Ntuk, a candidate for LBUSD Board of Education to represent District 1, announced he has received endorsements from LBUSD Boardmember Dr. Felton Williams, nine other school-board members across the state and the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAM) Local Lodge 1930 • Juan Benitez, who is running for LBUSD Board of Education’s District 3 seat, announced the endorsements from Long Beach Firefighters Association and the Long Beach Police Officers Association. • Sunny Zia, who is running for the Long Beach Community College Board of Trustees District 3 seat, announced an endorsement from the IAM Local Lodge 1930. • Patrick O’Donnell, a candidate running for the State Assembly’s 70th District seat, announced that the California Faculty Association, representing more than 23,000 higher education educators and professionals, has endorsed him.

Filing period for candidates in LB’s Primary Nominating Election lasts through Jan. 10

The nomination filing period for the April 8, 2014 Long Beach Primary Nominating Election opened on Monday, Dec. 16 and will close at 5pm on Friday, Jan. 10. Members of the public seeking nomination for the offices of mayor, city attorney, city prosecutor, city auditor or council district seats 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 may pick up nomination papers from the City Clerk’s department during City Hall business hours of 7:30am to 4:30pm. A runoff election will be held on June 3, coinciding with the Statewide Direct Primary Election. All elected

candidates are to assume office on June 15. In Long Beach, there are also seats up for grabs on both the Long Beach Unified School District Board of Education (Districts 1, 3 and 5) and the Long Beach Community College Board of Trustees (Areas 1, 3 and 5). During a candidate orientation workshop on the opening day of the filing period, candidates received information on provisions of the City Charter, the municipal code and the California Elections Code. Each candidate present also received a candi-

date handbook containing information on the City’s election process and systems as well as the rules and regulations of running a campaign in Long Beach. To be eligible to hold an elected office in the city of Long Beach, a person must be a legally registered voter and resident of the city at least 30 days immediately preceding the last day (Jan. 10, 2014) upon which candidates are permitted to file nominating petitions for office with the City Clerk. MORE INFORMATION longbeach.gov/cityclerk/elections

Filmmaker Pamela K. Johnson has completed a 15-minute documentary called The Making of Christmas Tree Lane, which is now showing on the Long Beach Public Digital Access Network’s (PADNET) website and on Charter Channel 32 and Verizon Channel 41. The documentary on the 60th anniversary of Christmas Tree Lane on Daisy Avenue is available as one of several videos on demand and will be made available online at iTunes and Amazon, according to a statement from Johnson. The first public screening of the film was on Monday, Dec. 16 at the Wrigley Area Neighborhood Alliance (WANA) annual holiday potluck at Veteran’s Park. Johnson worked with Long Beach filmmakers Alex Downs and Christian Guilder, who have served as camera operators, to capture the “behind-thescenes” story by going to a secret warehouse where the Christmas Tree Lane displays are kept. Also featured in the film is the process of placing the displays on Daisy Avenue, old parade footage and interviews of key figures such as Maria Norvell, “Mother of Christmas Tree Lane,” Mayor Bob Foster and United States Congressmember Alan Lowenthal. along with capturing footage of the 59th annual parade and surrounding events. This year, the annual Daisy Avenue Christmas Tree Lane Parade took place on Saturday, Dec. 14. “Editing the project took me four months of last year, and a month this year,” said Johnson, who completed producer, field production and editing classes at PADNET in December 2012. Johnson shot her second short film Stitches at Long Beach Polytechnic High School in 2007, as a fellow in the

American Film Institute’s Director Workshop for Women, and is at work on a documentary about Earl S. Daugherty, an early aviator who founded the Long Beach Airport. “I’m fascinated by Long Beach history,” said Johnson, who hopes to make a number of documentaries about the city. She has also shot films in other cities, including Albuquerque, NM, and Beijing, China—the latter in early Sep-

tember 2013. “I won a grand prize in the Beijing International Screenwriting Competition, and got to shoot my prize-winning short film in China. If you can wrangle a crew when you don’t speak any Mandarin, and most of them don’t speak much English,” she said, “then you can you can do anything.”

Long Beach filmmaker chronicles history of Christmas Tree Lane in short documentary

Source: Pamela K. Johnson

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GRAB SOME FRESH FRUITS AND VEGGIES What Grand re-opening of downtown farmers market Who Harbor Area Farmers Markets (HAFM) Where On 3rd Street between Pacific and Cedar avenues When Friday, Dec. 20 from 10am to 3pm More Info HAFM is a traditional farmers market that provides a venue for farmers to sell California certified produce, flowers, eggs and honey, as well as prepared foods from local vendors. The Friday market consists of 20 farmers and 14 food vendors. Visit goodveg.org . HELP SPREAD HOLIDAY CHEER What Food and toy drive Who McKenzie Mortuary Where 3843 E. Anaheim St. When Friday, Dec. 20 through the month of December More Info McKenzie Mortuary will be collecting donations throughout the holiday season. The mortuary will match donations, based on the monetary value of the donated items. Unused gift cards can also be donated. Donations can be dropped off at the funeral home, or pick-ups can be arranged. Call (562) 9619301. OVERDUE? What Library Fines Amnesty Month Who Signal Hill Library Where 1770 E. Hill St. When Friday, Dec. 20 through the month of December More Info The Signal Hill Library will waive all overdue fines during the month of December.

LET IT SNOW What 5th Annual Wrigley Snow Day Who Wrigley Association Where Veterans Park, 101 E. 28th St. When Saturday, Dec. 28 at 11am More Info The event will include snow, sled runs, bounce houses and more. Food trucks and vendors will be on-site. BOOKWORMS UNITE What Monthly community book club Who The Bixby Knolls Literary Society Where Elise’s Tea Room, 3924 Atlantic Ave. When Wednesday, Jan. 8 at 7pm More Info Next month, the club will delve into Rabbit is Rich by John Updike. Parking is available along Atlantic Avenue. Refreshments will be provided. Call (562) 595-0081 or email info@bixbyknollsinfo.com .

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Thoughts

OPINION

DECEMBER 20, 2013

from the

Publisher

by Neena Strichart

This year, I am blessed to be spending the holidays with my family– including my precious 94-year-old mother Marjorie. With her good health and great attitude, I am so lucky to have her. For those who will be with friends and family this season, please take the time to kiss and squeeze them and tell them how much you love them. We don’t know what next year will bring. And to you, my gentle readers, I want you to know how much we appreciate you. Also, please remember the reason for the season, happy birthday baby Jesus. Memories of Christmases past bring both smiles and tears for most of us. The smiles are for remembering happy times with loved ones, gifts exchanged and the festivities of the season. Our tears are usually reserved for thoughts of loved ones too far away to hug or for sadness surrounding those we have lost and the realization that they will not share the year-end holidays with us. This year, our family’s Christmas will be especially somber. The reason for our collective sadness is the passing of our darling niece Kari Strichart Gray. She was just a young woman, and we had all celebrated her wedding just one year and eleven months ago to her soulmate JohnLee. This loving girl– a sister, daughter, granddaughter, niece, cousin and friend– will not be joining any of us around the family’s decorated tree this year. Sweet Kari passed away in her sleep last Sunday morning. We don’t know why, and, at this point, the whys don’t really matter. What matters is that we still can’t believe she has left us. Not really knowing how to broach the subject in my column this week, I am grateful to Kari’s brother Scott for providing me with his thoughts and a beautiful picture of his loving sister. I share that with you below. Kari Lisa Gray (nee Strichart), born in 1983 and passed in the comfort of her sleep this last Sunday, 12/15, would more than likely be appalled at the thought of even an inch of space being dedicated to her in a newspaper, but as her brother, this is perhaps the final act of impishness I’ll be able to bother her with. So here goes.

Kari Lisa Gray

Kari jammed more life into her 30 years on Earth than most people manage in double that time. She saw at least 40 states and traveled abroad to Europe too. She double majored in Psychology and Film, and, when she realized those were BOTH not her “thing,” she became a manager of human resources. Through all that, she also managed to find her perfect match, JohnLee Gray, who she married in her pajamas on the beach and then promptly honeymooned in Italy. They shared a passion for strategy and board games, a philosophy she applied to her life to great success. She was the queen of the chess board. Kari refused to have a funeral– she wasn’t much for being the center of attention. This Saturday, we’re having a memorial service to celebrate her life and [to help us deal with] the gaping hole that her absence leaves behind. She is survived by lots of friends and family– but she would probably prefer that we mention, by name, her cat Sera, her rabbit Ms. BunBun and her skink Sydney. As for the future, don’t worry, Kari. I’ll snoot hard enough for both of us. – Scott Strichart

LETTERS AND EMAIL

Mea culpa

Getting some FaceTime

The Dec. 13, 2013 article “Signal Hill briefing explains healthbenefit exchange, Affordable Care Act mandates” should have read that Vice Mayor Ed Wilson is running for the 70th State Assembly District next year.

My name is Joy, and [Neena and I] spoke as I FaceTimed with my daughter Amber Hamilton in front of my home on Daisy during the parade. Amber is in her third year of medical school at St. Louis School of Medicine in St. Louis., Mo. She has seen every parade, with the exception of its cancellation due to rain, since birth! Because of her school schedule, she has missed the parades for the past two years, but she has been able to see them through FaceTime with me! My daughter would tell you that the Christmas Tree Lane parade is one of her favorite childhood memories! Joy Husband-Hamilton Long Beach Wrigley District resident PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Neena R. Strichart

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Photo by Neena Strichart

Joy Husband-Hamilton FaceTiming with her 30-year-old daughter Amber Hamilton during this year’s Daisy Avenue Christmas Tree Lane Parade. ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Stephen M. Strichart

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NEWS Long Beach police make arrests in string of cellphone robberies

DECEMBER 20, 2013

Long Beach police arrested five suspects in connection with one attempted robbery and three robberies, which occurred in the east and west divisions, according to the Long Beach Police Department (LBPD). Robbery detectives recognized an increase in incidents over the past few weeks and developed a strategy with the East Patrol, West Patrol and the Gang and Violent Crimes Divisions. Residents were encouraged to report suspicious persons and activity while police focused saturation-patrol efforts throughout the area. On Dec. 11, around 7:30pm, police responded to the 1700 block of East 2nd Street regarding an attempted armed robbery. One suspect approached the victim, demanded his cellphone and fled on foot. At approximately 8pm, another robbery occurred in the area of 4th Street and Rose Avenue. The armed suspect approached two victims and demanded their cellphones and cash. During the course of the investigation, two suspects were arrested and the investigation is ongoing. At this time, the suspects are only being described as an adult male resident of Los Angeles and an adult male resident of Bellflower. On the morning of Dec. 12, Long Beach Gang Enforcement detectives arrested three juveniles for robberies that occurred in the 3900 block of East Broadway on Nov. 23, and a robbery that occurred on Nov. 22 in the area of Division and La Verne. Pursuant to the arrests, detectives executed four search warrants and recovered jewelry, cellphones and additional evidence. Robbery detectives are in the process of determining if those arrested may be responsible for other incidents that occurred in the area south of 5th Street and east of Alamitos Avenue during the past few weeks. Those robberies were crimes of opportunity where the suspect spotted a potential victim who was distracted,

approached the victim, displayed a handgun, snatched the victim’s cellphone and then fled. The suspect(s) have been described as male African American(s), ranging in age from teens to mid-twenties and armed with a handgun, which may be a real or replica firearm. LBPD is asking for the public’s help in identifying the individual(s) responsible and encourages community members to increase their awareness and to diligently practice the following safety tips: • Always be alert and aware of your surroundings and the people around you • Whenever possible, avoid using your IPOD, cell phone, or portable game system while walking in public areas • Don’t “advertise” that you have valuables in public view (money, jewelry, electronic devices, etc.) • Be aware of locations and situations, which make you vulnerable to crime, such as dark parking lots, walkways, ATM machines, and alleys • Whenever possible, travel with a friend - there is safety in numbers • Stay in well-lighted areas as much as possible • Walk close to the curb and avoid doorways, bushes, and alleys where someone could hide • If you feel you are being followed or targeted, move to a well-populated and well-lighted area • Report suspicious persons or activity by calling 9-1-1 • If you are the victim of a robbery, call 9-1-1 immediately to provide a good description of the suspect(s), the mode of transportation, and direction of travel Anyone with information regarding the recent robberies is urged to call the LBPD’s Robbery Detail at (562) 570-7464. Those who wish to remain anonymous may call 1-800-222TIPS (8477), or text TIPLA plus your tip to 274637 (CRIMES), or visit lacrimestoppers.org .

