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“Beautiful Blue� acrylic on canvas by Monica Fleming See page 8

Signal T

Vol. 35 No. 18

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SERVING BIXBY KNOLLS, CALIFORNIA HEIGHTS, LOS CERRITOS, WRIGLEY AND THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

Your Weekly Community Newspaper

october 4, 2013

Auto-title lender sues City of Long Beach for denying permit to operate at Wrigley ‘gateway’

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

The former Signal Hill police station located at 1800 E. Hill St. will be demolished in early 2014. However, because of the State’s dissolution of redevelopment, demolition of the library next door to make way for a new 15,000-squarefoot library has been postponed since $8.6 million in bond proceeds for construction are currently frozen.

Signal Hill city officials vow to fight for RDA bond money to construct new library Sean Belk Staff Writer

Signal Hill city officials said they aren’t giving up just yet on a long-awaited project to replace the City’s small 4,234-squarefoot public library with a new facility that would be more than three times the size of the old building. The State’s decision to dis-

solve redevelopment nearly two years ago put a major wrench in the project since current legislation requires that proceeds from bonds issued by former redevelopment agencies (RDAs) after Dec. 31, 2010 be “defeased� and dispersed among surrounding taxing entities. For now, that means the $8.6 million in proceeds for bonds issued by the former Signal Hill

RDA in March 2011 for construction of the new library are frozen since the bonds were issued after the State’s deadline. But, until the State officially demands the proceeds be defeased, Signal Hill city officials said they are holding on to the money in hopes that proposed legislation will resolve the

Pennbrooke Financial Services, LLC, an auto-title-loan company, sought to lease an empty building at the corner of Pacific Coast Highway and Pacific Avenue, considered a "gateway" to the Wrigley Village area, but the Long Beach City Council denied the company's conditional-use-permit application last year. Now, the business has taken legal action against the City. Sean Belk Staff Writer

An auto-title-loan company has taken legal action against the City of Long Beach in an attempt to have the courts overturn the City Council’s decision last year that denied the firm’s request for a conditional-use-permit (CUP). The permit was needed for the business to move into a vacant building at the corner of Pacific Coast Highway and Pacific Avenue, considered by residents a “gateway� to the Wrigley Village area. Georgia-based Pennbrooke Financial Services, LLC filed a lawsuit, called a

writ of mandate, against the City after the Council unanimously voted (9-0) to turn down the business’s CUP application in November 2012. The Council’s decision was made on appeal after the Planning Commission came to a (3-3) tie vote on the permit. Both the City and the company are now expected to present oral arguments in Los Angeles County Superior Court before Judge James C. Chalfant at a hearing set for Oct. 22, according to attorneys. Opposition to the company moving to town was launched nearly two years ago by a group of Wrigley-neighborhood residents, who called such busisee LENDERS page 11

Post realignment, local police departments take a more active role in looking after offenders following their release see COUNCIL page 15

CJ Dablo Staff Writer

CJ Dablo/Signal Tribune

These prisoner handcuffs last month piled in a corner of the former courthouse in Long Beach were ready for inmates. A federal court panel last month extended the deadline to January 2014 for the State of California to reduce the prison population. California in 2011 adopted a realignment program that significantly changed how the State handles incarceration of low-level offenders by increasing the responsibilities of the local county jail systems and county probation departments.

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It’s a new era for law-enforcement agencies statewide two years after California made sweeping modifications to the justice system through its realignment program, and in Long Beach and Signal Hill, police departments are adapting to the change. In October 2011, California initiated the realignment program under legislation called AB 109 in order to comply with a federal court order that aimed to reduce the state prison population by the end of this year. Proposing a comprehensive three-year plan, Gov. Jerry Brown had hoped that the court would allow more time for the State to comply with the order to reduce the number of its inmates in state prison facilities, but last month, a three-judge panel only extended the deadline to Jan. 27, 2014. About seven years ago, the number of state prison

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inmates was estimated to be almost 200,000, and now the goal is to get the inmate population closer to 112,000, about 137.5 percent of the design capacity of the prison facilities, according to Dana Simas, a spokeswoman for the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. Simas also confirmed that, under the realignment program, only those offenders who are newly convicted after October 2011 of a non-serious, non-violent and non-sex offense will serve time in county jails. Once released, these lower-leveI offenders report to county probation instead of state parole. Ryan Fischer, a California State University, Long Beach associate professor of criminal justice, explained how county jail systems are now seeing a shift in their inmate populations. He said that, post-realignment, there see REALIGNMENT page 14


COMMUNITY O 4, 2013 Matter of Life First Fridays Art Walk to go APre-planning and pre-paying are the way to go bigger in honor of Arts Month 2 SIgNAl TRIbUNe

