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“Delorean” watercolor on paper by Patrick Williams See page 18

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SERVING BIXBY KNOLLS, CALIFORNIA HEIGHTS, LOS CERRITOS, WRIGLEY AND THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

Vol. 35 No. 28

December 13, 2013

Your Weekly Community Newspaper

Signal Hill briefing explains health-benefit exchange, Affordable Care Act mandates

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Signal Hill Vice Mayor Ed Wilson (left) introduces Jasmin Ramirez, health educator for the nonprofit California Health Collaborative, who gave a presentation at the Council Chamber on Dec. 7 about the Affordable Care Act and what’s available through the state’s health-benefit exchange Covered California.

Sean Belk Staff Writer

Wrigley Area Neighborhood Alliance President Maria Norvell has been involved in keeping the Daisy Avenue Christmas Tree Lane Parade going for the last 25 years. This year, Christmas Tree Lane celebrates its 60th year. Sean Belk

During the holidays, leaves aren’t the only things that change on Daisy Avenue.

Staff Writer

For the past 60 years, the street in westside Long Beach has turned into a “winter wonderland,” creating the ideal setting for the only known holiday parade--- to take place in the center of a residential neighborhood instead of a business district. For just two weeks in December, a stretch of Daisy Avenue, from Pacific Coast Highway to Hill Street, in the historic Wrigley District, becomes Christmas Tree Lane, dazzling families from far and wide. A grassy median where railroad tracks once ran are filled with a long line of winter-themed displays, such as the Old Lady and the Shoe, a train, four English village-style houses and a church– some of which were first built in the 1950s. Towering above are two-dozen giant conifers that are lit up at night with hundreds of strings of lights. Nearly every home along the street is also decorated. But that’s not all. This Saturday, Dec. 14, starting at 5pm, marching bands and floats will take to the street in the annual Daisy Avenue Christmas Tree Lane Parade that starts at Burnett Street and heads to Pacific Coast Highway. The neighborhood’s transformation goes back six decades, said Maria Norvell, who has been involved in keeping the annual tradition alive for the past 25 years and is the president of the Wrigley Area Neighborhood Alliance (WANA), which in 2007 broke away from a competing neighborhood group called the Wrigley Association and eventually took over ownership of the authentic displays and decorations. The making of a tradition It all started when Wrigley resident Gertrude B. Whittle came up with the idea in 1953. With the help of residents, she successfully petitioned the City Council and Council of Churches to take out railroad tracks along Daisy Avenue and replace them with a grass strip, setting the stage for a “Christmas Village,” complete with houses, shops, trees with lights, a church and a nativity scene, according to Norvell. The City’s Parks and Recreation Commission had suggested putting shrubs on the median, but that decision was overturned with Sean Belk/Signal Tribune the help of then Councilmember Pat Ahern, Jim Trout, a member of the Wrigley Area Neighborhood Alliance, has been involved with Christmas Tree Lane on Daisy Avenue since 2002 Norvell said. That year, 24 tall cedar deodar and currently helps put up lights as well as set up and maintain the see PARADE page 14 authentic holiday displays.

A handful of local residents attended a presentation at the Signal Hill Council Chamber on Saturday, Dec. 7 to get an update on options available through Covered California, the state-run health-benefit exchange that was rolled out this year to help individuals comply with the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Jasmin Ramirez, a certified health educator for Fresno-based nonprofit California Health Collaborative, gave a Powerpoint presentation and answered questions on the new law that requires all legal citizens obtain health coverage by next year or face a penalty. Signal Hill Vice Mayor Ed Wilson, a certified public accountant who is running for the 40th State Assembly District next year, said the City organized the event

Experts, activists and union organizers call for affordable-housing and living-wage policies in Long Beach see HEALTH CARE page 17

Sean Belk Staff Writer

A panel discussion on jobs and housing in Long Beach on Monday, Dec. 9 quickly turned into a call to action directed at city officials and the public to support policies that proponents say would

see JOBS page 17

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

A panel on jobs and housing at Long Beach City College on Dec. 9 included (from left) Peter Dreier, Roya Babazadeh and Derek Smith.

December 17, 2013 Weekly Weather Forecast Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday

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improve working and living conditions in the city. The panel drew a crowd of about 100 people, many of whom were college students and faculty, to an auditorium at Long Beach City College’s Liberal Arts Campus. The event began with a speech by Jose Landino, a 29-year Long Beach

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DECEMBER 13, 2013


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DECEMBER 13, 2013

NEWS

LA County Supervisor Knabe lays out plans for remainder of term in State of the County address

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HELP SPREAD HOLIDAY CHEER What Food and toy drive Who McKenzie Mortuary Where 3843 E. Anaheim St. When Friday, Dec. 13 throughout the month of December More Info McKenzie Mortuary will be collecting donations throughout the holiday season. The mortuary will match donations, based on the monetary value of the donated items. Unused gift cards can also be donated. Donations can be dropped off at the funeral home, or pick-ups can be arranged. Call (562) 961-9301.

OVERDUE? What Library Fines Amnesty Month Who Signal Hill Library Where 1770 E. Hill St. When Friday, Dec. 13 through the month of December More Info The Signal Hill Library will waive all overdue fines during the month of December. DROP THE KIDS OFF What Parents’ Night Out Who City of Signal Hill Community Services Department Where Signal Hill Youth Center, 1780 E. Hill St. When Friday, Dec. 13 from 6:30pm to 10pm More Info Parents will be able to drop off their kids for a night of games, crafts and more. Cost is $15 per child. Pre-registration is required. Call (562) 989-7325.

ENJOY THE PAGEANTRY What Christmas pageant outdoor walk Who Local churches Where 5500 block of Wardlow Road to Bellflower Boulevard When Friday, Dec. 13 through Sunday, Dec. 15 from 7:30pm to 9pm More Info The route will begin at St. Cornelius Catholic Church, continue to the Neighborhood Church, back along Wardlow Road to St. Luke’s Lutheran Church and Long Beach Christian Reformed Church (LBCRC), and will end at University Baptist. Each church will have additional musical performances in their sanctuaries.

Courtesy Knabe’s Office

Fourth District Los Angeles County Supervisor Don Knabe gives his seventh State of the County address at the Long Beach Convention Center on Dec. 5. Sean Belk Staff Writer

In his seventh State of the County address, Fourth District Los Angeles County Supervisor Don Knabe gave a rundown of what he has planned for the next two years before he is termed out of office in 2016. During the fundraising luncheon at the Long Beach Convention Center on Thursday, Dec. 5, Knabe focused on some of the challenges he said the county faces, including the State’s “realignment” of criminals, mandates of the Affordable Care Act and lingering economic effects of the federal government shutdown. The supervisor, who was elected to the post 16 years ago, also declared a “bucket list” of things he plans to accomplish during his final term, focusing on “infrastructure,” “public/private partnerships” and “safety-net-services projects.” “When you’ve had the honor of being in this position as long as I have, and, as you see the end coming near, you almost start to panic a bit, because you think, ‘Wait a minute. There’s more to do. I want to get some things done,’” he said. “… I do have a list of projects and programs that I’m going to work on to get completed, hopesee KNABE page 4

LOOKING BACK What 60th anniversary celebration Who Long Beach Republican Women Federated Where Pacific Room at The Grand, 4101 E. Willow. When Saturday, Dec. 14 from 9:30am to 11:30am More Info A number of previous club presidents, local candidates, area elected officials and staff will join club members and associate members to celebrate the group's history in Long Beach. Visit Visit LongBeachRepublicanWomen.com .

FOR THE KIDDIES What Family holiday event Who California Heights United Methodist Church Where 3759 Orange Ave. When Saturday, Dec. 14 from 10am to noon More Info The event will include crafts, games, the nativity, and activities for children of all ages. Admission is free, but canned food items will be donated to the Long Beach Rescue Mission. Visit calheightsumc.org or call (562) 595-1996. SAY ‘CHEESE’ FOR ST. NICK What Free pictures with Santa Who Deforest Park Neighborhood Association and Alvarez Realty Where Deforest Park, 6255 Deforest Ave When Saturday, Dec. 14 from 11am to 3pm More Info This will be a free event for the residents of Deforest Part and the surrounding community. Call Javier Alvarez at (562) 318-4021.

‘TIS THE SEASON What Holiday party Who Democratic Women’s Study Club of Long Beach Where Polly’s Pies, 4680 E. Los Coyotes Diagonal When Saturday, Dec. 14 from noon to 2pm More Info The holiday party will be co-hosted by Congressman Alan Lowenthal, Senator Ricardo Lara, Assemblymember Bonnie Lowenthal, Vice-Mayor Robert Garcia, Councilmember Suja Lowenthal, Councilmember Patrick O’Donnell, Sunny Zia and Megan Kerr. A traditional turkey meal will be served. The cost is $10 for members and guests and $25 to attend and join or renew. Both men and women are welcome to attend the holiday party and become members of the DWSC. Call (562) 652-5600. THE WRITE STUFF What Holiday networking Who California Writers Club Where Los Altos Branch Library, 5614 E Britton Dr. When Saturday, Dec. 14 from 3pm to 5pm More Info The meeting will allow attendees to meet local writers. Attendees are encouraged to bring a dish for a potluck. Call (562) 400-1100 or visit calwriterslongbeach.org .

JUST KIDDING What Ugly Sweater Kidical Mass Neighborhood Bike Ride Who Hosted by the Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association Where Georgie’s Place, 3850 Atlantic Ave. When Sunday, Dec. 15 at 1pm More Info Kids and adults will bike for roughly two and a half miles, beginning at Georgie’s Place. Participants are encouraged to wear an ugly sweater to celebrate the holidays. Email krista@bixbyknollsinfo.com, visit bixbyknollsinfo.com/ kidicalmass.html or call (562) 595-0081.

FA-LA-LA-LA-LAAAA What Advent Celebration concert Who Friends of Music at California Heights United Methodist Church Where 3759 Orange Ave. When Sunday, Dec. 15 at 3pm More Info The concert will feature music groups Fire Within Us, the Chancel Choir, and Chancel Orchestra. The program will include “Gloria” by Boccherini and contemporary and traditional holiday selections. Visit calheightsumc.org or call (562) 595-1996. Freewill offerings will be accepted. Child care will be provided. HAPPY BIRTHDAY, SIGNAL HILL LIBRARY! What 85th anniversary celebration Who Signal Hill Library Where 1770 E. Hill St. When Tuesday, Dec. 17 from noon to 8pm More Info The library will be serving cake and beverages all day in honor of their 85th anniversary.

PARTY LIKE IT’S THE HOLIDAYS What Annual Community Holiday Party Who Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association Where Long Beach Petroleum Club, 3636 Linden Ave. When Thursday, Dec. 19 from 7pm to 10pm More Info The community celebration will feature live music from Mexico68 and Bearcoon, food, giveaways and an opportunity for association members and the community to meet, greet, mix, mingle and network. Entry will cost $5. Call (562) 595-0081or email info@bixbyknollsinfo.com.


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Knabe

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fully, by the time that I leave office in 2016.” Knabe announced plans to invest nearly $25 million in repairing more than 35 miles of damaged sidewalks and $45 million in upgrading county libraries in the Fourth District. He also discussed plans to build two community health clinics and a junior golf academy, in addition to committing to developing a direct transit connection to LAX Airport, expressing that he would make it a priority in discussions with Metro and federal transportation officials. Knabe also said he would continue his ongoing efforts to work with Long Beach and other cities in his district to

eradicate child-sex trafficking in Los Angeles County. Regarding the economy, Knabe said Los Angeles County’s economic condition has seen “steady improvement,” however he added that the 16day federal government shutdown by Congress may have derailed the recovery somewhat as consumer confidence hit a nine-month low. Knabe predicts fourth-quarter economic growth to “undoubtedly be kicked back a bit.” The supervisor added that the role of local government in the community should be “invisible” to residents. “Sometimes I think what people really want is invisible government,” he said. “You are safe in your home. You put the garbage out, and it is collected. You drive to work, and the

NEWS

streets have no potholes and the lights work. Your kids go to school, and they learn. You come home, and the playgrounds and parks are well maintained and safe. And if all of this is true, you don’t notice government. It’s invisible, and it works. That is what our County government is trying to do.” One of the main issues facing the county, however, is the State’s realignment process, which Knabe called a “shell game.” California shifted inmates to county jails after a federal judge deemed in 2009 that state prisons were overcrowded and as allegations surfaced that prisoners were living in unacceptable conditions. Knabe said that since the realignment was enacted, the number of inmates in the county’s jails have increased from 15,000 to 19,000. The

OPINION

State has also released 17,000 parolees in Los Angeles County, he said. On average, inmates are now serving about 20 percent of their sentences, Knabe said. However, he said the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors is focused on “ensuring that the most dangerous criminals serve their full sentences,” adding that the County is exploring options to construct facilities or lease jail beds to “house those who need to be behind bars so they aren’t roaming the streets.” The County Board also established a Jails Commission that has implemented 43 out of 60 recommendations last year, and the County also has recently appropriated $29 million to increase supervisions, add cameras and address issues raised by the

DECEMBER 13, 2013

Department of Justice, Knabe said. In terms of the Affordable Care Act, Knabe said the County’s goal is to have 300,000 uninsured individuals enroll in Healthy Way LA, the County’s insurance system. So far, 290,000 individuals have enrolled in a health-care plan through help from the County. He said, Los Angeles County has well over 2 million uninsured residents and the “largest population” of undocumented people in the country. This year, the Long Beach Area Chamber of Commerce, which hosted the event, increased its traditional event-proceeds donation from $10,000 to $50,000 with the extra funds going to seed scholarships for Safe Surrender children and the victims of childsex trafficking, according to a press release from Knabe’s office. ß

houghts from the Publisher T by Neena Strichart We’ve all heard of some pretty over-the-top holiday gifts given and received, but I have a reallife tale to tell about a present that puts all others to shame. And I have the pictures to prove it! Our very own Blair Cohn (executive director of the Bixby Knolls Business Association) pulled out all the stops this year to give a holiday surprise/gift to longtime girlfriend Alissa Sablan. Apparently, Blair did some pre-planning, took a leap of faith and proposed to darling Alissa in front of bazillions of parade participants. Grasping an interviewer’s microphone during the parade, Blair got down on one knee right there on 2nd Street and popped the question! Looking surprised and then totally shocked, Blair’s beloved regained her composure and answered in the affirmative. Lucky for him, she agreed, because there are loads of photos on the Internet documenting the proposal and her acceptance! Congratulations, Blair and Alissa. May life never rain on your parade. Speaking of parades, I found a few quotations on the subject that I thought you would enjoy. “Parades should be classed as a nuisance, and participants should be subject to a term in prison.” –Will Rogers, entertainer

Thinking forwardly, or foolishly?