Two Long Beach gang members charged in 2012 murder case

On Dec. 12, 2013, the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office filed murder charges against two Long Beach gang members for the July 20, 2012 murder of 21-year-old Long Beach resident Ajay Steward, according to the Long Beach Police Department (LBPD). Steward was shot and killed in the 1200 block of Ohio Avenue, just south of Anehim Street, after becoming involved in a confrontation with a group of male subjects. The confrontation was determined to have been a gang fight that escalated into a shooting, according to LBPD. A seperate press release from LBPD states that one subject from a group pulled out a gun and fired several rounds into the other group, striking Steward. The victim was struck multiple times in the torso, was transported to a local hospital in critical condition and pronounced deceased later in the evening. The District Attorney filed one count of murder and three counts of attempted murder against 24-year-old Jorge Armando Samniego of Long Beach and 25-year-old Gustavo Castaneda Garcia of Long Beach, with gang and gun enhancements. They were in custody on unrelated charges at the time of the filing, and were arraigned in Long Beach Superior Court. Source: LBPD

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Boy burned in north LB apartment fire

On Friday, Dec. 13, 2013, at approximately 8:59pm, the Long Beach Fire Department (LBFD) responded to an apartment fire on the 5500 block of Ackerfield Avenue in north Long Beach. The first arriving units found a moderate fire and smoke coming from a first floor unit. Firefighters were able to extinguish the fire and kept it from spreading to adjacent apartments. Two residents of the apartment sustained injuries. An 11year-old boy suffered 2nd-degree burns as well as inhalation injuries. In critical but stable condition, he was treated and transported to a local hospital by Long Beach paramedics. An adult female suffered minor burns and was treated and released at the scene. The cause of the fire is under investigation by authorities. Source: LBFD

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SH Council

continued from page 1

The second year of the contract, however, comes with some contingencies. The 5-percent salary increase and the 2-percent employee contribution in Fiscal Year 2014-15 only go into effect if sales-tax revenue doesn’t drop by $300,000 or more, pension costs don’t rise above current projections and voters don’t pass the controversial “Taxpayers’ Right to Know and Vote� initiative, which will be on the ballot for a special election on June 3, 2014. While the City’s budget and the local economy are “slowly stabilizing,� there are still some “economic uncertainties� that exist, said Signal Hill Deputy City Manager Charlie Honeycutt, the City’s lead labor negotiator. He said one of the main concerns is the loss of redevelopment, which for years has been used primarily to subsidize development by covering oil-well-remediation costs, issuing bonds and paying for other expenses.

The State’s decision to dissolve redevelopment agencies has “hindered major economic-development projects from moving forward,� Honeycutt said. Projects in Signal Hill that have halted include a new permanent Fiat dealership planned by Glenn E. Thomas Dodge Chrysler on a lot on Spring Street near a Honda dealership and a retail/hotel development proposed by Signal Hill Petroleum at 700 Spring St. across from the Signal Hill Gateway Center, he said. A key factor in the labor negotiations was a survey that indicated salaries for Signal Hill police officers and sergeants were about 9.5 percent and nearly 11 percent, respectively, below the “average mid-point� for survey cities, city staff said. The disparity is mainly due to the fact that most police agencies are tied to multi-year labor contracts that have forced city governments to grant pay raises even as revenues declined during the Great Recession, according to city staff. Signal Hill, on the other hand,

HoW To AVoID PRoBATE

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has been able to negotiate with the POA to hold tight during the economic downturn and hasn’t granted any cost-of-living salary increases since January 2009, Honeycutt said. “You don’t increase your costs when your revenues are falling,� he said in a phone interview. In fact, in 2010, the POA agreed to pay more toward their pension costs as CalPERS rates increased. Subsequently, in 2012, the City put a “freeze� on step/merit increases– pay raises based on years of service and performance. Recently, however, more than half-a-dozen longtime police personnel– including a lieutenant, a captain, a detective sergeant and a police officer– have retired from the force. Honeycutt said it’s getting tougher for the Signal Hill Police Department, which has a total of 36 police officers, to find qualified recruits. “The department has hired several well-qualified individuals to fill those vacancies, but finding qualified candidates is getting harder for a variety of factors, including competition for a shrinking pool of good candidates,� he said. Honeycutt said new police officers have been most impacted by the step-increase freeze, since it has prevented them from advancing to their pay range and kept them at entry-level salaries. Now, the labor agreement should boost the City’s competitiveness in recruiting and retaining new officers, he said. According to Honeycutt, the MOU allows for one step increase in Fiscal Year 2014-15 after which “the freeze will be re-established.� Signal Hill POA Vice President Nick Davenport thanked the City Council and all city officials involved in the labor-negotiation process during the Council meeting, adding that the contract would aid the police department’s efforts to recruit and keep new officers. “Throughout the negotiation process it was apparent that the City was both fiscally minded and yet very committed to professional police services,� he said. “Throughout the negotiation process, it was clear that the city had a strong commitment to providing quality police services to the citizens and businesses of Signal Hill. The new contract takes great strides in recruitment and retention of highly qualified officers.� Signal Hill Mayor Michael Noll said of the contract agreement, “There wasn’t the bitterness I’ve seen in the past.�

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Councilmember Larry Forester thanked the POA for “sitting up at the table,â€? adding that the City and the union were both willing to “give and take.â€? One major contingency for the contract to be fulfilled, however, is a provision that allows the POA and the City to revisit labor negotiations if voters approve the Taxpayers’ Right to Know and Vote initiative next year. City officials said the initiative was tied into the contract after a fiscal analysis released by an independent consultant in November concluded that the ballot measure, if passed, would have major immediate and long-term impacts on the City’s finances, potentially affecting about 13 percent of Signal Hill’s General Fund budget. The initiative amends the City Charter to require that all new city taxes, assessments and fees be approved by a two-thirds majority vote in a special election. It also requires that all city taxes and fees sunset every 10 years. Maria Harris, a member of Signal Hill Community First, a watchdog group that drafted the initiative, disagreed with staff’s concerns, stating during public comment from the floor that the measure would only apply to new sales taxes, userutility taxes and property-related taxes, assessments and fees. “The Taxpayers’ Right to Know and Vote will not affect the existing structure of finances,â€? she said. “It does provide for a greater level of transparency to the voter.â€? City Attorney David Aleshire pointed out, however, that existing taxes, fees and assessments would be impacted since the initiative, as it is written, requires they sunset every 10 years. “We would not want the city committed to a set of payments to employees that might not be affordable in the future,â€? he said. “We have no problem with honoring these contracts, but, if this measure passes, it’s a whole new ball game.â€? Vice Mayor Edward Wilson and Councilmember Tina Hansen both agreed with Aleshire’s interpretation of the initiative. “Unfortunately, it’s not just anything new,â€? Wilson said. “It’s everything that currently exists‌ I think it is prudent for us to be looking at this issue and what fiscal impact it may have on the City.â€? Among other provisions in the labor deal, the City has agreed to increase its contribution for the “cafeteria planâ€? benefit, giving an extra $100 per month to employees requiring funds for health, dental, vision and long-term-care premiums. Additionally, a $10-per-month increase is proposed for dental benefits. The City is also providing a way

DECEMBER 20, 2013

for police personnel to “buy back� accrued vacation time and is increasing detective-standby pay from $100 per weekend shift to $150 this fiscal year and $200 next fiscal year.

Other Council highlights: Recognitions and presentations Mayor Michael Noll and city officials acknowledged that the newly built Signal Hill Police Station and Emergency Operations Center was recognized as “Project of the Year� by the Southern California Chapter of the American Public Works Association. City officials gave a presentation on the award and the ceremony. Noll also recognized the Signal Hill Library for its 85th anniversary, and Jennifer Northup, founder of Signal Hill-based Silver Spoon Jewelry, Inc., gave a presentation on her business as part of the City’s “Shop Signal Hill� program.

Community garden project City staff gave a presentation on the design and cost estimates of the proposed Community Garden project. Though staff presented plans to add “optional features,� such as a gathering space, trellis and extra trees, which would have cost an additional $13,000, the Council decided not to add the features and instead approved a new “streamlined� design that would cost a total of $160,000 and provides Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) access. The City purchased the property that will serve as a community garden at 1917 E. 21st St., adjacent to Signal Hill Park, in 2011 after a house was severely damaged from a fire on the property.

Cherry Avenue widening project City staff provided an update on the Cherry Avenue Widening Project, stating that construction is expected to start next summer after being in the works for about 12 years. The $3.6-million project has been a longtime goal of the City to reconfigure the street to alleviate a bottleneck that forms on Cherry Avenue during rushhour traffic from Pacific Coast Highway to 20th Street. The project is being funded entirely through State Transportation and Federal Highway Administration grants. Phase 1 includes new asphalt paving, new traffic signals at Cherry Avenue and PCH and other improvements. Phase 2 includes additional new asphalt paving and installation of a new landscaped median. The City is expected to advertise for construction bids on the week of Jan. 6 with all construction taking place from May through October 2014. The next Signal Hill Council meeting is scheduled for Jan. 7 at 7pm at the Council Chamber.

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NEWS

DECEMBER 20, 2013

California Congressional delegation led by Lowenthal calls on Boeing to select Long Beach for 777x work

Courtesy Boeing

Boeing announced in November that it would seek bids from interested states and/or cities for the 777x-airline manufacturing work. California Gov. Jerry Brown announced on Dec. 11 that the State submitted an official bid to Boeing to bring the 777x program to Long Beach.