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The First Fridays Art Walk in Bixby Knolls on Oct. 4 will celebrate Long Beach Arts Month, an annual program that renews awareness and support for local arts, with a digital community mural, pop-up art galleries, indie rock, break dancers, chalk zones, live sculptures and more. Work by artists participating in the Long Beach Open Studio Tour on Saturday, Oct. 12 and Sunday, Oct. 13 will be previewed at Gallery Expo, 4321 Atlantic Ave. Seventh District Councilmember James Johnson’s “First Books at First Fridays” will feature guest readers JoRae Zuckerman and Marie Treadwell starting at 5:30pm. Eighth District Councilmember Al Austin’s “Council on Your Corner” will be set up at Atlantic Avenue and Burlinghall Drive to meet and greet attendees Attendees may dine on “Art-Lantic” Avenue at one of the local restaurants, then grab the Big Red Bus to travel from venue to venue via designated stops at the participating businesses. Bella Cosa, 3803 Atlantic Ave., will have all the information about First Fridays, maps, business info and restaurant recommendations from 6:30pm to 8pm. MORE INFORMATION firstfridayslongbeach.com

SHPD’s Citizen Police Academy graduates 13 community members

Kenneth McKenzie Columnist

By making your own arrangements in advance, you take away the guesswork for your family, with what you want or do not want. Preplanning will help keep your family in emotional check, by helping them not to overspend when they are upset. By pre-planning and pre-paying, your wishes are locked in place, and prices typically are guaranteed. When you pre-pay your arrangements, the money is placed in a trust or life policy. These pre-paid funds will accrue interest that typically keeps up with inflation. This way your family does not have a bill at the time of death. If you pre-pay your wishes

at one funeral home, you are not bound to that funeral home forever. Perhaps you move, the original funeral home goes out of business or merges with another company, or you or your family simply changes their mind about which funeral home renders the final services. Your final wishes travel with you. You, not the funeral home, own them. Many times I have had families come to me and arrange a funeral for someone and then a year or more later the family finds an old burial policy for that person. The money is not lost! Simply providing a death certificate along with a letter from the funeral home that provided services will release all monies plus interest to the surviving family. Kenneth McKenzie is the owner of McKenzie Mortuary in Long Beach.

On Tuesday, Sept. 17, 13 community members graduated from Class #11 of the Signal Hill Police Department (SHPD) Citizen Police Academy. Class members Jack Schumann, Dyana Dulin, Khemaroth Huon, Evette Monji, Marlene Gonzalez, GB Bajaj, Brenda Bajaj, Mercy Cheung, Ida Aleman, Linda Raatz, Pat Nies, Connie Pino and Kris Chapman underwent 10 weeks of law-enforcement education and demonstrations to achieve graduate status. The class topics included: police administration and patrol, crime scene investigation, police communications and the jail system, identity theft, weaponless defense, traffic enforcement, a DUI workshop, weapon safety and live weapon fire, and the legal system presented by Honorable Judge Tomson Ong from the Long Beach Superior Court. The academy is presented as a way to provide community members with a more in-depth view of local law-enforcement, according to SHPD. The academy is facilitated by Sgt. Robert Cravens, Senior Officer Kelli Brown and police volunteer Judie Jacobus. Residents interested in the class may contact Sgt. Cravens at rcravens@signalhillpd.org . Source: SHPD

The 2013 graduating class of the Signal Hill Police Department Citizen Police Academy Courtesy SHPD

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NeWS

OCTObeR 4, 2013

FAA awards long beach Airport record $15.1-million grant

Long Beach Airport (LGB) has been awarded the largest grant in its history. The $15.1-million award is allocated through the United States Department of Transportation’s Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The funding will allow for much needed repairs to the 7L-25R runway and improvements of access to Taxiways E and F, according to the City of Long Beach. “Investing in the Long Beach Airport creates jobs and enhances the city of Long Beach’s position as a great place to live, work and visit,” said Mayor Bob Foster. Refurbishing Runway 7L-25R at the northern end of the airport will include rehabilitation of pavement markings, lighting, signage and drainage systems, as well as the

grading of infield areas. The current edge lighting will be replaced with FAA-approved LED lighting. Improvements of access to Taxiways E and F at the southern end of the airport will consist of rehabilitation of the pavement, including the shoulder, perimeter road and adjoining pavement area. All of the work will reduce foreign object debris (FOD), which can damage aircraft, and improve safety at the airport, according to the City. Overall, the projects are expected to create at least 120 more construction jobs at LGB and be completed within two years. “It’s terrific news that the Long Beach Airport has been awarded this grant,” said 5th District Councilmember Gerrie Schipske, whose

Long Beach City Manager Patrick H. West announced on Sept. 2 the appointment of Tom Modica to the position of deputy city manager. Prior to his appointment, Modica served as the director of Government Affairs and Strategic Initiatives in the City Manager’s Office, coordinating the City’s federal, state and local relations as well as managing the City’s communication functions. “With Deputy City Manager Reggie Harrison now leading the Department of Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Communication and focusing on priority issues such as the consolidation of emergency communications and dispatch, updating the City’s Disaster Management Plan, and Homeland Security coordination, there is a need in the City Manager’s Office for a deputy city manager to assist with day-to-day operations and continuing to run this organization at high speed to accomplish the significant goals the mayor and city council have set for us,” West said. As deputy city manager, Modica will continue to oversee external affairs, maintaining oversight over government affairs, communications and regional initiatives like water quality, transportation, regional planning, and state and regional funding issues. Modica will also serve in an executive management role to assist the city manager and assistant city manager guide and facilitate department projects, lead special initiatives, solve problems, continue the City’s innovation and technology efforts, and maintain