“And when it rains on your parade, look up rather than down. Without the rain, there would be no rainbow.” –G. K. Chesterton, essayist

“Lots of times you have to pretend to join a parade in which you're not really interested in order to get where you’re going” – Christopher Morley, American writer

Neena R. Strichart

Blair pops the question to Alissa

Photo by Justin Rudd

“One must either take an interest in the human situation or else parade before the void.” – Jean Rostand, French historian

“I tell you, if you're in the front row of the parade and you stop walking, pretty soon you’re back in the tuba section. And if you want to lead the parade you’ve got to keep moving.” – Phil McGraw, television’s Dr. Phil

LETTERS AND EMAIL

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Stephen M. Strichart

STAFF WRITERS

CJ Dablo Sean Belk CULTURE WRITERS

Photo by Blair Cohn

“Group conformity scares the pants off me because it’s so often a prelude to cruelty towards anyone who doesn’t want to– or can’t– join the Big Parade.” – Bette Midler, entertainer

an increase in City staff to meet the need in the Finance Department and the City Manager’s office to properly interpret and plan to forecast and implement city budgets. If passed, every department, Public Safety, Public Works, Community Services and Development would be impacted by the inability to function at current high levels of quality, if there are changes in the local/state/national economy. Incentives traditionally offered for new development would be on hold, pending an election and approval. This city does not survive on property-tax revenue; it is the 66 percent of sales-tax revenue that is the backbone of Signal Hill’s economy. Future business ventures could be impacted by delay in the City’s ability to offer traditional incentives until another election would occur. Competing cities might possibly take advantage of this to increase their efforts to lure this growth to their city. No other city in the state of California has similar requirements for voter approval for administering revenue sources and methods. Would this way of running our currently very fiscally responsible city make Signal Hill become known as incredibly forward-thinking, or incredibly foolish? Louise Cunningham Signal Hill

A proposed city charter amendment has been proposed as the [Right to] Know and Vote initiative. This will be put to voters at the June 2014 special election. This issue is important to every citizen in the city of Signal Hill. Traditionally, only a fraction of those people vote. It is crucial that this pattern not be followed in deciding the Know and Vote initiative’s fate. I attended the City Council meeting and heard the independent consultant’s summary of his extensive survey, done without city staff guidance, reporting his conclusions as to how it would affect the city. I have also reviewed this information, which is available on the Signal Hill city website, along with supporting documentation. The Signal Tribune has also published considerable information on this issue. The following are my personal impressions about this Charter change. There will be continual impact on every one of us by requirement for a special election for every possible change in taxes, assessments and fees. According to my understanding, the increase would require 66 percent of voter approval. Note: All these revenue streams would “sunset” in 10 years, requiring complete resubmission for a new voter approval. Each election would cost approximately $75,000, as well as an estimated $18,000 for additional election procedures to be in place. These additional costs would accrue from the need for PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

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Daniel Adams Vicki Paris Goodman Gregory Spooner

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[Ed. note– Cunningham is a Parks and Recreation commissioner for the City of Signal Hill.]

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ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS

Barbie Ellisen Ashley Goodsell COLUMNISTS

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The Signal Tribune welcomes letters to the editor, which should be signed, dated and include a phone number to verify authenticity. Letters are due by noon on the Tuesday before desired publication date. The Signal Tribune reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, language and space requirements. Letters should be 400 words or less. The Signal Tribune will publish no more than one “pro” letter and one “con” letter on a particular topic in a single issue. The Signal Tribune does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other publications or otherwise presented in a public forum. Letters to the editor and commentaries are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Signal Tribune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, letters to the editor and commentaries are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. Letter-writers will be identified by their professional titles or affiliations when, and only when, the editorial staff deems it relevant and/or to provide context to the letter. We do not run letters to the editor submitted by individuals who have declared their candidacies for public office in upcoming races. This policy was put in place because, to be fair, if we publish one, we would have to publish all letters submitted by all candidates. The volume would no doubt eliminate space for letters submitted by other readers. Instead, we agree to interview candidates and print stories about political races in an objective manner and offer very reasonable advertising rates for those candidates who wish to purchase ads. The Signal Tribune is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. Yearly subscriptions are available for $50.

939 E. 27th St., Signal Hill, CA 90755 (562) 595-7900

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COMMUNITY

LBPD, LBPF toy drive seeking donations

The Long Beach Police Department (LBPD), in partnership with the Long Beach Police Foundation (LBPF), has begun their annual “Toy Patrol” holiday toy drive and are collecting donations of new, unwrapped toys from individuals and businesses to be distributed to children in need throughout Long Beach. The delivery caravan will take place on Saturday, Dec. 21 and will be a joint effort with the Long Beach Fire Department’s “Spark of Love” toy drive. Officers come into contact with families and children every day who are less fortunate due to circumstances beyond their control, and police employees with firsthand knowledge of a family in need must submit the family’s information to the program for consideration, according to the LBPD. No outside referrals will be accepted. Collection boxes can be found at the following police facilities, as well as all City of Long Beach libraries, all Farmers & Merchants bank branches in Long Beach and in businesses throughout the city.

Police headquarters, 400 West Broadway East Division, 4800 Los Coyotes Diagonal North Division, 4891 Atlantic Ave. West Division, 1835 Santa Fe Ave.

Each year, there is a greater need of toys for boys and girls ages 12 and up. The LBPF, which is a a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, will also accept monetary donations and/or gift cards. Donations may be mailed to LBPF, P.O. Box 15418, Long Beach, CA 90815. (“Toy Patrol” should be indicated on the memo line.) For more information, call (562) 570-7210. Source: LBPD

Junior League to host mixers for recruiting new members

The Junior League of Long Beach (JLLB) will host two newmember mixers, one this month and another in January. The purpose of the mixers is to provide information for “women of all ages who want to make a difference in their community through interesting volunteer projects, as well as receive invaluable leadership opportunities and training,” according to a press release from JLLB, which is a women’s volunteer and training organization dedicated to serving children and their families. While JLLB has a variety of community programs, the organ-

ization is currently focusing on adolescent self-esteem with an emphasis on combating bullying through character development and life skills, according to the organization. Other projects include providing nutritional information and educational fun at the annual Kids in the Kitchen event, hosting literacy nights and book giveaways at local schools, providing comfort bags for young crime victims and holding self-esteem seminars for pre-teen girls. In addition, members receive handson training in a variety of areas, including group leadership, volunteer leadership, event planning

and public speaking among others. Attire for the mixers is business casual. Light refreshments will be served. The first mixer will be on Wednesday, Dec. 18 from 6:30pm to 8:30pm at La Palapa del Mar restaurant by the Belmont Plaza Pool, 4020 Olympic Plaza, in Belmont Shore. The second will be on Wednesday, Jan. 8 from 6:30pm to 8:30pm at Lola’s Mexican Cuisine, 2030 E. 4th St. To RSVP or for more information, email newmember@jllb.org. MORE INFORMATION jllb.org

Giving Santa the boot Kenneth McKenze Columnist

I was reaching the age when I was beginning to doubt that Santa Claus was real. It was the day before Christmas Eve, and since our entire family would be joining us at our house for Christmas Day, there were plenty of chores for each of us to do. My brother and I were assigned to haul a heavy chain up onto the roof and lower it into the chimney, in order to loosen the heavy build-up of soot and ash. This of course had to be done just a day before company arrived. My brother and I went down into the house to shovel out the debris into old Tab soda boxes, followed by burying the ash in the pasture. The ash covered our shoes, and you could clearly see the outline of our sneakers on the floors from the numerous trips that we made in and out of the house. My mother told me to make sure that I opened and closed the flue several times so that any collected debris would fall down. While I was doing my final inspection, I noticed how narrow the opening was and thought, “There is no way that man (Santa) can fit in here!” I, taking responsibly for all children across the world, decided to shut the flue and leave it shut! In my mind, my brave act would prove that there was not a creepy old man dressed in bright colors, wedging his way down chimneys. I mean, really, how stupid did adults think we were? I knew it was my parents or my grandparents sneaking presents in from their hiding places. I just knew it! On Christmas morning, the four

A Matter of Life

of us ran upstairs, our feet coming in contact with merely three of the 16 steps. On other days, Mom would always yell to us, “Don’t gather up the stairs!” Christmas morning was the only time we had an unspoken clearance to “gather.” When we emerged from the top of the stairs, we found a room full of presents. Then, collectively we noticed large boot prints of ash coming out of the fireplace, across the entire room and then again back to the fireplace. I immediately ran over and looked up into the chimney to find that the flue had been opened!

Feeling defeated, I kept the fact that I was trying to debunk Santa to myself. Years later, my mother shared with me that she had been watching me from the kitchen that day and could actually see my mind twirling as I was deep in thought, preparing for my brave undertaking. So in response, Mom took a pair of Dad’s 15½-size boots, dabbed them in ash and walked them one-by-one onto the carpet...after of course opening the flue. Kenneth McKenzie is the owner of McKenzie Mortuary in Long Beach.

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Downtown Residential Council mixer to serve as sock drive for needy

The Downtown Residential Council (DRC) will host a holiday mixer, its final quarterly forum for the year, at The Federal Bar, 102 Pine Ave., on Monday, Dec. 16 at 7pm. The event is free and open to the public, and it will be held in the new speakeasy vault event space located at the lower level of the restaurant. Sponsored by the Downtown Long Beach Associates, the holiday mixer will include the announcement of the new Downtown Residential Council Executive Committee board members, who will begin their terms in January 2014: Joe

Ganem, president; Mike Dunfee, vice-president; Dianne McNinch, treasurer; Patty Lund, secretary; Eric Carr, immediate past president. The DRC’s charity cause this holiday season is to support the Ocean Residents Community Association’s (ORCA) sock drive benefiting those in need in Long Beach. The goal this year is to collect 10,000 pairs. Mixer attendees are encouraged to bring socks to the Dec. 16 event to contribute to the sock drive. For more information, contact Eric Carr, president, DRC at ericcarr@longbeachdrc.com .

Metro Briefs

GATEWAY CITIES

Go Metro for the Holidays Discover dozens of holiday discounts around town with Metro. Whether you’re shopping, dining or enjoying a show, your TAP card can help you save! And through December 20, you can also enter the “12 Days of Metro” Instagram contest for a chance to win exclusive prizes. See the list of discounts and contest rules at metro.net/holidays.

New Metro Bus Schedules December 15 Metro’s annual bus service adjustments take e=ect soon. Minor changes to improve e;ciency and e=ectiveness are coming to routes 60, 120, 167, 577 and the Metro Silver Line. Find the new timetables aboard buses in December or at metro.net.

Holiday Eve Free Fares Enjoy the holidays safely, with free service on all Metro buses and trains during Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve. No fare will be charged from 9pm on Tuesday, December 24, until 2am Wednesday, December 25 and from 9pm on Tuesday, December 31, until 2am on Wednesday, January 1. See routes and timetables at metro.net.

Get free credit for Metro ExpressLanes Help your friends and family get through tra;c faster using Metro ExpressLanes. Right now, receive $10 in toll credit for every new sign-up you refer. The lanes are toll-free for carpools, vanpools and motorcycles, and available for a toll to single drivers. All you need is a FasTrak ® transponder. Open your account today at metroexpresslanes.net.

Get Metro service alerts on Twitter Metro service information is available instantaneously on Twitter at @MetroLAalerts. Get up-to-the-minute event detour updates, maintenance notices or holiday schedule reminders. Be the >rst to know by following twitter.com/metrolaalerts.

metro.net @metrolosangeles facebook.com/losangelesmetro

SHOP LOCALLY • DINE LOCALLY Support businesses in your neighborhood!

