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Haunts & Happenings Pages 8 and 9

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Vol. 35 No. 21

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“My Skull is a Home for Mice/Gone” by Cat Riley

See page 11

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october 25, 2013

SERVING BIXBY KNOLLS, CALIFORNIA HEIGHTS, LOS CERRITOS, WRIGLEY AND THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

Local history brought to life at 18th annual cemetery tour

Your Weekly Community Newspaper

Photos by Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Sunnyside Cemetery (pictured) and the Long Beach Municipal Cemetery, located at 1095 E. Willow St., are the settings for the Historical Society of Long Beach’s biggest annual fundraiser. Sean Belk Staff Writer

Don’t be afraid. They’re not ghosts. Volunteer actors and some city officials dressed in time-period costumes will conjure up local history at the 18th Annual Historical Cemetery Tour this Saturday, Oct. 26, just days before Halloween. This yearly tradition arranged by the Historical Society of Long Beach (HSLB) is not meant to scare anybody but to educate people about the many legacies of deceased residents who were buried at the city’s two oldest cemeteries. Amid some 20,000 grave plots at the Municipal and Sunnyside cemeteries– one of which dates back to the turn of the century– at 1095 E. Willow St. between Orange and California avenues, performers will portray individuals whose lives each tell a different story of Long Beach’s diverse past. The historic site, known for its upright, old-fashioned tombstones, will set the stage for “miniature” plays performed by actors garbed in clothing from various eras, from the early 1900s to the ‘50s (when Long Beach was named “Iowa by the Sea”) to modern day. The cemetery was made famous by a 1939 picture by photographer Ansel Adams that includes a statue in front of a backdrop of oil derricks in Signal Hill. This year’s cemetery tour has a theme of education and features some more recently departed individuals, such as Bill and Betty Seal, lifelong Long Beach residents who made major contributions to local schools and are the parents of Judy Seal, executive director of the Long Valentine and Maybell Leal, who married in 1905, Beach Education Foundation. will be brought to life by actors Jonathan Varillas Betty, a teacher and counselor (left) and Anna Kate Mohler (right) during the 18th who died in 2011, spearheaded the Annual Historical Cemetery Tour at the Municipal first English As a Second Lanand Sunnyside cemeteries on Willow Street this Satsee HSLB page 13 urday, Oct. 26 from 9am to 2:30pm.

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East Division Police substation just a little closer to reality CJ Dablo Staff Writer

Long Beach is that much closer to seeing former Army the Reserve Center transformed into the longawaited East Division Police Substation in the city’s 5th council district. City councilmembers earlier this month voted in favor of zoning changes for the former reserve center, and these changes now clear the path for the proposal to CJ Dablo/Signal Tribune build a new police subLong Beach city officials anticipate that construction may begin in March or station and juvenile April of 2014 to renovate the Schroeder Hall U. S. Army Reserve Center on Wildetention facility at the low Street to house both a police substation and a juvenile investigations section. Schroeder Hall U. S. Army Reserve Center located at ers. Although the Juvenile block any pedestrian traffic Investigations Section will also from getting close to the red3800 E. Willow St. According to the project be located at Schroeder Hall, its brick buildings. Just inside the description available in a city operations will be separate from front yard, a small branch has staff report, the substation will those of the police substation, fallen among dead autumn be home to the estimated 125 according to the report. A staff leaves which blanket the employees in the East Division of about 27 persons will be entrance. The zoning change was a who cover a 24-square-mile ter- working in the juvenile facilities. necessary step for City leaders ritory and serve about 170,000 Right now, the 4.68-acre site to take before the property is residents. The report described how the same building will also is vacant, surrounded by tall transferred from the federal govhouse facilities dedicated to at- fencing. Intimidating white, ernment to the City. That transrisk youth and juvenile offend- rusty metal bars at the front gate see SCHROEDER page 7

LBCC first in CA to offer pilot program of high-demand classes at higher tuition rates

Sean Belk Staff Writer

Long Beach City College (LBCC) is the first community college in the state that has agreed to participate in a controversial pilot program that offers a handful of highdemand classes during winter and summer intersessions at higher tuition rates as a solution to impacted regular semesters. Despite protests from some students and faculty, the Long Beach Community College Board of Trustees voted 4-0 at its Oct. 22 meeting to approve a new fee structure and notify the California Community Colleges Chancellor Brice Harris

Weekly Weather Forecast

see LBCC page 6

Friday

Saturday

Low clouds, then sun

74°

Foggy, then sunny

Low clouds, then sun

Lo 56°

Lo 57°

Lo 54°

81°

Sunday

Monday

79°

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Long Beach City College students wait on Oct. 22 outside the Board Room in the T Building of the college’s Liberal Arts Campus, where the Board of Trustees voted to approve a new pilot program that offers high-demand courses during summer and winter intersession at higher tuition rates.

October 25 through October 29, 2013

68°

Tuesday

66°

Slightly cooler

Rain & drizzle possible

Lo 56°

Lo 52°

This week’s Weekly Weather Forecast sponsored by: 1174 Wardlow Rd., LB Shell & Sheldon Grossman

owners for 35+ years

577 E. Wardlow Rd. @ Atlantic • 562-595-6666

(West of Orange Ave.)

562-427-4630 Like us on Facebook!

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NEWS

2 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

OCTOBER 25, 2013

State recognizes LB’s ‘Aviles Law’ that targets illegally converted garages after fatal 2007 fire Sean Belk Staff Writer

A tragic incident in which three girls died from a fire in central Long Beach nearly six years ago now serves as a cautionary message to landlords across the state about building and safety codes regarding illegal garage conversions. On the night of Dec. 14, 2007, Jasmine, 10, Jocelyn, 7, and Stephanie Aviles, 6, were fast asleep on the bedroom floor of a small apartment struc-

ture that had been converted from a garage into a living space at 1052 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave. To keep warm, an electric space heater had been set up. Later that night, however, a fire broke out. Though the girls were evacuated, they died from burns and carbonmonoxide poisoning. Arson investigators later determined that the fire was accidental and caused by the space heater and faulty wiring.

The living space had no smoke detectors or exit windows and had multiple additional building- and fire-code violations. It was determined that the building also had never been inspected by the City before or after the conversion was completed. The incident prompted the City to launch an aggressive code-enforcement operation led by the Long Beach Fire Department and code-enforcement investigators to go after illegally con-

Andrews also helped introduce Long Beach’s free-smoke-detectors program that allows any resident who can’t afford a smoke detector to obtain one from any Long Beach fire station for free. Since the incident, a total of 646 garage conversions in Long Beach have either been removed or brought up to code, with fines totaling about $270,000, according to city officials. The City’s law carries fines of more than $1,000 per violation. State lawmakers have since worked with Long Beach city officials to continue the City’s efforts by drafting a statewide resolution, known as Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 32, introduced by Assemblymember Bonnie Lowenthal (DLong Beach). The resolution was officially passed by the State Legislature in May and filed with the Secretary of State on June 5. While the resolution imposes Sean Belk/Signal Tribune no statewide fines, Carmen Herrera, far left, a relative of the Aviles girls, Jasmine, it recognizes that Jocelyn and Stephanie, who died in a fire in 2007, looks at a the provisions in photo of the incident after city and state officials hosted a press city and county conference on Oct. 21 regarding a state resolution that names government building and all provisions in city and county government building and safety codes regsafety codes regulating illegal garage conversions as the ulating illegal “Aviles Law.” garage conververted garages. Exactly three years after the fire, on Dec. 14, 2010, the City drafted the “Aviles Law,” named in memory of the Aviles girls and to educate the public about the dangers of illegal garage conversions. The law, which requires that property owners remove all illegal renovations and return structures to their original use, was later adopted in April 2011 by the City Council after being introduced by 6th District Councilmember Dee Andrews. The Council voted to rename all of the City’s municipal codes relating to the abatement of illegal garage conversions the “Aviles Law.”

sions as “Aviles Law.” The resolution also declares May 2013 Building and Safety Month in the State of California. On Monday, Oct. 21, city and state officials hosted a press conference at the Aviles residence. In attendance were members of the Aviles Family, who wept as the bittersweet event brought back memories of the horrific incident. Lowenthal, who was a Long Beach councilmember at the time of the fire, said the goal of the state resolution is to place all city and county fire codes under “one roof” to make it easier for people in multi-family units to comply with the laws. She vowed to work with Long Beach city officials on a state law that would take the resolution further with even more penalties. “I’m hoping that we can do more than that,” she said. “Of course, prevention is number one, and education is up there as number one too, but for those who continue to violate our laws, we need to find a way to provide those penalties so that if they are renting in substandard units and they are found to be living in substandard units … Those owners need to pay for the relocation of people who are still living in those units.” Sen. Ricardo Lara (D-Long Beach), who helped push the resolution through the Legislature, said families need to be educated about building and fire codes and should be assisted in finding appropriate housing. “I know times are tough,” he said. “For some families here in Long Beach and throughout the state, living in these converted garages seems like a viable option, especially in lowincome communities, but we have to do everything we can to educate these communities [and] our low-income young families that this is not a viable option for them and that there are ways they can seek help to get them appropriate housing. This horrible tragedy could have been prevented.” Long Beach Fire Capt. Pat Wills, who was dispatched to the scene of the fire in 2007, noted that the problem of illegal garage conversions persists, adding that 12 people have died in illegally converted garages and as recent as last week a woman was badly burned in a fire in such a structure in Compton. “That’s why we have those inspectors,” Wills said. “They come out, and they ensure those locations are safe, because we never want this to happen again. Even though it has happened since that fire, we never want it to happen on this magnitude.” ß

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NEWS

OCTOBER 25, 2013

Hit-and-run driver who struck child near Signal Hill middle school still at large

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

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Sean Belk Staff Writer

Signal Hill police officials said this week they are still searching for a driver who struck a 13-year-old girl and ran over her foot, on Thursday, Oct. 14 at 8:30am behind Jessie Elwin Nelson Academy middle school. According to a statement from the Signal Hill Police Department (SHPD), the girl Courtesy SHPD was hit by a vehicle in a cross- The vehicle that struck a child near Jessie Nelson Academy middle school in Signal walk close to the school on 20th Hill is described as a white, full-size pickup truck, Dodge Ram or similar brand, with Street, east of Walnut Avenue. a white lumber rack. The driver left the scene and was last seen driving westbound on to a local hospital. year-old Hispanic or Asian male 20th Street, according to the stateSignal Hill Operations Lt. Mel with gray hair and brown eyes. The ment. Krizo said in a phone interview that vehicle is a white, full-size pickup Police said the driver had possi- no new information had been truck, Dodge Ram or similar brand, bly dropped off a student at the reported as of Monday, Oct. 21. He with a white lumber rack. school just prior to the collision. said the girl has since returned to Anyone with information The girl who was hit sustained school. regarding this incident is asked to minor injuries and was transported The driver is described as a 50- contact SHPD at (562) 989-7263.