Long Beach’s position as a regional leader on municipal issues, according to a press release issued by the City. “During his tenure with the City, Tom Modica has demonstrated exceptional leadership and organizational skills, both in daily operations and special initiatives, while working closely with departments and the City’s elected officials,” West said. “He also has a keen ability to anticipate opportunities for achieving the City’s long-term goals.” Modica has worked with City departments and elected officials on several initiatives over the years, including the long-term improvement in the City’s ocean water quality, management and oversight of $120 million in stimulus funds, protection of the City’s interests through the dissolution of redevelopment, the study of the Long Beach Breakwater, the 2010 City Council Redistricting process, and coordinating citywide media and communications issues, including the City’s awardwinning use of social media,

district includes the airport. “It is a reflection of the importance of one of our city’s major assets. We must continue our efforts to attract and retain business and industry through this type of innovation and progress.” Airport Director Mario Rodriguez credited the airport’s engineers for the grant award. “LGB has won a grant every year since 1997, but this is the largest grant awarded to the airport in its history,” Rodriguez said. “The credit goes to LGB’s engineers for their efforts in applying, and also to the FAA and our Congressional delegation for supporting Long Beach Airport.”

Modica appointed as deputy city manager

you always said you wouldn’t be caught dead in that dress.

lives lived Don blevens 79 robert Douglas Miller 68 robert yamaguchi 58 Carolyn richmond 63 garth Winegar 61 Donna Pace 78 george Lee huntling 86 selma holstein 89 Jean Augey 86 Michelle biddix 63 robert browning 57 Jose santiago 66

better tell them now.

Source: City of LB

3

TAKE A WALK What Raptor Ramble Nature Walk Who Los Cerritos Wetlands Where The driveway/parking area at the corner of 1st St. and PCH in Seal Beach When Saturday, Oct. 5 from 8am to 10am More Info Parking lot gate will open at 7:45am and close at 8:10am. All participants must stay for the entire tour. Closed-toed shoes are required. Kids under 16 must be accompanied by an adult. Email ejlambe@verizon.net .

DIG UP THE NEIGHBORHOOD What Community tree planting Who Neighborhood Services Bureau Where Long Beach Petroleum, 3636 Linden Ave. When Saturday, Oct. 5 from 9am to noon More Info Volunteers are needed to help plant 54 trees in Bixby Knolls. All equipment and refreshments will be supplied. Call (562) 570-7777.

IMPROVING THE CORRIDOR What Broadway Visioning Study Meeting Who Hosted by 2nd District Councilmember Suja Lowenthal and facilitated by urban-design architecture firm RSAUD/UTILE Where Bixby Park Community Center, 130 Cherry Ave. When Saturday, Oct. 5 from 10am to 11:30am More Info In the meeting, Lowenthal and RSAUSD/UTILE will share their plans to enhance the Broadway corridor. Email District2@longbeach.gov .

SHARE YOUR HEART...SHARE YOUR HOME What Foster-care informational event Who District Councilmember Al Austin, 4th District LA County Supervisor Don Knabe and the LA County Department of Children and Family Services Where Expo Arts Center, 4321 Atlantic Ave. When Saturday, Oct. 5 from 11:30am to 1:30pm More Info Organizers will provide information on additional resources and support that are available to those interested in becoming foster parents or adoptive parents. Refreshments will be served, and on-site childcare will be provided for attendees. To RSVP for the event or acquire more information, call (562) 570-1326 or email district8@longbeach.gov .

according to the press release. Modica has worked for the City of Long Beach for the last 11 years, starting as a management assistant in July 2002, and he has served in a number of different roles in the City Manager’s Office including assistant to the city manager, Government Affairs manager, and director of Government Affairs and Strategic Initiatives. He lives in Long Beach with his wife and two children. Source: City of LB

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HEAR THE MUSIC What 1st annual “BAC Sound Investment” scholarship concert Who The Pepperdine University Black Alumni Council Where Hotel Maya, 700 Queensway Dr. When Saturday, Oct. 5 from 4pm to 8pm More Info The goal of the event is to raise scholarship funds for AfricanAmerican students at Pepperdine University’s Graziadio School of Business and Management. The benefit concert will feature a live performance by music aficionado Derek Bordeaux, with a special performance by Princeton Parker.

STEPPING STONES TO EMPLOYMENT What Training class Who Disabled Resources Center, Inc. Where 2750 E. Spring St., Suite #100 When Tuesday, Oct. 8 from 1pm to 2:30pm More Info The classes will focus on interpersonal communication skills and disability etiquette. The classes will take place every Tuesday for the next eight weeks. Call Andrew at (562) 427-1000, Ext. 23.