A letter authored by Congressmember Alan Lowenthal and signed by a delegation of 46 other California Congressional members was sent to Boeing executives earlier this month in an attempt to persuade the aerospace company to pick Long Beach, Calif. as the manufacturing site for the next-generation 777x airliner. The letter was sent to Boeing CEO W. James McNerney, Jr. on Dec. 5, highlighting the advantages that Boeing would receive if it selected Long Beach as the home of the 777x. Lowenthal’s office released the text of the letter on Dec. 13. Advantages that Long Beach offers include: “an in-place and highly-trained Boeing workforce, which is currently building the Boeing C-17 Globemaster III; an existing 1million square foot assembly facility; a world-class infrastructure including highways, rail, and one of the most modern ports in the world; an educational system that turns out some of the world's most highly trained aerospace and engineering graduates; and, a highly developed local and regional system of parts and component suppliers,” according to Lowenthal’s office. “Long Beach has been intertwined with aviation history for more than a century, including the manufacture of literally tens of thousands of commercial and military aircraft” Lowenthal said. “There is not a location better suited for producing the 777x than Long Beach. We have the best, most efficient aerospace workforce in the nation. They have proved it over and over again: on environmental issues, on safety issues, and on performance issues. I am willing to do whatever I can and work

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

7

Signal Hill checkpoint results in 11 citations but none for DUI

The Signal Hill Police Department (SHPD) Traffic Unit conducted a Driving Under the Influence (DUI)/Driver’s License checkpoint on Saturday, Dec. 14 at Willow Street and Signal Parkway between the hours of 8pm and 1 am. Out of 350 vehicles screened, no motorists were arrested for DUI for either alcohol or drug impairment, possession/transportation/sales of illegal drugs or other criminal charges. However, 11 drivers were cited and/or arrested for operating a vehicle unlicensed or for driving with a suspended/revoked license. Checkpoints are placed in locations that have the greatest opportunity for achieving drunk and drugged driving deterrence and provide the greatest safety for officers and the public, according to SHPD, which also states that the DUI/ Driver’s License checkpoint lowers DUI deaths and injuries. A major component of the checkpoints is the deterrent effects it has on

those who might drive drunk or drugimpaired bringing about more awareness and encouraging everyone to use sober designated drivers, said a press release from SHPD. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), checkpoints have provided the most effective documented results of any of the DUI enforcement strategies, while also yielding considerable cost savings of $6 for every $1 spent, according to SHPD. Signal Hill police will be conducting another DUI/ Driver’s License Checkpoint and several DUI saturation patrols in January and February 2014 in the department’s ongoing commitment to “lowering deaths and injuries upon our streets and highways.” The checkpoint was funded by a grant from the California Office of Traffic Safety, through the NHTSA. To report drunk drivers, residents are encouraged to call 9-1-1. Source: SHPD

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For more than two decades, Long Beach has been the home of the Boeing C-17 Globemaster III assembly plant, which currently employs about 1,200 workers. Now, the State of California, working with the City of Long Beach and regional partners, has submitted an official bid to Boeing to bring the 777x-airliner program to Long Beach.

with Boeing, the City of Long Beach, and Governor Brown to see our highly skilled workforce continue to do what it does best—build world-class aircraft. This would be a win for Long Beach, for California, and for Boeing.” Various versions of the Boeing 777 have been manufactured by the aerospace company since the mid-1990s. The 777x program will see the construction of at least two new highly-modernized versions. The program could last through the 2020s, creating thousands of manufacturing jobs, as well as support and supplier jobs in Southern California and throughout the state. Boeing announced in November that it would seek bids from interested states and/or cities for the 777x manufacturing work. California Gov. Jerry Brown announced on Dec. 11 that California had submitted an official bid to Boeing to bring the 777x program to Long Beach, where the C-17-assembly plant that employs about 1,2000 workers, is slated for closure in 2015. The bid package included the letter

signed by the California Congressional delegation.

Source: Lowenthal’s office

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8 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

A scene from ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas

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‘Twas the Night Before Christmas D

espite being known the world over as the poem “’Twas the Night Before Christmas,” this Christmas classic was actually titled “A Visit From St. Nicholas” when it was first written in 1822. Although there have been some recent claims to the contrary, the poem is generally attributed to Clement Clarke Moore (1779-1863), a wealthy Manhattan aca-

demic whose scholarly work was eclipsed in fame by this beloved tale.

The poem became an instant success following its first anonymous publication in 1823 in a Troy, N.Y. newspaper. Many also credit it with changing the popular view of St. Nicholas, from a stern patron saint to the jovial, magical giftgiver known today as Santa Claus.

The reading of the poem has long been an annual yuletide tradition in many households – including the Griswolds’ in the film “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” (1989). Indeed, it’s been immortalized in everything from comic books to music to television specials, allowing new generations to relive the magic of that first encounter with the jolly old elf himself.

Think you know the poem well? Fill in the blanks below to test your knowledge of this classic, including all eight original reindeer names! (hint: Rudolph isn’t one of them)

‘Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the __________ Not a creature was stirring, not even a __________; The __________ were hung by the __________ with care In hopes that St. __________ soon would be there; The children were nestled all __________ in their beds, While visions of __________ danced in their heads; And mamma in her __________, and I in my __________, Had just settled our brains for a long __________’s nap, When out on the __________ there arose such a __________ , I sprang from the bed to see what was the matter. Away to the window I flew like a __________ , Tore open the __________ and threw up the sash. The moon on the breast of the new-fallen __________ Gave the lustre of mid-day to objects below, When, what to my wondering __________ should appear, But a miniature __________, and eight tiny __________ , With a little old __________ , so lively and quick, I knew in a moment it must be __________. More rapid than eagles his coursers they came, And he whistled, and shouted, and called them by name: Now, __________ ! Now, __________ ! Now, __________ and __________ ! On, __________ ! On, __________ ! On, __________ and __________ ! To the top of the porch! To the top of the wall! Now dash away! Dash away! Dash away all!” As dry leaves that before the wild hurricane fly, When they meet with an obstacle, mount to the sky; So up to the house-top the coursers they flew, With the sleigh full of __________ , and St. Nicholas too.

And then, in a twinkling, I heard on the __________ The prancing and pawing of each little hoof. As I drew in my head, and was turning around, Down the __________ St. Nicholas came with a bound. He was dressed all in __________, from his head to his foot, And his clothes were all tarnished with __________ and soot; A bundle of __________ he had flung on his back, And he looked like a peddler just opening his pack. His __________ – how they twinkled! His dimples how merry! His cheeks were like __________, his nose like a __________ ! His droll little mouth was drawn up like a bow, And the beard of his chin was as __________ as the snow; The stump of a pipe he held tight in his __________, And the smoke it encircled his head like a wreath; He had a broad face and a little round __________, That shook when he laughed, like a bowlful of __________. He was chubby and plump, a right jolly old __________, And I laughed when I saw him, in spite of myself; A wink of his __________ and a twist of his head, Soon gave me to know I had nothing to __________; He spoke not a word, but went straight to his work, And filled all the stockings; then turned with a jerk, And laying his finger aside of his __________, And giving a nod, up the __________ he rose; He sprang to his __________, to his team gave a whistle, And away they all flew like the down of a thistle. But I heard him exclaim, ere he drove out of sight — “__________ __________ _____ _____, _____ _____ _____ __ __________ __________!” Answers

house; mouse; stockings; chimney; Nicholas; snug; sugarplums; ‘kerchief; cap; winter; lawn; clatter; flash; shutters; snow; eyes; sleigh; reindeer; driver; St. Nick; Dasher; Dancer; Prancer; Vixen; Comet; Cupid; Donner; Blitzen; toys; roof; chimney; fur; ashes; toys; eyes; roses; cherry; white; teeth; belly; jelly; elf; eye; dread; nose; chimney; sleigh; Happy Christmas to all, and to all a good night! Most insurance accepted

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ST3529 - Dec. 20_Layout 1 12/20/13 8:57 AM Page 9

SIGNAL TRIBUNE 9 ‘Tis the Season Signal Hill cards can help loved ones keep in touch any time of year

DECEMBER 20, 2013

Everyone loves to get greeting cards: birthday cards, thank-you notes and holiday cards. They are part of traditions passed on to us by our grandparents. Sending a card is a great way to truly show people you care, especially when you can’t be with them. You can keep that tradition alive by sharing cards portraying some of the stunning views atop Signal Hill. The City of Signal Hill is offering sets of four postcards (4” x 5”) and four notecards with envelopes. The cards are available for $5 at Signal Hill City Hall, 2175 Cherry Ave. Call the Community Services Department at (562) 989-7330. Proceeds benefit the Signal Hill Community Foundation.

Twelve healthy days of Christmas Nutrition

Carol Berg Sloan RDN Columnist

In honor of this festive season, here are 12 tips to get you through the holidays, happy and healthy.

Don’t skip meals. I used to do this in my younger days– not eat all day when I knew I was going out for a big dinner. It backfires by slowing down your metabolism and then usually leads to overeating or drinking anyway.

Do enjoy in moderation. If I am going to a party, and a favorite dish is served, I am going to enjoy it! I'll have a couple of crackers with spinach dip and then skip the fudge, because I really want the savory and won’t miss the sweet.

Drink water. Especially if consuming alcoholic beverages. Rule of thumb: for every drink, have eight ounces of water to stay hydrated. Do some form of exercise each day. Start by stretching and end with a quick walk around the block.

Buy your groceries from some type of meal plan and/or list. Grocery store end caps (these are at the end of each aisle) entice you

to buy with low prices but usually are low-nutrition items. Stick to your list, and get out of the store cheaper and healthier.

Have a three course meal and start with soup. Research shows consuming a broth-based soup before the main entrée leads to eating less of the main dish. Have a lighter dessert such as meringues or dried fruit and nuts.

Purchase high-quality “treats.” Go ahead and buy that one Godiva truffle instead of the 3-ounce milkchocolate bar; it’s worth it. Same for cheese. Why eat a couple of ounces of flavorless, mild cheddar cheese when you can have a delicious ounce of aged gouda or Vermont extra-sharp white cheddar?

Try to get enough sleep. Partying till midnight then being up at 6am will catch up to you and make you a grumpy human being.

Give edible gifts that will be appreciated. Bake high-fiber banana nut bread by substituting oat bran or ground flaxseeds for some of the flour. Use half the butter or oil by substituting with applesauce. Make your own granola and add nuts, seeds and dried fruit. Place in a jelly jar with a festive wrapping. People can use these items much more than a knick-knack.

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If going to a party, bring a healthy dish. Everyone will love a side dish of roasted vegetables, crudité with homemade hummus or toasted, spiced mixed nuts.

Eat three to five servings of fruits or vegetables every day. Enjoy: spaghetti squash instead of pasta; extra toppings such as radishes, onions, green beans on your salad; or mixed berries on your ice cream. Fabulous!

Enjoy these times. Don’t get stressed about details, thorough cleaning or the perfect present. Sometimes your presence (in a jolly mood) is present enough. Carol Berg Sloan RDN is a registered dietitian/nutritionist and independent consultant with expertise in food and nutrition communications.

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3 cups all-purpose flour mass. Cut dough into desired shapes; trans 3/4 cup brown sugar Scrape the dough onto your work -sur fer to parchment-lined cookie sheets, 1 tbsp cinnamon face; divide in half. Work with one - spacing por them 3/4-inch apart. 1 tbsp ground ginger (fresh preferred) tion of dough at a time. Roll out dough 1/2 tsp ground cloves (fresh preferred) between two large sheets of parch Bake cookies until the center is set 1/2 tsp kosher salt ment paper until it is 1/4-inch thick. and dough barely retains an imprint 3/4 tsp baking soda Leaving dough sandwiched between when touched very gently with fin 12 tbsp-1 cup unsalted slightly- softparchment layers, stack on cookie gertip, 8 to 11 minutes, rotating ened butter (cut into 12 pieces) sheet and freeze until firm, 15 to 20 cookie sheet from front to back 3/4 cup molasses minutes. (Make-ahead: Instead of halfway through baking time. Do not 2 tbsp milk (whole milk preferred) freezing the dough, refrigerate it for over2 bake. hours or overnight.) In a food processor bowl fitted with Remove cookie sheets from oven and steel blade, mix flour, sugar,- cinnaPreheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line leave cookies to cool on sheets for 2 mon, ginger, cloves, salt, and baking two cookie sheets with parchment minutes, then remove with a spatula soda until combined. Scatter butter paper. and move to a wire rack to allow the pieces over flour mixture and process cookies to cool to room tempera until mixture is sandy and resemblesRemove one dough sheet from the ture. very fine meal. With machine runningfreezer; place on work surface. Peel off Making gingerbread treats — like on low-med speed, gradually add the top parchment sheet and lay it Once cookies are cool, decorate as these ones, as seen on Sandra Lee molasses and milk; mix until the back in place. Flip dough over; peeldesired. off Store the cookies in an - air Celebrates: Magical Merry Christ dough is evenly moist and forms a soft and discard second parchment layer. tight container at room temperature,

