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“Madame Fortuna” Archival ink on acid-free fine-texture paper by Anthony Smyers

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SERVING BIXBY KNOLLS, CALIFORNIA HEIGHTS, LOS CERRITOS, WRIGLEY AND THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

Vol. 35 No. 22

Roadwork on portion of Atlantic Avenue causes bottleneck, impacts some businesses

Your Weekly Community Newspaper

November 1, 2013

Photos by CJ Dablo/Signal Tribune

Lola’s Mexican Restaurant on 4th Street celebrates El Dia de los Muertos every day with colorful memorabilia.

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

A sign notifies motorists that businesses along a section of Atlantic Avenue are still open while construction to repave the street and replace sidewalks and curbs is underway. The roadwork is expected to be completed by mid-November. Sean Belk Staff Writer

Construction crews began roadwork last month along a stretch of Atlantic Avenue, blocking off right lanes in each direction from 33rd Street to Bixby Road and causing traffic to back up daily along the retail business corridor. City officials expect the $1.5-million project to repave the street with rubberized asphalt pavement

and replace curbs and sidewalks to be completed by mid November, just before Thanksgiving. In the meantime, vehicles have been directed around cones and barricades while pedestrians have had to meander around gaping holes in the street. But impacts to businesses that rely on curbside parking and access to driveways, especially during lunchtime hours, will be “unavoidable” for the

Hamilton Bowl’s transformation into Chittick Field sports park on track to be finished by March 2014

see ATLANTIC page 13

Sean Belk Staff Writer

Children make their way home from school as bulldozers shovel dirt across 19 acres of excavated land, fenced off between Walnut and Cherry avenues, just north of Pacific Coast Highway in central Long Beach. The sunken property has historically been called Hamilton Bowl, but work is steadily underway on a community Sean Belk/Signal Tribune vision to turn the grounds into a sports park, complete with a A bulldozer drives up what will be a bike path at the 19-acre site, historiregulation football field, soccer cally called Hamilton Bowl or the “dust bowl,” which acts as a stormwafields and other athletic facili- ter-detention basin for Los Angeles County. City officials expect ties, in hopes that the site by construction of a new sports park, including a football field, soccer fields next year will live up to its other and a running track, to be completed by March 2014. name– Chittick Field. New light poles, rows of seating, a bike path and a 400-meter, all-weather running track that can already be seen at the site are all part of a nearly $8-million renovation project, touted as one of the “largest park projects” in Long Beach in several years that city officials expect to be completed by March 2014. The property will continue to serve its original purpose as a stormwater-detention basin owned by Los Angeles County, but the City was able to work out a deal through a land-use agreement with the County to

Embracing El Dia de los Muertos

Lola’s Mexican Restaurant brings out the whimsical side of a misunderstood holiday

CJ Dablo Staff Writer

Guests at Lola’s can’t ignore the skeletons hanging in the Mexican restaurant on Long Beach’s Retro Row. You’ll see dead people at Lola’s. You’ll even dine next to them. Outside, a giant white skull sports a flower over its temple. The painted wood-cutout skull grins over the dark, rust-colored stucco restaurant storefront on Fourth Street and Cherry Avenue. Inside, Jesus stretches across a two-foot-tall, pink, wooden crucifix suspended over a stack of water glasses. Above the bar, 12inch lady skeleton dolls pose in wide-brimmed hats. Tiny, round (presumably bony) hips poke out from the blue and rose floorlength gowns. A matador skeleton stands ready for his next bullfight in a print on the opposite wall. “What’s with all the dead stuff? Why is it so scary in here?”customers will ask restaurant co-owner Brenda Rivera. “They are freaked [out] by it because they don’t really understand it,” Rivera acknowledges. A few years ago, Rivera agreed to an interview to explain the significance of the décor. She spoke loudly above the din of forks scraping the last morsel of enchiladas off plates, the ping of ice cubes floating in Sangria goblets and the diners’ constant chatter which echoed over tiled floor. Celebrants of El Dia de los Muertos often depict the The décor, which feels a little dead in skeletal form engaging in some of the same like the exuberance of Mardis activities they did when they were alive, according to

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ST3522 - Nov. 1_Layout 1 10/31/13 4:40 Pm Page 2

NEWS

2 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Mayor Foster’s office, Google offering Long Beach businesses free websites Long Beach Mayor Bob Foster announced an initiative this week to help Long Beach businesses increase their Internet visibility through Google’s Get Your Business Online (GYBO) program. The program is a partnership between Foster’s office and Google. “Businesses have to be where their customers are. Today, that means you have to be online,” Foster said. “Although 97 percent of Internet users are now looking online to find local products and services, 62 percent of businesses in California still do not have a website.” Get Your Business Online provides business owners with a custom domain name, customizable web pages, web

hosting and access to educational resources free of charge for one year. Since its debut in July 2011, the program has helped more than 135,000 businesses across the country successfully get online, according to Foster’s office. Long Beach business operator and co-owner Cynthia Longbrake of Murphy’s Pub in Belmont Shore recently put together her business’s first website, MurphysPubLongBeach.com, through the GYBO program. “Our website opens my business to a whole new batch of customers,” Longbrake said. “Although Belmont Shore residents know about Murphy’s, there are Long Beach visitors who aren’t familiar with our unique loca-

tion. People today rely more on their Smartphones to find a place to grab a bite to eat or drink. It was well worth the investment of my time to set up Murphy’s website.” Interested business owners can visit LongBeachGYBO.com or call Foster’s office at (562) 570-6801 for more information about the program. “The misconception that getting online is complex, costly and time-consuming has prevented many small businesses from taking the first step,” said Scott Levitan, director of Small Business Engagement at Google. “This program makes it fast, easy and free for businesses to get online.” Source: City of LB

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NOVEMBER 1, 2013

The Campaign Trail

Community activist Joan Greenwood has entered the race for the Long Beach City Council’s 7th District, according to the City’s “Potential Candidates Primary Nominating Election” webpage. • Benjimin C. Daugherty has entered the race for the 9th District Long Beach Council seat, according to the City’s “Potential Candidates Primary Nominating Election” webpage. • Stella Ursua, a local business owner, nonprofit president and community organizer, has announced her candidacy for the District 3 Board of Trustees seat for the Long Beach Community College District. • The Committee to Elect Dr. Marshall Blesofsky to Long Beach City College Board of Trustees, 5th District Councilmember Gerrie Schipske and Brophy Dale will host a campaign fundraiser on Thursday, Nov. 14 from 6pm to 8pm at Phil Trani’s Restaurant, 3490 Long Beach Blvd. Contributon is $100. RSVP to Ammie Grauten at (562) 253-9653 or contact@blesofskyforlbcc.com . • Uduak Ntuk has announced that he has received the endorsements of the Long Beach Association of Engineering Employees and Laborers’ International Union of North America Local in his bid for the Long Beach Unified School District Board of Education’s 1st District seat. • The following are the candidates who have thus far filed for the various seats that will be on the April 8, 2014 Long Beach city election ballot (listed in order in which they filed intention statements):

Mayor Damon Dunn Jana Shields Gerrie Schipske Doug Otto Robert Garcia Kareem Muhammad Richard Camp Bonnie Lowenthal Steven Mozena City attorney Charles Parkin James Johnson Matthew Pappas

City prosecutor Rosemary Chavez Doug Haubert

Council District 1 Jason Aula Ricardo Linarez Pilar Pinel Lena Gonzalez Misi Tagaloa

Council District 3 Martha Gibson Jack Rosenberg James Lewis Stephen Bello Lionel Gatley

Council District 5 Joseph Luyben Stacy Mungo Carl Kemp Thomas Sutfin

Council District 7 Larry King Roberto Uranga Joan Greenwood

Council District 9 Rex Richardson Ben Daugherty

The Los Angeles County Registrar-Recorder/City Clerk’s office has not yet posted a list of candidates for Long Beach Unified School District and Long Beach Community College District Governing Board Member elections.

Bernard couldn't be happier: a flat in Paris and three gorgeous stewardesses all engaged to him without knowing about each other. But Bernard’s perfect life gets bumpy when his friend Robert comes to stay and a new and speedier Boeing jet throws off all of his careful planning.

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NOVEMBER 1, 2013

NEWS

Law prohibiting self-service checkout of alcohol at Fresh & Easy, other stores officially goes into effect