–A reminder from the Signal Tribune

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DECEMBER 13, 2013


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NEWS

DECEMBER 13, 2013

SHPD officer retires after 26 years of service Congressmember Lowenthal introduces legislation honoring

Signal Hill Police Officer Al Spiegel will end his 26-year tenure with the department on Monday, Dec. 16. Spiegel began his career with the Signal Hill Police Department (SHPD) in 1987 when he was appointed as a dispatcher/jailer. He was appointed as a reserve police officer in 1987 and as a police officer in 1996. During his career, Spiegel has served as a field training officer, bike patrol officer and traffic officer. As a field training officer, he has trained many of the existing Signal Hill police officers and has been the recipient of dozens of awards and commendations, according to SHPD. At the Dec. 3 City Council meeting, Al Spiegel Spiegel received several proclamations and letters acknowledging his years of service to the residents and businesses of Signal Hill. The proclamations came from U.S Sen. Barbara Boxer, U.S. Congressmember Alan Lowenthal, State Sen. Ricardo Lara, California Assemblymember Bonnie Lowenthal, LA County Supervisor Don Knabe and the Signal Hill City Council. “Twenty-six years is a long time to survive doing any activity,” said SHPD Chief Michael Langston. “It is quite an accomplishment to have over 26 years of dedicated law-enforcement service.” Source: City of SH

Human Rights Day, Universal Declaration of Human Rights Alan Congressmember Lowenthal on Dec. 10 introduced a House resolution that honors the 65th anniversary of Human Rights Day and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), which has roots that go back to 1948. “Whether it is negotiating trade agreements between countries, promoting democracy at home and abroad or combating discrimination based on race, gender or sexual orientation and gender identity, human rights play a critical role in our everyday lives and the lives of people around the world,” Lowenthal said. “The Congress and the world must recognize that those who are denied basic human rights, such as the freedoms of speech and religious or political expression, are therefore denied an opportunity to be treated with respect and with dignity.” “Since taking office in January, I have worked tirelessly to promote human rights around the globe and to ensure we put pressure on many of the worst violators of basic human rights. Sadly, the government of Vietnam continues to be one of the worst offenders by blatantly refusing to respect the rights its own people are entitled to. I

hope that this resolution serves as a signal to countries around the world, including Vietnam, that the United States will continue to stand for the basic rights of all human beings, no matter where they may live.” Lowenthal is a member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, whose jurisdiction includes U.S. foreign policy. As declared by the State Department, the promotion of respect for human rights as embodied in the UDHR is a central goal in the leadership the United States plays around the world. The UDHR, championed by Eleanor Roosevelt, represents the first comprehensive international agreement about the specific rights and freedoms of all human beings. To date, the UDHR holds the Guinness World Record for most translated document, with over 416 different translations, representing the universal sharing of respect for human rights. “The rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights uphold the same basic principles of liberty and freedom enshrined within the United States Constitution and Bill of Rights. This Resolution, supported by dozens of my col-

leagues, will shed a much needed light on the importance and protection of human rights in our global society.” This legislation currently has the support of more than 40 members of Congress, including 27 California Representatives: Reps. Karen Bass, Tony Cardenas, Jim Costa, Judy Chu, Susan Davis, Anna Eshoo, Sam Farr, John Garamendi, Janice Hahn, Mike Honda, Jared Huffman, Barbara Lee, Zoe Lofgren, Doris Matsui, Jerry McNerney, Grace Napolitano, Gloria Negrete McLeod, Scott Peters, Raul Ruiz, Linda Sanchez, Loretta Sanchez, Brad Sherman, Jackie Speier, Eric Swalwell, Mike Thompson, Juan Vargas, and Henry Waxman. As a member of the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission, the Congressmember’s legislation upholds the Commission’s mission, which is to promote, defend and advocate internationally recognized human rights norms in a nonpartisan manner, both within and outside of Congress, as enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other relevant human rights instruments. Source: Alan Lowenthal’s office

Apartment deemed uninhabitable after LBPD extinguishes building fire

The Long Beach Fire Department (LBFD) responded to reports of a residential structure fire on the morning of Dec. 11, according to the LBFD. The LBFD received calls just after midnight for an apartment fire in the 2600 block of East 56th Way. First-arriving fire-department resources encountered a fire in a second-floor unit and initiated an aggressive fire attack, according to LBFD Capt. Jim Arvizu. Fire-

fighters were able to confine the fire to the kitchen area, but the apartment was determined to be uninhabitable. A female resident was treated and released at the scene for an asthma attack. The family is being assisted by the Red Cross.

Source: LBFD


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NEWS

DECEMBER 13, 2013

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

SHPD to conduct DUI checkpoint

LBPD arrests former officer, gang member brother to Robinson’s brother-in-law. After Jones received the information, he passed it on to the leaders of the gang, LBPD said. In July 2012, Robinson was placed on administrative leave, stripped of her police powers and removed from her position as a police officer, while the police department conducted an administrative investigation. Upon conclusion of the administrative investigation, Robinson’s employment was terminated on March 7, 2013. The case was submitted to the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Justice System Integrity Division, who reviewed it and filed criminal charges. The complaint includes 21 overt acts showing the conspiracy between Robinson and Jones. The District Attorney’s Office subsequently issued arrest warrants for Robinson and Jones. On Thursday, Dec. 5, Long Beach Police arrested Robinson, 42 years old, in Carson, and arrested

Jones, 24 years old, in Long Beach. They were booked into the Los Angeles County Jail on $60,000 bail, pending their arraignment. Both posted bail on Dec. 6. “Police-department employees are held accountable to the highest standards, and the department takes immediate action to address employee misconduct,” said Police Chief Jim McDonnell. “It is extremely disappointing when the behavior of one individual undermines the public trust that this Department works so hard to uphold. We will not tolerate actions that dishonor the badge that we wear so proudly. The men and women of our department work diligently every day to do the right thing and to provide excellent service to our community. The acts of the one shouldn’t outweigh the acts of the many.”

The Signal Hill Police Department (SHPD) Traffic Unit will conduct a DUI/driver license checkpoint on Saturday, Dec. 14 at an undisclosed location within the city limits between the hours of 8:30pm and 2:30am. Officers will be looking for signs of alcohol and/or drug impairment while checking drivers for proper licensing. When possible, specially trained officers will be available to evaluate those suspected of drug-impaired driving. Funding for this checkpoint is provided by a grant from the California Office of Traffic Safety, through the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Source: SHPD

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Source: LBPD

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The Long Beach Police Department (LBPD) arrested Yvonne Robinson, a former Long Beach police officer, and Prentice Jones, a member of a criminal street gang, for conspiracy to obstruct justice with a enhancement of knowingly aiding a criminal street gang on Dec. 5. On June 13, 2012, the LBPD had announced the arrest of 16 members of the Baby Insane Crip criminal street gang for a variety of criminal charges. These included charges against two members who were involved in the Long Beach murder of 19-year-old Frank Castro in November 2009. During the course of that investigation, detectives learned that someone in the gang was being provided details of the murder investigation to aid the suspects involved in that case. The leaked information appeared to come from someone within the police department, and a full-scale criminal investigation was launched, according to LBPD. Detectives worked to identify the source and to determine how much information was leaked. In May 2012, they learned the individual providing the information was Robinson, a detective in the Youth Services Section of the Investigations Bureau. Although Robinson was a fellow officer, detectives investigated her and thoroughly examined all leads in the case, according to LBPD. In order for detectives to gather evidence to prove Robinson’s role in the crime, she was placed under surveillance. Over the course of several months, detectives were able to gather sufficient evidence to determine that she was utilizing her position as a detective to review police reports and provide information to Jones, a known gang member and

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8 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

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Ebenezer Scrooge: "A Christmas Carol"

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Stripe: "Gremlins" (1984)

"Gremlins" isn't on everyone's list of favorite Christmas films, but it's become a holiday cult classic. Stripe is the main baddie, a gremlin born of the hero, Gizmo, when he accidentally gets wet. As everyone knows, getting a Mogwai wet causes them to multiply ... and feeding them after midnight turns them into the nasty and wild reptilian creatures known as Gremlins. Stripe leads his band of Gremlins as they rip through town, destroying anything they like, attacking people and causing mischief everywhere. Stripe is a diabolical little demon, irredeemable,

holiday stories, even The Mean One is redeemed in the end. After witnessing an outpouring of love and camaraderie by the Whos of Whoville – despite the fact that their Christmases were literally stolen from them – "the Grinch's small heart grew three sizes," prompting him to return all of the Christmas loot he had stolen, and help the Whos celebrate the best Christmas ever.

unlike most of the characters on this list, which may be why he's so appreciated as a villain.

The Abominable Snow Monster: "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" (1964)

The story of Rudolph is essentially a tale of misfits finding a place where they can be themselves and be loved for it. The whole business with the Abominable Snow Monster is quite dramatic for a kids' special: the snow monster kidnaps Rudolph's family, so the misfits lure the monster out of his cave, knock it unconscious and pull out all of its teeth (good thing they had an aspiring dentist with them). When the beast awakens, the heroic prospector, Yukon Cornelius, and his sled dogs chase the monster over a cliff, the whole lot of them going over after him. Scary, no? But, this being a Christmas special, that can't be the whole story. Cornelius ultimately manages to tame the snow monster, teaching him how to place stars atop Christmas trees – a very useful skill in a land where Christmas is the sole industry.

Mr. Oogie Boogie: "The Nightmare Before Christmas" (1993)

Tim Burton's stop-motion animated classic is unique in its ability to suit Halloween and Christmas seasons alike. Jack Skellington, the misguidedbut-ultimately-redeemed protagonist, has Santa abducted so he can take his place and know what it's like to spread joy. Unfortunately, the scheming Mr. Oogie Boogie gets a hold of the jolly old man, and the villain sets out to play a dangerous game with Santa's life. Mr. Oogie Boogie represents the darkest places within ourselves, and Jack defeats his own demons by getting rid of this evil schemer.

The Grinch: "Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas" (2000)

This furry green jerk has become the epitome of holiday villains. Unlike Ebenezer Scrooge, we never find out why the Grinch is so cranky that he seems to hate Christmas just for the sake of hating Christmas. But, like most good

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The Grinch in Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas (1966 animated version)

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10 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Friday December 13 noon (TRaveL) Jingle Brawls we crisscrossed america to find the most amazing Christmas celebrations imaginable. 2 p.m. (fOOd) Cupcake wars four bakers compete to have their cupcakes at the opening night of The nutcracker. (haLL) Movie “Cancel Christmas” (2010, family) Judd nelson. Santa must teach two incorrigible children the importance of charity. 3 p.m. (fOOd) Cupcake wars four bakers battle for a place among the stars at the hollywood Christmas Parade. (GaC) all Out american Christmas homeowners go above and beyond traditional decor to create over-the-top holiday displays. 4 p.m. (faM) winnie the Pooh and Christmas Too! Pooh and Piglet play Santa when their Christmas letter doesn’t make it to the north Pole. (haLL) Movie “a very Merry Mix-up” (2013, Romance) alicia witt. a woman forms a bond with a family that she is accidentally landed with over the holidays. 8 p.m. (haLL) Movie “a holiday engagement” (2011, Comedy) haylie duff. a woman hires a man to come home and pretend to be her fiancé over the holidays. (hGTv) Celebrity holiday homes Kendra, Kathy najimy and Tiffani Thiessen get their homes decorated for Christmas. (Life) Movie “dear Secret Santa” (2013, drama) Tatyana ali. a woman receives Christmas cards from an admirer she believes to be someone who’s passed. 10 p.m. (haLL) Movie “The Christmas Card” (2006, drama) edward asner. Moved by an anonymous Christmas card, Captain Cody Cullen searches for the card’s sender. (Life) Movie “dear Santa” (2011, drama) amy acker. a young woman finds a letter from a girl asking for a new wife for her dad. Midnight (Life) Movie “dear Secret Santa” (2013, drama) Tatyana ali. a woman receives Christmas cards from an admirer she believes to be someone who’s passed. Saturday December 14 10 a.m. (faM) Movie “Mickey’s Once upon a Christmas” (1999, Children) wayne allwine. donald duck and his nephews wish for Christmas every day. Goofy shows Christmas spirit. 10:30 a.m. (fOOd) Trisha’s Southern Kitchen Trisha’s friend and her daughters prepare cookies for the annual holiday cookie swap. 10:45 a.m. (TBS) Movie “dr. Seuss’ Cat in the hat” (2003, family) Mike Myers. a mischievous cat visits siblings when their mother leaves them home alone.