mas — can be fun for the whole family

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10 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Friday, December 20 10:30 a.m. (TBN) My Christmas Soldier The story of an 11-year-old boy whose courage transcends fear and hatred. 11 a.m. (FAM) Movie “Christmas Do-Over” (2006, Family) Jay Mohr. A man is forced to relive one terrible Christmas with his ex-wife over and over again. 2 p.m. (HALL) Movie “Annie Claus is Coming to Town” (2011, Family) Maria Thayer. Santa’s daughter Annie Claus travels to Los Angeles in search of love. 3 p.m. (GAC) Christmas Crazy We dash from coast-to-coast to find the most deckedout holiday homes and stores. 4 p.m. (HALL) Movie “All I Want for Christmas” (2007, Drama) Gail O’Grady. A nineyear-old boy enters a contest to find a new husband for his mother. 5:30 p.m. (FAM) Frosty’s Winter Wonderland The children build Frosty a companion out of snow after noticing how sad he has become. 6 p.m. (FAM) A Chipmunk Christmas Alvin gives his harmonica to a sick boy and must find another for his Christmas concert. (HALL) Movie “A Christmas Wish” (2010, Family) Kristy Swanson. A woman, left destitute by her husband, faces a bleak Christmas with her children. 6:30 p.m. (FAM) Movie “Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas” (2000, Fantasy) Jim Carrey. The Grinch disguises himself as Santa to steal Christmas from the people of Whoville. 7 p.m. (TBN) Movie “The Perfect Gift” (2009, Drama) Jefferson Moore. A teenaged girl has a chance encounter with a man who changes the course of her life. 8 p.m. (FOOD) Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives Guy Fieri heads up to North Pole, Alaska, for all kinds of Christmas favorites. (HALL) Movie “The Christmas Ornament” (2013, Drama) Kellie Martin. A Christmas tree lot owner helps a widow face her first Christmas without her husband. (TNT) Christmas in Washington Celebrities and dignitaries gather for holiday performances by popular musical artists. 8:30 p.m. (TBN) Vicki Yohe Christmas From Holyland Seasonal music. 9 p.m. (FAM) Movie “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” (1989, Comedy) Chevy Chase. A man plays host to numerous dysfunctional relatives during the Christmas holidays. (TNT) Movie “A Christmas Carol” (1999, Drama) Patrick Stewart. A miserly old man is visited by three ghosts in order to learn the meaning of Christmas. 10 p.m. (HALL) Movie “Moonlight and Mistletoe” (2008, Drama) Tom Arnold. A woman must return to her hometown of Santaville to help her father. 11 p.m. (TNT) Christmas in Washington Celebrities and dignitaries gather for holiday performances by popular musical artists. Midnight (FAM) Movie “Chasing Christmas” (2005, Comedy) Tom Arnold. The Ghost of Christmas Past escapes and leaves his subject trapped in his past. (HALL) Movie “Santa Jr.” (2002, Comedy)

Nick Stabile. Santa’s adult son learns the spirit of Christmas when he takes over the family business. (TNT) Movie “A Christmas Carol” (1999, Drama) Patrick Stewart. A miserly old man is visited by three ghosts in order to learn the meaning of Christmas. Saturday, December 21 10 a.m. (FAM) ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas Stellar performances of classic holiday favorites by some of America’s hottest singers. (FOOD) The Pioneer Woman Ree Drummond celebrates the holiday season on the ranch serving up her down-home classics. (HALL) Movie “Moonlight and Mistletoe” (2008, Drama) Tom Arnold. A woman must return to her hometown of Santaville to help her father. 10:30 a.m. (FAM) Rudolph’s Shiny New Year Rudolph must find Happy, the missing baby new year, before midnight on New Year’s Eve. 11 a.m. (GAC) All Out American Christmas Homeowners go above and beyond traditional decor to create over-the-top holiday displays. 11:30 a.m. (FAM) Rudolph and Frosty’s Christmas in July During a July vacation, Rudolph and Frosty find themselves in danger. 1 p.m. (TNT) Movie “Nothing Like the Holidays” (2008, Comedy/Drama) Alfred Molina. A Puerto Rican family spends a Christmas together, facing the fact it may be their last. 1:30 p.m. (FAM) The Year Without a Santa Claus Santa decides to take time off because he feels people have lost the spirit of Christmas. 2 p.m. (HALL) Movie “The Santa Switch” (2013, Family) Ethan Erickson. A man is given the gift of being Santa this year and he finds himself with new powers. (TBN) Movie “A Christmas Snow” (2010, Drama) Danny Cahill. Christmas has not been the same for a young woman since her father left. 2:30 p.m. (FAM) Santa Claus Is Comin’ to Town Fred Astaire narrates the timeless tale of how Kris Kringle grew up to become Santa Claus. 2:45 p.m. (TNT) Movie “Surviving Christmas” (2004, Comedy) Ben Affleck. A lonely, wealthy executive pays a family to let him spend Christmas with them. 3 p.m. (FOOD) Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives Guy Fieri heads up to North Pole, Alaska, for all kinds of Christmas favorites. (TRAVEL) Jingle Brawls We crisscrossed America to find the most amazing Christmas celebrations imaginable. 3:30 p.m. (FAM) A Chipmunk Christmas Alvin gives his harmonica to a sick boy and must find another for his Christmas concert. 4 p.m. (FAM) Movie “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” (1989, Comedy) Chevy Chase. A man plays host to numerous dysfunctional relatives during the Christmas holidays. (HALL) Movie “Finding Christmas” (2013, Family) Tricia Helfer. A disgruntled ad executive and a disheartened repairman swap

houses over Christmas. (TRAVEL) Xtreme Christmas Viewers see America’s most unusual, wild, wacky and bizarre Christmas celebrations. 4:30 p.m. (TNT) Movie “Fred Claus” (2007, Comedy) Paul Giamatti. Santa bails his criminal brother out of jail and brings him to the North Pole. 6 p.m. (FAM) Movie “The Santa Clause” (1994, Comedy) Tim Allen. When a father mistakenly kills Santa Claus, he is magically recruited to take his place. (HALL) Movie “Fir Crazy” (2013, Romance) Craig Pryce. A marketing executive discovers a new fondness for the holidays selling Christmas trees. 7 p.m. (TLC) Invasion of the Christmas Lights 3: Europe We criss-cross the European continent to chronicle extreme Christmas lighting enthusiasts. 7:30 p.m. (TCM) Movie “Christmas Eve” (1947, Drama) George Raft. A rich spinster’s greedy nephew attempts legal action to take her estate. 8 p.m. (ABC) I Want a Dog for Christmas, Charlie Brown Linus and Lucy’s younger brother, ReRun, asks Snoopy to invite his brother Spike to visit. (FAM) Movie “The Santa Clause 2” (2002, Family) Tim Allen. After being Santa Claus for a few years, Scott Calvin must find a wife and help his son. (HALL) Movie “The Christmas Blessing” (2005, Drama) Neil Patrick Harris. A man meets a young woman and little boy who are in need of miracles for the holidays. 10 p.m. (FAM) Movie “The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause” (2007, Family) Tim Allen. Santa Claus prepares for a busy Christmas with his in-laws and the mischievous Jack Frost. (HALL) Movie “The Most Wonderful Time of the Year” (2008, Drama) Brooke Burns. A single mom who has lost all faith in Christmas finds answers when her uncle visits. 11:30 p.m. (TNT) Movie “Fred Claus” (2007, Comedy) Paul Giamatti. Santa bails his criminal brother out of jail and brings him to the North Pole. Midnight (FAM) Movie “The Mistle-Tones” (2012, Musical) Tia Mowry-Hardict. A young singer creates her own musical Christmas group after losing a spot in another. (HALL) Movie “Christmas Magic” (2011, Drama) Lindy Booth. An angel-to-be must earn her wings by watching over a despondent man and his daughter. Sunday, December 22 10 a.m. (HALL) Movie “Fir Crazy” (2013, Romance) Craig Pryce. A marketing executive discovers a new fondness for the holidays selling Christmas trees. 11 a.m. (TCM) Movie “Christmas in Connecticut” (1945, Comedy/Drama) Barbara Stanwyck. A promotional stunt threatens to expose a columnist’s fictitious housekeeping skills. Noon (HALL) Movie “Finding Christmas” (2013, Family) Tricia Helfer. A disgruntled ad executive and a disheartened repairman swap houses over Christmas. 1 p.m. (ABC) CMA Country Christmas

Country’s biggest superstars join together to celebrate the holidays. (FAM) Movie “The Santa Clause” (1994, Comedy) Tim Allen. When a father mistakenly kills Santa Claus, he is magically recruited to take his place. 2 p.m. (HALL) Movie “The Christmas Blessing” (2005, Drama) Neil Patrick Harris. A man meets a young woman and little boy who are in need of miracles for the holidays. 3 p.m. (FAM) Movie “The Santa Clause 2” (2002, Family) Tim Allen. After being Santa Claus for a few years, Scott Calvin must find a wife and help his son. 4 p.m. (FOOD) Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives Guy Fieri heads up to North Pole, Alaska, for all kinds of Christmas favorites. (HALL) Movie “Christmas Magic” (2011, Drama) Lindy Booth. An angel-to-be must earn her wings by watching over a despondent man and his daughter. 5 p.m. (FAM) Movie “The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause” (2007, Family) Tim Allen. Santa Claus prepares for a busy Christmas with his in-laws and the mischievous Jack Frost. 6 p.m. (HALL) Movie “Naughty or Nice” (2012, Drama) Hilarie Burton. A young woman receives a book that reveals the good and bad about everyone in her life. 7 p.m. (FAM) Movie “Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas” (2000, Fantasy) Jim Carrey. The Grinch disguises himself as Santa to steal Christmas from the people of Whoville. 8 p.m. (HALL) Movie “The Christmas Card” (2006, Drama) Edward Asner. Moved by an anonymous Christmas card, Captain Cody Cullen searches for the card’s sender. (TNT) Movie “Four Christmases” (2009, Comedy) Vince Vaughn. A couple struggles to spend Christmas with all four of their divorced parents. 9:30 p.m. (FAM) Movie “Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas” (2000, Fantasy) Jim Carrey. The Grinch disguises himself as Santa to steal Christmas from the people of Whoville. 10 p.m. (HALL) Movie “Hitched for the Holidays” (2012, Romance) Joey Lawrence. A man and woman agree to pose as each other’s significant other to their families. (TNT) Movie “Four Christmases” (2009, Comedy) Vince Vaughn. A couple struggles to spend Christmas with all four of their divorced parents. 10:30 p.m. (TBN) Jason Crabb Christmas At HLE Seasonal music. 11:30 p.m. (TBN) Movie “Love’s Christmas Journey” (2011, Romance) Ellie Davis. A woman’s brother goes missing while she’s visiting him during the Christmas holiday. Midnight (HALL) Movie “November Christmas” (2010, Drama) John Corbett. Neighbors band together to create Halloween and Christmas moments for a sick girl. Monday, December 23 10 a.m. (GAC) Year ‘Round Christmas Profiling people who are overflowing with the spirit of Christmas all year long. 11 a.m. (GAC) Christmas Crazy We dash from coast-to-coast to find the most decked-