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

3

Sean Belk Staff Writer

As of last month, it is now illegal for customers to buy alcoholic beverages at self-service checkout stands at Fresh & Easy stores or at any other grocer in California. A state law prohibiting patrons from purchasing alcohol at self-service checkouts officially went into effect in October after grocery-store companies fought but lost a battle in court that essentially delayed the law’s implementation. Sean Belk/Signal Tribune The legislation, known as AB 183, was The Fresh & Easy Neighborhood Market at 3300 Atlantic Ave. in Bixby Knolls is one of the remainpassed by the Legisla- ing stores that will have to comply with a new law that went into effect last month, prohibiting custure and signed into tomers from purchasing alcohol at self-service checkouts. law by Gov. Jerry Phone calls left and emails sent by compliance,” he said. “Because of the Brown in 2011, with the regulation set to go into effect on Jan. 1, 2012, but an the Signal Tribune to Fresh & Easy ramifications of not being in complieffort to overturn the law in court post- representatives were not returned by ance, by and large, as far as we can tell, I think everybody’s pretty much in compress time. poned enforcement. Dave Heylen, vice president of pliance.” In December 2011, The California John Carr, spokesperson for ABC, Grocers Association (CGA), a trade asso- communications for CGA, said in a ciation representing 500 retail members phone interview that the association’s said the agency now has the right to that operate more than 6,000 food stores goal now is to make sure its members enforce the law that carries misdemeanor charges and the possibility of in California and Nevada, filed a petition are complying with state law. “We are now working with our having an alcohol license revoked for with the California Third District Court of Appeals for a stay of enforcement members to make sure everyone’s in full violations. ß through a writ of mandate. Prior to the law going into effect, the California Alcoholic Beverage Control Department (ABC) issued an industry advisory, clarifying that simply “monitoring” customers during alcohol purchases at self-service checkout stands located on the licensee’s physical premises “does not satisfy the language and intent of the statute.” The advisory noted that “no alcoholic beverages may be sold through any checkout stand that is enabled to allow operation by the customer at the time the customer’s check-out transaction commences or at any point during the check-out process.” According to the law’s language, allowing customers to purchase alcohol through self-service checkouts “facilitates the purchase of alcoholic beverages by minors,” permits heavily intoxicated customers to purchase alcohol in violation of state law and “allows greater theft of alcoholic beverages, thereby depriving the state of tax revenues.” CGA representatives, however, claimed that the language in AB 183 is vague and confusing. The association also said the United Food and Commercial Workers International Union is primarily behind the bill. CGA states that there is no evidence that links self-service checkouts to an increase in alcohol sales to minors. While the law applies to all retail stores with self-service checkouts, the main business affected is Fresh & Easy Neighborhood Market, which is nonunion and is the only grocer in California that has based its business model on a self-service-checkout-only system. In September, British-owned Tesco announced that investment firm The Yucaipa Companies is purchasing 150 Fresh & Easy stores in the United States, while about 50 are expected to close. For years, Fresh & Easy has argued that its on-hand staff members have been notified if a customer attempts to purchase alcohol and it has been the company’s policy to require that employees check a customer’s identification. Still, the new law requires that customers take no part in the transaction, even scanning, and only employees are allowed to conduct such alcohol purchases. The law also requires that all retail stores post signs to notify customers of the regulation. It’s unclear if the law will now force Fresh & Easy to have at least one fully staffed checkout stand in its stores. At most other grocery stores, customers buying alcohol will be directed to fully staffed checkout lanes that are already in operation.

TAKE A WALK What Heron hike Who Los Cerritos Wetlands Where The driveway/parking area at the corner of 1st St. and PCH in Seal Beach When Saturday, Nov. 2 from 8am to 9:45am More Info Parking lot gate will open at 7:45am and close at 8:10am. All participants must stay for the entire tour. Closed-toed shoes are required. Kids under 16 must be accompanied by an adult. Email ejlambe@verizon.net . A UNIQUE FRIENDSHIP What Book-signing Who Mukta Cholette Where Farm Lot 59, 2714 California Ave, When Saturday, Nov. 2 from 10am to 2pm More Info Mukta Cholette will have a book-signing for her book A Pig For Friendship. The picture book for children ages 3 to 10 focuses on a young girl named Violette and her relationship with her family, environment, and forthcoming barn-animal friends.

A PIPE ORGAN CELEBRATION What Concert Who Friends of Music at California Heights United Methodist Church Where 3759 Orange Ave. When Sunday, Nov. 3 at 3pm More Info The event will feature a performance by organist James Petri. Musical selections will include works by Bach, Barber, Mendelssohn and others. Call (562) 595-1996 or visit calheightsumc.org .

EARLY HOLIDAY SHOPPING What Holiday fair Who Miller Children’s Hospital Long Beach Auxiliary Where Monday, Nov. 4 and Tuesday, Nov. 5 from 8am to 5pm When Long Beach Memorial Hospital, 2801 Atlantic Ave. More Info Items such as gifts, household items, clothes, jewelry and medical-related clothing will be available for purchase.

MEET AND EAT What Supper club Who Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association When Monday, Nov. 4 at 6:30pm Where George’s ‘50s Diner, 4390 Atlantic Ave. More Info Bixby Knolls Supper Club patronizes local restaurants on Monday nights, which are typically slow. Residents are invited to meet, eat and support the local economy. Visit supperclub@bixbyknollsinfo.com .

TALKING TREES What Presentation Who The Sierra Club Where Environmental Services Bureau, 2929 E. Willow St. When Wednesday, Nov. 6 at 7:30pm More Info During the monthly meeting, author and Ph.D. Gil Thibault will provide a free presentation on the Bristlecone pine trees, the world’s oldest living trees. The presentation will highlight how the trees have come to be found in this particular region of California.

HONORING OUR VETS What Vets Fest 2013 Who Ninth District Councilmember Steven Neal Where Houghton Park, 6301 Myrtle Ave. When Saturday, Nov. 9 from 7:30am to 3pm More Info This event is free and open to the public. The Veterans Festival follows the 17th Annual Long Beach Veterans Day Parade and the Veterans Classic 1-Mile Run. The event will feature gourmet food trucks, service organizations for military veterans and families, City departments and other vendors. Live music will be provided by the Jordan High Jazz Band & Drumline, Elvis Presley impersonator Fernie Ramirez and the Rush Hour Band. Call (562) 570-6137.

YOU’RE A PEACH What El Dorado Sugar Peach Festival Who El Dorado Park West Where 2800 N. Studebaker Rd. When Saturday, Nov. 9 from 9am to 4pm More Info The event will feature gourmet food trucks and different craft and plant vendors. Call (562) 570-3227.

GIFTS GALORE What Alternative Christmas Market Who California Heights United Methodist Church Where 3759 Orange Ave. When Sunday, Nov. 10 from 11am to 1pm More Info This market provides an opportunity to buy handcrafted items such as clothing, home decor, ornaments, cards, handbags, toys, jewelry and more from nonprofit cooperatives. Organizations will include Red Bird Mission, Church World Service, Empowering Lives International, Africa Team Ministries, Guatemala Project, Habitat for Humanity, For the Child, and Wings of Hope in Haiti. Pigs in a blanket, brown-cow ice cream floats and homemade pies will also be available for purchase to benefit Heifer Project. Call (562) 595-1996 or visit calheightsumc.org .

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NEWS

4 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

NOVEMBER 1, 2013

Appellate court orders cities to pay water bills but affirms WRD is required to return overcharges Sean Belk

on the litigation to determine the amount to which the cities are entitled has yet to be issued. In what some city officials say is a “split decision,” however, the recent ruling affirms that WRD may be required to return money it had “overcharged” the cities in past years, and the cities may be able to recover “an undetermined amount of the payments” once damages are officially awarded, according to a joint statement from the cities. The court also ruled that the cities aren’t required to pay interest on the amounts withheld to date. According to a statement from WRD, the cities have collectively withheld more than $16.7 million in water bills over the last two and a half years. Legal counsel for the cities directed them to hold the payment amounts in escrow until a final judgment is made. Attor-

Staff Writer

A California Appellate Court issued an interim ruling at a hearing on Wednesday, Oct. 30 that orders the cities of Bellflower, Cerritos, Downey and Signal Hill to pay their delinquent water bills. The cities had withheld the assessments from the Water Replenishment District of Southern California (WRD) for more than two years while the municipalities challenged the legality of the water agency’s assessed fees charged for replenishing groundwater. The cities so far have won the case filed in 2010 that WRD didn’t follow a state law known as Proposition 218 when it approved raising replenishment-assessment rates, as a judge ruled twice in favor of the cities, but a final judgment

neys advised that paying the bills would have constituted a “gift of public funds.” The appellate court, however, cited the “pay first, litigate later” doctrine as the reason for overturning the trial court’s initial ruling that the cities didn’t have to pay the assessment, according to the cities’ statement. Still, the cities claim that WRD overcharged the southeast Los Angeles County cities by more than $10 million per year to subsidize the coastal communities and oil refineries. “Despite the court rulings, the WRD has not only failed to adhere to Proposition 218 procedural requirements for levying assessments, it has also taken the position that it is not obligated to return overpayments, a position rejected by the court,” read the cities’

OPINION

statement. “Instead of following the law, the WRD has instituted a bogus protest mechanism that bypasses the cities’ right to protest the assessments, even though the cities are directly responsible for paying the assessments. “ The WRD, which released a counter statement, called the recent ruling a “victory” for WRD ratepayers, referring to residents who ultimately pay for the assessments through a portion of their water bills. “This is a huge win for WRD ratepayers and the residents of these cities,” said WRD Board President Robert Katherman. “Residents can rest assured that when they pay their water bills, that money is going to pay for clean, reliable water and for ensuring that the region’s long-term water needs are met.” ß

houghts from the Publisher T by Neena Strichart Again this year, I had a ball at the City of Signal Hill’s Halloween Carnival. There, youngsters were treated to booth after booth featuring games with prizes, candy, small toys and lots of spooky fun. The festivities took place last Saturday afternoon/evening, and I had the opportu-

nity to once again help staff a booth with my gal pal Rose Richard. This season our task was to help kids ages 5 and under put together faces on a board that depicted minions from the movie Despicable Me. Using various versions of hair, eyes and mouths; we guided the little costumed darlings through the experience with as much enthusiasm as we could muster. Not wanting to just repeat the same phrase of “Where do the eyes (or eye) go, where does the hair go and where does the mouth go?” I did my best to mix it up a little– even if just to entertain myself. One of the stick-on pieces that was supposed to be hair also resembled a mustache. And although I did my best to convince the kids that a minion could have a mustache, nearly all of them looked at me like I was an idiot for even suggesting it. Nevertheless, two older kids humored me by putting the facial hair look-a-like behind the stick-on mouth, making for a perfect vision of a minion with a handlebar mustache. They were immediately rewarded by me with a smile, a wink and a handful of extra candy. According to city staff, the event drew nearly 800 kids with accompaNeena Strichart/Signal Tribune nying family members– that’s a lot Sunshine, a very enthusiastic 3-year-old, completes her minion face and is rewarded with candy– even if she did of ghouls, goblins and princesses! I understand that over the past use the hair on the head instead of as a mustache!