NETWORK YOUR WAY TO THE TOP What Networking group Who The Success Network Where Roots Gourmet Café, 6473 E. PCH When Wednesday, Oct. 9, from 7:30am to 9am More Info The Success Network is a professional networking group which meets on the second Wednesday of every month for breakfast and discussions or presentations. The group is open to small-business leaders who seek networking opportunities with other professionals who are also interested in growing their businesses through quality relationships and referrals. Contact Katja Jones at katjajns@aol.com or call (562) 685-8532.

IT’S IN A BOOK What Monthly community book club Who The Bixby Knolls Literary Society Where Elise’s Tea Room, 3924 Atlantic Ave. When Wednesday, Oct. 9 at 7pm More Info This month, the club delves into Under the Volcano by Malcolm Lowry. Parking is available along Atlantic Avenue. Refreshments will be provided. Call (562) 595-0081 or email info@bixbyknollsinfo.com .

MIX IT UP What Mixer Who Long Beach Area Republican Party Where Malarkey’s Grill, 168 North Marina Dr. When Thursday, Oct. 10 at 6pm More Info Attendees will have the opportunity to meet local candidates running in the 2014 election. Complimentary appetizers will be served. Call (562) 424-1246 or email michele@longbeachrepublicans.org .

HONORING SMALL BUSINESSES What 2013 Excellence in Business Awards Who Senator Ricardo Lara Where Office of Keesal, Young and Logan, 400 Oceangate When Wednesday, Oct. 23 from 6pm to 9pm More Info Senator Ricardo Lara will honor local small business that continually help their community. Lara will also provide an update on the current state of affairs in Sacramento. Parking is available in the parking structure immediately behind the Union Bank Building at the corner of Golden Shore and Seaside Way. Call (562) 495-4766.


OPINION

4 SIgNAl TRIbUNe

OCTObeR 4, 2013

Thoughts from the Publisher by Neena Strichart

Yesterday was a very special day for our family. It was my mother’s 94th birthday. With a formula that includes clean living, a witty sense of humor, a bit of luck and fabulous genes, as well as a brilliant oncologist (Dr. Robert Nagourney) my mother, Marjorie Grommé has put together the ingredients for a long, healthy and very fulfilling life. She started her life as a farm girl, was one of the real Rosie the Riveters during the war, was married and widowed four times, served as Signal Hill City Treasurer, was named Signal Hill’s Outstanding Older American in 1994 and has been a member of the Susan B. Anthony Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution for more than 50 years. As her only child, I have been extremely fortunate to have mostly had her all to myself through the years, although I have happily shared her with my wonderful stepbrothers Jay and Michael Grommé and their kids/grandkids. My mom has always been my confidant and best critic/audience. As I have grown older I am proud to say that I also consider her to be my best friend. She can say more with a raised eyebrow and a wry smile than most people could say with a thousand words. Her looking at me over the top of her tri-focals still makes me a bit nervous, as that is her signal to me of her silent disapproval, or at least of her pretending to be unhappy with me. Fortunately for me, I can still get a rise out of her, and I have to admit sometimes I do it on purpose. Why? Let’s just say I still like to get attention from my mom– good or bad! For Mom’s birthday 10 years ago, I wrote a little poem and made it into a mouse pad for her to keep by her computer. The sentiment still remains. Happy birthday, Mommy.

Neena Strichart/Signal Tribune

Mom sitting in the garden at Bixby Knolls Towers

As I get older and begin to gauge how I appear at middle age. It seems to me, I’m my mother’s child we’re both even-tempered, not easily riled. One thing stands out and is quite clear, we sure look alike when viewed from the rear.

COMMENTARIES

By Neena Posner Strichart/2003

Government shutdown not impacting L.A. County…yet By Don Knabe Los Angeles County Supervisor Fourth District

As you know, at the stroke of midnight [Monday] night, the federal government shut down due to the inability of Congress to work together. This government shutdown will have ripple effects throughout the nation, impacting programs and services like national parks, veteran pensions, Coast Guard patrols and passport services. Fortunately, however, the shutdown is not expected to significantly hurt Los Angeles County’s operations. A big reason why is because Medicaid, which accounts for over half of the County’s federal revenue, is a mandatory program, and is thus excluded from the shutdown. However, two programs offered by Los Angeles County to residents in need, food stamps and Cal-

Works, could become tied up in the congressional mess. If these programs do not receive an extension by the end of the month, both will expire and the County, the ultimate safety net, will need to find other resources to continue providing these essential public-assistance programs. If Congress can’t come together and reach an agreement soon, this shutdown is not only going to impact “non-essential” services. It will hurt everyday people, like our military veterans, who rely on federal assistance programs that are necessary for their livelihoods. We need long-term vision and a thoughtful plan, not shutdowns and more last-minute, crisis debates, which do nothing but make the American people even more frustrated with their government.