24-year-old man murdered on 10th Street

On Monday, Oct. 21, at approximately 11:30pm, Long Beach Police Department (LBPD) officers responded to a “shots fired” call in the 2500 block of E. 10th Street that resulted in the death of an adult male. Officers discovered 24-year-old Juan Estrada of Long Beach on the sidewalk with multiple gunshot wounds to his upper torso. Officers rendered first-aid until Long Beach Fire Department personnel arrived and transported him to a local hospital, where he was later pronounced deceased. A motive for the shooting is unknown, and the incident is being investigated as gang-related. Those with information regarding the incident is asked to call Long Beach Police Homicide Detectives Teryl Hubert and Mark Bigel Guarino at (562) 570-7244. Anonymous tips may be submitted by calling 1-800-222-TIPS (8477), texting TIPLA plus the tip to CRIMES (274637), or visiting lacrimestoppers.org . Source: LBPD

Long Beach Vice Mayor Robert Garcia, who is a candidate for the city’s mayor, announced this week that 2nd District Suja Lowenthal endorsed him after she left the mayoral race to run for the 70th District State Assembly seat. • Matthew S. Pappas has entered the race for Long Beach City Attorney, according to the City’s “Potential Candidates Primary Nominating Election” web page.

The Campaign Trail

• Lena Gonzalez announced this week that she has received the endorsement of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 11 in her race for Long Beach City Council's 1st District. • Thomas J. Sutfin has become the fourth candidate seeking the 5th District seat on the Long Beach City Council,

according to the City’s “Potential Candidates Primary Nominating Election” web page. • Rex Richardson, who is thus far running unopposed for the Long Beach 9th District Council seat, announced Oct. 17 that he has garnered the endorsement of Assemblymember Anthony Rendon, who represents the 63rd Assembly District.

Local church-leader devoted lifetime to helping others Elizabeth “Betty” (Irwin) Moffitt was always looking for ways

to help people. Family, church and local charity work were her life. This Sunday, Oct, 27 would have been her 94th birthday and her 64th year as a member, leader and volunteer at the Fourth Church of Christ, Scientist on Atlantic Avenue in Bixby Knolls. Mrs. Moffitt passed away Sept. 13, 2013. Born in Canada on her 10th birthday, Betty left with her family and came to southern California during the Great Depression when her father was promised a job. Settling in north Long Beach, Betty and family quickly became regular churchgoers at the Fourth Church of Christ, Scientist, which was then located on Market Street. As fate would have it, one of the church’s 1925 founders, Edna Flandsburg would become Betty’s mother-in-law. Betty’s high-school sweetheart, Bob Moffitt, whom she met while attending Jordan High School, eventually became her husband. Betty received the David Starr Jordan Award and was among the school's second graduating class before attending UCLA. During their marriage the couple became parents to twins and named them after themselves– Betty and Bob. The couple later divorced. During her years as a single mother, Betty worked at the Southern California Gas Company, where she remained employed for more than 40 years, retiring as a customer-service supervisor. While working, she earned an AA degree at Long Beach City College. According to grandson Nick Dibs, whom she helped raise, his grandmother Betty was a very loving and caring person who was always glad to be of service and willing to help those less fortunate. “My beloved and precious grandmother Elizabeth also loved her country and, as such, was very concerned about the plight of the American people and ending all U.S.-funded wars and military occupations. Without her help and encouragement, I could not have run for Congress in 2008 and 2010.” When Joanne Garner was interviewed by Rachael Rifkin as part of a Feb. 5, 2009 Signal Tribune article celebrating Betty’s 90th birthday, she had nothing but kind words to say about her friend. “I have known Betty for over 30 years and, during that time, I’ve never heard her say an unkind word about anyone. If someone needed help or was bedridden she would stay with them night and day until they were able to do it for themselves. ‘No’ was not in her vocabulary if there was a need.” She is survived by her son, four grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. The family has requested that any donations in her memory be made to Fourth Church of Christ, Scientist, 3629 Atlantic Ave. Long Beach, CA 90807. A memorial “celebration of life” service is being planned for later in the year. Those wishing to be notified should call the church at 562-4245562 or email maxiview@gmail.com .

HEARING BY THE SEA What Sea-level rising hearing Who Assemblymember Bonnie Lowenthal, chair of the Select Committee on Ports and Assemblymember Rich Gordon, chair of Select Committee on Sea Level Rise Where Aquarium of the Pacific, 100 Aquarium Way When Friday, Oct. 25 from 1pm to 5pm More Info The hearing will focus on the state’s diverse and complex infrastructure for transportation and trade, including ports, airports, roads, and bridges. In addition, the Committees will discuss the impact of sea-level rise on water and power infrastructure, which includes stormwater facilities, wastewater treatment and power plants.

WALK FOR A HEALTHY COMMUNITY What Annual beach walk Who The Children’s Clinic Where Marina Green, 386 E. Shoreline Dr. When Saturday, Oct. 26 at 8am More Info The morning will begin with a 1K Healthy Kids Race/Walk, followed by an all ages 5K Walk down the Shoreline bike path and conclude with a fair and barbecue lunch provided by Long Beach Firefighters, Local 372 with musical entertainment throughout the morning. Congressmember Alan Lowenthal will serve as the grand marshal. Call (562) 2644646 or visit tccbeachwalk.kintera.org .

FOR THE ANIMALS What Free mobile animal clinic Who Fix Long Beach Where Martin Luther King Park, 1950 Lemon Ave. When Saturday, Oct. 26 from 9:30am to 4pm More Info Event will offer free spay and neuter procedures to those who have made appointments. Microchipping, deworming and flea-control products as well as nail trimming will be offered at discounted prices. Appointments are not necessary to get required shots for dogs and cats. Visit fixlongbeach.com .

GOT MEDS? What National Take Back Initiative Who Signal Hill Police Department and the Drug Enforcement Administration Where 2745 Walnut Ave. When Saturday, Oct. 26 from 10am to 2pm More Info The Signal Hill Police Department and DEA will be collecting unused, expired or unwanted prescription drugs. The service will be free and anonymous. Call (562) 989-7209. The Long Beach Police Department will be providing the same service at Memorial Hospital, 2801 Atlantic Ave.

EGGS WITH THE ELKS What Monthly breakfast Who Bellflower/ Long Beach Elks Lodge 888 Where 16426 Bellflower Blvd., Bellflower When Sunday, Oct. 27 from 8am to noon More Info Breakfast costs $6.50 per person and includes eggs, bacon, sausage, hash browns, biscuits with gravy, orange juice, assorted fruit, Belgian waffles and coffee. Call (562) 866-3027 or visit elks.org .

FIGHTING CRIME What Fifth District Community Meeting and Police Briefing Who Office of 5th District City Councilmember Gerrie Schipske Where El Dorado Community Center Bridge Room, 2800 Studebaker Rd. When Tuesday, Oct. 29 at 7pm More Info Schipske will discuss the rash of property crimes recently committed on the east side of Long Beach. Attendees will learn more about the crimes, what the police are doing and how residents can help.

HELP THE RAMS What All-in-one fundraiser and community-service event Who Rams Baseball Boosters Where Millikan High School’s north campus, 2800 Snowden Ave. When Saturday, Nov. 2 from 8am to 1pm More Info The Baseball Boosters club will hold a pancake breakfast, car wash, “e-waste” drop-off, document shredding and canned-food drive. The pancake breakfast and car wash will cost $5. Document shredding will be provided for a small donation. Canned food will benefit a local food bank. Funds will benefit Millikan’s baseball programs. Call (562) 799-4009 .

A PIPE ORGAN CELEBRATION What Concert Who Friends of Music at California Heights United Methodist Church Where 3759 Orange Ave. When Sunday, Nov. 3 at 3pm More Info The event will feature a performance by organist James Petri. Musical selections will include works by Bach, Barber, Mendelssohn and others. Call (562) 595-1996 or visit calheightsumc.org .

SUPPORT LGBT HISTORY What Benefit Who Long Beach Playhouse and The Historical Society of Long Beach (HSLB) Where Long Beach Playhouse, 5021 Anaheim St. When Sunday, Nov. 10 at 6pm More Info The Playhouse will hold a special performance of Avenue Q to raise funds for the HSLB. Preferred-seating tickets cost $60 and generaladmission tickets cost $40. Ticket prices include food, drink, reception and performance. Tickets can be purchased at the HSLB, which is located at 4260 Atlantic Ave. Call (562) 424-2220.

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OPINION

4 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

houghts Tfrom the Publisher by Neena Strichart

Dale Whitney: a local cornerstone for social justice By Julia Kohn Board Member, Harbor Area Farmers Markets

Last week, I wrote about all my recent gallivanting and promised to share a bit more about the dinner I attended the evening of Oct. 14 at Forbidden City Restaurant in Long Beach. What I expected to be a quiet dinner with a few dignitaries, including the Vice-chairman of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, Bu Xiaolin, turned out to be a party celebrating a signing deal for a new feature film about Genghis Khan. I didn’t really know much about what I was witnessing when all of the guests first arrived, but I was sure clued in after a couple of hours, dozens of delicious dishes and a few announcements. Once the short speeches were over, the quite sophisticated attendees broke out for Karaoke and a bit of dancing. I even took a turn on the dance floor myself, doing “the twist” with the guest of honor Bu Xiaolin. What a lovely lady. We, my editor Cory Bilicko and I, were initially invited to the soiree by John Goya– local candidate for State Assembly. After discovering that we would be the only newspaper in attendance, we decided to check out the party and maybe get a scoop for the paper. Although Cory and I sat at what some might call the “media table,” the equivalent of the “kiddie table” at Thanksgiving, we had a ball. Joining us for a foursome was Ben Ma and Cathy Chen with China Central Television. What lovely people. Their jobs are to interview, film and report Los Angeles area happenings for viewing in China. We shared business and personal contact information with one another, laughed like crazy people and promised to stay in touch. We are now friends on Facebook! All in all, it was an amazing experience, and I send out a special “thank you” to the owner of Forbidden City, Michael Brausen, for being such a gracious host. Another “thank you” goes out to John Goya for the invitation. [Note: Hey, John. I hope the guest of honor didn’t overload on sweets. Between your gift to her of Rossmoor Pastries goodies and my present of See’s Candies, I bet she had her fill of sugar and chocolate!] If you’d like to read more about the event, see Cory’s story on the front page of last week’s issue titled “Vice-Chairman of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region visits Long Beach.” You’ll find it easily at signaltribune.com under “archives” or just search by keyword. Speaking of Facebook, I found something fun on Wednesday while scrolling through my account. I just had to share it with my readers! The correct ways to say 10 words and phrases that many folks get wrong: Supposedly NOT Supposably For all intents and purposes NOT For all intensive purposes Regardless NOT Irregardless I couldn’t care less NOT I could care less Espresso NOT Expresso Specifically NOT Pacifically Et cetera NOT Ex cetera I saw it NOT I seen it Of utmost importance NOT Of upmost importance I need to lie down NOT I need to lay down

(Question from Neena– is it oriented or orientated?) Anyone out there know?