Saying yes to saying no

few years most cities have had to cut community-services events because of budget issues, however our neighborhood families are fortunate that so many of our local businesses and individuals donate their time and Neena Strichart/Signal Tribune money to help make Signal Hill librarian Gail Ashbrooke dons a beautiful costume and shows such events possible. off a large billboard thanking local sponsors. This year, those donating to the Halloween Carnival were Mesa Environmental Services Incorporated, RP Vititow Construction Corp., Assemblymember Bonnie Lowenthal, Home Office, RMS Company, Aleshire & Wynder, Signal Hill Employee Association, Mercedes-Benz of Long Beach, Gary Dudley, Aquarium of the Pacific, CBM/KOA Consulting, Concerned Citizens of Signal Hill, Hooman Nissan of Long Beach, Golden Eagle Restaurant, Courtyard Care Center, Mr. C’s Towing, Reldom Corporation, Coldwell Banker’s Terry Rogers, RKA Consulting Group, the Signal Tribune, Signal Hill Petroleum, Everson Spice Co., PT Industries Inc., Big E’s Pizza and Los Angeles County Supervisor Don Knabe. A big thank-you goes out to the City and Photo by Fonzie Nguyen the sponsors. I wish we would have had Six-year-old Signal Hill resident Kelvin sports his events like that when I was growing up! version of what a young Batman might look like.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

All across America students of all ages were celebrating National Red Ribbon Week [Oct. 21 through Oct. 25]. Students are learning the negative effects of drugs, alcohol, tobacco and bullying. Longfellow had a very eventful week. Each day of the week each student received a gift that represents saying “no to drugs.” Rather than just learning about the negative effects of drugs, Longfellow took a slightly different approach and taught the students about making better lifestyle choices and decisions. For every action there is a reaction. Longfellow wrapped the week up with a special Red Ribbon Flag Ceremony where every student and staff member took a pledge to lead a healthier lifestyle. Longfellow was honored to have a special guest at the flag ceremony– Councilman Al Austin II, 8th District. While attending the flag ceremony, Mr. Austin joined the Longfellow PTA. Nancy Johnson Red Ribbon Chairperson Longfellow Elementary School PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Neena R. Strichart

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

MANAGING EDITOR

Stephen M. Strichart

Cory Bilicko

CULTURE WRITERS

Daniel Adams Vicki Paris Goodman Gregory Spooner

Leighanna Nierle

ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS

STAFF WRITERS

CJ Dablo Sean Belk

DESIGN EDITOR/PRODUCTION MANAGER

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/WEBSITE MANAGER

Tanya Paz

Barbie Ellisen Ashley Goodsell COLUMNISTS

Jennifer E. Beaver Shoshanah Siegel

Carol Berg Sloan, RD

The Signal Tribune welcomes letters to the editor, which should be signed, dated and include a phone number to verify authenticity. Letters are due by noon on the Tuesday before desired publication date. The Signal Tribune reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, language and space requirements. The Signal Tribune does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other publications or otherwise presented in a public forum. Letters to the editor and commentaries are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Signal Tribune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, letters to the editor and commentaries are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. Letter-writers will be identified by their professional titles or affiliations when, and only when, the editorial staff deems it relevant and/or to provide context to the letter. We do not run letters to the editor submitted by individuals who have declared their candidacies for public office in upcoming races. This policy was put in place because, to be fair, if we publish one, we would have to publish all letters submitted by all candidates. The volume would no doubt eliminate space for letters submitted by other readers. Instead, we agree to interview candidates and print stories about political races in an objective manner and offer very reasonable advertising rates for those candidates who wish to purchase ads. The Signal Tribune is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. Yearly subscriptions are available for $50.

939 E. 27th St., Signal Hill, CA 90755 (562) 595-7900 www.signaltribune.com newspaper@signaltribune.com

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NEWS

NOVEMBER 1, 2013

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

5

Judge denies auto-title lender’s petition over LB Council’s objection to moving into Wrigley

File Photo

Pennbrooke Financial Services, LLC has been denied a petition for a writ of mandate against the Long Beach City Council’s refusal to grant the auto-title lender a permit to operate at this vacant lot located at the corner of Pacific Coast Highway and Pacific Avenue, considered a “gateway” to the Wrigley Village district.

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in an effort to dissuade them from taking any regulatory measures. Though there are fewer locations than in the past, there is still an estimated 2,100 to 2,200 payday lenders across the state, she said. “We support the judge’s decision, and I think local communities should have a say in what’s happening in their neighborhoods, including what kind of businesses are appropriate for their particular neighborhood,” Molina said. “We’re very happy that the City of Long Beach went forward, and they were successful at this round.” Phone calls by the Signal Tribune to Pennbrooke’s attorney were not returned before press time. ß

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A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge has denied a petition filed by auto-title lender Pennbrooke Financial Services, LLC for a writ of mandate over the Long Beach City Council’s refusal to grant the company a permit to operate in the Wrigley Village district. The Georgia-based company filed the petition against the City of Long Beach on the grounds that the Council “succumbed to public pressure” in its decision to deny the firm’s request for a conditional-use permit (CUP) last year. The permit was needed for the firm to take up a vacant lot at the corner of Pacific Coast Highway and Pacific Avenue, considered a “gateway” to the Wrigley district. Roger Jon Diamond, a Santa Monica-based attorney representing Pennbrooke Financial, cited a number of reasons to support the case, claiming that the Council’s CUP denial was a violation of California law because it was based on opposition to the type of business the company is, rather than on land-use findings. The attorney argued, among other things, that auto-title loan companies

absolutely correct to conclude that the City Council acted appropriately when it denied Pennbrooke’s CUP application,” Mais said. “The proposed use clearly did not comport with the City's General Plan or the vision of the local community with respect to the use of the property. Hopefully, a suitable business use will be found for this site, and the community and property owner will both benefit from its ultimate use.” The petition was filed just weeks after the Council unanimously voted (9-0) to turn down the business’s CUP application in November 2012. The Council’s decision was made on appeal after the Planning Commission came to a (3-3) tie vote on the permit. City officials have stated that the Council’s decision was based solely on grounds of an inappropriate land use and not on conjecture of the company’s business practices, despite opinions of some residents and councilmembers, who have called such companies “predatory lenders,” claiming they target low-income communities with high-interest-rate loans. The Council’s findings were based on the fact that the property sits on two separate designated land-use districts, a pedestrian-oriented zone and another

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Staff Writer

are legal businesses in California and the assumption that such a business would negatively impact the community is “pre-textual.” According to the petitioner, the opposition to the proposed use was “based on moral objections to predatory lending.” In a tentative judgment on Tuesday, Oct. 22, Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge James C. Chalfant, however, declared that there was in fact “substantial evidence” that supports the Council’s findings that the proposed use would be “detrimental to the surrounding community,” adding that the petitioner failed to prove otherwise, according to court documents. Though the attorney cited a 1995 federal court case in which a topless bar was denied a CUP in Westminster, the judge said the case of Pennbrooke Financial “does not involve First Amendment issues.” Long Beach Assistant City Attorney Michael Mais confirmed in an email that the judge is expected to sign a formal judgment within 10 days from the initial ruling after which Pennbrooke would have 60 days to appeal the judge’s ruling. “From the city attorney's perspective, we believe that the judge was

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zone for small retail operations. Wrigley community activists testified in various meetings that the area is already oversaturated with such shortterm lenders. City officials have stated that there are already 53 such businesses that exist in the city. In particular, a payday lender that also offers autotitle lending is already located within yards of the Wrigley intersection. In hearing the ruling, Lee Fukui, a Wrigley neighborhood resident who fought the business from moving in, said many residents are “relieved” by the judge’s decision. “I'm hoping that Pennbrooke will let this go and not appeal, so that we can put this behind us and move forward in attracting better businesses to the Wrigley area,” he said. “I feel we need to require more from not only residents, but particularly the landlords, local businesses and business property owners to help improve the quality of life in our community. When we act responsibly and work to make the neighborhood cleaner, safer, and healthier, it will be easier to attract new start-up businesses to our city.” The Wrigley gateway is located in a former redevelopment area that residents were working on revitalizing before redevelopment was shut down by the State. Though proposals from various clients have recently come forward, including plans for a brick-and-mortar Wrigley BBQ location, the auto-titleloan company has already signed a lease agreement with the property owner. The Council eventually agreed to put a one-year moratorium on such short-term lenders while developing a new city ordinance. The new law was passed by the Council in September and establishes new definitions and regulations for check-cashing, paydayloan, car-title-loan, signature-loan and other financial-services businesses. Liana Molina, an organizer for the California Reinvestment Association, a statewide, nonprofit financial-justice organization, said these types of cases are common in California, where short-term-loan businesses try to “intimidate” cities with veiled threats

562-498-8788 • 3225 E. Pacific Coast Highway • LB

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6 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Los Cerritos Neighborhood Association to conduct online election for board members The Los Cerritos Neighborhood Association (LCNA) will conduct online elections for two volunteer board of directors positions on Monday, Nov. 4. The LCNA is an organization of Los Cerritos community members who are committed to neighborhood safety and events as well representing the neighborhood at City Hall, according to a press release from the LCNA. There are a total of seven board members who act in accordance with the LCNA bylaws, which may be viewed at loscerritosna.org . The LCNA holds online elections annually in November. The six candidates are: Marilyn Forsha, who has been a Los Cerritos resident for most of her life; Gary Hamrick, a Los Cerritos resident for 15 years; Dani R. Johnson, a Los Cerritos resident for 15 years; Susan Lincoln, a 10-year Los Cerritos resident; La Vonne Miller, a 27-year Los Cerritos resident; and Terry Smiley, who has been a Los Cerritos resident for more than 35 years, according to LCNA. LCNA members will elect two of the six candidates to fill the available positions. Residents of the Los Cerritos neighborhood who would like to partake in the online elections as well as stay up to date with the LCNA may email jayme@loscerritosia.org . Source: LCNA

COMMUNITY

Cruise, car show and luncheon event to raise funds for nonprofit Honoring Our Fallen