How my mom’s death changed my definition of family

In my head, I’ve always placed my family into one category and my ancestors in another. My family members are my parents, my brother, my aunts and uncles, first cousins and grandparents. They’re the people I grew up with, the people I know too well, the ones who inspire the deepest and longest eye rolls. My ancestors are the people I want to learn more about. They’re a mystery I want to solve, their lives influencing my own in ways I’ve only recently begun to discover. They’re finished stories with birthdates and death dates, offering lessons that come with the benefit of hindsight. Then my mom died in July and the lines blurred. Her death has changed me and the way I look at life. The constants in my life aren’t the same, and a lot of my expectations and assumptions have to be altered. Every time I want to call my mom and tell her something, I almost start to pick up the phone. Every time I call my parents’ home, my dad will be the one who answers. (My mom always answered the phone first. She’d rather run to the phone than let the answering machine pick up.) When I’m shopping and I see something she might like, I think about how much she loved chocolate and the color turquoise. And how strange it is to know that I won’t be buying her anything anymore. I have to revise some of my ideas about the future. I assumed that when I got pregnant and had a baby, my mom would come PUblISHeR/eDITOR-IN-CHIeF

Neena R. Strichart

STAFF WRITeR

Sean Belk

CUlTURe WRITeRS

By Rachael Rifkin

over and help me for the first week or so. I expected to see my mom grow older and reach the ages of 65, 75, 80. I assumed her mom would pass away before she did. I never thought of my mom as an ancestor, but now my mom has both a birthdate and a death date. Future relatives won’t have the chance to get to know Photos courtesy Rachael Rifkin her first hand. They’ll be relying on the people On the left, the author’s grandmother, Ruth Goldstein, and mom, Rosalie Stillman. On the right, Rosalie Stillman who knew her and the and the author, Rachael Rifkin. things she left behind to get an idea of what she was like. Just like I’ve been doing with my eral, we are all more alike than we are different. We all have a limgrandparents, great-grandparents, great-great grandparents and ited amount of time to live, share and pass down our stories. cousins, just like future generations will eventually do with me. Now I realize there were never two categories, that we were Rifkin is a ghostwriter/personal historian and contributing writer always one family. We may be separated by time, geography or lan- to the Signal Tribune. For more information about her work, visit guage, but we share family pictures and stories and genes. In gen- lifestoriestoday.com .

ASSOCIATe PUblISHeR

Cory Bilicko

Daniel Adams Vicki Paris Goodman Gregory Spooner

STAFF WRITeR

Leighanna Nierle

CJ Dablo

ADVeRTISINg CONSUlTANTS

Barbie Ellisen Ashley Goodsell

DeSIgN eDITOR/PRODUCTION MANAgeR

MANAgINg eDITOR

Stephen M. Strichart

ADMINISTRATIVe ASSISTANT/WebSITe MANAgeR

COlUMNISTS

Jennifer E. Beaver Carol Berg Sloan, RD

Tanya Paz

Shoshanah Siegel

eDITORIAl INTeRN

Brandy Soto

The Signal Tribune welcomes letters to the editor, which should be signed, dated and include a phone number to verify authenticity. Letters are due by noon on the Tuesday before desired publication date. The Signal Tribune reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, language and space requirements. The Signal Tribune does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other publications or otherwise presented in a public forum. Letters to the editor and commentaries are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Signal Tribune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, letters to the editor and commentaries are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. Letter-writers will be identified by their professional titles or affiliations when, and only when, the editorial staff deems it relevant and/or to provide context to the letter. We do not run letters to the editor submitted by individuals who have declared their candidacies for public office in upcoming races. This policy was put in place because, to be fair, if we publish one, we would have to publish all letters submitted by all candidates. The volume would no doubt eliminate space for letters submitted by other readers. Instead, we agree to interview candidates and print stories about political races in an objective manner and offer very reasonable advertising rates for those candidates who wish to purchase ads. The Signal Tribune is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. Yearly subscriptions are available for $50.

939 e. 27th St., Signal Hill, CA 90755 (562) 595-7900 www.signaltribune.com newspaper@signaltribune.com


COMMUNITY

OCTObeR 4, 2013

Cal Heights home tour to feature five vintage homes, two gardens and a refreshment house

The California Heights Home and Garden Tour will return Sunday, Oct. 20, from 10am to 4pm. Check-in will begin at 9:30am at Longfellow School, 3800 Olive Ave., followed by a guest-speaker presentation at 10am. Presented by the California Heights Neighborhood Association (CHNA) and sponsored by local realtor Lewis Ebersole, the tour will showcase five vintage homes, two gardens and a refreshment house in the California Heights historic district of Long Beach, which consists mainly of modest Spanish, Tudor and Neo-traditional style bungalows dating from the early 1920s through the World War II era, as well as earlier Craftsman bungalows relocated after oil discovery in nearby Signal Hill. Guest speaker John Brinkmann, founder and publisher of American Bungalow Magazine, will present the virtues, livability and charm of small-home living. Local historian Rachel Rifkin will conduct recorded interviews with residents wishing to share their memories of Cal Heights in an effort to build a historic record. Sweet Lucieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vintage ice cream truckâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s organic ice cream, two restored iconic Helmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bakery trucks featuring local Sweet & Saucy Bakery treats, antique autos, and local home improvement and restoration resources will also be featured. The tour, which began in 1997, draws 600 to 800 visitors, with more than 100 volunteers dedicating their time throughout the day, according to John Royce, CHNA president. While highlighting the valueadded aspects of maintaining and restoring the neighborhood's historic fabric and sense of place, the home tour remains the largest source of income for the volunteer-run CHNA, providing funding for ongoing community improvement projects and public outreach, including historic lamppost restorations, Cal Heights ReLeaf, weekly Clean Streets clean-ups, CalHeights.org, The Heights newsletter and other com-