Out of the mouths of babes

For more than four decades, the Rev. Dale C. Whitney has served as a cornerstone in the foundation of Long Beach’s ecumenical movement for peace and social justice. Born in Nebraska in 1942, he grew up in California, graduating from Santa Barbara High School in 1960. His non-traditional academic preparation as a zoology major at Pomona College in the early ‘60s may have foreshadowed his eventual path to his current role as manager for the Harbor Area Farmers Markets. He later earned a bachelor’s of divinity from San Francisco Theological Seminary in 1968, and then his Courtesy Julia Kohn master’s of theology from the same institution. He served for Dale Whitney, at one of the local farmers markets he oversees approximately two years as an After completing his service as pastor of Geneva Presassistant pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Santa Paula, before accepting a call to become the pastor of the byterian Church in 1989, Dale became the manager of the Harbor Area Farmers Markets, providing greater Long Geneva Presbyterian Church in Long Beach in 1971. As pastor of Geneva Presbyterian Church, Dale not Beach with access to fresh, low-cost, nutritional proonly provided spiritual support and guidance to a thriving duce in six market locations. In addition, he serves as congregation and a large extended network of church an active member of the First Congregational Church friends for 18 years, he also became a core leader of of Long Beach, where he sings with the choir, has led Southern California’s nascent ecumenical social-justice Bible studies and provides leadership to committees movement. He made his debut as the “new kid on the focused on opposition to the use of torture and other block” by preaching at the ecumenical Thanksgiving Eve human-rights violations by the United States governservice at the Belmont Heights Methodist Church. Under ment, and peaceful solutions to world problems. The description of Dale’s service to his community his leadership, Geneva Presbyterian became home for Long Beach’s progressive community organizations, is impressive. For over 40 years, he has been a member including among others Long Beach Housing Action, of the Protestant Campus Ministries Advisory Board at Long Beach Area Citizens Involved, the Alliance for Sur- California State University Long Beach. He has been active with the Long Beach Ministerial Association, the vival, and the Seal Beach Nuclear Action Group. In the 1970s, Dale worked with a major social-services Interfaith Clergy Council and the Interreligious Assocenter for the Latino community in east Long Beach and ciation of Greater Long Beach. He was also a volunteer helped start the Long Beach Food Bank. Beginning in chaplain at Long Beach Community Hospital for more 1976, his involvement with hunger issues led him to than five years. Dale is decidedly cosmopolitan in his openness to become a member and then coordinator of the Long Beach Area Church World Service/CROP Hunger Walk. dialogue among faiths and has been one of the most The latter project has not only raised countless thousands important advocates of interfaith action since his arrival of dollars for Long Beach area homeless shelters and food in Long Beach. His engagement in this area extends banks, it has also financially supported the worldwide dis- even to playing on the Geneva Presbyterian Church aster relief, agricultural development, and refugee reset- softball, basketball and volleyball teams throughout the '70s and '80s. He is a well-read scholar on a wide range tlement work of Church World Service. In 1977, Dale’s involvement with the South Coast of topics– a true Renaissance man. Many would say his Ecumenical Council, forerunner of today’s South Coast most outstanding quality is his deep compassion for othInterfaith Council, led him to join Olivia Herrera on the ers, which has led him to offer shelter in his own home to original Centro Shalom program board as the representa- many needy people and to reach out to help those in distive of the local Presbyterian churches. This was the begin- tress wherever he meets them, in whatever way he is able. ning of a nearly 25-year run as president of that board. He continues to serve as a key member who provides institu- Centro Shalom will honor Whitney during a special event on Sattional memory, sage advice and strategic donations to urday, Oct. 26 at the Long Beach Petroleum Club. For more information, visit centroshalom.org/en/in-the-news/74-centroresolve fiscal emergencies.

Melissa Zambrano Long Beach

Neena R. Strichart

Heavy road construction has begun here on Atlantic Ave. Traffic has been reduced to one lane in each direction, and all of the street parking along Atlantic Avenue from 33rd Street to Bixby Road has been removed. Bixby Knolls businesses in the construction zone are being seriously affected by the road work as well as those north of Bixby Road. Although delays are to be expected when traveling down Atlantic Avenue, local businesses need your support during this trying time. Plan to get to local businesses by way of alternate routes. Long Beach Boulevard and residential streets that parallel Atlantic Avenue are always an option. If you find yourself stuck in traffic, take the time to look around, and you may discover a business you never knew existed before. If driving is too much, try walking or biking to local businesses. Our businesses need our support more than ever right now. Road construction is hard on businesses. Questions or concerns about this work? Call All American Asphalt at (951) 757-8056 or Public Works at (562) 570-5716. Blair Cohn Executive director Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

MANAGING EDITOR

Stephen M. Strichart

Cory Bilicko

Daniel Adams Vicki Paris Goodman Gregory Spooner

DESIGN EDITOR/PRODUCTION MANAGER

Leighanna Nierle

ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS

STAFF WRITERS

CJ Dablo Sean Belk CULTURE WRITERS

fundraiser .

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Word on the street

When my 7-year-old Los Cerritos second grader came to me and said, “I want to make a difference– I want to help people,” I jumped on this opportunity with him. I asked how he would like to do that. He replied, “I want to help our homeless.” This made my heart sing because this is a cause near and dear to my heart as well. He then asked if we could use our store for people to drop off small hygiene products and canned food. Absolutely, I said. So Alex’s Wednesdays was born. We will be accepting donations and joining with Dare to Care for the Homeless, a nonprofit organization in Long Beach that we have been working with annually at Christmas. Now we want to do it all year long. They will help guide where the donations land in our Long Beach community. Please join my son in helping our homeless community get what they need. Gently used or new blankets have also been requested. You can drop the items off at: Urban Cottage– A Store for Your Soul, 4121 Long Beach Blvd.

PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

COMMENTARY

OCTOBER 25, 2013

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/WEBSITE MANAGER

Tanya Paz

Barbie Ellisen Ashley Goodsell COLUMNISTS

Jennifer E. Beaver Shoshanah Siegel

Carol Berg Sloan, RD

The Signal Tribune welcomes letters to the editor, which should be signed, dated and include a phone number to verify authenticity. Letters are due by noon on the Tuesday before desired publication date. The Signal Tribune reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, language and space requirements. The Signal Tribune does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other publications or otherwise presented in a public forum. Letters to the editor and commentaries are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Signal Tribune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, letters to the editor and commentaries are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. Letter-writers will be identified by their professional titles or affiliations when, and only when, the editorial staff deems it relevant and/or to provide context to the letter. We do not run letters to the editor submitted by individuals who have declared their candidacies for public office in upcoming races. This policy was put in place because, to be fair, if we publish one, we would have to publish all letters submitted by all candidates. The volume would no doubt eliminate space for letters submitted by other readers. Instead, we agree to interview candidates and print stories about political races in an objective manner and offer very reasonable advertising rates for those candidates who wish to purchase ads. The Signal Tribune is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. Yearly subscriptions are available for $50.

939 E. 27th St., Signal Hill, CA 90755 (562) 595-7900 www.signaltribune.com newspaper@signaltribune.com

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NEWS

OCTOBER 25, 2013

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Orange County developer purchases Will J. Reid Scout Park in north LB

Sean Belk Staff Writer

After searching for a buyer for the past four years, the Boy Scouts of America Long Beach Area Council (LBAC) has sold its private, 10-acre campground known as Will J. Reid Scout Park in north Long Beach to Orange County-based developer Integral Communities. LBAC has owned the gated property for 65 years but decided to consolidate resources amid dwindling membership and budget deficits. Integral Communities, a diversified real-estate company headquartered in Newport Beach, closed escrow earlier this month on the sale but has so far not revealed its plans for the site. The developer was established in 2003 by principals of Western Pacific Housing and has experience building and acquiring residential, commercial and mixed-use projects throughout California, according to the company’s website. Phone messages left and emails sent by the Signal Tribune seeking comment from Integral Communities Principal C. Evan Knapp were not returned before press time. The park property, which includes classrooms, a meeting room, a pool house and other facilities, is being sold for $6 million, about $1.15 million more than the appraised price for a deal that fell through earlier this year. In May, the LBAC Board decided to not renew its contract with The Trust for Public Land, a nonprofit that sought to facilitate a “joint use” settlement between a developer and a pub-

lic steward to ensure that a portion of the land would remain as open space, but the group failed to find a buyer. Under that deal, the land was priced at $4.85 million. Since the previous contract was terminated, the property, located at 4747 Daisy Ave. and bounded by the Virginia Country Club, the Dominguez Gap Wetlands, a railroad track, the Los Angeles River and a residential neighborhood, was put on the open market. While real-estate negotiations took place, the property sat unutilized since late 2012, and LBAC stopped maintaining the property in July. All of the council’s personal property has been removed, according to LBAC officials. In a letter to Scout members, LBAC states that the new transaction meets the council’s objectives of both “maximizing return on the sale” and finding a buyer that has committed to “enhancing our community.” Long Beach-based real-estate broker Inco Commercial Realty and community leaders helped seal the deal, according to LBAC. “Careful consideration was given to find the best candidate who could meet the needs of the council and who could be a good partner in the neighboring community,” the letter reads. John Fullerton, LBAC executive director, declined to comment in a phone interview on the developer’s plans for the site. Though preserving part of the land for open space has “always been [LBAC’s] goal,” he said the future of the site and whether the company will work with the commu-

nity is solely up to the developer. “We sold the property in its entirety,” Fullerton said. “I can’t really comment on [Integral Communities’] behalf.” LBAC has been searching for a buyer to purchase the property as membership has dwindled significantly and the organization has experienced budget deficits, forcing the Scouts to consolidate resources, Fullerton said. Throughout the years, LBAC membership has dropped from 12,000 to 4,500 members, since the Scouts first bought the park and other properties, including the square-mile Camp Tahquitz in Angeles Oaks near Big Bear, the Aquatics Center Sea Scout Base near Marine Stadium in Belmont Shore and the Council Service Center, he said. “It’s been very difficult for us to support the same properties with only about a third of the membership,” Fullerton said. After seeing a gradual decline in usage of the park, with only 22 percent of the program’s usage coming from local constituents, LBAC made a decision to instead invest in its other existing resources, he said. Also, Fullerton said LBAC troops are able to use a brand-new, $30-million camp facility, known as the Irvine Ranch Outdoor Education Center (IROEC), located just 30 minutes away in Orange County at the end of the 22 Freeway. The net proceeds from the sale will be put into LBAC’s investment pool and help bolster the council’s endowment, he said. Interest from the

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Will J. Reid Scout Park, located at 4747 Daisy Ave. in north Long Beach, has been sold by the Boy Scouts of America Long Beach Area Council to Orange Countybased developer Integral Communities for $6 million.

sale will also help deliver more Scout programs at the organization’s existing facilities and assist in creating a capital reserve fund to be used to maintain and fix-up properties, Fullerton said. “As places need new roofs, and other maintenance issues come up, we’ll be able to repair it in a timely and professional manner,” he said. Some of those improvements have already begun, such as the construction of a new bridge across Highway 38 and the installation of new bathroom facilities, according to LBAC. Additionally, LBAC was recently awarded a $750,000 matching grant for a new dining hall at Camp Tahquitz. In conjunction with LBAC, the IROEC will be hosting an open house on Sunday, Nov. 24 from 1pm to 4pm. Admission is free. For more information on this event, visit longbeachbsa.org or iroec.webs.com . ß

State’s Office of Traffic Safety awards two grants to SHPD The California Office of Traffic Safety has awarded the Signal Hill Police Department (SHPD) a $31,037 traffic-safety grant for an anti-DUI program and a $75,400 grant for a year-long program aimed at preventing deaths and injuries on roadways through special-enforcement and publicawareness efforts.