The nonprofit organization Honoring Our Fallen will host a fundraiser entitled Cruise Honoring Our Fallen on Saturday, Nov. 16. The event will feature up to 100 classic cars cruising 26 miles through Long Beach to raise awareness about the organization that is dedicated to the needs of families who have lost a loved one abroad or at home while serving in the military or as a first responder. “When the opportunity came along to do something for the families of fallen veterans, I had to get involved,” said Rick Lorenzen, CEO for Price Transfer and Automobilia, which is also the presenting sponsor of the event. Sports celebrities are scheduled to appear, including a player from the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, former welterweight boxing champion Armando Muniz and former MMA welterweight champion Mike “The Joker” Guymon will ride in some of the cars, along with many local families of our nation’s fallen. The cars will roll through downtown Long Beach, then eastbound on 2nd Street, through Belmont Shore and Naples. Members representing different branches of the military along with the public are expected to line the streets waving American flags as the cars drive by. The Cruise will end at the Petroleum Club, 3636 Linden Ave., where a free car show will kick off at noon. The car show will feature car cus-

tomizer George Barris and his original Batmobile. Also included will be the Global War On Terror Wall Of Remembrance, which is 100 feet long and six feet high, and engraved with more than 11,000 names. It honors the fallen from Desert/Shield Storm, the attacks of 9/11, Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation New Dawn. For a $10 admission, attendees may go inside the club for grilled food, silent-auction items, an open swimming pool and live music. At 1:30pm, Honoring Our Fallen’s founder Laura Herzog will host a Golden Boots Awards Luncheon, where she will present awards to Angels Baseball, Fox Sports West, Santa Catalina Island Company, Valley Hi Toyota and Stars and Stripes Marketing. Tickets for the luncheon are still available for $25 at cruisehonoringourfallen.org . “I am so excited that Honoring Our Fallen can bring this familyfriendly event to involve the entire community in giving back to families whose loved one paid the ultimate price for our freedom,” Herzog said. To get involved by sponsoring or volunteering for the event, call Herzog at (714) 904-0253. Source: Honoring Our Fallen

CSULB’s new health center to focus primarily on issues within Latino community

California State University, Long Beach (CSULB) opened the Centro Salud es Cultura, a new downtown Long Beach Latino health resource center, on Oct. 18 with a tour and reception. The center is located at 1205 Pine Ave. Intended as a new resource to address health-related issues, particularly for the Latino community, the center is sponsored by the National Council for La Raza/CSULB Center for Latino Community Health, Evaluation, and Leadership Training and will build on its work on the CSULB campus, according to a press

release issued by the university. “Much of student success starts at this center. It’s so nice that so many former students have come back today to this new center,” said Britt Rios-Ellis, codirector of the CSULB department of health science graduate program, who in addition to being a professor of health science is the director of the CSULB-NCLR Center for Latino Community Health, Leadership, Evaluation and Training. “What we’ve created is an empowering culture, and that leads to inspiration and success. We will use this space for many things and continue our commitment at Cal State Long Beach to the community. “At Centro Salud es Cultura we are leveraging resources by seeking partnerships to provide health- and educational-equity programming at our downtown site. Our long-term goal is to establish a center that brings together corporate and governmental partners, community leaders, researchers, Long Beach

­ ives­ L Lived

Beauty through the ages

Circa B.C.

NOVEMBER 1, 2013

Circa 1950s

Ruby Mae Johnson 91 Fred Katabazi 46 Gerd Tamms 73 Grace Roldan 63 Charles LeBlanc 101 Chiles Lee 92 Adrian Dixson 50 Ellen Proctor 71 Gregory Paul Taylor 58 Joseph Michell 88 Wayne Cockerham 47 Mary Walser 72 Willie Todd 42 Daphne Lewis 94 Carter Latham 44 Ma Carmen Vidal Marquez 75

e­families­were­assisted­by McKenzie­Mortuary. For­more­details­on service­dates­and­times, contact­(562)­961-9301

Circa 2013

Courtesy CSULB

Assemblymember Bonnie Lowenthal (D-Long Beach) (right) presents a certificate to Britt Rios-Ellis during the opening of the Centro Salud es Cultura, a new downtown Long Beach Latino health-resource center, on Oct. 18. Rios-Ellis is co-director of the CSULB department of health science graduate program, a health-science professor and director of the CSULB-NCLR Center for Latino Community Health, Leadership, Evaluation and Training.

residents, students and elected officials to create effective strategies that reflect and incorporate the cultural capital of the community they serve,” she continued. Assemblymember Bonnie Lowenthal (D-Long Beach) presented the center with a certificate and said, “What a wonderful day it is to celebrate this community partnership. It’s very important– community partnerships. That’s what’s happening here. I wish many years of success to you here.” Chicano civil rights leader Jose Angel Gutierrez actually kicked off the celebration the night before with a lecture and a screening on the upcoming PBS series Latino Americans: Pride and Prejudice, in which he is featured. Recognized as one of the four major Chicano leaders, including Cesar Chavez, Gutierrez is responsible for leading the Raza Unida Party, the first Latino political party, to victory in South Texas. The center is designed to: provide health-promotion services that improve the health outcomes of residents while reinforcing positive cultural values; increase capacity to conduct health-equity programming in the local commu-

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nity; and discover and develop effective community health strategies to improve access to care and culturally and linguistically relevant health education. “This is an amazing opportunity to link the city and university like our Long Beach Promise does. It would not happen without community support. This is exactly the kind of relationship our university and our community should have,” said CSULB president Don Para. “This is one example of how that happens. It’s a new, amazing reality that has happened.” The center will provide an array of classes such as mental wellness, student academic preparedness and leadership-development opportunities aimed at supporting family unity and health. It will also address issues like obesity. The long-term goal is to establish a center that brings together corporate and governmental partners, community leaders, researchers, Long Beach residents, students and elected officials to create effective strategies that reflect and incorporate the cultural capital of the community they serve, and it will facilitate research aimed at improving the health outcomes of economically disadvantaged residents, according to CSULB. Sponsors include: Molina Healthcare; St. Mary Medical Center; Kaiser Permanente; Wellpoint, Inc.; Port of Long Beach; Assemblymember Lowenthal; The California Endowment; Nutragentics; JMS; Northgate Gonzalez Markets; and Sergio Avina Winery. Source: CSULB

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COMMUNITY

NOVEMBER 1, 2013

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Sen. Lara salutes 23 businesses in his district

Sen. Ricardo Lara’s (D-Huntington Park/Long Beach) honored 23 businesses from throughout his district at his annual Excellence in Business Awards celebration on Oct. 23. Honorees were selected for outstanding work in job creation, customer service and community investment. “I’m so proud to have been able to honor the hard-working men and women in my district whose businesses are providing a solid foundation for the recovery of our state,” Lara said. “While all excel in their individual fields, one thing they all have in common is their dedication to the advancement of our community.” Source: Lara’s office

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From left: Servando Orozco, State Sen. Ricardo Lara and Cindy Orozco during the Excellence in Business Awards celebration on Oct. 23

State Sen. Ricardo Lara (left) honored Christy Pardini of the Bixby Knolls store Bella Cosa during his Business Awards celebration on Oct. 23.

State Sen. Ricardo Lara (third from left) honored Signal Hill Petroleum (SHP) as one of the recipients of his Excellence in Business Awards. Also pictured, from left, are: Debra Russell, David Slater and Taylor Colacion from SHP.

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ST3522 - Nov. 1_Layout 1 10/31/13 4:41 Pm Page 8

COMMUNITY

8 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

SHPD encouraging residents to ‘call the police’ to report suspicious individuals

In response to a rash of recent residential burglaries, the Signal Hill Police Department (SHPD) is encouraging residents to “call the police” regarding suspicious individuals in their local neighborhoods. Police Chief Michael Langston said a burglary suspect will typically knock on a door to see if someone is home, and then, if a resident answers, pretend to look for someone who might live there or solicit for work. “We want our residents to call us if they have someone engaged in these activities in their neighborhood,” Langston said. “We will determine if the individuals are engaged in legal or illegal activities. Having someone call is the key to this issue as officers unfortunately cannot be posted on every corner.” Langston said residents know better than anyone who belongs in their neighborhoods. “When neighbors start looking out for each other, the security of the neighborhood is increased exponentially,” he said. “In one neighborhood, a residential burglary was thwarted just two weeks after residents started a Neighborhood Watch group. A resident called police when he saw some subjects near his neighbor’s house that he did not recognize. Officers responded and arrested the

subjects as they were leaving the neighbor’s house after burglarizing it.” According to the SHPD, the department will help residents get a Neighborhood Watch group started upon request, and officers have increased patrols in residential neighborhoods while investigators are utilizing automated license-plate reader technology to assist in identifying suspects. According to SHPD Lt. Ron Sagmit, while violent crimes have dropped significantly in Signal Hill after spiking in 2012, property crimes have slowly risen since 2011 after the implementation of prison realignment. “We have seen an increase in every property-crime category, and the total number of arrests has risen,” Sagmit said. “We have arrested individuals for burglary, only to catch them a few weeks later committing the same crimes. When suspects opt to plead guilty and serve time rather than take advantage of counseling, treatment or probation, there is something wrong with the criminal justice system. They know they are not going to serve significant time in county jail. There just isn’t room in county jail.” The SHPD can be reached at (562) 989-7200. Source: SHPD

NOVEMBER 1, 2013

First Fridays Art Walk to celebrate its 7th anniversary Dia de los Muertos-style

The First Fridays Art Walk will celebrate its 7th anniversary with “Day of the Dead” in Bixby Knolls. Businesses will participate in an altar contest and host themed face painting, music and sugar-skull coloring in honor of the holiday. The event will also include a “living altar,” a community photo-mural project at 4320 Atlantic Ave., and a community altar where attendees may honor loved ones who have passed. Seventh District Councilmember James Johnson’s “First Books at First Fridays” at the Dana Branch Library will feature the Knolls Ranger mascot as guest reader at 5:30pm. Eigth District Councilmember Al Austin’s “Council on Your Corner” will be set up at Atlantic Avenue and Carson Street to meet and greet attendees. The Big Red Bus will be available to transport attendees from venue to venue via designated stops at the participating businesses. Bella Cosa, 3803 Atlantic Ave., will have information about First Fridays, maps, business info, and restaurant recommendations from 6:30pm to 8pm.