5

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â&#x20AC;˘ A real street address, not a P.O. Box number â&#x20AC;˘ Text/email package alerts munity events â&#x20AC;˘ Package acceptance from all shipping carriers â&#x20AC;˘ Call-in MailCheck and projects. â&#x20AC;˘ Mail holding and forwarding â&#x20AC;˘ 24-hour access Past projWeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll help you sort itsavings all out. with the Key Savings Card â&#x20AC;˘ Exclusive ects include the it all out. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll help you sort We also cater to home â&#x20AC;˘ When you need someone to manage yourbase businesses! Cal Heights mail and packages, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the solution. Signyour up today and save big! mural at to manage When you need someone Copyright Š 2012 The UPS Store, Inc. CANH515159 11.12 Orange and mail and packages, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the solution. Wardlow by Copyright Š 2012 The UPS Store, Inc. CANH515159 11.12 Art Mortimer, "5-"/5*$"7& historic district -0/(#&"$) $" street signage  and a neighborhelp you sort it all out. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll )PVST Limit one coupon per customer. Not valid with other offers. Restrictions apply. Valid hood informaand redeemable only when presented at a participating location. The UPS Store )PVST centers are independently owned and operated. Š 2012 The UPS Store, Inc. tion kiosk. The 0GGFSFYQJSFT 0GGFSFYQJSFT When you need someone to manage your .PO'SJBNQN groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activi4BUBNQN and packages, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the solution. ties alsomail include 4VO$MPTFE local Copyright commuŠ 2012 The UPS Store, Inc. CANH515159 11.12 0GGFSFYQJSFT 0GGFSFYQJSFT nity partnership projects along the Bixby Knolls commercial corridors and beyond. California Heights earned New hours now 0GGFSFYQJSFT in effect: the 2012 Neigh0GGFSFYQJSFT 0GGFSFYQJSFT Tues.-Thurs.: 5pm to 9pm Friday: 5pm to 9:30pm â&#x20AC;˘ borhoods, USA Sat.: Noon to 9:30pm â&#x20AC;˘ Lunch Tues.-Fri.: 11:30am to 3pm Neighborhood Closed on Sunday & Monday of the Year Photo by Tom Underhil award, recog- The California Heights Neighborhood Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Home 2201 East Willow St., Suite G in Signal Hill nizing the and Garden Tour began in 1997 and draws hundreds of vis562.595.0210 | Sushi, Tempura, & Traditional Favorites Home and Garitors each year. den Tour and the community projects it funds. Bicycle racks will be provided at each location courtesy of Bikeable Communities Long Beach, and the Cal Heights Trolley will provide free servEXICAN ESTAURANT ice throughout the tour. The Obie Tickets are $20 pre-sale and $25 at Awardthe door. All tickets include a Cal winning farce From the family that Heights Local Dining Discount Card brought you Mexico City by Larry and the home tour brochure, featuring Restaurant in Long Beachâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Shue ("The house portraits by Ellen Kirk. Azteca Mexican Restaurant Nerd") in Residents may purchase tickets has been offering authentic which a mildonline through Oct. 18 at calheights.org Mexican cooking for over mannered or mail checks to CHNA Home Tour, 50 years! proofreader postmarked no later than Oct. 11, to 3553 Atlantic Ave #350, Long Beach, and dull Home of Aunt Connieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s CA 90807. No paper tickets will be husband famous garlic sauce issued. seeking a and the original Volunteers will receive a free ticket to rest at a the tour. Those interested may leave their GARLIC TACO! Georgia name and contact information at homefishing lodge tour@calheights.org or (562) 424-6727. discovers what people MORE INFORMATION really think of

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Long Beach Free School begins its second session

Neighbors teaching neighborsâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; that is the driving vision for the new Long Beach Free School, which recently opened enrollment for its second session. Prospective students can go to lbfreeschool.com to become members and enroll in classes. The six-week term of classes is scheduled to run from Oct. 6 to Nov. 17. Some of the classes include photography, public speaking, gardening, guerilla herbalism, upcycling, marine science, yoga, career development and more. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our first session went really well, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re excited to have our second session starting soon,â&#x20AC;? said Rachael Rifkin, co-coordinator for the Long Beach Free School. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some of our first session teachers will be back, and we have a good variety of classes.â&#x20AC;? Classes will be held at partner locations throughout the city, including the Long Beach Depot for Creative Reuse, LBCAP Spring Street Farm, Cultural Alliance Long Beach, the Aquarium of the Pacific, Apostrophe Books and Trinity Lutheran Church. Students will receive a certificate at an end-of-term reception in November. Students and teachers will also have an opportunity to share their learning experiences with each other and discuss the next Free School term. All classes are free to students. Some classes could be multigenerational. Some classes could be taught by kids. The scope and diversity of the free-school experience will be shaped by the creativity of everyone who participates The Long Beach Free School is a new project of the Catalyst Network of Communities, a 501c3 nonprofit social-impact organization helping