DECEMBER 20, 2013

out holiday homes and stores. 1 p.m. (FAM) Movie “Deck the Halls” (2006, Comedy) Danny de Vito. Two feuding neighbors try to prove to the other that he has more holiday spirit. (FOOD) Sandra’s Money Saving Meals The holidays are here so let Sandra Lee show you how to prepare a picture perfect feast. 2 p.m. (HALL) Movie “A Christmas Wedding Tail” (2011, Comedy) Shawn Ardalan. Two dog owners owners fall in love and it’s up to the pets to perform a Christmas miracle. 3 p.m. (FAM) Movie “A Christmas Carol” (2009, Animated) Jim Carrey. Spirits visit Ebenezer Scrooge and show him the errors of his ways by revisiting his life. (TCM) Movie “Scrooge” (1970, Musical) Albert Finney. Three spirits visit Scrooge, a miserable man soured on the meaning of Christmas. 4 p.m. (HALL) Movie “A Princess for Christmas” (2011, Family) Katie McGrath. A young woman falls for a dashing prince when she visits England for Christmas. 5 p.m. (FAM) Jack Frost Jack Frost wants to leave his North Pole existence and become human. (FOOD) The Pioneer Woman Ree Drummond celebrates the holiday season on the ranch serving up her down-home classics. 5:30 p.m. (FX) Two and a Half Men Charlie’s preparations for his Christmas Eve date are hampered by unexpected guests. 6 p.m. (FAM) Santa Claus Is Comin’ to Town Fred Astaire narrates the timeless tale of how Kris Kringle grew up to become Santa Claus. (GAC) All Out American Christmas Homeowners go above and beyond traditional decor to create over-the-top holiday displays. 7 p.m. (FAM) The Year Without a Santa Claus Santa decides to take time off because he feels people have lost the spirit of Christmas. (TBN) Christmas with a Capital “C” A man tries to rid his town of a 50 year old Christmas tradition. 8 p.m. (ABC) Shrek the Halls Shrek, Fiona, Donkey, Puss In Boots and all their fairytale buddies celebrate Christmas. (CW) iHeartRadio Jingle Ball A star studded concert for the holidays, featuring Miley Cyrus, Robin Thicke and more. (HALL) Movie “November Christmas” (2010, Drama) John Corbett. Neighbors band together to create Halloween and Christmas moments for a sick girl. 8:30 p.m. (ABC) A Chipmunk Christmas Alvin gives his harmonica to a sick boy and must find another for his Christmas concert. (GAC) The Making of ‘Cheers, its Christmas’ With Blake Shelton and Friends Blake Shelton gives viewers a behind the scenes look at the recording of his new album. 9 p.m. (ABC) The Great Christmas Light Fight 10 p.m. (ABC) The Great Christmas Light Fight (FAM) Movie “The Polar Express” (2004, Animated) Voices of Tom Hanks. A doubting little boy boards a magical train to visit the

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SIGNAL TRIBUNE

DECEMBER 20, 2013 North Pole on Christmas Eve. (GAC) All Out American Christmas Homeowners go above and beyond traditional decor to create over-the-top holiday displays. (HALL) Movie “The Wishing Tree” (2012, Family) Jason Gedrick. A professor brings students together through a Christmas tree decorated with wishes. 11 p.m. (TBN) Movie “Mary of Nazareth” (2012) Alissa Jung. The story of Mary of Nazareth. Midnight (FAM) Movie “Scrooged” (1988, Fantasy) Bill Murray. A callous executive learns the true meaning of Christmas when he is visited by ghosts. (HALL) Movie “The Night Before the Night Before Christmas” (2010, Family) Rick Roberts. Santa Claus loses his memory and his magical bag two days before Christmas. 12:30 a.m. (GAC) The Making of ‘Cheers, its Christmas’ With Blake Shelton and Friends Blake Shelton gives viewers a behind the scenes look at the recording of his new album. Tuesday, December 24 10:15 a.m. (TCM) Movie “A Christmas Carol” (1938, Drama) Reginald Owen. Ebeneezer Scrooge learns a lesson in charity after a visit from three spirits. 10:40 a.m. (STARZ) Movie “Elf” (2003, Comedy) Will Ferrell. A man raised as an elf at the North Pole travels to New York to find his true father. 11 a.m. (FAM) Movie “Scrooged” (1988, Fantasy) Bill Murray. A callous executive learns the true meaning of Christmas when he is visited by ghosts. Noon (HALL) Movie “Finding Christmas” (2013, Family) Tricia Helfer. A disgruntled ad executive and a disheartened repairman swap houses over Christmas. 12:20 p.m. (STARZ) Movie “Elf” (2003, Comedy) Will Ferrell. A man raised as an elf at the North Pole travels to New York to find his true father. 1 p.m. (FAM) Movie “The Polar Express” (2004, Animated) Voices of Tom Hanks. A doubting little boy boards a magical train to visit the North Pole on Christmas Eve. 1:15 p.m. (TCM) Movie “Holiday Affair” (1949, Drama) Robert Mitchum. A man offers to buy a model train set for a boy whose mother cannot afford it. 1:30 p.m. (TBN) Jesus of Nazareth An epic chronicle of Christ. 2 p.m. (STARZ) Movie “Elf” (2003, Comedy) Will Ferrell. A man raised as an elf at the North Pole travels to New York to find his true father. 3 p.m. (GAC) The Making of ‘Cheers, its Christmas’ With Blake Shelton and Friends Blake Shelton gives viewers a behind the scenes look at the recording of his new album. (TCM) Movie “It Happened on Fifth Avenue” (1947, Comedy) Don DeFore. While a family is away for Christmas, a hobo and his friends live in their mansion. 3:40 p.m. (STARZ) Movie “Elf” (2003, Comedy) Will Ferrell. A man raised as an elf at the North Pole travels to New York to find his

true father. 4 p.m. (FMC) Movie “A Christmas Carol” (1951, Fantasy) Alastair Sim. The ghosts of Christmas past, present and future show a miser the meaning of Christmas. (HALL) Movie “Debbie Macomber’s Call Me Mrs. Miracle” (2010, Drama) Doris Roberts. Mrs. Miracle, a magical lady turns the lives of a group of New Yorkers upside down. 5 p.m. (FAM) Movie “The Santa Clause” (1994, Comedy) Tim Allen. When a father mistakenly kills Santa Claus, he is magically recruited to take his place. (GAC) Christmas With Scotty McCreery & Friends Hot young country stars join forces in this one-hour Christmas special. (IFC) Movie “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” (1989, Comedy) Chevy Chase. A man plays host to numerous dysfunctional relatives during the Christmas holidays. (TCM) Movie “Christmas in Connecticut” (1945, Comedy/Drama) Barbara Stanwyck. A promotional stunt threatens to expose a columnist’s fictitious housekeeping skills. 5:20 p.m. (STARZ) Movie “Elf” (2003, Comedy) Will Ferrell. A man raised as an elf at the North Pole travels to New York to find his true father. 6 p.m. (FMC) Movie “A Christmas Carol” (1951, Fantasy) Alastair Sim. The ghosts of Christmas past, present and future show a miser the meaning of Christmas. (HALL) Movie “Single Santa Seeks Mrs. Claus” (2004, Family) Steve Guttenberg. Santa worries about turning over the reigns to his son, Nick, who hasn’t yet found a wife. 7 p.m. (FAM) Movie “The Santa Clause 2” (2002, Family) Tim Allen. After being Santa Claus for a few years, Scott Calvin must find a wife and help his son. (TBN) Jesus of Nazareth An epic chronicle of Christ. (STARZ) Movie “Elf” (2003, Comedy) Will Ferrell. A man raised as an elf at the North Pole travels to New York to find his true father. 8 p.m. (ABC) Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas A Grinch steals everything Christmas from the Whos so they can’t celebrate the holiday. (CW) Movie “The 12 Dogs of Christmas” (2005, Family) John Billingsley. The story of a young girl who uses dogs to teach people the meaning of Christmas. (FMC) Movie “A Christmas Carol” (1951, Fantasy) Alastair Sim. The ghosts of Christmas past, present and future show a miser the meaning of Christmas. (NBC) Movie “It’s a Wonderful Life” (1946, Drama) James Stewart. An angel shows a suicidal banker how important he has been in the lives of others. (TBS) Movie “A Christmas Story” (1983, Family) Peter Billingsley. In the ‘40s, a young boy wants only one thing from Santa: an official Red Ryder BB gun. 8:30 p.m. (ABC) Movie “Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas” (2000, Fan-

tasy) Jim Carrey. A Grinch plans on stealing Christmas from the residents of Whoville, who love Christmas. 8:45 p.m. (STARZ) Movie “Elf” (2003, Comedy) Will Ferrell. A man raised as an elf at the North Pole travels to New York to find his true father. 9 p.m. (FAM) Movie “The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause” (2007, Family) Tim Allen. Santa Claus prepares for a busy Christmas with his in-laws and the mischievous Jack Frost. (GAC) Christmas With Scotty McCreery & Friends Hot young country stars join forces in this one-hour Christmas special. 10 p.m. (FMC) Movie “A Christmas Carol” (1951, Fantasy) Alastair Sim. The ghosts of Christmas past, present and future show a miser the meaning of Christmas. (TBS) Movie “A Christmas Story” (1983, Family) Peter Billingsley. In the ‘40s, a young boy wants only one thing from Santa: an official Red Ryder BB gun. 10:15 p.m. (TCM) Movie “The Bishop’s Wife” (1947, Comedy) Cary Grant. An angel comes to Earth to help a bishop and his wife raise funds to build a new church. 10:30 p.m. (STARZ) Movie “Elf” (2003, Comedy) Will Ferrell. A man raised as an elf at the North Pole travels to New York to find his true father. 11 p.m. (TBN) The Collingsworth Family Christmas music. 11:35 p.m. (NBC) Christmas Eve Mass at St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome Midnight (FAM) Movie “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” (1989, Comedy) Chevy Chase. A man plays host to numerous dysfunctional relatives during the Christmas holidays. (HALL) Movie “Fir Crazy” (2013, Romance) Craig Pryce. A marketing executive discovers a new fondness for the holidays selling Christmas trees. (TBN) Movie “The Perfect Gift” (2009, Drama) Jefferson Moore. A teenaged girl has a chance encounter with a man who changes the course of her life. (TBS) Movie “A Christmas Story” (1983, Family) Peter Billingsley. In the ‘40s, a young boy wants only one thing from Santa: an official Red Ryder BB gun. 12:15 a.m. (STARZ) Movie “Elf” (2003, Comedy) Will Ferrell. A man raised as an elf at the North Pole travels to New York to find his true father. Wednesday, December 25 10 a.m. (TBS) Movie “A Christmas Story” (1983, Family) Peter Billingsley. In the ‘40s, a young boy wants only one thing from Santa: an official Red Ryder BB gun. 10:30 a.m. (HALL) Movie “The Santa Switch” (2013, Family) Ethan Erickson. A man is given the gift of being Santa this year and he finds himself with new powers. 10:50 a.m. (STARZ) Movie “Christmas With the Kranks” (2004, Comedy) Tim Allen. Luther and Nora Krank scramble to create the perfect Christmas for their daughter. Noon (FMC) Movie “A Christmas Carol” (1951, Fantasy) Alastair Sim. The ghosts of