Source: BKBIA

MORE INFORMATION firstfridayslongbeach.com

EDCO service won’t be affected by Veterans Day

There will be no delay in waste- and recycling-collection services on Veterans Day, Monday, Nov. 11. As a result, EDCO will be performing regularly scheduled collection services during that week. EDCO’s customer-service office, and public disposal site and recycling center in Signal Hill, will also remain open. This includes Park Waste and Recycling Services and Signal Hill Waste and Recycling Services.

Source: EDCO

They’re 50, he’s 10!

Courtesy CCeJ

Ten-year-old Jonas Corona accepts the 2013 Human Dignity Award from Teresa Gomez, coordinator for the City of Long Beach’s Human Dignity Program, during the California Conference for Equality and Justice’s (CCEJ) 50th Annual Dinner & Gene Lentzner Human Relations Award Celebration on Oct. 17 at the Grand Event Center in Long Beach. Jonas was awarded the honor for founding Love In The Mirror, a local nonprofit organization that he created to benefit the homeless. Honorees of the Gene Lentzner Human Relations Award were: LaVerne Duncan, coordinator for the African-American Convening Committee; Roberta Lanterman, director of the Long Beach Family Literacy Program for the Long Beach Unified School District; and Candace Meehan, program director for Jordan High School. Awarded the CCEJ Anthony B. Rogers “Volunteer of the Year” were Zaq Tinker and Karina Fing. The Gene Lentzner Human Relations Award recognizes people for significant contributions to improving human relations at a grassroots level in Long Beach. More than 20 past recipients of the Gene Lentzner Human Relations Award were present to celebrate CCEJ’s 50th anniversary.

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COMMUNITY

NOVEMBER 1, 2013

9

Signal Hill Petroleum earns Corporate Social Responsibility Award

Courtesy Keri Gee Semmelman

From left: Buono family members Georgio, Oreste (Andrew), Teresa, Antonia and Frank

Buono’s celebrates its 40th year as San Pedro, Long Beach pizzeria

Buono’s Authentic Pizzeria, with locations in San Pedro and Long Beach, will celebrate its 40th anniversary year with 40-cent specials and other festivities during the week of Nov. 11–14. The anniversary comes at a poignant time, as family patriarch, Nicolaniello Buono, recently passed away. He left Italy to come to America in 1967 with the dream of sharing numerous Italian recipes from his ancestors with the growing population of Italians who settled in San Pedro. Upon arrival, he became a business partner with his parents, who had opened Buono’s Market and Deli three years earlier. By 1973, he had transformed it into the restaurant where it still resides 40 years later. His family, including his wife Antonietta and children Frank, George, Oreste “Andrew” and Teresa, opened two locations in Long Beach. “As we celebrate our 40th anniversary by appreciating our customers, we also remember the wonderful legacy our father and grandparents left us and the whole community,” said Buono’s owner/general manager Frank Buono. “Aside from their authentic Italian recipes that we use daily, they had a very strong work ethic and were generous to their family and the community.” Buono’s flagship restaurant in San Pedro will kick off the week with 40 percent off its entire menu. At designated times during the week, pizza slices will be 40 cents. In Long Beach, customers can celebrate with a 40 cent glass of wine, beer or soft drink. All customers will receive an exclusive 40th anniversary keepsake certificate and access to a variety of special offers and contests on Buono’s Facebook page where a 40-day countdown to the anniversary has already begun. Buono’s community involvement and its longtime patrons will also be spotlighted. One such customer, Frank Zaragosa, used to go to the San Pedro restaurant with his father 38 years ago and has been a customer ever since. “When my own son’s ball team came in first place, I couldn’t think of a more fitting place to celebrate such a milestone,” Zaragosa said. “It reminded me of when my dad and I used to go to Buono’s together.” According to Gavin Mc Kiernan, founder of the Long Beach Neighborhood Foundation, Buono’s has been much more than a restaurant throughout the 40 years. “The Buono family has actively served in leadership positions for several nonprofits and donated generously of their time, resources, and even pro-

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

vided valuable strategic advice to nonprofits like ours on what it takes to run a successful organization,” Mc Kiernan said. “Everything they do they do with a big heart and with genuine care for their community. It shows in their restaurants and in the causes they support.” Buono’s has received numerous community awards during the past four decades, among them the 2010 Small Business of the Year in the 54th District, the Hero and Pride of Partnership Awards, and a People’s Choice Winner as Best Pizza in San Pedro and Long Beach. Buono’s is often recognized for its ongoing partnership with local schools, especially for its Annual Cultural Poetry/Art Contest in which thousands of youth explore the Italian culture and are recognized and celebrated, in person by the Buono family, for their creative talents.

Source: Keri Gee Semmelman PR

MORE INFORMATION BuonosPizza.com facebook.com/BuonosAuthenticPizzeria

Signal Hill Petroleum, Inc. (SHP) won the national Corporate Social Responsibility Award at the 2013 West Coast Oil and Gas Awards at the Marriott at the Convention Center in Bakersfield, Calif. on Oct. 24. “We are incredibly honored to receive this award and be recognized for our commitment to bridging the gaps between industry, academics and the community,” said Craig Barto, president of Signal Hill Petroleum. “I am proud of our industry’s commitment to strengthening our communities through local programs and initiatives.” SHP was selected as the winner for their ongoing philanthropic efforts and community involvement, including the company’s recent gift of $250,000 to California State University, Long Beach (CSULB) for the development of the environmental geochemistry laboratory. The company has made donations to the Long Beach Movies in the Park Program, the Long Beach Food For Kids Program, Signal Hill Movies in the Park, The Long Beach Public Library Courtesy eTA Advertising Foundation, WomenShelter of Signal Hill Petroluem President/CEO Craig Barto and Director of ComLong Beach, The Guidance Cen- munity Relations Debra Russell with the company’s award for Corporate ter of Long Beach and the Signal Social Responsibility at the 2013 West Coast Oil and Gas Awards at the Hill Police Department National Marriott at the Convention Center in Bakersfield, Calif. on Oct. 24 Night Out program. “Partnering with local programs to promote education and unite our community has been an incredibly rewarding experience that we look forward to building upon,” said Debra Russell, director of Community Relations at SHP. The Oil and Gas Awards recognize and reward advancements made by the oil and gas industry in the areas of environmental stewardship, efficiency, innovation, corporate social responsibility and health and safety. The complete lists of finalists can be viewed at oilandgasawards.com . The judges, made up of a panel of 52 industry executives, reviewed more than 400 entries from 250 companies in 19 categories. Source: ETA Advertising

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Monday, Thursday, and Saturday before 9:00 am and after 4:00 pm

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CULTURE

10 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Imitating Life

NOVEMBER 1, 2013

Eleven (or so) questions for local artist Anthony Smyers Cory Bilicko

Managing Editor

In 50 words or less, what do you do as an artist? As an artist I try to convey the things around me like the environment and people into something that makes sense. A lot of what I do is an outlet for me to make sense of the things happening in my lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; relationships, emotions, etc.

In one word, describe what your life would be like if, for some reason, you couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t create art. Nuclear

Is there a particular kind of art or an artist whom you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t particularly like? I appreciate art as a whole, but if I had to choose a style of art that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not a

huge fan of, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s abstract. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get me wrong, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen some pieces that I think are great, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just not my favorite.

Does anything cause you to have artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s block? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not sure I can say that things cause me to â&#x20AC;&#x153;haveâ&#x20AC;? artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s block as so much that it just happens. Things like my job that pays my bills can be a drain sometimes on my creativity. Sometimes youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in a rut, but I have to take the time to look at other art out there in the world to get my juices flowing.

How would you characterize the role of art in modern society? Art in modern society is still thriving and evolving. I love all the different styles and mediums that exist and how technology and digital is a

Anthony Smyers

platform that has become just as commonplace as traditional mediums.

Describe what the scene is like when you are creating your art. It usually involves me at home or at a coffee shop and music. Music is always the constant. I have to be listening to something, and a lot of the times I think that helps give me ideas as well.

How does your artistic sensibility or skills help you in your daily life? It helps me view things in a more abstract way. You can observe things around you and look at them in a different light. For example, I got an idea for a little creature wearing an ornate helmet from a huge pinecone I found. Kooky stuff.

                                                

    

   

        

  

   !           !        

     "

      " #       # #    

         "       "

As an artist, have you had any experiences with censorship? (If so, how did you react? If not, how do you think you would react?) Personally, as an artist, I havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t experienced censorship yet (knock on wood). How I would react I guess really depends [on] to what level I was being censored. When you create something itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s meant as you intended, not with pieces taken out or missing. Honestly I would be

 

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Mariner,â&#x20AC;? archival ink and digital painting

upset but hopefully I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to deal with that anytime soon.

Have you ever found a piece of art offensive? Art offensive? Nope. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure I can say one or two pieces Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done could have offended someone, but thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the point, I think. Art is meant to elicit a reaction, good, bad or indifferent. What are your ultimate goals as an artist? My ultimate goal is to get to a point where I could sustain myself creat-

ing what I love and give up my day job. I live for being creative and have been trying hard over the last year to put myself out there. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m making strides in the right direction, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for sure.

What color excites you? Blues and anything bright. I LOVE bright color, and I have a hard time washing colors out. Tough problem, I know.

To view more of Smyersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work, visit anthonysmyers.com and society6.com/anthonysmyers .