“When you see an impaired driver enter a checkpoint with alcohol hidden in a child restraint seat occupied by a child, you realize we still have a lot of work to do dealing with the problem of DUI and drugged drivers.,” said SHPD Police Chief Michael Langston. “We appreciate the State’s support of our efforts to combat this problem.”

5

The grants’ activities will specifically target impaired-driving offenders as well as be used to educate the public on the dangers of impaired driving, according to a press release issued by the SHPD. Source: SHPD

­ ives­ L Lived Mr. Shirley Vincent Johnson 83 Troya Patch 54 Sandra Klatt 63 Garry Dean 54 Laura Tondreault 94 Stewart Hanson 86 David Spitler 72 Jose Reategui 83 John Cotter 68 Geraldine Woodruff 86 Dale Loughlin 71 B'nai Faulkner 72 Dennis Grasman 68 e­families­were­assisted­by McKenzie­Mortuary. For­more­details­on service­dates­and­times, contact­(562)­961-9301

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LBCC

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that the college is implementing the program this winter intersession. Trustee Roberto Uranga was absent. LBCC is one of six community colleges that were originally listed as eligible for the five-year pilot program under legislation known as AB 955, which the State Legislature approved and Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law. Assemblymember Das Williams (D–Santa Barbara) authored the bill. The goal is to increase access to classes that otherwise are impacted during regular semesters. College officials said thousands of students have been turned away from classes in recent years as a result of state budget cuts that slashed programs and that funding from voterapproved Proposition 30 isn’t enough to meet student demand. “At Long Beach City College, we’re trying to solve problems instead of just acknowledging that the problem exists, because anyone can do that,” said Board of Trustees President Jeff Kellogg. “The tough thing to do is make the hard choices to try to address them. I hope we’re right. I hope students take advantage of it, and we’ll find out in a few months.” Beginning this winter, LBCC is offering the high-cost intersession extension courses at a rate of $225 per unit for resident students and $90 per unit for low-income Board of Governor’s Fee Waiver-eligible

students. The higher fees allow the college to offer courses above and beyond what is State-funded. At the same time, the college is offering regular State-supported intersession courses for $46 per unit. Opponents of the program, however, voiced concerns that the new fee structure for intersession creates a “two-tier tuition system” that would be “unfair” to students who can’t afford the more expensive courses and are already drowning in debt. California Community Colleges Chancellor Harris has officially opposed the bill along with a number of faculty unions. “It is a privileged pathway of broken promises,” said Lynn Shaw, president of the LBCC full-time faculty union. “I don’t know how anyone can think that dramatically raising tuition is a way to create educational access for our students and our community. Implementation of a two-tiered structure will create a system of apartheid.” Even though the program requires that LBCC raise funds to provide financial aid to lowincome students, Student Trustee Andrea Donado, who voted to oppose the program, said the legislation still discriminates against poor students currently struggling to pay for textbooks, food and housing. She said the bill will “open the door” for future “privatization” and tuition increases. “AB 955 is a discriminatory bill that will eliminate the equal opportunity of the students to get to classes,” Donado said. “AB 955 is

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OCTOBER 25, 2013

Some Long Beach City College students hold signs in protest against the Board of Trustees’ decision on Oct. 22 to implement a pilot program that charges students higher fees for some high-demand courses during intersession.

an unfair bill that will work just for a little percentage of students that can pay for this high-cost tuition… Long Beach City College should offer equal and affordable education for everybody. That’s what a community college is for.” LBCC Superintendent-President Eloy Ortiz Oakley, who worked with the bill’s author on the legislation, however, pointed out that the high-cost extension courses are “strictly voluntary” and do not impact or replace any Statesupported courses. “Those of us who already have our education, we will sit here and have a philosophical debate about whether or not this is a slippery slope, but for the thousands and thousands of students who have not been able to get the degrees that [we] valued so much, we’re trying to find one more opportunity for them,” he said. Oakley said there were more than 5,000 students on waiting lists for classes during the fall semester at LBCC and nearly 100,000 students on waiting lists at the college thoughout the past several years. He said the Public Policy Institute of California has documented that more than 600,000 students

have recently been denied access to California community colleges. The institute also reported that course offerings have declined by 21 percent since 2008, which is a loss of 86,000 course sections. Some trustees said providing the high-cost option to help students graduate or transfer to a fouryear college faster is better than doing nothing. “As a member of the Board of Trustees at Long Beach City College, the choice is between implementing this or … doing nothing to expand access,” said Trustee Mark Bowen. “That’s the way I understood it.” Some faculty claimed that the board and administrators didn’t consult academic members and student leaders before Oakley started lobbying for the legislation on behalf of LBCC. Bowen said having an official vote on the action might have been best in “retrospect,” but he said trustees have been fully aware of the legislative effort. While a few students held picket signs that read, “Education should not be a privilege,” one student took to the podium expressing support for the new courses. “If I’m in my very last semester, and I only need one more class in order to transfer, if I have the option of

paying more in order to finish faster in order to go on and pursue my career in my life, I think it would be very beneficial,” she said. Trustee Doug Otto noted that the program sunsets in 2018. He assured that the board and college staff would evaluate the new intersession system on a yearly basis. Otto added that the courses would help open up space for future generations of students. “We talk about how important it is, with education becoming a scarce commodity, to make sure that students not only get in but they get out of here too,” Otto said. “Until they get out of here, they’re taking the seats of the generations that are coming behind them.” Oakley confirmed that two of the six colleges listed in the legislation have elected not to implement the program this winter. He said both Pasadena City College and Oxnard College recently voted against initiating the program, however, in the case of Pasadena, the decision was based on the college moving to a tri-semester system. Oakley also confirmed that two other colleges have been deemed ineligible but only for this winter’s intersession, adding that they have expressed interest in implementing the program next academic year. In order to be eligible, colleges must show enrollment capacity in the two preceding academic years prior to implementation. Administrative staff said LBCC students are able to register for the four-to-five-week extension courses as soon as November. The winter intersession is from Jan. 6 to Feb. 8. College officials said LBCC is expected to offer up to five of the high-demand courses. Impacted courses have been in sections such as English, math, anatomy, sociology, counseling, communications, biology, psychology, allied health, reading, statistics, food and nutrition, political science and history. ß

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On Oct. 22, the Long Beach Community College Board of Trustees voted 4-0 to approve a new pilot program offering high-demand intersession courses at higher tuition rates. Pictured from left: LBCC Superintendent-President Eloy Ortiz Oakley, Trustee Doug Otto, Trustee President Jeff Kellogg, Trustee Thomas Clark, Trustee Mark Bowen and Student Trustee Andrea Donado.

Casino Night to benefit Widows and Orphans Fund

The Signal Hill Honorary Police Officers Association (SHPOA) will host its first Casino Night on Saturday, Nov. 9 at 6pm at Skylinks Golf Course, 4800 E Wardlow Rd. The proceeds of the event will benefit the SHPOA Widows and Orphans Fund. The buy-in for Casino Night is $85 per person or $150 per couple. This includes dinner, two drink tickets and $500 in playing chips, per person. The grand prize for the event is a flatscreen TV. Also included in the festivities will be a raffle of gifts which have been donated. Source: SHPOA

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Schroeder

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fer has not yet taken place. One key document is in the hands of the Army, according to Michael Conway, the Director of Business and Property Development for the City of Long Beach. He confirmed in an email Thursday that construction plans are “near 90 percent,” adding that specifications will soon be prepared and that the City will “expect to release an invitation to bid before the end of the year.” Conway added that the expectedfive-month construction’s anticipated start date is in March or April of next year. The move into the new facility is scheduled for August or September of 2014, he said. Some things at the old Army Reserve building won’t change much. According to the staff report, there will be “minimal changes” to Schroeder Hall’s exterior, and the design plans call for repair of the original windows and doors. However, there are other key changes anticipated for the building. A proposed new elevator tower will provide access to the second floor on the

east side of the auditorium. Also noted are plans for a catwalk to connect the elevator tower to the two building wings, according to the staff report. The report also states that the parking areas will be repaired, slurry-coated and re-striped. It’s taken several years for the substation proposal to progress this far. A mental-health facility dedicated to the homeless had been initially proposed to be situated close to the substation. However, after some residents voiced sincere opposition to the facility since it would be located so close to their homes, the City earlier this year negotiated to have the mental-health program operate from a building located at 1955 Long Beach Blvd. Mental Health America, a nonprofit organization, plans to renovate the old warehouse building at that location to serve the homeless population. The building is a vast, empty space for now, said Dave Pilon, the president and CEO of Mental Health America, in a phone interview this week. He noted that his organization will be modifying the building to accommodate more than just space for counseling. The building will house the organization’s administra-

NEWS

tive offices, a community meeting space and even a restaurant. Pilon confirmed that his organization has engaged an architect for the design overview but will be looking to put the full design out for the bidding process. He added that they would like to begin construction for the mental-healthcare facility no than October 2014. At a Council meeting early October,

5th District Councilmember Gerrie Schipske seemed pleased and a little relieved that the police substation was a step closer to reality. The East Division Substation had been operating out of a leased facility on Los Coyotes Diagonal, and the City had been paying rent. “I do think, quite honestly, that this has worked out to be in the best inter-

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

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est of all the community,” she said, noting that the City will get a new substation and won’t any longer have to pay for a lease. “I think that is going to be an economic plus, and I also want to thank the city manager and his staff for having worked out also a solution that was acceptable to all parties regarding accommodation of the homeless services program.” ß

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TRICKS & TREATS

OCTOBER 25, 2013

H aunts and H appenings

Local events celebrating Halloween, Autumn and Dia de los Muertos FRIDAY, OCT. 25 A freaky Franken-Friday

The last Friday in October will be “Frankenstein Friday” at the Signal Hill Library, 1770 E Hill St. The Tim Burton-directed Disney film Frankenweenie will be screened at 6pm. This movie is rated PG and is 87 minutes long. Register for the event by calling (562) 989-7323 to reserve a space and be entered into the drawing for the Frankenweenie

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book, DVD and stuffed animal. Popcorn, candy, drinks and a take-home craft will be provided. Admission is free, and the event is open to all ages.