11:30 a.m. (faM) Movie “Mickey’s Twice upon a Christmas” (2004, family) voices of wayne allwine. Mickey, Minnie and Santa Claus attempt to teach donald the true meaning of Christmas. noon (fOOd) Rachael Ray’s easy holiday feast Rachael shares a festive meal for a crowd with everything but the stress. (haLL) Movie “The Santa Switch” (2013, family) ethan erickson. a man is given the gift of being Santa this year and he finds himself with new powers. (Life) Movie “On Strike for Christmas” (2010, family) daphne zuniga. a mother goes on strike when all her family takes her for granted at Christmas time. 1 p.m. (faM) Mickey’s Christmas Carol The three ghosts of Christmas visit Scrooge Mcduck to teach him the spirit of the holiday. 2 p.m. (TBn) Movie “a Christmas wish” (2010, family) Kristy Swanson. a woman, left destitute by her husband, faces a bleak Christmas with her children. 3 p.m. (TRaveL) Christmas Crazy we dash from coast-to-coast to find the most decked-out holiday homes and stores. 4 p.m. (haLL) Movie “november Christmas” (2010, drama) John Corbett. neighbors band together to create halloween and Christmas moments for a sick girl. 6 p.m. (haLL) Movie “The Christmas Card” (2006, drama) edward asner. Moved by an anonymous Christmas card, Captain Cody Cullen searches for the card’s sender. (Life) Movie “Christmas in the City” (2013, family) John Prescott. a woman tries to bring out the true meaning of Christmas before it’s too late. 7 p.m. (fOOd) Cupcake wars four bakers battle for a place among the stars at the hollywood Christmas Parade. (TLC) extreme Christmas Trees Captures the anticipation, excitement and joy embodied by the ultimate Christmas icon. 8 p.m. (aBC) The Great Christmas Light fight Twenty families from across america decorate their homes to the extreme for Christmas. (CBS) Rudolph the Red nosed Reindeer a young reindeer and an elf search for a home where they will be accepted as they are. (fOOd) Cupcake wars four bakers compete to have their cupcakes at the opening night of The nutcracker. (nBC) Movie “it’s a wonderful Life” (1946, drama) James Stewart. an angel shows a suicidal banker how important he has been in the lives of others. (TBn) Movie “Love’s Christmas Journey” (2011, Romance) ellie davis. a woman’s brother goes missing while she’s visiting him during the Christmas holiday. 9 p.m. (aBC) CMa Country Christmas

DECEMBER 13, 2013

Country’s biggest superstars join together to celebrate the holidays. (CBS) frosty the Snowman Pursued by a greedy magician and rising temperatures, frosty sets off for the north Pole. (TLC) invasion of the Christmas Lights visit Christmas lighting enthusiasts and see their glorious and elaborate displays. 9:30 p.m. (CBS) frosty Returns a little girl tries to keep frosty from melting when a snow-removing spray is invented. 10 p.m. (haLL) Movie “Silver Bells” (2005, drama) anne heche. a widower and a young woman help each other to put their painful pasts behind them. (Life) Movie “a Snow Globe Christmas” (2013, Romance) Christina Milian. a woman wakes up in a snow globe; trying to escape she begins to find happiness. (TLC) invasion of the Christmas Lights visit six homes in the u.S. where wizards of light put on holiday displays that dazzle. 11 p.m. (TBn) The Collingsworth family

Christmas music. Midnight (haLL) Movie “november Christmas” (2010, drama) John Corbett. neighbors band together to create halloween and Christmas moments for a sick girl. (TBn) The Christmas Box a heartwarming story about the true spirit of Christmas is a testament to family values. Sunday December 15 10 a.m. (haLL) Movie “The Christmas Pageant” (2011, Comedy) Melissa Gilbert. an overbearing theater director begrudgingly takes a job directing a Christmas pageant. 10:30 a.m. (faM) disney’s Prep and Landing elves known as Prep & Landing prepare homes around the world for Santa’s arrival. 11 a.m. (faM) Prep and Landing 2: naughty vs. nice wayne and his estranged brother, Lanny, race to recover classified north Pole technology. (TCM) Movie “The Bishop’s wife”

(1947, Comedy) Cary Grant. an angel comes to earth to help a bishop and his wife raise funds to build a new church. 11:30 a.m. (faM) Mickey’s Christmas Carol The three ghosts of Christmas visit Scrooge Mcduck to teach him the spirit of the holiday. noon (faM) Movie “all i want for Christmas” (1991, Comedy/drama) Jamey Sheridan. a divorced couple’s two children scheme to get them back together for Christmas. (GaC) Christmas with Scotty McCreery & friends hot young country stars join forces in this one-hour Christmas special. 2 p.m. (faM) Movie “i’ll Be home for Christmas” (1998, family) Jonathan Taylor Thomas. a conniving college student tries desperately to get home in time for Christmas dinner. 4 p.m. (faM) Movie “deck the halls” (2006, Comedy) danny de vito. Two feuding neighbors try to prove to the other that he has more holiday spirit. (haLL) Movie “Silver Bells” (2005, drama) anne heche. a widower and a young woman help each other to put their painful pasts behind them. 6 p.m. (haLL) Movie “a Princess for Christmas” (2011, family) Katie McGrath. a young woman falls for a dashing prince when she visits england for Christmas. (TBS) Movie “This Christmas” (2007, Comedy) delroy Lindo. a drama centered around the whitfield family’s first holiday together in four years. 7 p.m. (TBn) Jesus of nazareth an epic chronicle of Christ. (TRaveL) xtreme Christmas viewers see america’s most unusual, wild, wacky and bizarre Christmas celebrations. 8 p.m. (faM) Movie “national Lampoon’s Christmas vacation” (1989, Comedy) Chevy Chase. a man plays host to numerous dysfunctional relatives during the Christmas holidays. (haLL) Movie “finding Christmas” (2013, family) Tricia helfer. a disgruntled ad executive and a disheartened repairman swap houses over Christmas. (hGTv) white house Christmas 2013 an exclusive, behind-the-scenes look at how the white house is decorated for the holidays. 9 p.m. (iOn) Movie “all i want for Christmas” (2013, family) Melissa Sagemiller. a woman is given a gift to listen to every unspoken thought of people around her. 10 p.m. (faM) Movie “Scrooged” (1988, fantasy) Bill Murray. a callous executive learns the true meaning of Christmas when he is visited by ghosts. (haLL) Movie “Single Santa Seeks Mrs. Claus” (2004, family) Steve Guttenberg. Santa worries about turning over the reigns to his son, nick, who hasn’t yet found a wife.


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DECEMBER 13, 2013

Monday December 16 noon (fOOd) The Pioneer woman Ree has invited a crowd of friends over for a festive holiday get-together. 1:30 p.m. (fOOd) Ten dollar dinners Melissa helps herself to delicious savings with this wallet-friendly holiday menu. 2 p.m. (haLL) Movie “Mistletoe Over Manhattan” (2011, family) Tricia helfer. when Santa considers retirement, Mrs. Claus tries to prove that his work still brings joy. 3 p.m. (fOOd) Rachael Ray’s easy holiday feast Rachael shares a festive meal for a crowd with everything but the stress. 4 p.m. (haLL) Movie “Twice upon a Christmas” (2001, family) John dye. Santa’s daughter, Kristin Claus, has lost her memory and does not know who her father is. (TBn) aaron neville Seasonal music. 6 p.m. (haLL) Movie “help for the holidays” (2012, family) Summer Glau. an elf sets out to teach her new employers what it means to be a family at Christmas time. 6:30 p.m. (GaC) The Making of ‘Cheers, its Christmas’ with Blake Shelton and friends Blake Shelton gives viewers a behind the scenes look at the recording of his new album. 7 p.m. (faM) Movie “The Santa Clause” (1994, Comedy) Tim allen. when a father mistakenly kills Santa Claus, he is magically recruited to take his place. (GaC) Christmas with Scotty McCreery & friends hot young country stars join forces in this one-hour Christmas special. (TBn) Christmas with a Capital “C” a man tries to rid his town of a 50 year old Christmas tradition. 8 p.m. (aBC) Prep and Landing when an elf gets upset, his partner must remind him of the real meaning of Christmas. (Cw) Grandma Got Run Over by a Reindeer On Christmas eve, a boy sets out to find his grandmother who mysteriously disappeared. 8:30 p.m. (aBC) Prep and Landing 2: naughty vs. nice wayne and his estranged brother, Lanny, race to recover classified north Pole technology. (TBn) a Christian ebner Christmas featuring engaging carols and arrangements to get you in the holiday spirit. 9 p.m. (aBC) The Great Christmas Light fight (faM) Movie “The Santa Clause 2” (2002, family) Tim allen. after being Santa Claus for a few years, Scott Calvin must find a wife and help his son. (fOOd) diners, drive-ins and dives Guy fieri heads up to north Pole, alaska, for all kinds of Christmas favorites. 10 p.m. (aBC) The Great Christmas Light fight (haLL) Movie “farewell Mr. Kringle”

(2010, Comedy) Christine Taylor. a journalist writes about a Santa Claus impersonator who lives in a Christmas-themed town. 10:30 p.m. (GaC) The Making of ‘Cheers, its Christmas’ with Blake Shelton and friends Blake Shelton gives viewers a behind the scenes look at the recording of his new album. 11 p.m. (faM) Movie “The Santa Clause 3: The escape Clause” (2007, family) Tim allen. Santa Claus prepares for a busy Christmas with his in-laws and the mischievous Jack frost. (GaC) Christmas with Scotty McCreery & friends hot young country stars join forces in this one-hour Christmas special. (TBn) Movie “a Christmas visitor” (2002, drama) Meredith Baxter. a visitor enters the lives of grieving parents to help them remember the joy of Christmas. 11:15 p.m. (TCM) Movie “it happened on fifth avenue” (1947, Comedy) don defore. while a family is away for Christmas, a hobo and his friends live in their mansion. Midnight (fOOd) diners, drive-ins and dives Guy fieri heads up to north Pole, alaska, for all kinds of Christmas favorites. (haLL) Movie “Karroll’s Christmas” (2004, Comedy) Tom everett Scott. The Christmas ghosts end up at the wrong house and allen Karroll is taken on a ride. 12:30 a.m. (TBn) donnie McClurken Christmas Seasonal music. Tuesday December 17 10:30 a.m. (fOOd) down home with the neelys Pat and Gina cook up a holiday feast to deliver to the local senior community center. 1 p.m. (faM) Movie “Prancer” (1989, family) Sam elliott. a girl finds an injured reindeer and decides to nurse it until she can return it to Santa. 1:30 p.m. (TBn) Christmas with a Capital “C” a man tries to rid his town of a 50 year old Christmas tradition. 2 p.m. (haLL) Movie “The Santa Suit” (2010, Comedy) Kevin Sorbo. The president of a marketing firm is turned into a Santa lookalike. 3 p.m. (faM) Movie “i’ll Be home for Christmas” (1998, family) Jonathan Taylor Thomas. a conniving college student tries desperately to get home in time for Christmas dinner. 5 p.m. (faM) Movie “The Santa Clause” (1994, Comedy) Tim allen. when a father mistakenly kills Santa Claus, he is magically recruited to take his place. (TCM) Movie “holiday affair” (1949, drama) Robert Mitchum. a man offers to buy a model train set for a boy whose mother cannot afford it. 5:30 p.m. (fOOd) Trisha’s Southern Kitchen Trisha’s friend and her daughters prepare cookies for the annual holiday cookie swap.

6:45 p.m. (TCM) Movie “Remember the night” (1940, Romance) Barbara Stanwyck. a shoplifter’s life is changed when she is placed in a compassionate lawyer’s care. 7 p.m. (faM) Movie “The Santa Clause 2” (2002, family) Tim allen. after being Santa Claus for a few years, Scott Calvin must find a wife and help his son. (TBn) King of Kings The Jews suffer under King herod but the arrival of Jesus offers them hope. 8 p.m. (haLL) Movie “a Bride for Christmas” (2012, Romance) andrew w. walker. a woman falls in love, unaware she’s been handpicked to help the man win a bet. 9 p.m. (faM) Movie “The Polar express” (2004, animated) voices of Tom hanks. a doubting little boy boards a magical train to visit the north Pole on Christmas eve. 10 p.m. (TBn) dottie Rambo Christmas Seasonal music. 11 p.m. (TBn) Movie “a Christmas wish” (2010, family) Kristy Swanson. a woman, left destitute by her husband, faces a bleak Christmas with her children. Midnight (faM) Movie “i’ll Be home for Christmas” (1998, family) Jonathan Taylor Thomas. a conniving college student tries desperately to get home in time for Christmas dinner. (haLL) Movie “Christmas with holly” (2012, drama) Sean faris. a young girl asks for a mother for Christmas following the death of her mother. 12:30 a.m. (TBn) The Collingsworth family Christmas music. Wednesday December 18 10 a.m. (TBn) Crabb family Christmas Seasonal music from the Crabb family. 11 a.m. (faM) Movie “The Mistle-Tones” (2012, Musical) Tia Mowry-hardict. a young singer creates her own musical Christmas group after losing a spot in another. 1 p.m. (faM) Movie “Santa Baby” (2006, Comedy) Jenny McCarthy. Santa’s daughter, Mary Class, tries to makeover Christmas when her father gets sick. (fOOd) Rachael Ray’s easy holiday feast Rachael shares a festive meal for a crowd with everything but the stress. 2 p.m. (haLL) Movie “a Bride for Christmas” (2012, Romance) andrew w. walker. a woman falls in love, unaware she’s been handpicked to help the man win a bet. 3 p.m. (faM) Movie “Santa Baby 2: Christmas Maybe” (2009, family) Jenny McCarthy. Santa’s daughter is torn between taking over the family business and running her own firm. 4 p.m. (GaC) Over the Top holiday Outrageous, quirky, and over-the-top holiday displays. (haLL) Movie “Once upon a Christmas” (2000, family) Kathy ireland. Santa’s

daughters must infuse a family with holiday spirit or lose Christmas forever. 5 p.m. (faM) Movie “The Polar express” (2004, animated) voices of Tom hanks. a doubting little boy boards a magical train to visit the north Pole on Christmas eve. (GaC) all Out american Christmas homeowners go above and beyond traditional decor to create over-the-top holiday displays. 6 p.m. (haLL) Movie “Christmas with holly” (2012, drama) Sean faris. a young girl asks for a mother for Christmas following the death of her mother. 7 p.m. (faM) winnie the Pooh and Christmas Too! Pooh and Piglet play Santa when their Christmas letter doesn’t make it to the north Pole. 7:30 p.m. (faM) Mickey’s Christmas Carol The three ghosts of Christmas visit Scrooge Mcduck to teach him the spirit of the holiday. 8 p.m. (Cw) iheartRadio Jingle Ball a star studded concert for the holidays, featuring Miley Cyrus, Robin Thicke and more. 9 p.m. (GaC) all Out american Christmas homeowners go above and beyond traditional decor to create over-the-top holiday displays. 10 p.m. (haLL) Movie “The Santa Switch” (2013, family) ethan erickson. a man is given the gift of being Santa this year and he finds himself with new powers. (nBC) Michael Bublé’s 3rd annual Christmas Special Grammy award winner Michael Bublé will deliver some of his most popular songs. (TBn) God Came near Based on Max Lucado’s beloved book, God Came near. Midnight (faM) Movie “Santa Baby” (2006, Comedy) Jenny McCarthy. Santa’s daughter, Mary Class, tries to makeover Christmas when her father gets sick. (haLL) Movie “a Season for Miracles” (1999, drama) Patty duke. a woman leaves with her sister’s children in an attempt to keep them from foster care. Thursday December 19 noon (faM) Movie “12 dates of Christmas” (2011, Comedy) amy Smart. a young woman relives the same first date on Christmas eve over and over again. 1 p.m. (fOOd) Semi-homemade with Sandra Lee Sandra and her sister make a holiday meal starting with macadamia nutcrusted goat cheese. 1:30 p.m. (TBn) God Came near Based on Max Lucado’s beloved book, God Came near. 2 p.m. (faM) Movie “holiday in handcuffs” (2007, Comedy) Melissa Joan hart. a woman kidnaps a handsome guy to take home to her parents during the Christmas holidays. (haLL) Movie “Lucky Christmas” (2011, drama) elizabeth Berkley. a woman’s car