SIgNAl TRIbUNe

people and groups to connect, collaborate, and share resources. For more information about the Long Beach Free School, go to LBfreeschool.com or call (562) 2874661. Source: LB Free School

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The wait is over. The Passport Wine Tasting, our premier wine tasting of the year, is upon us once again. This is the â&#x20AC;&#x153;big boy.â&#x20AC;? At least 36 wines from all over the world, a main buffet loaded with savory delicacies, a second buffet with breads, cheeses, pĂ tĂŞs and desserts, and a selection of tray-passed appetizers.

Attendance is limited to 100- make reservations now. PREFERRED SEATING OFFERED AGAIN THIS YEAR!!! Preferred seating with waiter service - $75 (Must request when making reservation)

The Passport is essentially a self-service event, which is how we keep the cost low. If, however, you would like a more upscale experience, there will be a very limited number of seats available served by waiters who you can send to the buffet and wine-tasting stations to bring you anything your heart desires. This option is perfect for those who prefer to be guaranteed to have a seat and who would rather sit back, relax and feel pampered. (Parties of less than 4 may have to share a preferred table.) Nonrefundable tickets are being sold for this event. While we cannot give refunds, if you find that you are unable to attend and we have a waiting list, we will be glad to help you try to sell your ticket (tickets may not be resold for more than the original price).

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6 SIgNAl TRIbUNe ReDeFININg THe gOlDeN YeARS Oldest living, still working Rosie the Riveter among those to be honored at ‘We Can Do It!’ Awards

Ninety-three-year-old Elinor Otto, who is still working as a spar mechanic at Boeing, is the oldest living and still working Rosie the Riveter. Otto will be honored along with 12 other women leaders at the 3rd Annual “We Can Do It!” Awards luncheon on Thursday, Oct. 17. The event, sponsored by the Rosie the Riveter Foundation, honors women who have blazed new trails in their professions and whose achievements serve as inspiration for women of all ages.

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“Elinor’s life and work is the continuing story of the thousands of women we now refer to as Rosie the Riveters,” said 5th District Councilmember Gerrie Schipske, who founded The Long Beach Rosie the Riveter Foundation. “These pioneering women worked on assembly lines rolling out airplanes, tanks and military machinery to support our troops overseas during World War II. It is so important to remember how far we’ve come and that the struggle for women to have the opportunity to achieve in any field they choose continues. Women like Elinor have forever changed the way our nation views the role of women in the workplace. All of our honorees are women who have followed their dreams and made them come true.” The luncheon will include a presentation about the individual honorees, entertainment from the High Tide Quartet and gourmet menu served by Keesal, Young and Logan’s in-house chefs. This year’s honorees are: • Public Service– Martha Thuente, former chair, North Long Beach Redevelopment Project Area Committee (NORTHPAC), Long Beach Veterans Day Committee chair

• education– Mary Thoits, manager, Long Beach City College Senior Studies (teaches world affairs), World War II Women’s Air Force Service Pilots • International Trade– Doris TopsyElvord, first African-American woman to serve on Long Beach Board of Harbor Commissioners, former Long Beach City Councilmember; first member of the Justice and Peace Commission (Archdiocese of Los Angeles), co-founder of the African-American Heritage Society of Long Beach, and serves on various nonprofit boards • Healthcare– Lillian Lew, Families in Good Health Director (St. Mary Medical Center), former Indo-Chinese Refugee Employment Project Developer (State of Hawaii), former LULAC Headstart Community Analyst (Long Beach) • Historic Preservation– Kaye Briegel, California State University of Long Beach Oral Histories • Arts and Culture– Karen Harper, Oral History Project, Hmong Association of Long Beach, Historical Society of Long Beach • Nonprofit leadership– Shirlee Jackert, executive director, Camp Fire USA • Corporate leadership– Connie

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Turner, Public Affairs regional manager, Southern California Edison • local business leadership– Mary Lynn Sophiea, owner, Baja Sonora Mexican restaurants • Volunteerism– Mary Alice Braly, Rancho Los Alamitos Trustee, 49ers Foundation Board of Directors, Steel Magnolias • Special Recognition: Bea Antenore, High Tide Quartet and Elinor Otto

OCTObeR 4, 2013

Courtesy Schipske’s office

Elinor Otto, seen here in a photo circa 1945, is the oldest living and still working Rosie the Riveter. She still works as a spar mechanic at Boeing, Otto will be honored along with 12 other women leaders at the 3rd Annual “We Can Do It!” Awards luncheon on Oct. 17.