The Skating Dead

Who are undead, gorgeous, and roll on eight wheels? The Long Beach Derby Gals– that’s who! Long Beach’s own all-female roller derby league is throwing a Zombie Prom, including a pop-up roller rink, at Crafted, 112 E. 22nd St. in San Pedro. Zombies and skaters alike are encouraged to bring their own skates, and rentals will also be available. A prom wouldn’t be complete without a king and queen, so wear your best blood-stained prom dress and worm-infested tuxedo to be voted Zombie Prom royalty. The whole family is welcome to join in on the fun, on and off skates, through shopping from local vendors, and gorging on brains– er, tasty snacks– Halloween treats, plus beverages for zombies who made it to 21 years of age. Long Beach Derby Gals will be on site for pictures and skating lessons. Pose for scary snapshots in the Zombie Prom photo booth, and win raffle prizes all fright-night long. The event will be open for all ages from 4pm to 6:30pm and for those 18 and older from 7pm to 10pm. Contact

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4600 Virginia Rd. For more information, call (562) 570-1755 or visit rancholoscerritos.org .

Face your fears..

Frights in the Fifth

Or just scream “lollipop!” The Youth Center dares you to come and face your very worst fears at its 4th annual Haunted House sponsored by Joe’s Premium Painting. Prepare to see your “Fears Come Alive” this October, on Friday the 25th, Saturday the 26th, and Sunday the 27th from 6pm to 9pm at The Youth Center, located at 10909 Oak St. in Los Alamitos. You can fully expect to feel your blood pressure rise in realistic, life-or-death situations while navigating two disturbingly haunted mazes and rooms featuring snakes, monsters, clowns, the morgue, a cemetery, a haunted hospital with a blood-thirsty docThis year’s tor and more. Haunted House is so terrifying that the Youth Center developed a “code word” system. Simply scream “lollipop,” and the dreadful actors will become friendly. From that point on, there is nothing to fear because the volunteers will only wave or offer a high-five. Tickets are on sale for $5 for one maze or $6 for two. Thanks to Blockbuster, the first 50 people through the mazes each night receive a free movie rental. Items will be up for raffle, and everyone will have the chance to win a prize. Purchase tickets online at TheYouthCenter.org to avoid waiting in line for the Haunted House. For more information about this horrific event, contact Community Relations Director Lisa Lee at (562) 493-4043 or online at lisa@theyouthcenter.org .

Gerrie Councilmember Schipske and the Parks, Recreation & Marine Department will host a 5th District Halloween Kiddie Karnival from 1pm to 5pm at El Dorado Park Community Center, 2800 Studebaker Rd. The free event will offer a Halloween laser show, games, crafts, face painting, a bounce house and a costume contest (for kids up to 10 years old). Kids can dress as their favorite Aquarium creature for a chance to win a family four-pack to the Long Beach Aquarium of the Pacific. Attendees may bring their own already carved and decorated jack-o'-lanterns to enter the pumpkin contest. The film Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein will be shown at 2pm, and, for older folks, the movie Young Frankenstein will be screened at 6pm. For more information, contact Schipske’s office at (562) 570-6932 or district5@longbeach.gov .

Walk with the dead

Long Beach’s largest annual Halloween event, the Long Beach Zombie Walk Festival, will make its return to the streets of downtown Long Beach for a full day of music, film and ghoulish fun starting at 2pm. The event will feature more than a dozen rock bands, screenings of two classic horror films, a zombie wrestling match and a meet-and-greet with a collective of zombie-apocalypse authors. Tickets are $15 each. For more information, visit zombiewalklb.com .

SATURDAY, OCT. 26 Face your fears again...

Stories to be told

Rancho Los Cerritos Historic Site, in conjunction with the South Coast Storytellers Guild, will present “A Harvest of Stories,” a family festival, from 1pm to 4pm. Admission is $3 per person or $10 per family, payable at the gate. The historic Rancho Los Cerritos adobe home will be open throughout the afternoon for tours. The following storytellers and themes will be presented: Cynthia Callard, Stories of Africa and California history: Ron Chick, Multicultural folktales and tales of heroes and adventures; David Chittenden, Personal tales with a slice of life; Bob and Linda King Pruitt, American folk stories, tall tales and Native-American stories; Ranger Jack, Interactive children’s songs; Diana SpiritHawk, California Native-American stories; Debra Weller and Patti Christensen, Interactive folktales, Native-American stories and personal stories with guitar accompaniment and family sing-a-longs; and David Whiting, Animated multicultural tales. Rancho Los Cerritos Historic Site is located at

Or just scream “lollipop!” The Youth Center dares you to come and face your very worst fears at its 4th annual Haunted House sponsored by Joe’s Premium Painting. Prepare to see your “Fears Come Alive” from 6pm to 9pm at The Youth Center, 10909 Oak St. in Los Alamitos. You can fully expect to feel your blood pressure rise in realistic, life-ordeath situations while navigating two disturbingly haunted mazes and rooms featuring snakes, monsters, clowns, the morgue, a cemetery, a haunted hospital with a blood-thirsty doctor and more. This year’s Haunted House is so terrifying that the Youth Center developed a “code word” system. Simply scream “lollipop,” and the dreadful actors will become friendly. From that point on, there is nothing to fear because the volunteers will only wave or offer a high-five. Tickets are on sale for $5 for one maze or $6 for two. Thanks to Blockbuster, the first 50 people through the mazes each night receive a free movie rental. Items will be up for raffle, and everyone will have the chance to

win a prize. Purchase tickets online at TheYouthCenter.org to avoid waiting in line for the Haunted House. For more information about this horrific event, contact Community Relations Director Lisa Lee at (562) 493-4043 or online at lisa@theyouthcenter.org .

SUNDAY, OCT. 27

Calling all calaveras

The Museum of Latin-American Art (MOLAA), 628 Alamitos Ave., will host a free Day of the Dead festival from noon to 4pm honoring José Guadalupe Posada, the “father of Mexican printmaking.” The event will include art workshops, live performances, gallery tours, food, face painting, unique craft vendors, an altar contest display, a community altar, and a display of José Guadalupe Posada's prints. Festivities will begin with a procession by the tamborazo ensemble El Quelite and continue with Aztec dancers Los Danzantes del Sol, traditional Oaxacan dance and music with Ballet Folklorico la Antequera and Banda Filarmonica Maqueos, concluding with the Ska/Latin sounds of Roncovacoco. Día de Los Muertos attire is strongly encouraged. The Aquarium on Wheels hosted by the Aquarium of the Pacific will be at the event, and food and drink will be available for purchase. The festival takes place in the Robert Gumbiner Sculpture Garden and Balboa Events Center and is sponsored by Target. Free parking will be available in the MOLAA parking lot; additional parking will be at Franklin Middle School. Call (562) 437-1689 or visit molaa.org .

Harvesting some fun for the kiddies

Rancho Los Alamitos Historic Ranch and Gardens will present a Children’s Fall Harvest Festival entitled “Spirit of the Harvest: Growing Grounds– The Roots of Our Community” from noon to 4:30pm. Admission is free. Only a few generations ago, families farmed the grounds that have become our communities. Throughout the Rancho’s gardens and grounds, participants will find clues to the area’s historic past from dairy farming and sheep-herding of the late 1800s through the tenant farming days of 1900-1930. The event will include games, crafts, a sheep-shearing demonstration, displays of local produce and antique farming equip-

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OCTOBER 25, 2013

ment, the annual Children’s Fall Harvest costume parade at 2pm and more. Foot-tapping music of the California Cowboy Band will enliven the Rancho while experts demonstrate trick roping and storytellers recite cowboy poetry and legends. The Rancho’s magnificent Shire horses Bristol, Valentina, and Preston the colt will be on hand as will the other livestock, including goats, sheep, chickens, rabbits and ducks. Pony rides will be available for a fee. Free parking will be available at CSULB Lot 11A at Palo Verde Avenue and Rendina Street with continuous handicap-accessible shuttle service to the Rancho.

Face your fears at last

Or just scream “lollipop!” The Youth Center dares you to come and face your very worst fears at its 4th annual Haunted House sponsored by Joe’s Premium Painting. Prepare to see your “Fears Come Alive” this October, on Friday the 25th, Saturday the 26th, and Sunday the 27th from 6pm to 9pm at The Youth Center, located at 10909 Oak St. in Los Alamitos. You can fully expect to feel your blood pressure rise in realistic, life-or-death situations while navigating two disturbingly haunted mazes and rooms featuring snakes, monsters, clowns, the morgue, a cemetery, a haunted hospital with a blood-thirsty doctor and more. This year’s Haunted House is so terrifying that the Youth Center

TRICKS & TREATS

developed a “code word” system. Simply scream “lollipop,” and the dreadful actors will become friendly. From that point on, there is nothing to fear because the volunteers will only wave or offer a high-five. Tickets are on sale for $5 for one maze or $6 for two. Thanks to Blockbuster, the first 50 people through the mazes each night receive a free movie rental. Items will be up for raffle, and everyone will have the chance to win a prize. Purchase tickets online at TheYouthCenter.org to avoid waiting in line for the Haunted House. For more information about this horrific event, contact Community Relations Director Lisa Lee at (562) 493-4043 or online at lisa@theyouthcenter.org .

THURSDAY, OCT. 31

Magician and candy and popcorn.. oh, my!

Calvary Chapel Signal Hill will host its annual community outreach, the Let Him Shine Celebration, from 6pm to 10pm. This event will take place on the campus of Signal Hill Elementary School, 2285 Walnut Ave. The church is offering the event as a safe and fun environment for families. Free carnival games, jumpers, hot dogs, popcorn and cotton candy will be provided. There will also be lots of free candy distributed. In addition to these goodies, there will be a magician for children, a live drama presentation and live music. For more information, contact Assistant Pastor Amaury Rosario at (562) 804-5509.

A ton of candy?

Grace Brethren Church of Long Beach will host its 19th annual community carnival on Halloween night from 6pm to 9pm in the church’s back parking lot at Linden Avenue and 36th Street. The church expects to give away more than a ton of candy. The event will include carnival games, a large slide, a bungee run, an obstacle course, a skate park and a live deejay. For younger attendees, the church will offer free balloon animals, bounce houses, face painting and a pumpkin-patch area. Hamburgers, hot dogs, popcorn, cotton candy and other treats will be available for purchase, along with chili and cornbread from Bake ‘n’ Broil and Mexican food from Baja Sonora.