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

11

is stolen with a winning lottery ticket inside, and the thief falls for her. (TBn) Movie “The Perfect Gift” (2009, drama) Jefferson Moore. a teenaged girl has a chance encounter with a man who changes the course of her life. 3:30 p.m. (TBn) dottie Rambo Christmas Seasonal music. 4 p.m. (haLL) Movie “The wishing Tree” (2012, family) Jason Gedrick. a professor brings students together through a Christmas tree decorated with wishes. 5 p.m. (TCM) Movie “Scrooge” (1970, Musical) albert finney. Three spirits visit Scrooge, a miserable man soured on the meaning of Christmas. (haLL) Movie “debbie 6 p.m. Macomber’s Trading Christmas” (2011, Romance) Gil Bellows. a man and woman find love at the most unexpected time and have the best Christmas ever. 7 p.m. (TCM) Movie “a Christmas Carol” (1951, fantasy) alastair Sim. The ghosts of Christmas past, present and future show a miser the meaning of Christmas. 8 p.m. (aBC) a Charlie Brown Christmas Charlie Brown and his Peanut pal, Linus, search for the true meaning of Christmas. (haLL) Movie “all i want for Christmas” (2007, drama) Gail O’Grady. a nine-yearold boy enters a contest to find a new husband for his mother. 8:30 p.m. (faM) Movie “dr. Seuss’ how the Grinch Stole Christmas” (2000, fantasy) Jim Carrey. The Grinch disguises himself as Santa to steal Christmas from the people of whoville. (TCM) Movie “Scrooge” (1935, family) Sir Seymour hicks. Scrooge is visited by three Christmas ghosts, who teach him about charity and compassion. 10 p.m. (haLL) Movie “finding Christmas” (2013, family) Tricia helfer. a disgruntled ad executive and a disheartened repairman swap houses over Christmas. (TCM) Movie “a Christmas Carol” (1938, drama) Reginald Owen. ebeneezer Scrooge learns a lesson in charity after a visit from three spirits. 11 p.m. (ewTn) TaJCi: Christmas Concert Seasonal music. (TBn) Movie “The Christmas Box” (1995, family) Richard Thomas. a family learns the true meaning of Christmas after caring for a stubborn elderly widow. 11:15 p.m. (TCM) Movie “a Carol for another Christmas” (1964, drama) Sterling hayden. Midnight (faM) Movie “deck the halls” (2006, Comedy) danny de vito. Two feuding neighbors try to prove to the other that he has more holiday spirit. (haLL) Movie “a Christmas wish” (2010, family) Kristy Swanson. a woman, left destitute by her husband, faces a bleak Christmas with her children. 12:30 a.m. (TBn) wondrous Gift Music Special

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ST3528 - dec. 13_Layout 1 12/13/13 9:29 aM Page 12

12 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

‘Tis the Season

Top 10 Holiday Movies

1. It’s a Wonderful Life, 1946 Jimmy Stewart stars as a downtrodden Will banker whose guardian Farrell angel shows him what as seen life would be like within Elf out him in this quintessential holiday masterpiece. Although the film is a timeless classic today, it was considered a box office flop at the time of its release.

2. The Muppet Christmas Carol, 1992 Kermit and the rest of the Muppets put their own spin on Charles Dickens’ holiday tale in this adaptation starring Michael Caine as Scrooge. This was the first Muppets movie to be

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3. Home Alone, 1990 Laugh out loud as young Kevin McCallister shows a couple of burglars he’s no helpless child in this holiday comedy. When his parents accidentally leave for their Christmas vacation without him, Kevin fends off crooks with booby traps.

4. Elf, 2003 Will Ferrell pokes fun at the lighter side of the holidays in a Christmas comedy with real heart. The “Saturday Night Live” alum portrays Buddy, an average-sized person who was raised as an elf after he climbed into

Santa’s toy bag as an infant.

5. The Santa Clause, 1994 Tim Allen made his big-screen debut in this holiday comedy about a father who reluctantly takes on the mantle of Santa Claus after the real St. Nick falls off his roof. He undergoes a dramatic transformation and develops a taste for all things Christmas.

6. A Christmas Story, 1983 Nine-year-old Ralphie petitions his parents, Santa Claus and anyone else who’ll listen for a Red Ryder BB Gun for Christmas in this spirited holiday classic. Set in small-town Indiana, the film was based on the works of author Jean Shepherd.

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7. National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation, 1989 Holiday antics abound as Clark Griswold and his wacky family celebrate the season with numerous dysfunctional relatives. Chevy Chase reprises his role as the Griswold patriarch in this third installment of the “National Lampoon’s Vacation” film series. 8. Miracle on 34th Street, 1947 A Macy’s store Santa causes an uproar when he claims to be the real Kris Kringle and attempts to rekindle the Christmas spirit in a young girl. Considered by many to be the best Christmas movie ever, the film celebrates its 65th anniversary this year.

DECEMBER 13, 2013 employs cutting-edge motion-capture technology.

10. Holiday Inn, 1942/ White Christmas, 1954 Enjoy the sweet sound of Bing Crosby belting out “White Christmas” in two beloved Christmas films, 1942’s “Holiday Inn” and 1954’s “White Christmas.” Composed by Irving Berlin, the song won an Academy Award and has been assowith ciated Crosby ever since.

9. The Polar Express, 2004 Enjoy a holiday adventure in this film based on the classic Chris Van Allsburg book about a skeptical boy who’s transported to the North Pole on a magical train. Tom Hanks lends his voice to the computer-animated film, which

Chevy Chase as Clark Griswold in National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation

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Set a ‘course for adventure’ with something that’s ‘exciting and new’ DECEMBER 13, 2013

Television fans may recognize the name Jeraldine Saunders as that of the author of the book Love Boats, which inspired the hit television series The Love Boat. What most fans don’t know is that the book was autobiographical in nature and that Saunders had been one of the first female cruise directors in the world. To share her expertise with novice and seasoned “cruisers,” Saunders later penned another book, Cruise Diary. Her readers have found it to be the perfect cruise accessory. Within the pages of the elegant hardbound Cruise Diary, readers will find information that can help guarantee a carefree and joyful vacation at sea. Having lived at sea seven days a week, 11 months each year for more than eight years as a cruise director, Saunders has written a book that offers tips that only someone who has worked and lived on ships as a cruise director could share. Chapters in Cruise

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

‘Tis the Season

Diary include: packing, dressing for ship and shore, dining and shipboard tipping, embarkation, disembarkation, immigration and customs. Also included are sections for the cruiser to record diary notes, purchases, port lecture notes and names and contact information of new shipboard friends. There are also pages designed for mounting photos taken by the ship’s photographer. In the months and years following a voyage, Cruise Diary will allow cruisers to relive the excitement of the trip, as everything was documented in his or her own handwriting, including memories of the many beautiful sights and all the shipboard adventures.

“Cruises were created for fun and relaxation, and they are filled with days and nights of enjoyment. I believe Cruise Diary is a wonderful gift for a friend during the holiday season, or a memorable way for Signal Tribune travelers to relive their own cruise experiences for years to come– I wish them all happy sailing,” said Saunders during a recent interview. Cruise Diary is now available exclusively at Urban Cottage this holiday season at $10 per copy. Located in Bixby Knolls at 4121 Long Beach Blvd., Urban Cottage is open Tuesday to Saturday 11am to 5pm and Sundays noon to 4pm. Visit urbancottagelb.com for more holiday ideas or call owner Melissa at (562) 9974121 for details.

13

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14 SIGNAL TRIBUNE COMMUNITY DECEMBER 13, 2013 honors five of its own during awards ceremony SHPD recognized for its SHPD The Signal Hill Police Depart- Volunteer of the Year, Ron Langston recognized Officer Art ment (SHPD) honored several of Griggs; Professional Employee of Smith with the Lifetime AchieveNational Night Out program its employees during an annual the Year, Dispatcher/Jailer Carly ment Award. As a reserve police

The Signal Hill Police Department has been selected as an award winner by the National Association of Town Watch (NATW) for its community policing outreach efforts, specifically its National Night Out program. The NATW is a nonprofit organization dedicated to develop and promote various crime prevention programs, including National Night Out, which was introduced in 1984 to promote police-community partnerships. On Aug. 6, 2013, the SHPD hosted its 10th annual National Night Out program at Reservoir Park. The event, which was attended by approximately 950 citizens, included games, vendors, a gift

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focus on the expansion of outside events at the Long Beach Petroleum Club. “I am excited to start a new opportunity with the Long Beach Petroleum Club and look forward to working with the team to further develop their exposure as a landmark event venue,” she said. “I am fortunate to be joining such a respected organization that prides itself on top-quality events.” Bette Bloom, General Manager said Becker’s experience and industry knowledge have already made her a key addition to the LBPC family. “We view her appointment as a sign of our commitment to being a leading banquet venue in the area,” Bloom said. “I am confident that Tara will play a key role in providing and implementing high-quality events.”

Ice rink to present holiday-movie-themed show

Source: SHPD

Source: Petroleum Club

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officer for more than 40 years, Smith donates hundreds of hours annually, according to the SHPD.

awards ceremony on Dec. 6. The following individuals were recognized for their specific contributions to the Department’s value and mission statements: Police

Petroleum Club gets new director of sales

The Long Beach Petroleum Club recently announced that Tara Becker has joined the club as director of sales to further develop bookings of outside events. Becker spent the last seven years at Main Event Marketing, where she facilitated corporate events throughout North America. Joining just in time for engagement season, Becker will

Fisher; Police Officer of the Year, Sergeant Ricardo Oliveros; and Award of Excellence, School Resource Officer Brian Johnson. In addition, Chief Michael

give-away, a police-officer dunk tank and food, according to the SHPD. “This event is a really positive opportunity for the community to meet with our police officers and develop positive partnerships,” said Police Chief Michael Langston. “We are proud that this event has grown over the past few years. We are also grateful for the support of the City Council and the numerous sponsors that make this event possible. Frankly, this event could not happen without their support.” This is the third consecutive year that SHPD has been recognized for the National Night Out event.

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Free holiday concert to feature gospel, jazz and drumline performances Source: SHPD

Soulbound Media and Greener Good Farmer's Market will present a free holiday music concert on Friday, Dec. 13 from 5pm to 7pm at the market, which is located at 609 E. Artesia Blvd. The event will include live performances and entertainment for the whole family. Long Beach Alliance Food & Fitness will be giving a free lecture on healthy eating habits that will involve fruits and vegetables from the farmers market from 3pm to 5pm. Santa Claus will make a special appearance during the concert, which will feature Jordan High Spirit and Drum Line Team, professional gospel recording artist Kesha Ealy, The Memorial Gospel Christmas Choir and jazz artist Dave Williams + MBT. “We are thrilled to put together this festive holiday concert that will connect area residents.” said organizer Stephen Metz. Johnny Rebs restaurant staff will be at the market that day serving specially prepared food dishes for the event. Those who attend are encouraged to bring chairs and blankets.

Source: Soulbound Media

The Rinks–Lakewood ICE, 3975 Pixie Ave. in Lakewood, will host its fourth annual holiday show on Saturday, Dec. 14 at 2pm and 6pm. “Gliding Through the Holiday Cinema” will feature elite performers from the national and local level taking the audience through a history of Christmas in the movies. The event will feature appearances from Santa Claus, the Peanuts gang, Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer, Scrooge and Frosty the Snowman.