Christmas past, present and future show a miser the meaning of Christmas. (HALL) Movie “A Very Merry Mix-Up” (2013, Romance) Alicia Witt. A woman forms a bond with a family that she is accidentally landed with over the holidays. (TBS) Movie “A Christmas Story” (1983, Family) Peter Billingsley. In the ‘40s, a young boy wants only one thing from Santa: an official Red Ryder BB gun. 1 p.m. (FAM) Movie “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” (1989, Comedy) Chevy Chase. A man plays host to numerous dysfunctional relatives during the Christmas holidays. 2 p.m. (FMC) Movie “A Christmas Carol” (1951, Fantasy) Alastair Sim. The ghosts of Christmas past, present and future show a miser the meaning of Christmas. (TBS) Movie “A Christmas Story” (1983, Family) Peter Billingsley. In the ‘40s, a young boy wants only one thing from Santa: an official Red Ryder BB gun. 3 p.m. (FAM) Movie “The Santa Clause” (1994, Comedy) Tim Allen. When a father mistakenly kills Santa Claus, he is magically recruited to take his place. 4 p.m. (FMC) Movie “A Christmas Carol” (1951, Fantasy) Alastair Sim. The ghosts of Christmas past, present and future show a miser the meaning of Christmas. (TBS) Movie “A Christmas Story” (1983, Family) Peter Billingsley. In the ‘40s, a young boy wants only one thing from Santa: an official Red Ryder BB gun. 4:30 p.m. (HALL) Movie “Fir Crazy” (2013, Romance) Craig Pryce. A marketing executive discovers a new fondness for the holidays selling Christmas trees. 5 p.m. (FAM) Movie “The Santa Clause 2” (2002, Family) Tim Allen. After being Santa Claus for a few years, Scott Calvin must find a wife and help his son. 6 p.m. (FMC) Movie “A Christmas Carol” (1951, Fantasy) Alastair Sim. The ghosts of Christmas past, present and future show a miser the meaning of Christmas. (TBS) Movie “A Christmas Story” (1983, Family) Peter Billingsley. In the ‘40s, a young boy wants only one thing from Santa: an official Red Ryder BB gun. 7 p.m. (FAM) Movie “The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause” (2007, Family) Tim Allen. Santa Claus prepares for a busy Christmas with his in-laws and the mischievous Jack Frost. 8 p.m. (COM) Jeff Dunham’s Very Special Christmas Special Comedian Jeff Dunham performs a holiday-themed stand-up special with his friends. (FMC) Movie “A Christmas Carol” (1951, Fantasy) Alastair Sim. The ghosts of Christmas past, present and future show a miser the meaning of Christmas. (FOX) Ice Age: A Mammoth Christmas Sid travels to the North Pole after Manny convinces him he is on Santa’s naughty list. (NBC) Kelly Clarkson’s (Cautionary) Christmas Tale Kelly Clarkson learns the true meaning of Christmas while performing songs from her album.

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9 p.m. (FAM) Movie “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” (1989, Comedy) Chevy Chase. A man plays host to numerous dysfunctional relatives during the Christmas holidays. (HALL) Movie “The Christmas Ornament” (2013, Drama) Kellie Martin. A Christmas tree lot owner helps a widow face her first Christmas without her husband. (NBC) Michael Bublé’s 3rd Annual Christmas Special Grammy Award winner Michael Bublé will deliver some of his most popular songs. 10 p.m. (COM) Jeff Dunham’s Very Special Christmas Special Comedian Jeff Dunham performs a holiday-themed stand-up special with his friends. (FMC) Movie “A Christmas Carol” (1951, Fantasy) Alastair Sim. The ghosts of Christmas past, present and future show a miser the meaning of Christmas. 11 p.m. (TBN) Donnie McClurken Christmas Seasonal music. Thursday, December 26 11:20 a.m. (COM) Jeff Dunham’s Very Special Christmas Special Comedian Jeff Dunham performs a holiday-themed standup special with his friends. 2 p.m. (HALL) Movie “The Christmas Ornament” (2013, Drama) Kellie Martin. A Christmas tree lot owner helps a widow face her first Christmas without her husband. 3 p.m. (TBN) Christmas with a Capital “C” A man tries to rid his town of a 50 year old Christmas tradition. 6 p.m. (HALL) Movie “Twice Upon a Christmas” (2001, Family) John Dye. Santa’s daughter, Kristin Claus, has lost her memory and does not know who her father is. 7 p.m. (COM) Jeff Dunham’s Very Special Christmas Special Comedian Jeff Dunham performs a holiday-themed stand-up special with his friends. (FAM) Movie “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” (1989, Comedy) Chevy Chase. A man plays host to numerous dysfunctional relatives during the Christmas holidays. (TBN) King of Kings The Jews suffer under King Herod but the arrival of Jesus offers them hope. 8 p.m. (HALL) Movie “A Town Without Christmas” (2001, Drama) Patricia Heaton. A reporter and a novelist try to locate a child who wrote a disturbing letter to Santa. 9 p.m. (FAM) Movie “The Santa Clause” (1994, Comedy) Tim Allen. When a father mistakenly kills Santa Claus, he is magically recruited to take his place. 10 p.m. (HALL) Movie “The Christmas Blessing” (2005, Drama) Neil Patrick Harris. A man meets a young woman and little boy who are in need of miracles for the holidays. Midnight (FAM) Movie “The Santa Clause 2” (2002, Family) Tim Allen. After being Santa Claus for a few years, Scott Calvin must find a wife and help his son. (HALL) Movie “Karroll’s Christmas” (2004, Comedy) Tom Everett Scott. The Christmas ghosts end up at the wrong house and Allen Karroll is taken on a ride.

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12 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

A Christmas Carol: Evolution of a holiday classic

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"I have endeavored in this Ghostly little book, to raise the Ghost of an Idea, which shall not put my readers out of humor with themselves, with each other, with the season, or with me. May it haunt their houses pleasantly, and no one wish to lay it.”

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Gene Lockhart and Reginald Owen as Jacob Marley and Ebenezer Scrooge in 1938's A Christmas Carol

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contemplate our lives. In reading the story, we will hopefully assess whether we're living life to the fullest, living up to our potential and being kind and charitable toward others. Do we relate to Scrooge more easily than we do to Cratchit? If so, maybe we have some work to do. His intent is to inspire in a way that also entertains, and in this he succeeds. So much so that, 170 years later, millions of people are still entertained by versions of the Dickens classic every Christmas season. The earliest known film adaptation of Dickens' story was created in 1901. It's only about five minutes long, and you can actually watch it on YouTube if you're feeling ambitious. It's virtually impossible to track down every version of "A Christmas Carol" ever adapted for the screen, but trust me, there's a lot of them. Of all of the adaptations of "A Christmas Carol," there are a handful that stand out, and these versions constitute appointment television when they're aired each year during the Christmas season. First among them is the 1951 British film "Scrooge," starring Alastair Sim as the titular meanie. It was released in the U.S. as "A Christmas Carol" but failed to achieve the same level of success as it did in Britain. These days, though, it's equally popular on both sides of the pond and has attained the status of "classic." It's Sim's portrayal of the grouchy Scrooge that really sets this version apart. Scrooge is a difficult character to play seriously and believably – taking an audience with you on a life-changing night full of ghosts and time travel is no small task, and asking them to believe that Scrooge's sudden and mighty change of heart is honest and lasting is tougher still. But Sim does it with grace, subtlety and just the right amount of giddy humor. The film really captures the spirit of Dickens' story, and its status as a classic is well earned. In 2009, Disney released its latest version of "A Christmas

Carol," starring Jim Carrey, and it's the next film on my list of favorites. At first glance, Carrey seems a questionable casting choice – the most over-the-top, goofy comedian of our day playing the oh-so-serious and loathsome Ebenezer Scrooge? – but in the end, he really pulls it off. Part of his success can be attributed to the medium of the film. Motion-capture animation makes it possible for the character we see to mirror Jim Carrey's movements exactly, but also allows filmmakers to make adjustments where necessary. I don't know how many adjustments were made, but I know that not long into the film I'd forgotten it was Carrey I was watching and had lost myself in Dickens' classic tale. The scary ghost scenes are legitimately scary, and the awful Scrooge is legitimately deplorable in this version, which makes his redemption all the sweeter. This version is larger than life, and it's one that is sure to be part of many a Christmas tradition for years to come. Next on the list is another Disney classic, "Mickey's Christmas Carol" (1983). I recall watching this one on television every year growing up, and it's one I still look for today. This half-hour short was actually nominated for an Academy Award in 1983 (Best Animated Short), and for good reason. Condensing more than 80 pages of source material into a half-hour cartoon is a nearly impossible task, but this Mickey Mouse version hits every mark just right. It's clever and fun, and really manages to convey the spirit of Dickens' work. Plus, unlike the 2009 version, it's super kid-friendly. Not so kid friendly is 1988's "Scrooged." I know it's not the most faithful of adaptations, but it's just too good to be left off this list. Bill Murray is in top form as the cynical, cruel television executive, Frank Cross (the Scrooge character), who has squandered his chances for happiness in exchange for money and power. Cross is see CHRISTMAS page 13

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Christmas

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‘Tis the Season

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asked to oversee the broadcast of "A Christmas Carol," and ensuing events mirror the experiences of Scrooge in that film. Murray manages hilarity while still perfectly embodying the ruthless, heartless television exec. Murray makes Cross's miraculous change of heart just as funny as his earlier meanness, while at the same time keeping us engaged and invested in the redemption of his character. If you've ever liked Bill Murray in a comedy, this is the Christmas movie for you. Finally, my personal favorite is "The Muppet Christmas Carol." It was the first Jim Henson Productions film to be released after the death of Henson himself, and it's dedicated to his memory and the memory of fellow puppeteer Richard Hunt – a perfect tribute. The film lays out Dickens' story with a wonderful mix of feeling and humor (a combination the Muppets are exceptionally good at), and the usually very serious Michael Caine shines in his dramatic/comedic turn as Ebenezer Scrooge. The songs are catchy (you can't have a Muppet movie without catchy tunes), puns abound and penguins skate through the streets of London, yet there are also many misty-eyed moments, and Scrooge's journey has never been so fun or so touching. As with all Muppet films, there are plenty of shenanigans going on in the background – keep your eyes peeled for the kid in the Christmas marching band who clocks his neighbor with his trumpet, earning a head-butt and a scuffle for his efforts. That's the comedy gem that cracked us kids up every time we watched it (full disclosure: we still watch it every year, and the Muppet slapstick still gets us every time). This holiday season, 170 years after the story was first published, millions of households will sit down together to watch Dickens' story unfold, whether in black and white or in Muppet form. I think Dickens would be glad to know that his little story still "haunts our houses pleasantly" year after year. Check your Christmas listings and find out when your favorite version of "A Christmas Carol" airs, or maybe try watching a new one this year – the classic story is sure to get you in the Christmas spirit no matter how you experience it.

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Long Beach City College students collect items for an annual gift-giving campaign organized by the college’s Cooperative Agencies Resources for Education (CARE) program, which helps financially struggling, single-parent students.

Long Beach City College’s (LBCC) Cooperative Agencies Resources for Education (CARE) program’s annual gift-giving campaign in support of single-parent students took place on Dec. 7 with a holiday celebration at the Liberal Art Campus located at 4901 E. Carson St. at the Nordic Lounge next to the D Building lawn area. Parents and their children received special gift items collected from LBCC staff, faculty and students. Launched on Nov. 5, the CARE program collects shampoos, conditioner, lotions, soaps, scrubs, hair and spa products for students and toys for their children ages six-months to 12 years. LBCC students and the Long Beach community were encouraged to donate during the collection. “The campaign is a way for LBCC and the community to help single-parent students remain focused on their education and career goals and not worry about the holidays and some of life’s basic items,” said program specialist Deborah Boyle. “These students are trying to make a better life for themselves and their child(ren). We want them to know that we care and want them to succeed.” Students enrolled at LBCC, and who are part of the CARE program, are eligible. CARE assists Long Beach City College students who are low-income single parents in achieving their educational goals and transition from welfare to work. Murad Skincare, an El Segundo-based manufacturer of worldrenowned prestigious clinical skin health products, is a major contributor to the campaign. Murad has contributed over 200 items to enhance the quality of life for LBCC single parent students. “We appreciate the dedication and sacrifice parents who are on their own make to balance college life with family life,” said Hilarie Murad, president of the Murad Family Foundation. “For these parents, the stress of managing day-to-day life runs even higher during the holidays. Our company was founded on the idea that taking care of yourself first makes you better able to care for others. We are happy to do our small part in helping single parents feel a little more cared for and less stressed.” “We want our students who are parents to know they are supported in their goals and that LBCC is a community of sharing and giving, “ said Eric Borin, director of Extended Opportunities Program Services at LBCC. “We want to celebrate our students who are working through parenthood and their academics by giving them everyday items of use.” For more information, contact Boyle by calling (562) 938-4088.