*

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ST3522 - Nov. 1_Layout 1 10/31/13 4:41 Pm Page 11

NOVEMBER 1, 2013

Lola’s

continued from page 1

Gras blended with Halloween, celebrates El Dia de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead. Starting at midnight on Oct. 31 through Nov. 2, the holiday is observed by many families in Mexico, including Rivera’s relatives in Guadalajara. Those who celebrate the special day honor the dead, often with festivities that include building an altar in the home or holding a vigil. Many bring food to gravesites. Rivera recalled how her own family during this holiday traditionally would spend time remembering their loved ones in the cemeteries in Mexico. “So instead of mourning, you celebrate all the good memories of people who have passed. That’s why the skulls are usually happy,” Rivera said. “It’s never scary.” Unlike the American version of Halloween, Dia de los Muertos isn’t meant to be creepy. At the restaurant, skulls and crucifixes dominate nearly every corner, but the place lacks a sinister tone. Painted gold swirls dance over mustard-yellow and flame-colored walls. Shiny metal stars dangle from the ceiling. And then there are the dead men and women who have taken on skeletal form. They may have shed their skin, but they still seem…natural. On one giant canvas, a bony face smiles beneath a sombrero. He slings a rifle over a shoulder. Skeletons are usually depicted doing the same activities that they pursued when they were alive, Rivera explained. It might make sense. Why would the dead be doing anything differently on the eternity side, even if they did lack flesh and vital organs? The owners rejected the usual ranch décor of Mexican restaurants and decided to add their personal style, Rivera said, even if it wasn’t going to be understood. She has her co-owner’s sister to thank for the massive number of skulls and skeletons. She had been collecting Dia de Los Muertos memorabilia for years. The restaurant’s owners also thought about improvements to their exterior surroundings that had less to do with the fall holiday and more to do aesthetic appeal. Two years ago, they and 2nd District Councilmember Suja Lowenthal celebrated the installation of the city’s first “parklet,” an outdoor landscaped area that extends the sidewalk into the street. In front of the restaurant, patrons can dine al fresco in space which used to be reserved for parking. The choice of constructing a parklet adds a little decorative flair to an urban streetscape, offering character along a street that boasts vintage and thrift shops among other specialty shops. According to a media release from the councilmember’s office, this parklet was the first of its kind in Southern California. San Francisco had initiated a parklet program years ago. Restaurant co-owner Luis Navarro says that the idea to put a parklet in front of the restaurant was proposed to them by City officials. He says that the contract that they have with the City requires the owners to take charge of the cost to build, maintain and insure the parklet. The parklet installation was part of a pilot program that lasted 12 months. The City leases out the space to the restaurant on an annual basis. “It was really a roll of the dice,” Navarro said in a phone interview this week, acknowledging that the community could have rejected the changes

CULTURE

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

11

to the outdoor sidewalk area. Navarro said that the restaurant invested $25,000. The change is permanent now, and he says that the investment in a parklet offered an economic benefit. With the increased number of diners coming over to enjoy the outdoor setting, the owners were able to hire more staff. “Even though it was a gamble at first,” Navarro added, “it’s just been a success story for us.” The Navarro and Rivera families won’t keep all of the traditions of Dia de los Muertos, even though at this time of the year they have a special connection to the holiday. Luis Navarro’s mother, Lola Navarro, passed away in 2010. They have relatives in Mexico who will make a traditional altar for her, and her son says that he keeps in touch with them through social media. Lola’s fingerprints are all over the restaurant named after her. She helped decorate the restaurant with Luis’ sister, and Lola is responsible for many of the dishes on the menu. For Dia de los Muertos, Navarro says that he and his family will likely remember her by making the dishes his mother loved. Lola’s favorite dish is a chile relleno, and Navarro says he’ll also make chile en nogadas, a chile stuffed with sautéed with pine nuts, peaches, pears, apples and raisins, topped with a creamy walnut sauce and pomegranates. The dead won’t likely mind that the holCJ Dablo/Signal Tribune iday won’t be fully observed in the tradi- Beginning at midnight on Oct. 31 through Nov. 2, El Dia de los Muertos, or the Day of the Dead, is traditionally tional manner, especially if the owners are celebrated in Mexico to honor loved ones who have passed away. Lola’s Mexican Restaurant has amassed a willing to share their meal. ß small collection of whimsical skeletons and crucifixes.

ST3522 - Nov. 1_Layout 1 10/31/13 4:41 Pm Page 12

12 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

TST4477 NoTICe oF TRUSTee'S SALe TS No. 120082164 Doc ID #0001619713752005N Title order No. 12-0146994 Investor/Insurer No. 1704156703 APN No. 7207-014-022 YoU ARe IN DeFAULT UNDeR A DeeD oF TRUST, DATeD 06/13/2007. UNLeSS YoU TAKe ACTIoN To PRoTeCT YoUR PRoPeRTY, IT mAY Be SoLD AT A PUBLIC SALe. IF YoU NeeD AN exPLANATIoN oF THe NATURe oF THe PRoCeeDING AGAINST YoU, YoU SHoULD CoNTACT A LAwYeR. Notice is hereby given that ReCoNTRUST ComPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by DAmoN NeLSoN, A SINGLe mAN, dated 06/13/2007 and recorded 6/20/2007, as Instrument No. 20071481881, in Book N/A, Page N/A, of official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, will sell on 11/12/2013 at 11:00Am, By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2635 LIme AveNUe # A, B, C and D, SIGNAL HILL, CA, 90755. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $393,634.25. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. NoTICe To PoTeNTIAL BIDDeRS If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on a property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NoTICe To PRoPeRTY owNeR The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 1-800-281-8219 or visit this Internet web site www.recontrustco.com, using the file number assigned to this case TS No. 12-0082164. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled

PUBLIC NOTICES

sale. DATeD: 01/05/2013 ReCoNTRUST ComPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-91401-94 SImI vALLeY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 By: - Trustee's Sale officer ReCoNTRUST ComPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. A-FN4420867 10/18/2013, 10/25/2013, 11/01/2013

TST4490 Trustee Sale No. 12-519249 CeN Title order No. 7331593 APN 7214-009-212 NoTICe oF TRUSTee’S SALe     YoU ARe IN DeFAULT UNDeR A DeeD oF TRUST DATeD 02/13/04. UNLeSS YoU TAKe ACTIoN To PRoTeCT YoUR PRoPeRTY, IT mAY Be SoLD AT A PUBLIC SALe. IF YoU NeeD AN exPLANATIoN oF THe NATURe oF THe PRoCeeDINGS AGAINST YoU, YoU SHoULD CoNTACT A LAwYeR.    on 11/21/13 at 9:00 am, Aztec Foreclosure Corporation as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust executed by Jesse m. Bill, a Single man, as Trustor(s), in favor of virtualBank. a Division of Lydian Private Bank, a Federal Savings Bank, as Beneficiary, Recorded on 02/24/04 in Instrument No. 04 0418196 of official records in the office of the county recorder of LoS ANGeLeS County, California; Sabadell United Bank, N.A., as the current Beneficiary  , wILL SeLL AT PUBLIC AUCTIoN To THe HIGHeST BIDDeR FoR CASH (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States, by cash, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state), Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County, California described as: 2514 eAST wILLow STReeT UNIT#310, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90806 The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit: $212,841.75 (estimated)   Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale.   The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located and more than three months have elapsed since such recordation. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The property heretofore described is being sold "as is".   DATe: 10-2813 elaine malone Assistant Secretary & Assistant vice President   Assistant Secretary & Assistant vice President Aztec Foreclosure Corporation     6 venture, Suite 305  Irvine, CA 92618  Phone: (877) 257-0717 or (602) 638Fax: (602) 6385700  5748    www.aztectrustee.com NoTICe To PoTeNTIAL BIDDeRS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NoTICe To PRoPeRTY owNeR: The sale date shown on

this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call or visit this Internet web site, using the file number assigned to this case 12-519249. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Call 714-573-1965 http://www.Priorityposting.com or Aztec Foreclosure Corporation (877) 257-0717 www.aztectrustee.com P1068399 11/1, 11/8, 11/15/2013             

TST4476 / 2013 211465 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: FISHeR'S CATCH, 1025 1/2 Raymond Ave., Long Beach, CA 90804. Registrant: FISHeR'S CATCH, LLC, 1025 1/2 Raymond Ave., Long Beach, CA 90804. This business is conducted by: a Limited Liability Company. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: ma Belle Ammie Fisher. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on September 28, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on october 9, 2013. NoTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: october 11, 18, 25, & November 1, 2013.

TST4481 / 2013 206077 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: FoRTUN INCome TAx SeRvICe, 5720 e. Imperial Hwy. Unit 1, South Gate, CA 90280. Registrant: GISeLLA LUCIA FoRTUN, 5720 e. Imperial Hwy. Unit 1, South Gate, CA 90280. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Gisella Lucia Fortun. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on october 2, 2013. NoTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: october 18, 25, & November 1, 8, 2013.

TST4482 / 2013 215372 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. ALoHI vACATIoNS, 2. PICS 4 mY PARTY, 3. RmS weDDINGS, 4. RmS eveNTS, 5. ADvoCATeS IN ACTIoN, 6. oUR CoFFee CoRNeR, 2510 e. willow St., Unit 101, Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: ALoHI eNTeRPRISeS, INCoRPoRATeD, 2510 e. willow St., Unit 101, Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Kelly m. James, Secretary. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on April 15, 2007. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on october 15, 2013. NoTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A

EYE ON CRIME Crimes reported by SHPD Citywide Thursday, Oct. 24 Identity theft 9:49am– 2500 block Cherry Ave. Stolen vehicle 1:09pm– R/O 3269 Grant St.

Commercial burglary 1:11pm– 2400 block Cherry Ave.

Annoyance of child 10:26pm– 2400 block California Ave.

Friday, Oct. 25 Residential burglary 8:30am– 2200 block Sea Ridge Dr.

Saturday, Oct. 26 Identity theft 10:22am– 2500 block Temple Ave.

Identity theft 2:04pm– 2700 block Walnut Ave.

Stolen vehicle 7pm– 3500 block Rose Ave.

Auto burglary 6:45pm– 1200 block E. Hill St.

Friday, Oct. 25 Recovered stolen vehicle 8:30am– 800 E. PCH

Elder abuse 1:23pm– 2800 block Temple Ave.

Robbery of person 6:03am– 2700 block W. American Ave.

Tuesday, Oct. 29 Identity theft 4:54pm– 2100 block E. 19th St.

Wednesday, Oct. 30 DUI 1:31am– Cherry Ave./E. 29th St.

Person with knife 6:48pm– 2300 block Lewis Ave.

DUI 8:44pm– Cherry Ave./E. Willow St.

Sunday, Oct. 27 Forging official seal 11:03pm– Cherry Ave./E. 21st St.

DUI 11:50pm– E. Willow St./Cherry Ave.