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SIGNAL TRIBUNE

9

Play it safe this Halloween by following fire safety tips from NFPA

It’s the time of the year for festive costumes, endless candy, spooky jack-o-lanterns and creepy decorations. The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) is reminding everyone to take a few simple precautions to keep Halloween safe and enjoyable. “Just about everyone loves a good scare on Halloween, but not when it comes to safety,” said Lorraine Carli, NFPA’s vice president of Outreach and Advocacy. “Costumes with billowing or long, trailing fabric and candle decorations should be avoided to keep fun events from turning into tragedies.” From 2006 to 2010, decorations were the main type of item ignited in an estimated average of 1,000 reported home structure fires per year, resulting in an average six civilian deaths, 53 civilian injuries and $16 million in direct property damage. In that same time period, United States fire departments responded to an estimated 11,640 home-structure fires that were started by candles. These fires caused 126 deaths, 953 injuries, and $438 million in direct property damage.

Safety tips to keep everyone safe for Halloween: • When choosing a costume, stay away from billowing or long, trailing fabric. If you are making your own costume, choose material that won’t easily ignite if it comes into contact with heat or flame. If your child is wearing a mask, make sure the eye holes are large enough so they can see out. • Provide children with flashlights to carry for lighting or glow sticks as part of their costume. • Dried flowers, cornstalks and crepe paper are highly flammable. Keep these and other decorations well away from all open flames and heat sources, including light bulbs and heaters. • It is safest to use a flashlight or battery-operated candles in a jack-olantern. If you use a real candle, use extreme caution. Make sure children are watched at all times when candles are lit. When lighting candles inside jack-o-lanterns, use long fireplace-style matches or a utility lighter. Be sure to place lit pumpkins well away from anything that can burn and far away from trick-or-treaters, doorsteps, walkways and yards. • If you choose to use candle decorations, make sure to keep them well attended at all times. • Remember to keep exits clear of decorations, so nothing blocks escape routes. • Tell children to stay away from open flames. Be sure they know how to stop, drop and roll if their clothing catches fire. (Have them practice stopping immediately, dropping to the ground, covering their face with hands, and rolling over and over to put the flames out.) • Use flashlights as alternatives to candles or torch lights when decorating walkways and yards. They are much safer for trick-or-treaters, whose costumes may brush against the lighting. Source: NFPA

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COMMUNITY

10 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

In Living Color

OCTOBER 25, 2013

How to make curb appeal of home or business front and center Shoshanah Siegel Columnist

In my last article, I introduced you to ways of amping up the curb appeal of your home or business. I wrote about elements such as house numbers, front doors, mailboxes, lighting, doorbells and entry door locksets. (In case you missed the article, you can go to signaltribune.com and select the article in the archives. The article will be under the column heading “In Living Color.” I had suggested that you look at your property with an objective eye, and the best way to do that would be to go across the street and view the total structure and yard from a distance. It is even better to take a photo, just in case you missed something.

Are you styling? What’s great about our city is that there are 17 historical districts in Long Beach. The chances are good that your property fits into one of the many architectural styles we have in this area. To make sure you are on the right track about what architectural elements to add or delete, check out sites such as these: architecture.about.com or decaturoldhousefair.com/what-style-ismy-house . Be sure to tailor the ele-

ments to your specific property. As a famous architect, Helmut Jahn stated, “Every building is a prototype. No two are alike.”

Repeat business One good way to create a cohesive look to the exterior is repeating elements. For example, if one of the prominent design elements is an arch in a window, you might repeat a circular pattern in the awning over the doorway. Like icing on the cake Shutters, window boxes, trim, moldings, sidings, and stone veneers automatically transform the look of your property.

Shutters– an elegant embellishment Shutters add a welcoming layer of beauty to the exterior. Shutters can be made of wood, aluminum, vinyl, composite, or fiberglass. New composite materials such as PVC resins or polyurethane make them durable and low maintenance. They come in many styles, and this is one area where you can repeat an element, such as a circular pattern. All the trimmings Trim and moldings add depth and definition to features such as doors and win-

dows. They act like architectural eyeliner. Craftsmanstyle homes really use this element well.

Boxes of joy I love window boxes because they are a fast and easy way to bring style, charm and color to the exterior. The materials you can use are endless metal, (wood, iron). The decoraPhotos by Shoshanah Siegel/Signal Tribune tions are varied. Window boxes filled with flowers of the season, along with a pop of color on the window shutters, bring However, plant great curb appeal to this home. selection is key. They need to be Get stoned to do some research online or look at easily maintained and changed out Nothing has the look of permanence books and magazines to get some with the seasons. The idea of having more than stone. However, there are ideas. If creating what you want is not window boxes is a great one; the exemany types of stone veneers that are in your realm of expertise, contact a cution and maintenance might be less heavy and more cost effective. vendor who can assist you, and in the another story. They look great on column footings long run, do so correctly. Be sure to and other small masonry details. It ask yourself some key questions: How Pick a side works best as an accent. Make sure do you want your porch to function? Using siding and shingles instead of that you don’t overdo it or your prop- What look do you love? How can it be stucco is one way of keeping with the erty starts to look like a castle (unless adapted to the architecture of your architecture and style. These now it really is). building? come in some durable alternatives.

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Making an entrance Adding arbors, fence panels (the new post-modern look is to run the panels horizontal instead of vertical) or gates can create a fun and inviting way to greet guests. These can be found in easy-to-build kits or prefab sections and can be made from an endless array of materials.

Because winter weather is on its way, be sure to repair and maintain all the elements you already have so they don’t downgrade the aesthetics and integrity of the building. This in turn will help you enjoy the upcoming seasons.

Shoshanah Siegel provides color consulting as well as space planning, remodeling, upgrading and staging through her firm Your Color Diva. She can be contacted at (562) 427-0440 or at shoshanah.siegel@gmail.com. Samples of her work can be found at houzz.com .

Serve and protect Adding a cover over the front door can keep both the rain and sun off visitors and off of you while you fish for your keys. Whether you decide to create a front porch with a roof or awning, be sure to create one that is in the style and integrity of the building. This is a feature that needs thought and planning. Make sure that adding a porch or element is in code and architecturally sound. To add cohesiveness you will need to incorporate the walkways and landscaping leading up to the porch in your plans. The materials and ideas are endless, so you may want A crisp white trim, portico, and stone veneer at the base of the columns creates a cohesive and inviting entrance.

Approved Watering Sched-

Watering is approved on the following days:

Monday, Thursday, and Saturday before 9:00 am and after 4:00 pm

For more information, call the Water Conservation Hotline: 562-989-7350

ST3520 - Oct. 25_Layout 1 10/25/13 4:14 PM Page 11

CULTURE

OCTOBER 25, 2013 Imitating Life

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

14 (or so) questions for local artist Cat Riley

11

Table made of “tinfoil and rusty things”

Cory Bilicko

From the creator of

CRUISE DIARY Love Boat:

“All My Dreams are Made of Chrome,” pen and ink

Managing Editor

In 100 words or less, what do you do as an artist? I work in various mediums, from fabric to rusty objects. I have done stained glass, quilting, drawing, multi-media work, sculpting,and so on. This year, I [showed] some “foil and flotsam” objects, including a table and a wall-mounted lazy susan plus some zen-inspired drawings and some garden goodies [at the Long Beach Open Studio Tour]. What motivates you to create art? Seeing what other artists are doing always makes me want to create my visions.

How has your practice changed over time? Since I am retired now, I can work on art every day if I want to, so I get better at bringing my ideas to life.

Do you ever get artist’s block? If so, how do you combat it? I let it go and work in the garden until I am ready to create again.

What do you think your life would be like if, for some reason,

you could no longer create art? Over.

What role does the artist have in society? I only seek to amuse and entertain. Society is not concerned with me or my art. The larger role of the artist in society has to be discussed by those who have impact.

How do you feel when people ask you to explain the meaning of your art? I have to admit to them that most of it has no meaning except what they, the viewers, give it. I don’t know that I intend anything when I make something.

Have you ever been banned or censored to any degree as an artist? If so, how did you react? If not, how do you think you would react in that situation? No, none of my work is controversial. But I would not appreciate being banned. Does your artistic life ever get lonely? If so, what do you do to counteract it? I have great support for my art from friends and family, so I

rarely feel alone in what I am doing. What do you hope to achieve with your art? Self-satisfaction. What are one or two primary areas of fear for you as an artist? I worry that this piece or that is either not done or overdone. It’s hard to know when to stop sometimes.

What are one or two factors that, when they’re in place, enable you to really flourish artistically? A bright, cool day. No one home. All my supplies at hand.

What jobs have you had other than being an artist? I worked for the phone company for 40 years in various capacities. It was mostly uninspiring work, but it paid well and had benefits! What’s your favorite color? Green

More of Riley’s work may be seen at flickr.com/photos/ 52822842@N00 .

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ST3520 - Oct. 25_Layout 1 10/25/13 4:14 PM Page 12

12 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

TST4477 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 120082164 Doc ID #0001619713752005N Title Order No. 12-0146994 Investor/Insurer No. 1704156703 APN No. 7207-014-022 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 06/13/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by DAMON NELSON, A SINGLE MAN, dated 06/13/2007 and recorded 6/20/2007, as Instrument No. 20071481881, in Book N/A, Page N/A, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, will sell on 11/12/2013 at 11:00AM, By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2635 LIME AVENUE # A, B, C and D, SIGNAL HILL, CA, 90755. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $393,634.25. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on a property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 1-800-281-8219 or visit this Internet Web site www.recontrustco.com, using the file number assigned to this case TS No. 12-0082164. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is

PUBLIC NOTICES

to attend the scheduled sale. DATED: 01/05/2013 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 By: - Trustee's Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that A-FN4420867 10/18/2013, purpose. 10/25/2013, 11/01/2013

TST4470 / 2013 199255 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: SHORTCAKES, 1746 Grand Ave., Unit 4, Long Beach, CA 90804. Registrant: CYNTHIA SHORT, 1746 Grand Ave., Unit 4, Long Beach, CA 90804. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Cynthia Short. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on September 23, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: October 4, 11, 18, 25, 2013.

TST4476 / 2013 211465 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: FISHER'S CATCH, 1025 1/2 Raymond Ave., Long Beach, CA 90804. Registrant: FISHER'S CATCH, LLC, 1025 1/2 Raymond Ave., Long Beach, CA 90804. This business is conducted by: a Limited Liability Company. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Ma Belle Ammie Fisher. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on September 28, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on October 9, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: October 11, 18, 25, & November 1, 2013. TST4481 / 2013 206077 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: FORTUN INCOME TAX SERVICE, 5720 E. Imperial Hwy. Unit 1, South Gate, CA 90280. Registrant: GISELLA LUCIA FORTUN, 5720 E. Imperial Hwy. Unit 1, South Gate, CA 90280. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Gisella Lucia Fortun. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on October 2, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: October 18, 25, & November 1, 8, 2013.