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The Ghost of Christmas Present and Ebenezer Scrooge, both voiced by Jim Carrey, in Disney's 2009 adaptation of A Christmas Carol

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14 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Theater

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lives lived

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Jonathan harris 32 maria Camacho 87 mary Case 94 yolanda heys 101 gregory Johnson 48 evangelyn Lewis 91 elizabeth tracy 73 veda barken 72 roderick Clark 51 Lisa Abraham 48 Dorothy Cameron 87 Aaron Sandler 82 henry ompson 87 ernie holmes 54 roselie Day 88

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Designs of the new north Long Beach library depict an outside view of the facility that is expected to include an outdoor patio and space for public art.

its stamp of approval in April this year that a $16-million bond issued in 2010 by the City’s former redevelopment agency to fund the library’s construction was an enforceable obligation under the State’s redevelopmentdissolution law. “I’m very glad that it’s moving forward,” said Glenda Williams, director of the Long Beach public library system. “This community has been wanting this library for about the last 10 to 12 years. It’s getting so close. I’m very happy that we’ll be able to provide library services for that part of the community that really needs it.” At 24,500 square feet, the new library is expected to be the largest in the city and the newest branch in the north Long Beach area, which currently only has the North Neighborhood Library on Orange Avenue that was built in 1951, she said. Most libraries in Long Beach are about 7,000 square feet and

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historical artifacts of the theater by incorporating them into the new library. Certain elements of the historic Art Deco-style theater, including the spire, which resembles the famous RKO-Radio Pictures trademark, will be incorporated in the new library that has been designed by LPA, Inc., Jalali said. Local historic-building preservationists fought to save the now condemned and seismically outdated theater, which is a remnant of the golden era of “movie palaces.” The theater was designed by prominent Los Angeles architect Carl Boller and built by the Stivers Brothers, according to historical references. The theater has been closed and vacant since the 1970s. Jalali noted that the diamond at the top of the tower is in “a good condition” but the tower itself is in “a very poor condition.” Other pieces of the theater building, including the terrazzo floors and a fountain, will likely be put in an on-site display area, Jalali said. As far as the theater’s seats, he said they were transported to the Expo Building in Bixby Knolls. Though the seats got wet during a roof leak when it rained, Jalali said they are still in “pretty good condition” and will be incorporated into the Expo’s rehabilitation and may be used as seating for a teenage center at the new library. Jalali said he expects construction of the new library to take about 18 to 24 months to complete and work will start shortly after the City Council awards a contractor. He said all bids for the project should be in by April. Once completed, city officials expect the new north library to be a “focal point” for new developments in the community and the North Village business district. Jalali added, “This project will serve as a major catalyst and anchor for future development opportunities in the Uptown area.” ß

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SIGNAL TRIBUNE

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16 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

TST4513 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE APN: 7214009-025 T.S. No. 004322-CA PURSUANT TO CIVIL CODE Section2923.3 NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 6/26/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER On 12/27/2013 at 11:00 AM, CLEAR RECON CORP., as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 7/3/2007, as Instrument No. 20071587185, in Book XX, Page XX, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of CALIFORNIA executed by: CLARA D. PENROSE AND DOROTHY VINCIGUERRA, TRUSTEES OF THE PENROSE TRUST DATED NOVEMBER 15, 1995 AS AMENDED AND RESTATED ON AUGUST 17, 2006 WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, SAVINGS ASSOCIATION, OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE: IN THE AREA IN THE FRONT OF By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: COMPLETEL DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2500 EAST WILLOW STREET UNIT 110 SIGNAL HILL, CALIFORNIA 90755 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition, or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $338,267.19 If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if

PUBLIC NOTICES

applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (714) 730-2727 or visit this Internet Web site WWW.LPSASAP.COM, using the file number assigned to this case 004322-CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR SALES INFORMATION: (714) 730-2727 Date: 11/25/2013 CLEAR RECON CORP. 4375 Jutland Drive Suite 200 San Diego, California 92117 A-4429173 12/06/2013, 12/13/2013, 12/20/2013

TST4521 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 120080507 Doc ID #000144460582005N Title Order No. 12-0144187 Investor/Insurer No. 4000486999 APN No. 7215-026-053 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 01/18/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by ANGEL PULEX AN UNMARRIED MAN., dated 01/18/2006 and recorded 2/3/2006, as Instrument No. 06 0261893, in Book N/A, Page N/A, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, will sell on 01/14/2014 at 11:00AM, By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2218 OHIO AVE, SIGNAL HILL, CA, 90755. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $935,776.42. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on a property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code.

CITY OF SIGNAL HILL TST4522 NoTICE oF oRDINANCE ADoPTIoN

Ordinance No. 2013-11-1463 was adopted by the City Council at their meeting of Tuesday, December 17, 2013. A summary of the ordinance is as follows:

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL, CALIFORNIA, AMENDING CHAPTER 3.28 OF THE SIGNAL HILL MUNICIPAL CODE ENTITLED “CLAIMS AGAINST CITY” ADDING PROCEDURAL REQUIREMENTS FOR CLAIMS MADE AGAINST CITY IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE CALIFORNIA GOVERNMENT CODE AYES: NOES:

ABSENT:

ABSTAIN:

The ordinance was adopted by the following vote:

Mayor Michael J. Noll, Vice Mayor Edward H.J. Wilson, Council Members Larry Forester, Tina L. Hansen, Lori Y. Woods None

None

None

Pursuant to Signal Hill City Charter Section 315, this ordinance shall become effective thirty days from and after the date of its adoption. A certified copy of the full text of the ordinance is available in the City Clerk’s Office. Kathleen L. Pacheco City Clerk

Published in the Signal-Tribune newspaper on December 20, 2013. Posted at City Hall, Library, Discovery Well Park, and Reservoir Park on December 20, 2013.

The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 1-800281-8219 or visit this Internet Web site www.recontrustco.com, using the file number assigned to this case TS No. 12-0080507. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. DATED: 12/28/2012 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 9274399 By: Trustee's Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. A-4432477 12/20/2013, 12/27/2013, 01/03/2014

TST4520 APN: 7216-017-016 TS No: CA08000815-131  TO No: 1470214  NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED April 27, 2004. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.  On January 7, 2014 at 09:00 AM, behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA 91766, MTC Financial Inc. dba Trustee Corps, as the duly Appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded on May 7, 2004 as Instrument No. 04 1153794 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, executed by JUAN M. GOMEZ, JR AND CORINNA GOMEZ, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS COMMUNITY PROPERTY WITH RIGHT OF SURVIVORSHIP, as Trustor(s), in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as nominee for AMERICORP CREDIT CORP as Beneficiary, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of sale, that certain property situated in said County, California describing the land therein as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST    The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2315-2317 EAST 19TH STREET, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755   The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein.  Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the Note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said Note(s), advances if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust.  The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligations secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of this Notice of Trustee’s Sale is estimated to be $378,936.21 (Estimated). However, prepayment premiums, accrued interest and advances will increase this figure prior to sale. Beneficiary’s bid at said sale may include all or part of said amount. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the California Financial Code and authorized to do business in California, or other such funds as may be acceptable to the Trustee. In the event tender other than cash is accepted, the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustee’s Deed Upon Sale until funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a matter of right. The property offered for sale excludes all funds held on account by the property receiver, if applicable.  If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse.    Notice to Potential Bidders  If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a Trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a Trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien

being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same Lender may hold more than one mortgage or Deed of Trust on the property.  Notice to Property Owner  The sale date shown on this Notice of Sale may be postponed one or more times by the Mortgagee, Beneficiary, Trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about Trustee Sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call Priority Posting and Publishing at 714573-1965 for information regarding the Trustee's Sale or visit the Internet Web site address listed below for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case, CA08000815-13-1. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale.  Date: December 4, 2013 TRUSTEE CORPS  TS No. CA08000815-13-1  17100 Gillette Ave  Irvine, CA 92614  949-2528300    Joseph Barragan, Authorized Signatory  SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.priorityposting.com  FOR AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: Priority Posting and Publishing at 714573-1965  TRUSTEE CORPS MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT.  ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. P1073584 12/13, 12/20, 12/27/2013 

TST4512 / 2013 243257 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: THE BLACKBERRY PATCH COTTAGE, 9753 Flower St., Bellflower St., Bellflower, CA 90706. Registrant: GLORIA J. DYSON, 3313 Maine Ave., Long Beach, CA 90806. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Gloria J. Dyson. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on November 11, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on November 25, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 29, & December 6, 13, 20, 2013.

TST4508 / Case No. NS026913 oRDER To SHoW CAUSE FoR CHANGE oF NAME, SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, SOUTH DISTRICT, 275 Magnolia Ave., Long Beach, CA 90802. PETITION OF David Robert Stein, For Change of Name. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: 1. Petitioner DAVID ROBERT STEIN, filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name: DAVID ROBERT STEIN to Proposed Name: DAVID ROBERT MARTIN. 2. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, shy the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: January 7, 2014; Time: 8:30 A.M.; Dept. S26. The address of the court is the same as above. A copy of this Order to

DECEMBER 20, 2013

Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, THE SIGNAL TRIBUNE, 939 E. 27th. Street, Signal Hill, CA 90755: November 29, & December 6, 13, 20, 2013. ___//ss//___ Michael P. Vicencia, Judge of the Superior Court Dated: November 18, 2013

TST4515 / 2013 247745 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: MOONLIGHTNING MOTORIZED & PEDAL BIKES, 150 W. Lomita Blvd., Wilmington, CA 90744. Registrant: CARL BALLANTYNE, 150 W. Lomita Blvd., Wilmington, CA 90744. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Carl Ballantyne. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name in December, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on December 3, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: December 6, 13, 20, 27, 2013. TST4519 / 2013 252169 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: OLYMPIC CLEANERS, 2063 Pacific Ave., Long Beach, CA 90806. Registrant: 1. JAE SIK KIM, 2. KYUNG JA KIM, 19506 Fagian Way, Cerritos, CA 90703. This business is conducted by: a General Partnership. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Jae Sik Kim. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on March 15, 1990. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on December 10, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: December 13, 20, 27, 2013 & January 3, 2014.

TST4523 / 2013 256272 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: GREAT COMMISSION BAPTIST MISSIONS, 3332 Magnolia Ave., Long Beach, CA 90806. Registrant: PACIFIC BAPTIST CHURCH, 3332 Magnolia Ave., Long Beach, CA 90806. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Steve Meyers, President. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on November 5, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on December 16, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: December 20, 27, 2013 & January 3, 10, 2014.