Monday, Oct. 28 Commercial burglary 12:05pm– 2400 block Cherry Ave.

Thursday, Oct. 24 Commercial burglary 9:20am– 900 block E. 33rd St.

Injury hit-and-run 11:33pm– E. PCH/Redondo Ave.

Crimes reported by LBPD Council Districts 6, 7 & 8

Stolen vehicle 7:15pm– W. Spring St./Chestnut Ave.

Saturday, Oct. 26 Stolen vehicle 1am– 3600 block Pacific Ave.

Stolen vehicle 9pm– 3600 block Falcon Ave.

Monday, Oct. 28 Assault 5:37pm– 1800 block Pine Ave.

Stolen vehicle 8:10pm– 2000 block Daisy Ave.

Wednesday, Oct. 30 Recovered stolen vehicle 7:05am– 2200 block Linden Ave.

Stolen vehicle 9:30pm– E. 28th St./Atlantic Ave.

new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: october 18, 25, & November 1, 8, 2013. TST4485 / 2013 215151

FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: mIND THoUGHT PRoDUCTIoN, 5250 w. Century Blvd. #448, Los Angeles, CA 90045. Registrant: JImmY CHRIS, 14702 visalia Ave., Compton, CA 90220. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Jimmy Chris. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on october 15, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on october 15, 2013. NoTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: october 25, & November 1, 8, 15, 2013.

TST4486 / 2013 218565 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: THomAS FIeLD SeRvICeS, 324 mira mar Ave., Long Beach, CA 90814. Registrant: GAwIN ARRoN THomAS, 324 mira mar Ave., Long Beach, CA 90814. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Gawin Arron Thomas. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on october 21, 2013. NoTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: october 25, & November 1, 8, 15, 2013.

TST4487 / 2013 219013 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. PUBLIC SeCToR exCeLLeNCe, 2. TRAINING CoNCePTS, 3520 Long Beach Blvd. #209, Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: FoRReST L. SToRY, 3520 Long Beach Blvd. #209, Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Forrest L. Story. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on october 1, 1995. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on october 21, 2013. NoTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: october 25, & November 1, 8, 15, 2013.

TST4489 / 2013 217713 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: DoNATo'S HAIR SALoN, 4102 orange Ave., Ste. 121, Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: LeoNoRA L. FARRIS, 4102 orange Ave., Ste. 121, Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Leonora L. Farris. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on march 6, 1996. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on october 18, 2013. NoTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: october 25, & November 1, 8, 15, 2013. TST4485 / 2013 215151 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: mIND THoUGHT PRoDUCTIoN, 5250 w. Century Blvd. #448, Los Angeles, CA 90045. Registrant: JImmY CHRIS, 14702 visalia Ave., Compton, CA 90220. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Jimmy Chris. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on october 15, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on october 15, 2013. NoTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: october 25, & November 1, 8, 15, 2013. TST4486 / 2013 218565 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: THomAS FIeLD SeRvICeS, 324 mira mar Ave., Long Beach, CA 90814. Registrant: GAwIN ARRoN THomAS, 324 mira mar Ave., Long Beach, CA 90814. This business

NOVEMBER 1, 2013

is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Gawin Arron Thomas. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on october 21, 2013. NoTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: october 25, & November 1, 8, 15, 2013.

TST4487 / 2013 219013 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. PUBLIC SeCToR exCeLLeNCe, 2. TRAINING CoNCePTS, 3520 Long Beach Blvd. #209, Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: FoRReST L. SToRY, 3520 Long Beach Blvd. #209, Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Forrest L. Story. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on october 1, 1995. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on october 21, 2013. NoTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: october 25, & November 1, 8, 15, 2013.

TST4491 / 013 223257 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: FoRTIS FUTURA FINANCIAL SeRvICeS, 767 Freeman Ave. #3, Long Beach, CA 90804. Registrant: mAURICIo ToRReS, 767 Freeman Ave. #3, Long Beach, CA 90804. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: mauricio Torres. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on october 28, 2013. NoTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 1, 8, 15, 22, 2013.

TST4492 / 2013 223258 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: BIG e PIzzA, 3225 e. Pacific Coast Hwy. #C, Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: JAmeS eLeoPoULoS, 3225 e. Pacific Coast Hwy. #C, Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: James eleopoulos. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name in 1986. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on october 28, 2013. NoTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 1, 8, 15, 22, 2013.

FOLBA

Pet of the Week:

Hamlet

To adopt, or not to adopt? There should be no question—take Hamlet home. This 6year-old slightly corpulent kitty is about to make his bed for a nap, so before we say, “Goodnight, sweet paw prints,” we offer the hope that someone dear will take him home from the shelter side of the Pitchford Companion Animal Village, 7700 East Spring St., (562) 570-PETS. Ask for ID#A508280

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next few weeks, said Blair Cohn, executive director of the Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association (BKBIA). The only consolation is that the contractor, All American Asphalt, and the City have been accommodating to businesses thus far, said Cohn and some business owners. Cohn said the street improvements should make the “entrance” to Bixby Knolls more attractive in the long run. “We’re trying to stay optimistic throughout this whole thing because we know the end game is going to be great,” Cohn said. “It’s just trying to get through it and dealing with any issues that come up.” According to a statement from the City of Long Beach, access to businesses will be maintained and streetsweeping enforcement will be suspended on adjacent side streets to provide additional parking. City officials encourage motorists to use “alternative routes when possible,” as lane closures will be required during construction. While Atlantic Avenue will stay open during working hours, motorists can expect some traffic delays. As work officially began on Oct. 10, employees at GoFetch, a dogdaycare, -training and -grooming facility at 3434 Atlantic Ave., couldn’t drive out of the business’s parking lot because the driveway was blocked, but within minutes construction workers installed a metal plate for employees and customers to drive over, said Carley Hovis, coowner of the shop. She said the business was also first in line to have concrete poured for a new front sidewalk just in time for the shop’s one-year anniversary event last Saturday that included a “Howl-o-ween” costume party for dogs. Though the event had a lessthan-expected turnout since some walk-in clients from the neighborhood avoided the trek, the accommodations have been a “redeeming factor,” Hovis said. “It’s definitely been a little bit of a challenge for us,” she said. “I hope that it’s the prettiest street in Long Beach by the time it’s done.” Some business owners said they have already seen a dip in sales as people have been avoiding the drive down Atlantic Avenue or have stayed away from the area entirely. Bixby Knolls Car Wash and Detail Center at Atlantic Avenue and Wardlow Road had a 20-percent drop in business on Saturday, Oct. 19 that manager Ward Shaw attributes to the street construction. He said business has been slow on Saturdays, which are normally the establishment’s busiest time of the week. “Customers who are dedicated to do it, wash their car; sure they came, but the ones that do it on a whim… those are the ones that kept on going, I’m sure,” Shaw said. “It will be nice when it’s done. It has to happen. What else can you do?” Restaurant owners have had differing views on the impacts to business. Jack Skandalakis, owner of Café Bixby, located a few blocks north of the construction zone, said lunchtime business during the week has

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dropped off by about 80 percent since from employees nearby businesses and even residents are now steering clear of the area. He said it has taken him about 26 minutes to drive up Atlantic Avenue to get to his restaurant. “Most of my business comes from the business section around Memorial Hospital and the dealerships on the Signal Hill side, and nobody come up will Atlantic anymore,” Skandalakis said. “They’re staying away from it… People have 40-minutes leave. They cannot spend an extra half an hour in their cars trying to get here. They can come Sean Belk/Signal Tribune through the side streets, but most A construction worker prepares the side of the road in front of the Denny’s restaurant at 33rd Street and Atlantic Avenue where major street people are avoiding repairs have impacted businesses and caused traffic to back up. City officials expect the $1.5-million project to be finished before Thanksgiving. the area right now.” He said the City cut back,” Shaw said. “With infra- said he has asked the contractor to them try to weave their way through should have done the construction structure, we know that those are keep the corridor as open as possi- all the cones and barricades and during the summer, when traffic is necessary.” ble. stuff.” much less since school is out and Seventh District Councilmem“We want to aim for Friday to Cohn said BKBIA plans to host people are on vacations, rather then ber James Johnson said in a state- have a clear path starting from late an event on Atlantic Avenue to comduring the winter, when business typ- ment that the project is critical to afternoon to late evening as wide memorate the end of construction. ically picks up. keeping a cohesive community. open as possible to get people up “What we’d like to do is plan some“Hopefully they finish up and get City officials said the section of and down and around to all the thing for after, when it’s all said and out because this is continuing for Atlantic Avenue hadn’t been businesses,” he said. “We don’t done,” he said. “We want to bring another month, and they’re going to repaved in several decades. want to put anybody off by having people back to the businesses.” ß put us out of business,” Skandalakis “I’m pleased that this longsaid. “There’s a sign that says it’s overdue project is happening,” he BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER • CATERING going to be completed by the sec- said. “The improvements will help ond week of November. I hope unify this important arterial corrithat’s true, because if we go dor with one look from the San Served Monday through Thanksgiving and through Diego (405) Freeway to north through Friday, Christmas, then there’s going to be Long Beach– that of a top-notch 7am-11am big problems.” business district,” he said. David Sanchez, owner of PatriCohn said improvements to the #1- 2 Eggs - Cooked any style (2 strips of bacon or sausage cia’s Restaurant, which serves road are needed and the City is also links & home fries. Served with toast) breakfast, lunch and dinner at 3626 fixing drainage issues at 37th Atlantic Ave., however, said the Street and Atlantic Avenue in front #2- 2 Buttermilk Pancakes (2 eggs, cooked any style & 2 strips only negative aspect of the con- of Jongewaard’s Bake & Broil of bacon or sausage links) struction is the impact to parking restaurant. #3- French Combo (2 slices of French toast, 2 eggs cooked lots. Otherwise, business has been “There’s been a number of spots any style and 2 strips of bacon or sausage links) normal, he said. “People still seem that have been bumpy or uneven,” #4Biscuits & Gravy (2 eggs & home fries) to want to come in,” Sanchez said. Cohn said. “They’ve spent a lot of #5- Chorizo Scramble (2 eggs with beans & tortilla) “I wouldn’t call it slow.” time analyzing it, and I think we’re #6- 2 Eggs (Toast & fruit) Cohn said the owner of Baja going to have a much better place #7- Breakfast Bowl (2 eggs, 2 sausage, home fries & country gravy) Sonora said business during the all together.” evenings has been steady despite As for this month’s First Fridays the road construction. “I think peo- Art Walk (today, Nov. 1) that takes ple are still finding their way there, place north of the construction No substitutions but of course, for the businesses along Atlantic Avenue from Bixby or to-go orders and the retailers, it’s going to be a Road to San Antonio Drive, Cohn tough couple of weeks,” Cohn said. 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14 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Bowl

Derek Wieske, assistant city engineer, said some of the work on the site has taken “a little longer than anticipated,” however construction so far is about 90-percent complete. He said new turf should be installed next spring after the track is resurfaced.