TST4482 / 2013 215372 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. ALOHI VACATIONS, 2. PICS 4 MY PARTY, 3. RMS WEDDINGS, 4. RMS EVENTS, 5. ADVOCATES IN ACTION, 6. OUR COFFEE CORNER, 2510 E. Willow St., Unit 101, Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: ALOHI ENTERPRISES, INCORPORATED, 2510 E. Willow St., Unit 101, Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Kelly M. James, Secretary. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on April 15, 2007. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on October 15, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: October 18, 25, & November 1, 8, 2013.

TST4485 / 2013 215151 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: MIND THOUGHT PRODUCTION, 5250 W. Century Blvd. #448, Los Angeles, CA 90045. Registrant: JIMMY CHRIS, 14702 Visalia Ave., Compton, CA 90220. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Jimmy Chris. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on October 15, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on October 15, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: October 25, & November 1, 8, 15, 2013.

TST4486 / 2013 218565 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: THOMAS FIELD SERVICES, 324 Mira Mar Ave., Long Beach, CA 90814. Registrant: GAWIN ARRON THOMAS, 324 Mira Mar Ave., Long Beach, CA 90814. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Gawin Arron Thomas. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on October 21, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: October 25, & November 1, 8, 15, 2013.

TST4487 / 2013 219013 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: PUBLIC SECTOR EXCELLENCE, 3520 Long Beach Blvd. #209, Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: FORREST L. STORY, 3520 Long Beach Blvd. #209, Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Forrest L. Story. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on October 1, 1995. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on October 21, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: October 25, & November 1, 8, 15, 2013.

TST4489 / 2013 217713 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: DONATO'S HAIR SALON, 4102 Orange Ave., Ste. 121, Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: LEONORA L. FARRIS, 4102 Orange Ave., Ste. 121, Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Leonora L. Farris. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on March 6, 1996. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on October 18, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: October 25, & November 1, 8, 15, 2013.

EYE ON CRIME Crimes reported by SHPD Citywide Thursday, Oct. 17 DUI 1:58am– Cherry Ave./E. Burnett St. Grand theft from auto 5pm– 3100 block E. Willow St. Commercial burglary 6:40pm– 900 block E. 33rd St.

Battery 9:48pm– 2800 block Walnut Ave. Friday, Oct. 18 DUI 1:24am– E. Willow St./Palm Dr.

Saturday, Oct. 19 DUI 12:51am– E. 27th St./Walnut Ave. Sunday, Oct. 20 Commercial burglary 11:58am– 900 block E. 33rd St.

Attempted residential burglary 2:30pm– 1000 block E. 32nd St.

Commercial burglary 2:49pm– 900 block E. 33rd St.

Monday, Oct. 21 Identity theft 11:26am– 2700 block Walnut Ave.

Forgery 12:01am– 1300 block E. Burnett St.

Tuesday, Oct. 22 Disorderly conduct, under influence of drugs, alcohol 10:58pm– 2800 block Walnut Ave. Wednesday, Oct. 23 Battery on non-cohabitating spouse 2:34am– 3200 block E. PCH Petty theft 4pm– 700 E. Spring St.

Battery 10:57pm– 1900 block E. 21st St.

Crimes reported by LBPD Council Districts 6, 7 & 8

Nothing reported

OCTOBER 25, 2013

CITY OF SIGNAL HILL TST4488 NoTICE oF PUBlIC HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Signal Hill will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, November 5, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chamber located at City Hall, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, to review: ORDINANCE AMENDMENT RELATED TO STORM WATER/URBAN RUNOFF

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL, CALIFORNIA, AMENDING CHAPTER 12.16 OF THE SIGNAL HILL MUNICIPAL CODE AS IT RELATES TO STORM WATER AND URBAN RUNOFF POLLUTION PREVENTION CONTROLS AND DECLARING THE URGENCY THEREOF Applicant: City of Signal Hill

THIS PROJECT IS CATEGORICALLY EXEMPT from the requirements of the California Environmental Quality Act pursuant to Sections 15307 and 15308 of Guidelines for implementation of the California Environmental Quality Act (for activities that enhance or protect natural resources and enhance or protect the environment). The project is also exempt pursuant to Section 15061(b)(3) of the California Administrative Code, Title 14 (for projects that will not have a significant adverse effect on the environment). ALL INTERESTED PERSONS are hereby invited to attend this public hearing to present written information, express their opinions, or otherwise present evidence on the above matter. If you wish to legally challenge any action taken by the City on the above matter, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing as described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the City prior to or at the public hearing. THE FILE CONTAINING MATERIAL relevant to the proposed project may be inspected by the public between the hours of 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday and on Friday until 4:30 p.m. in the Public Works Department located at City Hall.

THE PUBLIC IS INVITED to submit written comments to the Public Works Department prior to or at the public hearing. Written comments may also be submitted at the public hearing.

FURTHER INFORMATION on this item may be obtained at the City of Signal Hill Public Works Department located at 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, or by emailing Steve Myrter, P.E., Director of Public Works at smyrter@cityofsignalhill.org or calling (562) 989-7356. Published in the Signal Tribune newspaper (Gov’t Code (§65091(a)(3)(1): October 25, 2013 Posted in accordance with S.H.M.C. Section 1.08.010 October 25, 2013

CITY OF SIGNAL HILL TST4483 NoTICE oF A PUBlIC HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Tuesday, November 12, 2013, the Planning Commission of the City of Signal Hill will conduct a public hearing at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chamber located at City Hall, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, to consider the recommendation of the item discussed below. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Tuesday, November 19, 2013, the City Council of the City of Signal Hill will conduct a public hearing at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chamber located at City Hall, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California to consider the following: ZONING ORDINANCE AMENDMENT 13-04

AN AMENDMENT TO SIGNAL HILL MUNICIPAL CODE CHAPTER 20.41, ENTITLED “SP-7 SPECIAL PURPOSE HOUSING SPECIFIC PLAN,” AREA SIX AN APPROVED AFFORDABLE HOUSING SITE AT 1500 HILL STREET TO: •

AMEND THE MAXIMUM DWELLING UNIT DENSITY FROM 60 MULTIPLE-FAMILY UNITS TO 72 UNITS

• AMEND THE OFFICIAL ZONING MAP BY DESIGNATING A .20 ACRE PARCEL LOCATED AT 2170 GUNDRY FROM LIGHT INDUSTRIAL TO “SP-7 SPECIAL PURPOSE HOUSING SPECIFIC PLAN” AREA SIX APPLICANT: City of Signal Hill

ALL INTERESTED PERSONS are hereby invited to attend this public hearing to present written information, express their opinions or otherwise present evidence on the above matter. If you wish to legally challenge any action taken by the City on the above matter, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearings described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City prior to or at the public hearings.

A NEGATIVE DECLARATION has been prepared in conjunction with the subject project based on an initial study finding of no significant environmental impacts associated with the project. Written comments may be submitted to the Community Development Department regarding Negative Declaration 10/25/13(1) during the public review period from October 25, 2013 to November 15, 2013.

THE FILE and associated documents for the proposed project may be reviewed by the public between the hours of 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Fridays, in the Community Development Department at City Hall. FURTHER INFORMATION on this item may be obtained at the City of Signal Hill Community Development Department located at 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, or by emailing Selena Alanis, Assistant Planner, at salanis@cityofsignalhill.org or calling at (562) 989-7341. Published in the Signal Tribune newspaper: October 25, 2013 Posted in accordance with S.H.M.C. Section 1.08.010: October 25, 2013 Mailed to affected property owners within 300’ on or before: October 25, 2013

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NEWS

OCTOBER 25, 2013

HSLB

continued from page 1

guage, or ESL, curriculum at Long Beach Unified School District, while Bill, a teacher who passed away this year, helped Vietnam veterans enroll in community college. Local community-theatre actors Mitchell and Jane Nunn, who participated two years ago, are representing the couple. During dress rehearsals last Sunday at HSLB’s building on Atlantic Avenue, Mitchell said he is grateful to pay respects to such noble people. “It’s really interesting when you find out about these people,” said Mitchell, who also performs in The Foreigner at Long Beach Playhouse. “It’s just very fulfilling inside to keep this message alive as to what these people did and to pay the honor to them to let people know this isn’t just a person in the ground.” Jane, who held back tears while practicing her lines, said the performances will be “especially interesting” since they feature people who recently passed away, unlike previous reenactments of people who died decades ago. “There’s a chance there will be people who come to the event who actually knew these people, and we’ve never had that before,” she said. In his fifth year directing the performances, Denis McCourt, who is the founder of the Public Theatre of Southern California and has worked with the Long Beach Shakespeare Company and Long Beach Playhouse, said each performance is like a “living obituary” for different residents of various time periods and they show how people never change. “This is a way to bring it to life by finding that human connection and the power of personal story,” he said. “When you see real people standing there, you realize we haven’t changed much. The humanity is still the same.” Local historians Roxanne Patmore and Kaye Briegel worked together on writing the scripts after months of researching each person’s life through newspaper archives, the Internet and relatives of the deceased. Some of the residents featured in the plays were chosen by circumstance, however Briegel –Jane Nunn, said the goal is to showcase a wide cross section of people’s lives, whether influential or not, instead of the traditional “movers and shakers” of Long Beach history. “The challenge is to do something that says something worthwhile about the history of Long Beach and still make it interesting and engaging for the public,” she said. “These aren’t the same old stories. It’s not the booster history of Long Beach. It’s an attempt to look at a broader idea of what Long Beach has been in the past.” This year, some city officials have joined the reenactments. For instance, Councilmember Al Austin is playing Charles Haynes, who in 1961 became

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NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Signal Hill will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, November 19, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chamber located at City Hall, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, to consider:

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Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Director Denis McCourt, far left, gives actors Jane and Mitchell Nunn some advice for their performance as Betty and Bill Seal during dress rehearsals of the 18th Annual Historical Cemetery Tour scheduled for this Saturday, Oct. 26.

the first African-American member of the Long Beach Board of Realtors. The performance will also feature Haynes’s wife, Ethel, an elementaryschool teacher. Some mayoral candidates are also participating, including Assemblymember Bonnie Lowenthal, Councilmember Gerrie Schipske, Long Beach Community College Trustee Doug Otto and Jana Shields, who runs a nonprofit educational service. Councilmember Suja Lowenthal, who announced she has dropped out of the mayoral race and is running for the 70th District Assembly seat, is expected to perform as well. Other Long Beach residents featured in the short plays besides the Seals and the Hayneses include: Elizabeth “Liz” and Donald Wallace; Thomas and Kathleen Harnett (brother and sister); Yaye Kurayama Takeshita; Valentine and Maybell Leal; the Coseboom Family; and Dora Czerny. Jonathan Varillas, who plays Valentine Leal, a Mexican from Texas who married Maybell Leal in 1905 to have three sons, one of whom attended UCLA and became a language scholar, said the reenactment is unlike any performance he has ever done. “It’s almost like you can literally touch the history of it,” said Varillas, who has been studying dramatic arts for about five years. “It’s kind of like

“There’s a chance there will be people who come to the event who actually knew these people, and we’ve never had that before.”