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ST3529 - Dec. 20_Layout 1 12/20/13 8:58 AM Page 17

NEWS

DECEMBER 20, 2013

LB Council

continued from page 1

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

17

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In the Council Chamber at Long Beach City Hall, advocates in favor of increasing the salaries for food-service workers at the airport and convention center held up yellow signs calling for a “living wage” during the Dec. 17 City Council meeting. The Council voted in favor of asking the city attorney to draft an ordinance that would require airport and convention center concessionaire workers a higher minimum wage consistent with Measure N, a law passed last year by voters to mandate a $13-an-hour wage for workers in hotels with 100 rooms or more.

a living wage really does for the overall health and economic health of the city,” Garcia said. An ordinance would apply toward new contracts with current food-concession businesses at the airport and convention center if the contracts were renegotiated or amended in the future, a spokesperson for O’Donnell’s office confirmed Thursday. Fifth District Councilmember Gerrie Schipske also favored a hike in salary for airport and convention center concession workers. She said about 23 percent of the Long Beach population lives at or below the poverty line. “When people have to struggle and work two or three jobs just simply, simply to survive,” Schipske said, “that’s wrong. And in a city this size, I think…we are sending a very strong message.” There were a number of people who seemed to agree with the councilmembers during the comment period, however out of the handful of speakers on Tuesday, only one individual was directly affected by the Council action. Speaking through a Filipino-language translator, one man, who said he works for both the Hyatt Hotel and the Long Beach Convention Center, spoke of the disparity in the wages between his two jobs. At the hotel, he said he is paid $14 per hour, and at the convention center, he only earns $8.60 per hour. He added that, at the convention center, he doesn’t get vacation pay and doesn’t have medical benefits. Even though they weren’t directly affected by the proposed wage increase, a number of people in the Council Chamber who represented community and labor organizations sympathized with workers at the airport and convention center. A few spoke out. April Sanchez works in customer service in the coffee industry and attends California State University, Long Beach with a double major in sociology and communications studies. She says she used to live in Long Beach until she had an economic

hardship. Currently residing in San Pedro, the 28-year-old said in an interview Tuesday night that she wants to return to Long Beach. Sanchez is a part of the Long Beach Coalition for Good Jobs and a Healthy Community, an organization which has supported the wage hikes for the airport and convention workers and campaigned for Measure N in 2012. “Working [in] customer service, I can identify with the hardships of other lowwage workers,” Sanchez told the Council, “because I know firsthand how difficult it can be to put on a happy face and provide that outstanding customer service when I’m worried I won’t be able to make my rent for the month or even if I’ll be able to buy Christmas presents for my family.” Sanchez said she has been working at her job for three years, and even with annual raises and an anticipated promotion, she still earns “poverty-level wages.” Eric Tandoc is a member of the steering committee for the same coalition and also represents the Filipino Migrant Center in Long Beach. A 7th-district resident, Tandoc told the Council that he favored a wage increase for workers. He remembered how he and other volunteers campaigned throughout the city in support of Measure N. “The reason people support a living wage,” Tandoc said Tuesday, “is because they know that the alternative to a living wage is a poverty wage.” Only one individual at the Council meeting spoke out against Measure N. He said that while some individuals may be doing better after measure was passed, the initiative ordinance has decreased the number of jobs for hotel workers. “You know, considering that California is the worst business climate in all 50 states for three, four years running under the helm of Democrats,” he concluded, “I don’t think that we should be embracing a Democrat economic policy, which is all this is.” Adraft of the ordinance may be brought before the City Council by January or Feb-

ruary, City Attorney Charles Parkin confirmed Thursday in a telephone interview. In a second-reading vote, the Council also passed later that night two other ordinances relating to the airport and conventioncenter workers. One ordinance required food-service-concession businesses to sign labor-peace agreements with employee organizations. Another ordinance established worker-retention requirements, stating that it aimed to reduce employee turnover and workplace instability. ß

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EYE ON CRIME

Crimes reported by LBPD Council Districts 6, 7 & 8

Thursday, Dec. 12 Residential burglary 10:45am– 4300 block Cerritos Ave. Grand theft auto 4pm– PCH/MLK Bl.

Grand theft auto 8:30pm– 3900 block Virginia Rd. Grand theft auto 8:30pm– 4200 block Boyar Ave.

Friday, Dec. 13 Commercial burglary 7:30am– 4100 block Cherry Ave.

Sunday, Dec. 15 Grand theft auto 12:30pm- 1900 block Long Beach Blvd. Grand theft auto 8:30pm– Pepper Dr./Long Beach Blvd. Monday, Dec. 16 Recovered stolen vehicle 11:25am– 700 block W. Willow St. Crimes reported by SHPD Citywide

Thursday, Dec. 12 Residential burglary 8:30am– 1800 block Stanley Ave.

Recovered stolen vehicle 9:46am– 3200 block Lewis Ave.

Recovered stolen vehicle 10:03am– E. 33rd St./Lewis Ave. Petty theft 5:02pm– 700 block E. Spring St. Suspect in custody. Stolen vehicle 8:15pm– E. 21st St./Cherry Ave. Friday, Dec. 13 Grand theft; property 9:30am– 2100 block E. 21st St. Named suspect.

Nonsufficient funds; check 1:56pm– 2700 block Gundry Ave. Two named suspects.

Non-injury hit-and-run 2:30pm– 1700 block E. Willow St. Battery 8:14pm– 1900 block E. 20th St.

Saturday, Dec. 14 Identity Theft 2:30pm– 1800 block Orizaba Ave. Auto burglary 2:20pm– 2100 block E. Hill St.

Residential burglary 3:30pm– 1900 block Junipero Ave. Sunday, Dec. 15 DUI 2:40am– E. PCH/Temple Ave. Suspect in custody.

Residential burglary 11:32am– 2100 block E. Hill St. Residential burglary 2:45pm– 2100 block E. 21st St.

Stolen vehicle 5:22pm– 2200 block E. Willow St.

Sexual battery restrained person– felony 6:30pm– E. 19th St./Molino Ave. Named suspect. Monday, Dec. 16 Commercial robbery 10:58am– 700 block E. Spring St. Suspect in custody.

Tuesday, Dec. 17 Commercial burglary 3:52pm– 2400 block Cherry Ave. Three juvenile subjects in custody.

Wednesday, Dec. 18 Grand theft 12:07pm– 1400 block E. Willow St.

SIGNAL TRIBUNE’S FOCUS ON BUSINESS Name of Business: The Vape Depot Name of Owners: Mousa & Ramzy Rahib (brothers), Managed by Alex and Amanda Shor (husband & wife) Address: 2139 Bellflower Blvd, Long Beach CA 90815 Phone: 562-494-1442 Hours: M-Thurs: 10am till 8pm, Friday & Sat: 10am till 10pm, Sunday: 10am till 7pm What type of business: Electronic Cigarette Retail How long in business: Opened October of 2013 Unique features of business: Clean-cut and friendly staff, lounge area for games and electronic hookah rentals, movie nights on the big screen, electronic cigarette workshops with no sales pressure (advice and pep-talks are always free.) Non-threatening décor—we don’t look like a head shop! Our house E-liquid is 100% all natural and is made with kosher vegetable glycerin. What do you want your new customers to know: We carry a large inventory of devices and liquids and have something for everyone- from beginners to advanced users. We aren’t snobby about vaping—you want a rebuildable with ceramic wicks and high resistance coil on a variable voltage mod? That’s cool. You want a disposable? That’s cool too. We always have something on special and we also give discounts to college students, teachers, active military, police, and firefighters, and senior citizens. Website: www.thevapedepot.com Social networks: We’re on Facebook under the name “The Vape Depot.”

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CULTURE

18 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Imitating Life

DECEMBER 20, 2013

Posing questions for local artist Annie Clavel

Cory Bilicko Managing Editor

In 100 words or less, what you do as an artist? I’m an abstract painter. My preferred media are watercolor, acrylic and mixed media. I love color and movement.

What motivates you to create art? My current feelings. I love to bring to life short stories I have in my head by painting on canvas or paper. How has your practice changed over time?

I am influenced by Asian art as my father was half-Vietnamese. I like to simplify my composition.

Do you ever get artist’s block? If so, how do you combat it? It can happen when I feel depressed. I combat it by painting small watercolors.

What do you think your life would be like if, for some reason, you could no longer create art? Difficult to imagine. Life would be boring.

What role does the artist have in society? If I knew the answer, I very likely

Annie Clavel

wouldn’t be an artist myself.

How do you feel when people ask you to explain the meaning of your art? I’m not comfortable with it. It’s very personal. I don’t want to share about it except if the person asking is a close friend.

Have you ever been banned or censored to any degree as an artist? If so, how did you react? If not, how do you think you would react in that situation? Never. I would react violently.

Does your artistic life ever get lonely? If so, what do you do to counteract it? Yes, sometimes. I wait.

“Climax,” acrylic on canvas

What do you hope to achieve with your art? Personal achievement. What are one or two primary areas of fear for you as an artist? Not being able to express my feelings properly.

What are one or two factors that, when they’re in place, enable you to really flourish artistically?

“Flight,” watercolor on Yupo paper

Bookkeeping & Tax Services

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1640 E. Burnett Street Phone: 562-264-5114 www.MadKatInc.com “Departure,” acrylic on linen

Having to prepare many artistic events.

What jobs have you had other than being an artist? Mathematics teacher and marketing in an IT company.

What’s your favorite color? Blue.

To view more of Clavel’s work, visit annieclavel.com .

ST3529 - Dec. 20_Layout 1 12/20/13 8:58 AM Page 19

CULTURE LB Symphony Orchestra’s next free ‘Sounds & Spaces’ concert is Jan. 19

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

DECEMBER 20, 2013

Long Beach Symphony Orchestra’s (LBSO) latest installment of its free “Sounds & Spaces” series called “Classic American 2” returns to Farmers & Merchants Bank in downtown Long Beach next month. The performance is on Jan. 19 at 4pm. String-quartet music will be performed by the LBSO’s Roger Wilkie and Carrie Kennedy (violins) Colleen Sugata (viola) and Trevor Handy (cello). This year, Sounds & Spaces presents Joseph Haydn’s late Quartet in G Opus 76, No. 1, written during Haydn’s return to supervising musical life at Prince Esterhazy’s gilded Austrian palace, and Antonín Dvořák’s lyrical String Quartet No. 12, The American. According to LBSO, the historic Farmers & Merchants Bank building at 302 Pine Ave. is “one of Long Beach’s most stunning architectural and acoustical treasures” and the musical works will be “right at home in the exquisite architectural detail of the interior of the bank.” LBSO’s other Sounds & Spaces performances will take place at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church on Feb. 23, Temple Israel on March 23 and Homeland Cultural Center on May 18. MORE INFORMATION lbso.org

19

Courtesy LBSO

The Farmers & Merchants Bank in downtown Long Beach that was built in 1923 will be the site of Long Beach Symphony Orchestra’s free Sounds & Spaces series.

Courtesy LBSO

FoR RENT

The Farmers and Merchants Bank in downtown Long Beach is located at 302 Pine Ave.

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ST3529 - Dec. 20_Layout 1 12/20/13 8:58 AM Page 20

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

DECEMBER 20, 2013

20

Courtesy the Barretts

y p p a H ! s y a d Holi

Wrigley residents Ali Morgan Barrett and Darrell Barrett, who create their own authentic Christmas displays each year in front of their home at 434 W. 31st St., have decorated their residence with a theme they call “Neighborhood Flakes.” This year, the homeowners are encouraging visitors who drop by to view their display to also drop off non-parishable food items that will be donated to the Long Beach Rescue Mission (LBRM). Barrels for the collection are provided. For more information on what and how to donate, visit lbrm.org/how-you-can-help/needs .

(Below) Sharon, a participant at Ability First, shows off her newly completed ornament.

Washington Middle School Patriots smile for the photographer. Stephanie works on a holiday decoration with Ability First staff member Bryce Brahmbhatt at the Elks 888 holiday party.

Photos by Neena Strichart

Pho

District City College Long Beach ady to Trustees re Board of e. nu ve n Daisy A parade dow

Parade viewers enjoying the evening’s festivities

Jackie Robinson Academy on parade

to by Reuben Tolentin o American Gymnastics Ac ademy students perform their holiday spectacular on Dec. 14.

Signal Hill Police Chief Michael Langston trying to convince Santa that he belongs on the “nice” list

Tree and Menorah lighting took place in the parking lot of Nino's Ristorante on Friday, December 6 at the First Friday's event.


St3529 dec 20 layout 1