NEWS

NOVEMBER 1, 2013

During that time, new restrooms, a parking lot continued from page 1 and a new pump station add the new sports complex in a parkwith stormwater-treatdeprived neighborhood while enhancment features will also ing the site’s drainage system, city be installed, Wieske officials said. said. Though the County prohibits development on such sites during the “rainy season” that starts in October, Wieske said the City has been cleared to continue construction. “We can do construction if we get [the County’s] approval,” he said. “We’ve had a couple rainy days, but nothing Photos by Sean Belk/Signal Tribune major.” During heavy rains, A mini excavator scoops up dirt in front of a row of newly installed seats as part of a project to however, the site typi- create a new sports park at Chittick Field, located between Walnut and Cherry avenues, just north cally fills up with water, of Pacific Coast Highway. The project includes adding a parking lot, lights, restrooms, a football as it was first developed field, soccer fields and a 400-meter running track. in the 1930s as a stormwater-detention basin, serving now called Willow Springs Park was and football fields for practice and the City of Long Beach, the City of scratched after the community deter- possibly home games instead of the Signal Hill and Los Angeles County. mined the site would be better suited Long Beach Veterans Memorial StaWhile the site has been used during for wetlands restoration, trails, a dog dium. Sixth District Councilmember Dee dry months for baseball and soccer park and a BMX-bike track. Nevertheless, city officials have Andrews, one of the project’s main games, the field has deteriorated. The project to create a new sports hailed the Chittick Field project as a proponents who won the all-Ameripark in central Long Beach has sur- way to provide athletic facilities in a can high-school football and track vived after various failed attempts community that has needed them for award as a Poly Jackrabbit, said during a groundbreaking ceremony over the years. A much grander $140- years. School officials for nearby Poly- last year that he expects the million proposal for a Ray and Joan Kroc Community Center was can- technic High School have stated that upgrades to benefit local schools, in 2010 because of a lack of the school’s top-ranking sports pro- youth and 75,000 residents who live celled “A Gourmet Gifting financing, and another plan at what is grams will be able to utilize the track within one mile of the site. & Baking Funding for the Company” project came from myriad sources. Last March, oil operator •••••••••••••••• Occidental PetroDecadent, Seductive, leum Corporation provided a $1-milAddictive contribution lion Call in advance for catering toward the project HOURS 4147 Long Beach Blvd. @ Carson St. that was facilitated Tues-Sat 1 1am to 7pm Bixby Knolls • (888) 9BUNDTS Sunday 1 1am to 6pm through the nonprofit Closed Monday www.bundtsonmelrose.com Partners of Parks. In addition, the City was able to secure more than $6 million in grants from the Los Angeles County Regional Park and Open Space District New hours now in effect: while $50,000 came Tues.-Thurs.: 5pm to 9pm ¥ Friday: 5pm to 9:30pm from the City’s Fiscal Sat.:?Noon to 9:30pm ¥ Lunch Tues.-Fri.: 11:30am to Year 2012 operating 3pm funds and $700,000 The nearly $8-million project to renovate Chittick Field includes adding “bioswales,” landscaped came from the City’s 2201 East Willow Suite St., G in Signal Hill habitats used to improve water quality by helping prevent silt and surface runoff water from making 2006 open-space 562.595.0210 | Sushi, Tempura, & Traditional Favorites it into the ocean, at the site’s four drainage locations. bond for the design. Funding for future phases of construction is still yet to be determined, city officials said. While the new athletic facilities make up a lot of the visible construction, most of the work on the site was made underground in order to revamp the property’s stormwater drainage system, said Mike Slama, Long Beach public works project manager. “One of the goals of the project À la carte: Entrées: was to take an exposed groundwater • muffin of the Day $3.50 • Crème Brûlée French Toast with vanilla Brown Sugar Syrup $11 or nuisance-water drainage system • meat Lovers’ omelette $11 • Bagel with Smoked Salmon $9 and put it underground,” he said. • egg white omelette $10 Cream cheese, tomato, red onion, capers “The outfalls used to just have pipes Asparagus, roasted tomatoes caramelized onions, feta cheese • Rosemary & mustard Sausage Patties $6 sticking out of the side of the basin. • Green eggs and Ham $14 Water would just come out of the end • Andouille Sausage $4 Fried egg, sliced ham, pesto hollandaise with French fries on a brioche bun of the pipe and go into a V-gutter that • Fresh Fruit Plate $9 • Smoked Salmon wrapped Poached eggs $15 went around the perimeter and then • Your Choice of eggs Benedict or eggs Florentine $13 was pumped out by the old pump sta• Steak and eggs $25 tion. Now everything’s underground. USDA Prime Flat Iron Steak, 2 eggs, homestyle potatoes That makes more usable space.” • Salad of Curried Chicken with Red Grapes, Cranberries Long Beach city officials have and Celery on Baby Greens $12 • Bloody mary $7 also been coordinating with the City • Delius Kobe Burger w/fries $14 of Signal Hill’s Public Works Depart• Champagne $6 • Teriyaki Chicken Burger w/Pineapple and Swiss Cheese $13 ment on the design of Signal Hill’s • Roasted BBQ Pork Belly Sandwich $13 • mimosa $7 storm-drain facilities that include Asian slaw, chipotle mayo, Italian roll newly installed trash nets. Slama said • multiple Refill Champagne $10 • Cheese Steak Sandwich w/fries $14 the project also includes adding Choose beef or chicken “bioswales,” landscaped habitats • Grilled Cheese Panini $11 used to improve water quality by Melted Provolone and Cheddar with Spinach and Pesto helping prevent silt and surface • Pastrami Reuben Panini $12 runoff water from making its way • Tuna Salad and Boiled eggs on wheat w/Fries $10 into the ocean, at the site’s four • monte Cristo Sandwich w/Fries $14 drainage locations. Wieske said the final part of the project includes resurfacing a portion of Walnut Avenue from PCH to approximately 20th Street sometime next year. ß

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NEWS

NOVEMBER 1, 2013

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

CSULB Center for Criminal Justice receives nearly $2.4 million for programs with law-enforcement supervisors, management The Center for Criminal Justice at California State University, Long Beach (CSULB) has received nearly $2.4 million in grants from the California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) to support a pair of statewide training programs aimed at sergeants, lieutenants and middle-level managers in law enforcement. The largest of the two grants, $2.04 million, represents the biggest single contract ever for the center, and it will be used to present an eight-week Sherman Block Supervisory Leadership Institute (SLI), according to CSULB. The SLI is an ongoing professional education opportunity for sergeants throughout the state working as supervisors in various police departments and supervisors in other lawenforcement agencies. “The SLI program develops supervisors to the next level, offers them a broader range of skills and helps to professionalize them,” said Ron Mark, who became director of the Center for Criminal Justice this past summer and comes to CSULB after a 31-year law-enforcement career. Mark also received both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in criminal justice from CSULB, the latter in 1990. He joined the university as a lecturer in 2005. Designed and implemented in 1988, the Sherman Block SLI program challenges its students to learn new ways to resolve issues through group and individual work. The curriculum takes participants through an analysis of management (planning, organizing and directing) and leadership (inspiring, challenging and developing) and how each discipline complements the other. The CSULB center offers about 18 sessions of the SLI program each year. The second grant, worth $353,000, will support 104 hours of training over three weeks for lieutenants and middle-level managers in law enforcement. “This represents a big leap from being an hourly supervisor to becoming part of

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management,” Mark said. “CSULB is not the only provider for the statewide program, but we are the largest. Other programs offer about six courses a year, but CSULB offered nine in the last budget year, and this year there will be 10.” Mark believes the double grants are a vote of confidence in the center and what it does. “We have been trusted with a lot of money to run a program with a lot of moving parts,” he said. “We organize sites, students and instructors. These grants offer validation in that they show the confidence imposed in CSULB. It really is a big deal.” Working in cooperation with POST, the Center for Criminal Justice staff includes judges, attorneys, law-enforcement managers, forensic experts, crime analysts and profilers who provide training to more than 2,000 law enforcement personnel annually in 12 instructional programs. The primary function of the center is to design and present in-service training seminars and conferences that meet the training standards of POST as well as conduct grant-funded research and participate in community outreach. Mark said the Center for Criminal Justice serves as the university’s ambassador to the law-enforcement community. “It is easy to reach out and talk to former colleagues now serving as executives,” he said. “It can range from obtaining research material to creating internships and job opportunities. Many of the local chiefs have opened their doors to the center, not only in terms of placing students, but by providing data and offering research opportunities. “The center offers a path to employment in law enforcement whether it is for police officers, forensic technicians, or other professional positions,” he added. “In the first weeks of 2013, I met with more than 25 police chiefs throughout Los Angeles County. (Recently), I

met with the Irwindale Police Department to offer assistance in developing their training programs. They are eager to work with the center because they realize what a resource it is.” Mark said that, in the coming years, he would like to see the Center for Criminal Justice focus on additional grant-funded research opportunities. “The additional funding

would allow more opportunities for students and faculty and would improve both training and continuing education for the criminal justice professionals that we serve,” he said. “It also benefits the criminal-justice system, our local communities and improves the quality of life for our communities.”

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