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you can feel what it was like to have lived in Long Beach. I’m just really glad to be able to express that to people.” Anna Kate Mohler, who plays Maybell, said the graveside performances are the “essence of community theatre,” adding that the event is more about paying tribute to those whom the stories are about rather than the performances. “I think there’s something that’s so wonderful about pieces that have historical relevance, especially in the town that we live in,” Mohler said. “It’s that much more important. It’s not just getting on stage… and getting to perform. You’re there, and you’re at their gravesite. That’s pretty special.” Performances run continuously from 9am to 2:30pm. The event also features a Dia de los Muertos exhibit, a free hotdog lunch and guided tours. Tickets are $20 for general admission, $15 for HSLB members and $5 for students 8 to 18 years old (children under age 8 are free). Tickets may only be purchased the day of the tour from 8:30am to noon. MORE INFORMATION hslb.org

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ALL INTERESTED PERSONS are hereby invited to attend a public hearing at which all persons interested in or objecting to the proposed transfer of pipelines under said franchise to Tesoro SoCal Pipeline Company LLC may appear and be heard. If you wish to legally challenge any action taken by the City on the above matter, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City prior to or at the public hearing. THE PUBLIC IS INVITED to submit written comments to the Public Works/Engineering Department or during the public hearing.

FURTHER INFORMATION on this item may be obtained at the City of Signal Hill Public Works/Engineering Department located at 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California or by calling Joshua Rosenbaum at (562) 989-7355. //ss// Joshua Rosenbaum Management Analyst

Published in the Signal-Tribune newspaper on October 25, 2013. Posted at City Hall, Library, Discovery Well Park, and Reservoir Park on October 25, 2013.

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CULTURE

14 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

OCTOBER 25, 2013

Theater review

International City Theatre’s Don’t Dress for Dinner

Photo by Suzanne Mapes

Trois is company too in International City Theatre’s Don’t Dress for Dinner. Pictured from left are: Greg Derelian, Matthew Wrather, Karen Jean Olds, Amie Farrell and Michael Cusimano. Gregory Spooner Culture Writer

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“Come and knock on our door… we’ve been waiting for you… where the kisses are hers and hers and his…” If you’re over 35, I’ll bet you my first-born son that you can complete this line. Like many Gen-Xers, I grew up watching Three’s Company. I remember watching it when I was in middle school; it was one of the ways I was introduced to the “naughty” world that adults inhabited. There was always some kind of sordid intrigue going on… Chrissy had two dates on the same night and thought she could to keep them both by simply keeping the guys in different rooms, or Jack tries to babysit his neighbor’s daughter while simultaneously putting the moves on an old friend who stops by. (Quick Three’s Company trivia opportunity! Did you know it was an American remake of a 1973 BBC sitcom, Man About the House? Well, now you do! You see, it’s my duty as a Brit to alert you Yanks to all things that were first British, and then, of course, to condescendingly add that they were so much better too. Then it’s your duty to remind me who won that little war

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back in 1776 and shut me up.) After reading a short description of Don’t Dress for Dinner, I couldn’t help but think of Three’s Company. Although I loved it in my teenage years, by the time I graduated high school, the re-runs seemed flat, formulaic and filled with canned laughter. “Oh no… here we go!” I thought. “Typical sitcom drivel!” However, as soon as International City Theatre’s performance of Don’t Dress started, my fears quickly vanished. The play quickly went above and beyond any episode of Three’s Company on many levels... including delivering many more laughs! The plot starts off with a simple dilemma: Bernard’s wife is leaving for the weekend, so he has made elaborate plans for a romantic weekend with his mistress, Suzanne; however, his wife decides to stay at home when she learns that her own lover is coming in to town to visit her. If this was Three’s Company, things would have stopped there, and this simple level of doubledeceit would have provided ample opportunity for plenty of gaffes and sexual innuendo. However, this is not Three’s Company… it’s Three’s Com-

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pany on steroids! Bernard and his wife Jacqueline are both lying to each other, but the cook, Suzette, and Bernard’s friend Robert are soon both victims and perpetrators to an increasingly tangled web of lies that simultaneously boggles and delights the audience’s minds. As each layer of deceit is added, you will be convinced that the game is up, yet playwright Marc Camoletti manages to weave each layer of lies neatly into the existing web… a Herculean and ingenious feat. Camoletti’s playwrighting credentials boast over 40 plays, including Boeing Boeing, which holds the Guiness World Record for the most performed play of all time. Camoletti wrote Don’t Dress in 1987 and originally set the comedy in the contemporaneous decade of the 1980s. After playing in Paris and then London, the play made its Broadway debut in 2012, where its temporal setting was pushed back to the 1960s. Maybe it’s just me, but I think the decade switch was a great idea. The men look dashing in their trim, threebutton blazers, and the ladies are seductively svelte in their cocktail dresses. (Kudos to costume designer Kim DeShazo!) Would this have worked as well with women in leg warmers and acid-washed jeans and the men in Members Only jackets and mullets? I don’t think so. Greg Deralian and Amie Farell play the adulterous couple (Bernard and Jaqueline) with farcical abandon. Afton Quast and Matthew Wrather are cast as their respective paramours and fulfill their duties admirably. But one cast member truly stood out with a performance that went above and beyond: Karen Jean Olds stole the show in the role of the cook, Suzette. Olds’s performance was simply brilliant; her timing and accent were impeccable! I hope I have the pleasure to see more plays with this standout in the future, and if you catch this play before it closes on Nov. 3, I’m sure you will agree. “This is pure, desperate, naughty fun from start to finish,” says Director Todd Nielsen. “We get to peer in on this lovable group of fools as they stumble and strain through a weekend of lusty anticipation that crashes and fizzles. Sometimes you just have to go through the crazy to get to the sane. And in the end true romance wins the day!”

Don’t Dress for Dinner will play at the International City Theatre through Nov. 3. The venue is located at 300 East Ocean Ave. (directly above and behind the Long Beach Terrace Theatre). Performances are Thursday through Saturday at 8pm and Sunday at 2pm. Tickets are $38 general admission on Wednesdays, $45 on Fri-Sun. For tickets and more information, call (562) 436-4610 or visit InternationalCityTheatre.com .

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OCTOBER 25, 2013 Theater review

Avenue Q at Long Beach Playhouse Vicki Paris Goodman Culture Writer

Hats off to the creators of Avenue Q for a delightfully unique audience experience. Not only do the musicalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s puppet characters express a full range of emotion, but so do their human puppeteers. The overall effect of this highprofile Long Beach Playhouse production is a doubly satisfying performance for the price of one. With music and lyrics by Robert Lopez and Jeff Marx, and book by Jeff Whitty, Avenue Qâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hummable numbers cover a wide range of issues besetting the human condition. Finding oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s purpose in life, being a closeted homosexual, lacking self-esteem, being â&#x20AC;&#x153;a little bit racist,â&#x20AC;? and admitting to looking at Internet pornography all find their way into the lives of the showâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s puppets and the familiar real-life dilemmas they face. Given that the setting for Avenue Q is a blighted neighborhood somewhere in New York City, and gay themes intertwine the story line, the show immediately struck me as Rent with puppets, albeit decidedly more upbeat and thankfully lacking in the heart-wrenching heavy drug use and AIDS. The impossibly talented Angela Griswold handles Kate Monster, who falls for newly arrived Princeton and whose dream is to open a school for monsters. Monsters, in this context, are fuzzy creatures who represent a race, like being black, Hispanic, or Asian. Princetonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s handler is the equally fabulous Andrew Manzani. He and Griswold are, as far as Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m concerned, the backbone of the entire show, establishing early on two exceedingly adorable puppet characters. Their childlike singing and speaking voices, altered intentionally for their charactersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; cartoonish depictions, are a perfect match. The run-down buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s super is none other than Gary Coleman, a wise role beautifully executed with lots of good fun by actress Kieara Williams. We are overjoyed when Kate and Princeton begin dating, only to have the Bad Idea Bears (Rick Reischman and Nicky Finn) mess things up. The final nail in the budding relationshipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coffin comes courtesy of stage performer Lucy the Slut, given a persona reminiscent of Mae West by handler Madison Mooney. Lucy unfortunately fancies Princeton, and he lacks the self-confidence to resist her in favor of making things right with Kate. Roommates and best buddies Rod (Matt DeNoto) and Nicky (Dennis

Dyck) fall out over Nickyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s asking Rod if he is gay. Rod, who is not ready to come clean with regard to his sexual orientation, has a conniption and â&#x20AC;&#x153;unfriendsâ&#x20AC;? Nicky, rendering him homeless. Even the several puppetless cast members depict fairly recognizable stereotypes. There is the domineering Asian Christmas Eve (Sawami Shinohara) who marries the willingly subjugated and slovenly Brian (Nicholas Woodall). Kellee Elizabeth plays Kate Monsterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s overly uptight boss, Mrs. Thistletwat. The depiction is hysterical in its recollection of a stern old maid who weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve all had as an elementaryschool teacher at some time in our past. Brian Bozanich is amazing as handler for the oversized and oversexed Trekkie Monster. Trekkie Monster grosses us out until he surprises everyone by becoming the groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main benefactor and, hence, the showâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hero. I could have done without some of the more graphically sexual themes addressed in the show. I am not a fan of putting it out there strictly for shock value just because it reflects some aspect of social reality. I also took exception to the customary gratuitous bashing of political conservatives. This stuff just gets so old. Thank goodness there is so much to like about Avenue Q that the minuses were fairly inconsequential.

CULTURE

www.

signal tribune .com

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Courtesy LBPH

Dennis Adrian Dyck as Nicky and Matt DeNoto as Rod in Long Beach Playhouseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s production of Avenue Q

Andrew Vonderschmitt masterfully directs the youthful cast of this engaging popular Broadway musical. I was most impressed with the likable personifications the actors/puppeteers gave their puppets while simultaneously refining those characterizations using their own facial expressions and vocalization. This had to have been no easy feat. As an audience member,

you find your eyes darting back and forth between puppet and handler in order to avoid missing a single expressive nuance. It is well worth the effort. Live music with keyboard and drums are fully visible on stage. The action is complemented by Halley Wrightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s splendid choreography and Naomi Kasaharaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fine set.

Avenue Q continues at the Long Beach Playhouse Studio Theatre through Nov. 16. General-admission tickets are $24, senior tickets are $21, and student tickets are $14 with valid ID. Performances are Fridays and Saturdays at 8pm, with Sunday matinees at 2pm. The Long Beach Playhouse is located at 5021 E. Anaheim St. Call (562) 494-1014, option 1, for reservations and information. Tickets are also available at lbplayhouse.org .

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OCTOBER 25, 2013

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

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