Parade

Tickets are on sale now at showtix4u.com or at the Lakewood ICE box office beginning one hour before the show. On-ice seating is available for $20 ($10 for 12 and under), and general-admission balcony seating is offered for $15 ($7.50 for 12 and under). For more information, visit lakewoodice.com or call (562) 429-1805 ext. 228.

Source: Lakewood ICE

continued from page 1

trees, which Norvell said are considered “the original Christmas tree,” were installed as first proposed. The City contributed the trees and electrical outlets at a cost of $2,126 while donors, such as the West Side Lions Club, gave $507 to pay for the lights. City and Edison Co. workers installed lights as neighborhood groups shared the cost of decorating the trees. Today, however, the task of putting up the lights is much more costly, Norvell said. This year, for instance, it took nearly four days to replace 250 strings of LED lights at a cost of about $4,000. “Nothing is cheap anymore,” she said. Jim Trout, a member of WANA who has been involved with Christmas Tree Lane since 2002, currently helps put up lights as well as set up and maintain the fenced-in displays along with Vernon Rudd, who helped restore the train. Some of the trees are dedicated in memory of residents who have passed away, including a small tree located at Daisy Avenue and PCH that was planted as a memorial for Trout’s daughter Jaime, who died tragically at age of 21 from choking on a piece of food. “Every year, my family and friends decorate her tree,” he said. The original displays on Daisy Avenue today still capture the zeitgeist of the era, when Disneyland was being built not far away along with holiday-theme parks called Santa’s Villages, including the one in Lake Arrowhead that eventually shut down in 1998. Norvell said the community, however, eventually decided to nix the nativity-scene display from Daisy Avenue to keep it more secular. “It was totally different than what we have now,” she said. “They could do the nativity scene. We had the camels. We had the cows. We had the sheep. We had everything out there. That was before the separation of church and state.” The nativity scene wasn’t the only controversy. Money disputes over Christmas Tree Lane are what caused members of the Wrigley Association to form WANA, which was eventually awarded ownership of the displays and decorations by the courts.

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

A long line of winter-themed displays, such as this train, can be seen on a grassy median along Daisy Avenue, which for two weeks in December becomes Christmas Tree Lane. Some of the displays were originally built in the 1950s.

Today, a company called Desert Express Trucking provides an in-kind donation to supply two flatbed trucks to move the displays from a warehouse where the City stores them. “I am so thankful because I don’t know how we could afford to do that,” Norvell said.

A neighborhood parade A City-sponsored parade along Daisy Avenue was added just a few years after Christmas Tree Lane was first created. Then, in 1977, the parade took a five-year hiatus since City funding was cut after the passage of Prop 13, according to Norvell. In 1982, however, the parade returned with support from the Downtown Kiwanis Club, the Wrigley Business Association and the City, she said. Sixteen years later, the City and the Wrigley Association pitched in to revamp both the parade and Christmas Tree Lane, building new mini-houses and displays. The parade has changed over the years, more recently with the elimination of horses because of publicsafety concerns, but it has always kept its neighborhood vibe and continues to be free to all entrants, Norvell said. Last year drew the largest crowd ever, she said, with about 12,000 people in attendance. “We have a good neighborhood parade,” Norvell said. “It’s not commercialized, and it’s not used for campaigning or nothing… It’s strictly for the neighborhood and the kids.”

Seventh District Councilmember James Johnson said in an email that he considers the parade “a holiday tradition that exemplifies the closeknit communities” that continue to make Long Beach unique. “While there are many holiday parades that occur on commercial corridors, this is the only known parade to occur in the middle of a neighborhood, which imparts its special neighborhood feel,” he said. “For those who have not attended this parade, I recommend you come and bring the whole family for an experience that you can only get in Long Beach.” Financial support for the parade comes from the Port of Long Beach, Vanco Properties, the Long Beach Airport, Los Angeles County Supervisor Don Knabe’s Office, Assemblymember Bonnie Lowenthal’s Office, the Grand Prix Association, Signal Hill Petroleum and many other local companies and organizations. In addition to the parade, other events include: a tree-lighting & home-decorating contest today, Dec. 13, at 7:30pm; entertainment nights on Dec. 15, 20 and 21 at 7pm; and Wrigley Snow Day on Dec. 28 at 11am. A 15-minute documentary produced by Pamela K. Johnson on the history of Christmas Tree Lane is currently being broadcast on Long Beach’s publicaccess television channel PADNET.tv .


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SIGNAL TRIBUNE

DECEMBER 13, 2013

THE GREAT OUTDOORS JUST GOT GREATER. Say hello to 81% cleaner air in Long Beach. Clean air is serious business, especially for an entrepreneur like Elizabeth Williams, who shares the beauty of Long Beach with her bike tours. That’s why we’re delivering on our bold environmental promises with innovative initiatives that have led to dramatic emissions reductions since 2005. Together, we’re on the green path. To learn more about our air-quality accomplishments, go to polb.com/CleanAir

© Port of Long Beach

Thinking outside the docks

Elizabeth Williams Owner, Cali Bike Tours

15


ST3528 - dec. 13_Layout 1 12/13/13 9:29 aM Page 16

16 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

TST4513 nOTiCe Of TRuSTee'S SaLe aPn: 7214009-025 T.S. no. 004322-Ca PuRSuanT TO CiviL COde Section2923.3 nOTe: TheRe iS a SuMMaRy Of The infORMaTiOn in ThiS dOCuMenT aTTaChed iMPORTanT nOTiCe TO PROPeRTy OwneR: yOu aRe in defauLT undeR a deed Of TRuST, daTed 6/26/2007. unLeSS yOu TaKe aCTiOn TO PROTeCT yOuR PROPeRTy, iT May Be SOLd aT a PuBLiC SaLe. if yOu need an exPLanaTiOn Of The naTuRe Of The PROCeedinG aGainST yOu, yOu ShOuLd COnTaCT a LawyeR On 12/27/2013 at 11:00 aM, CLeaR ReCOn CORP., as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to deed of Trust recorded 7/3/2007, as instrument no. 20071587185, in Book xx, Page xx, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los angeles County, State of CaLifORnia executed by: CLaRa d. PenROSe and dOROThy vinCiGueRRa, TRuSTeeS Of The PenROSe TRuST daTed nOveMBeR 15, 1995 aS aMended and ReSTaTed On auGuST 17, 2006 wiLL SeLL aT PuBLiC auCTiOn TO hiGheST BiddeR fOR CaSh, CaShieR'S CheCK dRawn On a STaTe OR naTiOnaL BanK, a CheCK dRawn By a STaTe OR fedeRaL CRediT uniOn, OR a CheCK dRawn By a STaTe OR fedeRaL SavinGS and LOan aSSOCiaTiOn, SavinGS aSSOCiaTiOn, OR SavinGS BanK SPeCified in SeCTiOn 5102 Of The finanCiaL COde and auThORized TO dO BuSineSS in ThiS STaTe: in The aRea in The fROnT Of By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, Ca 91766 all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: COMPLeTeL deSCRiBed in Said deed Of TRuST The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2500 eaST wiLLOw STReeT uniT 110 SiGnaL hiLL, CaLifORnia 90755 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition, or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the notice of Sale is: $338,267.19 if the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written declaration of default and demand for Sale, and a written notice of default and election to Sell. The undersigned caused said notice of default and election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. nOTiCe TO POTenTiaL BiddeRS: if you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. you will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. you should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. if you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. you are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. if you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. nOTiCe TO PROPeRTy OwneR: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. if you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (714) 730-2727 or visit this internet web site www.LPSaSaP.COM, using the file number assigned to this case 004322-Ca. information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the internet web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. fOR SaLeS infORMaTiOn: (714) 730-2727 date: 11/25/2013 CLeaR ReCOn CORP. 4375 Jutland drive Suite 200 San diego, California 92117 a-4429173 12/06/2013, 12/13/2013, 12/20/2013

TST4520 aPn: 7216-017-016 TS no: Ca08000815-131  TO no: 1470214  nOTiCe Of TRuSTee'S SaLe yOu aRe in defauLT undeR a deed Of TRuST daTed april 27, 2004. unLeSS yOu TaKe aCTiOn TO PROTeCT yOuR PROPeRTy, iT May Be SOLd aT a PuBLiC SaLe. if yOu need an exPLanaTiOn Of The naTuRe Of The PROCeedinGS aGainST yOu, yOu ShOuLd COnTaCT a LawyeR.  On January 7, 2014 at 09:00 aM, behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona Ca 91766, MTC financial inc. dba Trustee Corps, as the duly appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain deed of Trust Recorded on May 7, 2004 as instrument no. 04 1153794 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Los angeles County, California, executed by Juan M. GOMez, JR and CORinna GOMez, huSBand and wife aS COMMuniTy PROPeRTy wiTh RiGhT Of SuRvivORShiP, as Trustor(s), in favor of MORTGaGe eLeCTROniC ReGiSTRaTiOn SySTeMS, inC. as nominee for aMeRiCORP CRediT CORP as Beneficiary, wiLL SeLL aT PuBLiC auCTiOn TO The hiGheST BiddeR, in lawful money of the united States, all payable at the time of sale, that certain property situated in said County, California describing the land therein as: aS MORe fuLLy deSCRiBed in Said deed Of TRuST    The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2315-2317 eaST 19Th STReeT, SiGnaL hiLL, Ca 90755   The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrect-

PUBLIC NOTICES

ness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein.  Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances if any, under the terms of the deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said deed of Trust.  The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligations secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of this notice of Trustee’s Sale is estimated to be $378,936.21 (estimated). however, prepayment premiums, accrued interest and advances will increase this figure prior to sale. Beneficiary’s bid at said sale may include all or part of said amount. in addition to cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the California financial Code and authorized to do business in California, or other such funds as may be acceptable to the Trustee. in the event tender other than cash is accepted, the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustee’s deed upon Sale until funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a matter of right. The property offered for sale excludes all funds held on account by the property receiver, if applicable.  if the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse.    notice to Potential Bidders  if you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a Trustee auction. you will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a Trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. you should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. if you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. you are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. if you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same Lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of Trust on the property.  notice to Property Owner  The sale date shown on this notice of Sale may be postponed one or more times by the Mortgagee, Beneficiary, Trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about Trustee Sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. if you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call Priority Posting and Publishing at 714573-1965 for information regarding the Trustee's Sale or visit the internet web site address listed below for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case, Ca08000815-13-1. information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the internet web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale.  date: december 4, 2013 TRuSTee CORPS  TS no. Ca08000815-13-1  17100 Gillette ave  irvine, Ca 92614  949-2528300    Joseph Barragan, authorized Signatory  SaLe infORMaTiOn Can Be OBTained On Line aT www.priorityposting.com  fOR auTOMaTed SaLeS infORMaTiOn PLeaSe CaLL: Priority Posting and Publishing at 714573-1965  TRuSTee CORPS May Be aCTinG aS a deBT COLLeCTOR aTTeMPTinG TO COLLeCT a deBT.  any infORMaTiOn OBTained May Be uSed fOR ThaT PuRPOSe. P1073584 12/13, 12/20, 12/27/2013  TST4501 / 2013 230221

FIcTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT

The following person is doing business as: ManfRed LeaTheR, 6325 e. eliot St., Long Beach, Ca 90803. Registrant: BuMPeRCaR inC., 6325 e. eliot St., Long Beach, Ca 90803. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: eduardo Cortes, President. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los angeles County on november 6, 2013. nOTiCe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: november 22, 29, & december 6, 13, 2013. TST4502 / 2013 236723

FIcTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT

The following person is doing business as: iSaBeLLe handBaGS, 801 S. Garfield ave. Ste. 318, alhambra, Ca 91801. Registrant: MTC BaGS uSa, inC., 801 S. Garfield ave. Ste. 318, alhambra, Ca 91801. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Gaohua huang, CeO. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on november 15, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los angeles County on november 15, 2013. nOTiCe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: november 22, 29, & december 6, 13, 2013.

DECEMBER 13, 2013

TST4504 / 2013 237433

FIcTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT

The following person is doing business as: z COMfORT ORThOPediC PROSTheTiC & ORThOTiCS, 2296 amelia Ct., Signal hill, Ca 90755. Registrant: LaRRy RadfORd, 2296 amelia Ct., Signal hill, Ca 90755. This business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Larry Radford. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los angeles County on november 18, 2013. nOTiCe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: november 22, 29, & december 6, 13, 2013. TST4512 / 2013 243257

FIcTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT

The following person is doing business as: The BLaCKBeRRy PaTCh COTTaGe, 9753 flower St., Bellflower St., Bellflower, Ca 90706. Registrant: GLORia J. dySOn, 3313 Maine ave., Long Beach, Ca 90806. This business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Gloria J. dyson. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on november 11, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los angeles County on november 25, 2013. nOTiCe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: november 29, & december 6, 13, 20, 2013.

TST4508 / case No. NS026913 oRDER To SHoW cAuSE FoR cHANGE oF NAME, SuPeRiOR COuRT Of CaLifORnia, COunTy Of LOS anGeLeS, SOuTh diSTRiCT, 275 Magnolia ave., Long Beach, Ca 90802. PeTiTiOn Of david Robert Stein, for Change of name. TO aLL inTeReSTed PeRSOnS: 1. Petitioner david ROBeRT STein, filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: david ROBeRT STein to Proposed name: david ROBeRT MaRTin. 2. The COuRT ORdeRS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, shy the petition for change of name should not be granted. nOTiCe Of heaRinG: date: January 7, 2014; Time: 8:30 a.M.; dept. S26. The address of the court is the same as above. a copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, The SiGnaL TRiBune, 939 e. 27th. Street, Signal hill, Ca 90755: november 29, & december 6, 13, 20, 2013. ___//ss//___ Michael P. vicencia, Judge of the Superior Court dated: november 18, 2013 TST4515 / 2013 247745 FIcTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT

The following person is doing business as: MOOnLiGhTninG MOTORized & PedaL BiKeS, 150 w. Lomita Blvd., wilmington, Ca 90744. Registrant: CaRL BaLLanTyne, 150 w. Lomita Blvd., wilmington, Ca 90744. This business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Carl Ballantyne. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name in december, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los angeles County on december 3, 2013. nOTiCe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: december 6, 13, 20, 27, 2013. TST4519 / 2013 252169

FIcTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT

The following persons are doing business as: OLyMPiC CLeaneRS, 2063 Pacific ave., Long Beach, Ca 90806. Registrant: 1. Jae SiK KiM, 2. KyunG Ja KiM, 19506 fagian way, Cerritos, Ca 90703. This business is conducted by: a General Partnership. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Jae Sik Kim. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on March 15, 1990. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los angeles County on december 10, 2013. nOTiCe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: december 13, 20, 27, 2013 & January 3, 2014.

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lives lived bernardina herrera 78 Juvenal martinez 31 Laird Leon 52 timothy greenfield 43 steven merriman 45 travis Chavis 69 John mcCoy 59 Darrell hulbert 62 Julia Ann belotsky 80 Loreto Cruz 26 grace Luland 93 richard vanderhoof 88 george Lopez 45 mary Fitzhugh 90 Antonio mendez 57 hazel Coleman 91 e families were assisted by McKenzie Mortuary. For more details on service dates and times, contact (562) 961-9301

CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

TST4518 NoTIcE oF PuBlIc HEARING nOTiCe iS heReBy Given ThaT on Tuesday, January 7, 2014, the City Council of the City of Signal hill will conduct a public hearing at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chamber located at City hall, 2175 Cherry avenue, Signal hill, California to consider the following:

zOninG ORdinanCe aMendMenT 13-05 in ORdeR TO SaTiSfy STaTe Law and ReQuiReMenTS fOR CeRTifiCaTiOn Of The hOuSinG eLeMenT uPdaTe, aMendMenTS TO TiTLe 20 Of The MuniCiPaL COde aS fOLLOwS: TiTLe 20.04 (definiTiOnS) - add The STaTe definiTiOn fOR eMeR• GenCy SheLTeRS fOR The hOMeLeSS • SeCTiOn 20.20.020 (uSe CLaSSifiCaTiOnS) - aLLOw eMeRGenCy SheLTeRS By RiGhT in The COMMeRCiaL GeneRaL (CG) zOne and eSTaBLiSh MiniMuM deveLOPMenT and OPeRaTiOnS STandaRdS aS aLLOwed By Law inCLudinG: design Standards 1. Maximum number of beds 2. Parking 3. exterior and interior waiting and client intake areas 4. Security lighting 5. Minimum separation distance 6. established CG development standards 7. voluntary or incentive based standards Operational Standards • Length of stay • On-site Management • On-site security applicant: City of Signal hill

The PLanninG COMMiSSiOn of the City of Signal hill, California, at a public hearing on Tuesday, december 10, 2013, recommended City Council adoption of a resolution approving zoning Ordinance amendment 13-05. a neGaTive deCLaRaTiOn 11/29/13(1) has been prepared in conjunction with the subject project based on an initial study finding of no significant environmental impacts associated with the project. The negative declaration, as well as relevant material, may be inspected by the public between the hours of 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and on fridays from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in the Community development department located on the lower floor of City hall. written comments may be submitted to the Community development department during the public review period from november 29, 2013 to January 7, 2014. aLL inTeReSTed PeRSOnS are hereby invited to attend the hearings to present written information, express their opinions or otherwise present evidence on the above matter. if you wish to legally challenge any action taken by the City on the above matter, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearings described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City prior to or at the public hearings. fuRTheR infORMaTiOn on this item may be obtained at the City of Signal hill Community development department located at 2175 Cherry avenue, Signal hill, California, or by emailing Colleen doan, associate Planner, at cdoan@cityofsignalhill.org or calling at (562) 989-7344. Published in the Signal Tribune newspaper per Gov’t Code §65091(a)(4): Posted in accordance with S.h.M.C. Section 1.08.010 on or before:

december 13, 2013 december 13, 2013

CITY OF SIGNAL HILL TST4514 NoTIcE oF VAcANcy

CiviL SeRviCe COMMiSSiOn

nOTiCe iS heReBy Given that a vacancy exists on the Signal hill Civil Service Commission. The City of Signal hill will be conducting a recruitment to fill the vacancy. all interested residents are encouraged to apply.

To serve as a Civil Service Commissioner, you must be a u.S. citizen, 18 years of age or older; and a registered voter and resident of the City at least 29 days prior to the date of appointment. each member shall continue to reside in the City for the duration of the term of office (Signal hill City Charter Section 602). if you are interested in serving as a Commissioner, please call (562) 9897305 for an application. applications are also available in the City Clerk’s office, 2175 Cherry avenue, Monday–Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. you are encouraged to apply online via the City’s website at hyPeRLinK "http://www.cityofsignalhill.org" www.cityofsignalhill.org.

applications will be accepted until friday, december 20, 2013, at 4:30 p.m.

Published in the Signal Tribune dec. 6 and 13, 2013

FoR RENT

Banquet Room available for parties or events at Bellflower-Long Beach elks Lodge, 16426 Bellflower Blvd. Call Steve at (562) 925-5750 for details.


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NEWS

DECEMBER 13, 2013

Jobs

continued from page 1

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Jasmin Ramirez, a certified health educator for the nonprofit California Health Collaborative, presents information to a handful of local residents at Signal Hill City Hall during a presentation on the Affordable Care Act on Saturday, Dec. 7.

Health Care

continued from page 1

strictly to provide residents with accurate information on the ACA’s new mandates and what is available through Covered California. “We’re going to give you the real facts,” he said. “It may be modified years later or next year, but we do know this is what it is right now.” After changes were made earlier this year, all uninsured legal citizens now have until Dec. 23 to enroll in a health plan for coverage starting Jan. 1, when the law, also known as Obamacare, officially goes into effect, Ramirez explained. Those who haven’t enrolled in a plan by that date won’t be penalized until March 31. After that time, however, the fine for being uninsured is $95 and the penalty rises annually thereafter, she said. “You have a pretty open window in terms of being able to apply and get the ball rolling,” Ramirez said. “You still have time to look at different options if you’re not satisfied yet. We definitely don’t want anybody to just jump the gun and choose something just to have something.” She said Covered California is considered the “leading” state-operated health-benefit exchange in the country for implementing the new health-care reform law. The exchange provides a “marketplace” for individuals to enroll in a health plan, whether through the State’s website (coveredca.com) or through a local services center. Ramirez said Covered California also has call centers dedicated to helping individuals who recently had their health insurance dropped because it didn’t comply with the law. Health-plan enrollment is currently only offered to individuals, as the Small-Business Health Options Program (SHOP), in which businesses with 50 or fewer full-time employees are able to purchase small-group healthinsurance plans and may qualify for federal tax credits, has been delayed until November 2014. Large businesses with 50 or more employees will be required to cover employees’ health insurance by 2015. Ramirez noted that it’s important to log on to the right website when obtaining resources or providing personal information, since there are numerous fraudulent sites that are spreading misinformation and may be identity-theft scams. According to a Dec. 3 press release from Covered California, a total of 431,756 individuals had enrolled in the state exchange through Nov. 30. Earlier this year, Covered California estimated that more than 5 million individuals in the state were uninsured and 2.6 million individuals, who don’t receive insurance assistance through their employer or the government, were eligible for federal subsidies offered through the exchange. In Los Angeles County, six healthinsurance providers are offered through Covered California. These include Anthem, Blue Shield, Health Net, Kaiser Permanente, L.A. Care and Molina Healthcare. Under the state exchange, each provider offers five health-plan tiers: bronze, silver, gold, platinum and catastrophic. The tiers are categorized from cheapest (with low monthly co-pays and high premiums) to most expensive (high monthly co-pays and low premiums) based on a person’s health-care needs.

“Every health plan has its own set of co-pays that you’re working with,” Ramirez said. “So it’s up to everybody to take that ownership and really look into the details of what you’re looking for and what you want out of the health plan. Everybody’s going to have a health plan that is different in comparison to everybody else because everybody has different needs.” A benefit to enrolling in Covered California is being able to receive federal premium assistance, which is based on income, age, residency and household size. However, not everyone is eligible for the federal subsidy offered through the state exchange, she explained. Eligibility for financial assistance on monthly payments through Covered California ranges from a single person making between $15,860 and $45,960 a year to a household of five with an annual income of $38,050 to $110,280. Households with incomes less than those thresholds are not eligible for financial assistance and would qualify for Medi-Cal coverage instead, Ramirez said. “In California, Medi-Cal has expanded,” she said. “A lot of individuals who did not qualify for Medi-Cal now have the opportunity to apply for services.” Ramirez added that individuals who fall into this category still have the option of enrolling in Covered California but won’t get the monthly financial assistance. Factors that won’t be determining rates under the new law, however, are a person’s health status, gender, “preexisting conditions” and tobacco use, Ramirez noted. Prior to Obamacare, however, these considerations dictated health-plan rates. During the presentation it was brought up that, under the new law, the cost ratio between young and old individuals has been condensed in that young people will be paying higher fees to cover the cost of elderly people who often need more expensive care and treatments. One resident pointed out, however, that young individuals would still be paying less than older people. Under the ACA, all health-insurance providers are required to cover 10 “essential health benefits,” which include doctor visits, hospitalization, emergency care, maternity care, pediatrics, prescriptions drugs, medical tests, mental health care and preventive-care services, such as mammograms and colonoscopies. Ramirez said Covered California offers certified enrollment counselors who provide individuals with information on all of the options offered under the state exchange, however, she added that individuals also have the option of consulting their own private insurance agents as well. “Everybody is welcome to call wherever you want,” Ramirez said. “It could even be an agent outside of Covered California, if that’s what you choose. You have the option of choosing any type of health insurance as long as you choose [one that complies with the ACA] you won’t be penalized the $95 next year.” She said the IRS is expected to monitor each person’s compliance with the new law starting next year after tax season. MORE INFORMATION coveredca.com (888) 975-1142

resident and hotel worker who last year helped organize the successful campaign to pass Measure N, also known as the living-wage measure. The measure, which passed by more than 64 percent of the vote, requires that hotels with 100 rooms or more pay their workers at least $13 an hour, offer sick leave and impose a mandatory 2-percent annual pay raise. The measure, driven by hotel union UNITE (formerly the union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Employees) HERE (Hotel Employees and Restaurant Employees International Union) Local 11, however, stipulates that the wage mandates be voided if any of the hotels agree to unionize. Earlier this year, two Hyatt hotels in downtown Long Beach were the first to form a union after the measure’s passage. Now, three city ordinances related to employees working at concessionaires for the Long Beach Airport and the Long Beach Convention Center have come forward. On Tuesday, Dec. 10, the City Council unanimously approved a worker retention ordinance, which requires that contractors at both public facilities retain employees if a new contract is approved, and a labor peace agreement, allowing workers the right to unionize while agreeing to no labor disputes, boycotts or walkouts. Another proposal, which is on the agenda for the Dec. 17 Council meeting, is a living-wage ordinance, mandating the same requirements at Measure N, including the $13 minimum wage, for all employees working at Airport and Convention Center concessionaires. Fourth District Councilmember Patrick O’Donnell, Vice Mayor Robert Garcia and 7th District Councilmember James Johnson introduced the item. “We don’t need to be scared to organize,” said Landino, who left the panel discussion immediately after speaking through a Spanish-to-English translator.

To r ea d o r d own l oa d f ul l iss ue s of th e S ig n al Tr ibu n e, vi s it

signal tribune .com

“There are all kinds of people supporting us. We just need to take that first step… Si se puede! (Yes we can!)” Moderator Darick Simpson, executive director of the Long Beach Community Action Partnership, asked his own questions and those from the audience during the panel discussion, which was sponsored by 15 community groups, including Housing Long Beach, the Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles and the Long Beach Coalition for Good Jobs and a Healthy Community. Other than Landino, panelists included: Derek Smith, political director for UNITE HERE Local 11; Peter Dreier, distinguished professor of politics and chair of the Urban & Environmental Policy Department at Occidental College; and Roya Babazadeh, director of enforcement operations for the City of Los Angeles Housing and Community Development Department. Jan Breidenbach, former executive director of the Southern California Association of Non-Profit Housing and a public-policy professor at USC, was invited as a panelist but was unable to attend. Dreier, a published author who once worked as a housing director for the Boston redevelopment authority, said that, contrary to statements from business organizations such as the Chamber of Commerce, there is no evidence that passing policies to raise the minimum wage or forcing developers to protect or add affordable-housing stock would hurt the economy. In fact, he said evidence indicates that such policies would improve the overall economy since they would enable lowincome families to spend more money at local businesses and improve the standard of living. “Affordable housing and higher wages are good for everybody,” Dreier said. “They’re good for the economy. They’re good for the workers. They’re good for the neighborhood to maintain the property, and they’re good for the businesses because the businesses will prosper. So it’s a win-win.” Dreier added that 81 percent of Americans in a national poll indicated that they believe individuals who work full time should not live below the poverty line. “What was once a radical idea has now become common sense,” he said. “If you work full time you should not live in poverty. That means that we need to have minimum wage roughly at $10.50 an hour. We also know that there are some cities that have a much higher cost of living.” Dreier pointed out that cities such as Long Beach are able to impose higher wages on certain industries that can only be located in the city and benefit from a captured market. He gave an example of a city near Seattle, Washington, where the biggest employer is the airport and voters just raised the minimum wage to $15 an hour. “People said this will ruin the economy and the town, but it’s unlikely that the Seattle airport is going to move to Mexico or China,” Dreier said. “You can say the same things about a lot of these industries

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

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that are pretty sticky.” Smith noted that no hotels have closed up shop because of the passage of Measure N, adding that the worst that has happened is some hotels have discontinued rooms to skirt around the 100-room requirement. “I don’t think that hurt the city of Long Beach,” he said. After the panel discussion, Nikole Cababa, community organizer for the Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy, or LAANE, a group that worked with UNITE HERE to campaign for Measure N, said that the living-wage ordinance is critical to make sure public facilities protect sustainable jobs. “If there’s any development that takes our taxpayer dollars, we want to make sure that there’s benefits to revenue for the community,” she said. “It’s our money, so we want to make sure good jobs are attached to that.” Kerry Gallagher, executive director of Housing Long Beach, said the affordablehousing advocacy group and others are calling on the City to include three main city-policy proposals in Long Beach’s Housing Element, a State-mandated planning document that sets guidelines for housing development for the next eight years. Those proposals include a citywide inclusionary or mixed-income housing ordinance that would require developers to set aside 10 percent of all new apartments and condominiums as affordable, a commercial linkage fee that would secure funds for affordable housing through fees on commercial developers and a rentescrow or rent-trust account program in which residents living in “substandard units” are allowed to pay their rent to the City where it’s held in an account until provisions are fixed. According to Gallagher, the Council is expected to vote on the Housing Element at its Jan. 7 meeting. The Council has until February to approve the document. “Because we continue to lose money for affordable housing and because we don’t have any policies that require affordable housing here in Long Beach, we could easily go the next eight years with no new affordable-housing development, and we are not okay with that,” she said. “We know that our workers and our families are elderly and are students who deserve to live in a quality place that they can afford.” Dreier and other speakers implored the audience to take action and “push” politicians to make changes. He said that in recent weeks groups have been organizing all across the country, including protests on Black Friday, in which people demanded improved conditions for WalMart workers and demonstrations supporting higher wages for fast-food employees. “It is not impossible to win big dreams or win big victories when people organize,” Dreier said. “Long Beach is a city that … is sort of invisible because it’s often in the shadow of LA, but in most states Long Beach would be the biggest city in the state ... You can win big things here, and I hope you do.” ß

EYE ON CRIME

Crimes reported by SHPD Citywide

Thursday, Dec. 5 Recovered stolen vehicle 10:46am– 2500 block E. PCH

Elder abuse 4:53pm– 1800 block Stanley Ave.

Recovered stolen vehicle 6:07pm– 3300 block Atlantic Ave.

Identity theft 8:05pm– 800 block E. Spring St.

Friday, Dec. 6 Recovered stolen vehicle 1:28am– 700 block E. Spring St.

Elder abuse 8:23am– 2600 block E. 19th St.

Saturday, Dec. 7 DUI 2:11am– Las Brisas Way/California Ave. Commercial burglary 9:33am– 900 block E. 33rd St.

Garage, residential burglary 10 pm– 2200 block Legion Dr.

Grand theft, automobile/livestock 10:20pm– 3200 block California Ave. Monday, Dec. 9 Residential burglary 7:15am– 2200 block St. Louis Ave.

Robbery of person 3:15pm– Atlantic Ave./ E. 21st St.

Friday, Dec. 6 Grand theft auto 3:30pm– 2000 block Atlantic Ave.

Recovered stolen vehicle 9:55am– 3500 block E. PCH

Saturday, Dec. 7 Grand theft auto 10 am– 3700 block Lewis Ave.

Stolen vehicle 7:57pm– 2500 block Cherry Ave.

Grand theft auto 9pm– 3100 block Locust Ave.

Commercial burglary 11 am– 2400 block Cherry Ave.

Wednesday, Dec. 11 Forgery 2:05pm– 2100 block Cherry Ave.

Stolen vehicle 9:18pm– 1000 block E. 32nd St.

Crimes reported by LBPD Council Districts 6, 7 & 8

Thursday, Dec. 5 Grand theft auto 8am– 2300 block Magnolia Ave.

Grand theft auto 11:30am– 2900 block Daisy Ave.

Monday, Dec. 9 Grand theft auto 3:45pm– 1800 block Lemon Ave.

Tuesday, Dec. 10 Grand theft auto 8:40am– 4500 block Atlantic Ave.

Wednesday, Dec. 11 Recovered stolen vehicle 2:36am– 2400 block Long Beach Blvd.


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CULTURE

18 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Imitating Life

DECEMBER 13, 2013

Posing questions to local artist Patrick Williams

cory Bilicko Managing Editor

In 100 words or less, how would you describe what you do as an artist? I pursue creating works that I per-

sonally, as a believer in art, want to see and experience. I toil to create exciting, engaging and entertaining experiences and environments. In mixed materials; environmentally friendly, reused

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and recycled ingredients; and sometimes just plain old paint, I labor for that moment with my audience where the spark of what they know meets the fuel of something they haven’t considered yet.

Why do you make art? I realized early on that mathematics was not a field of study that would be welcoming me with open arms.

How has your art changed over time? My work has definitively and proSignalgressively become more and more awesome.

Tues.-Thurs.: 5pm to 9pm ¥ Friday: 5pm to 9:30pm ¥ Sat.:?Noon to 9:30pm

What are you currently working on? I [built] a massive installation/performance/sculpture piece for the

Patrick Williams

Arts Council of Long Beach’s ALOT project. My piece [debuted] in the evening on the 12th of October, in the lot on the corner of Anaheim and Walnut. It [was] a fun and completely different kind of public sculpture. I’m also working on a series of paintings that I’ve been calling

Can you describe a time when you first realized that being an artist was something you absolutely had to do? I must have been in high school. I started to realize that making things was a large part of who I am. I think it always had been, but at that point I started to become a bit more introspective and aware of art’s role in my life.

“Vacation,” watercolor on paper

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What’s the best thing about being an artist? I do what I love.

Have you ever been banned or censored to any degree as an artist? If so, how did you react? If not, how do you think you would react in that situation? I don't think I’ve ever really been banned or censored, but then I’m not really interested in making those kinds of statements or asking those kinds of questions with my work.

Mainstage

Thursday, Friday & Saturday at 8pm, Sunday at 2pm

Does art-making ever frustrate you? If so, how do you deal with that frustration? Making art is usually the answer to other frustrations.

What are one or two primary areas of fear for you as an artist? I assume I will die early, slowly and horribly as a result of some solvent, pigment or other toxic artist’s materials. Other than that, what’s to fear? It’s art, not really a life-ordeath pursuit– might as take some well chances.

“P-51,” watercolor on paper

The classic tale of Ebenezer Scrooge, the miser who finds the real meaning of Christmas in his heart, after visits by three spirits.

Midlife Crisis that I’m totally in love with right now.

3900 Atlantic Ave., Long Beach (Bixby Knolls) 562-427-2233 • Open 7 Days • 6am-10pm

What kind of creative rituals do you have? I think the only one I really have is cleaning my studio in between larger projects, series and the like. It’s mostly about resetting my space so I can think a bit clearer– more of a habit than a ritual. Which creative medium would you love to pursue but haven’t yet? Filmmaking.

Do you have a least favorite color? It's not that I I don’t really like them, but I find violets and purples difficult to see and thus work with. I tend not to use them much in my work. MORE INFORMATION pwilliamsart.com


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CULTURE

DECEMBER 13, 2013 Theatre review

Long Beach is Sinking at The Garage Theatre Gregory Spooner Culture Writer

Google “Long Beach is Sinking,” and the first thing that will pop up is not the Garage Theatre’s latest production; it is a link to the City of Long Beach website. This link briefly explains that our city was once known as “the sinking city” and that drilling and removal of oil (and to a lesser extent, water) has resulted in up to 20 square miles of coastal land sinking almost 30 feet! Fortunately, this sinking has been arrested by having the oil companies inject seawater underground to replace the oil they are pumping out. The oil companies didn’t do this from the start, and the result was that “Damage to public and private property and the rebuilding of Port facilities have cost billions in today’s dollars.” (See longbeach.gov/oil/subsidence .) I first learned about our sinking city in a history class at LBCC almost 20 years ago. What concerned me the most was learning that the water that we pump down to take the place of the oil must constantly be replenished. It’s not a matter of pumping down one gallon of water for each gallon of oil and forgetting about it; there are now so many holes in the aquifer from years of drilling that the water soon seeps out. We must keep pumping down water to maintain enough pressure to prevent the subsidence. Right now, the pumps that do this are paid for and run by the oil companies that are still extracting what’s left of our oil, but that won’t last forever. And when it runs out, where is the profit in pumping water into the ground? Call me cynical, but I prognosticate this bill being picked up by John Q. Public quicker than you can say, “Chapter 11.” When I learned that the Garage Theatre’s latest production was entitled Long Beach is Sinking, I was eager to attend. It’s not often you get to see a production about your own neighborhood, let alone one that’s based on fact, yet still filled with danger and intrigue. When I learned the production was to be a melodrama, accompanied by live music, and great for kids, my interest was only piqued further. The last production I saw at Garage Theatre was Trojan Barbie, and it was excellent, so it seemed the stars were aligned for a delightful evening. Upon entering the modest theatre (you may want to get your tickets online in advance, as the theatre only seats about 40), I was immediately impressed by Yuri Okohana’s set design. The walls were filled with the signs of that icon of yesteryear– the Long Beach Pike. My father took me

to the Pike when I was a child, and I still have memories of its old-time, Coney Island feel. Playwright Jamie Sweet then addressed us as the play was about to begin. Being a melodrama, he passed out cloth tomatoes (that we were encouraged to throw at the villians) and flowers (for the heroine). Each character was then introduced, along with their “theme music,” which was always played as they entered the scene. Finally, the audience was led in a rousing warmup of “Heads, Shoulders, Knees and Toes.” (Did I mention this was a great show for kids?!) The play’s set-up is that our hero Rod (Rob Young) runs the Cyclone Racer rollercoaster at the Pike but finds it is repeatedly damaged due to the land beginning to sink. When a large sinkhole opens up, Rod and his girlfriend Dixie (Lola Jaye) decide to go underground to investigate the cause. Here they encounter the archvillain and his minions (Oil, Commerce and Industry) who have been morphed into giant mole-people. (Once again, doesn’t this sound like a play it would be great to bring the kids to?) Acting in melodrama must be a challenge. The genre demands that the acting is not “good” in that it should not be realistic; just like the plot, it should be exaggerated and larger-than-life. The actors must then walk the tightrope between realism and ridiculousness and somehow make their performances “work.” The troupe at the Garage Theatre did more than deliver on this. While the characters are the archetypes we all expect (villain, hero, damsel-in-distress, mad scientist, etc.), the actors all manage to emboss their own unique spin on them. Clayton Steacker’s policeman, “Frenchy,” was an unexpected comic gem; furthermore, he manned the keyboard for accompanying live music with fellow cast member Gus Palooka on guitar. Lola Jaye played the archetypical, fast-talkin’-city-gal reporter... with moxie! Will McCrabb’s standout performance as “the Professor” had him channeling the late, great Peter Sellers in Dr. Strangelove, down to the single black-gloved hand! Ian Sidious (played by Joe Howells) fulfills his task of arch-villain, complete with nefarious laughter. He even stooped to occasionally lobbing the cloth tomatoes back into the audience! The show has an intermission, at which time free ice cream (or Toffuti for the lactose-intolerant crowd) is served. (Free ice cream! Is this play great for kids, or what?!) My only complaint about Long Beach is Sinking is that it didn’t go

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

19

Courtesy Garage Theatre

From left: Clayton Steacker, Katie Faris, Rob Young and Sally Nguyen in The Garage Theatre’s production of Long Beach is Sinking

into more depth on the real story behind the melodrama. We know there was a great deal of damage that occurred when subsidence began. We can be sure that the three forces of Oil, Commerce and Industry butted heads over this (Oil must have denied it, while Commerce and Industry probably got the short end of the subsidence stick), rather than

cooperating in an “Axis of Evil.” Perhaps including some of this backstory rather than “the Mole people” would have appealed more to the adults in the audience. But I’m probably trying to dig too deep. This is a melodrama– intended for kids– not Chinatown. Long Beach is Sinking will play at

the Garage Theatre through Saturday, Dec. 21. The venue is located at 251 E. 7th St. Performances are Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays at 8pm; matinees are on Saturdays only at 2pm. Tickets are $12 general admission for adults and $5 for children. For tickets and more information, call 866-811-4111 or visit thegaragetheatre.org .

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