The awards will be presented at the law offices of Keesal, Young and Logan, 400 Oceangate. Proceeds from the luncheon will go to The Long Beach Rosie the Riveter Foundation, a 501c3 nonprofit organization that works to enhance the Rosie the Riveter Park and Interpretive Center at Clark Avenue and Conant Street. The Rosie the Riveter

Park and Interpretive Center is the only public setting in the United States to honor the women who worked in the airplane factories in World War II. For more information call (562) 570-6932. Read more about The Long Beach Rosie the Riveter Foundation at lbrosie.com .

Centenarians celebrated

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Vera Enquist, right, who turned 104 on Sept. 30, and Ruth Goldman, who turned 100 on May 15, release monarch butterflies during a special celebration on Friday, Sept. 27, honoring the centenarians at the Bixby Knolls Towers retirement home in Long Beach. Florence Perkins, who turned 103 on Feb. 8, could not attend due to health reasons. Sean Belk Staff Writer

Ruth Goldman said it never crossed her mind that she would one day turn 100 years old, but, earlier this year, that day came. “It amazed me,” said the Long Beach resident who

became a centenarian on May 15. “I never thought I’d live this long. I had a twin sister, and she passed away when she was in her 70s. I thought, well, ‘I’ll probably be going soon too.’ I’m still here, and I’ll be here as long as God wants me to.” see CENTENARIANS page 7

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OCTObeR 4, 2013

Centenarians continued from page 6

ReDeFININg THe gOlDeN YeARS

SIgNAl TRIbUNe

7

Perkins, who lost her parents at age 7 and lived in an orphanage until she was 14, was a factory worker for 25 years before retiring to work in her sister’s grocery store. She married at the age of 54, and the couple spent 45 years together before her husband passed away five years ago. Perkins moved with her husband in 2003 to the Bixby Knolls Towers, where she considers the staff her “family.” Enquist, the only surviving member of her immediate family, never married, but she said, “I’ve had a really good life and nothing to complain about.” In fact, Enquist said living single and independent is what has made her stronger throughout the years. For the past 50 years, she climbed two flights of stairs to her Lakewood apartment, and she was still driving at the age of 102 despite having to use a walker at times due to a hip injury. Born in Nebraska, Enquist Photos by Sean Belk/Signal Tribune moved to California in 1934 Vera Enquist, right, is presented with a birthday card from her friend Joanna Matos for turning 104 years old. and worked as an operatingroom nurse for the Army for 28 years, serving in Germany vital to “live every day the best and Okinawa, Japan. She is also you can.” a “world traveler,” having travHer niece, Susan Housel, said eled to 81 countries, including a what stands out the most about 30-day cruise along the Black Enquist is her can-do spirit. Sea from Russia when she was “She never says ‘I can’t do it, 92. I’m too old to do it, or anything.” Today, Enquist said she lives Housel said. “She just gets up Complete Nails • Waxing • Skin Care • Spa Treatments “day by day,” adding that it’s and does it.” ß 3-Year Anniv ersary Special!

Her secret? Goldman said it’s all about her attitude. “I keep saying, ‘I’m not ready,’” she said. “I like to see what’s coming next.” Goldman is one of three women at the Bixby Knolls Towers retirement home who have passed the 100-year mark. Vera Enquist turned 104 on Monday, Sept. 30 and Florence Perkins turned 103 on Feb. 8. Surrounded by friends and family, the women were honored during a special birthday celebration on Friday, Sept. 27 that included a release of monarch butterflies. Seventh District City Councilmember James Johnson presented Enquist and Goldman with certificates, recognizing them for being “an integral part of Bixby Knolls and our city’s rich history.” Perkins was unable to attend because of health reasons. Upon receiving the honors, Goldman replied, “Let’s put it this way– we’re starting over again. I’m one year old.” Goldman, who was born in Cleveland, Ohio, moved to California in 1947 with her husband, who passed away 16 years ago after 68 years of marriage. Living in Los Angeles, she worked for Sears as a customer-service representative for 48 years until officially retiring at age 78. She moved to the retirement complex about four and a half years ago. Throughout the years, Goldman’s passions have been knitting, croWALK-INS cheting, reading and WELCOME traveling. She has Manicure Pedicure also kept herself active in organizaOpen 7 days tions, serving as PTA Mon—Sat: president and super9:30am vising a walking -6:30pm group in Santa MonExpires Sunday: Expires Expires ica, where she Nov. 1, 2013 Nov. 1, 2013 Nov. 1, 2013 11am-4pm walked “three days a week for 16 years.” Goldman, who has outlived all her We’ve got good siblings, has a big service plus air family of her own, conditioning! with three daughters, eight grandchildren, 17 great-grandchildren and 10 greatgreat-grandchildren. Her daughter, A monarch butterfly, which often symbolizes rebirth, was among several released during a Ellen Lowery, said special event at Bixby Knolls Towers that celebrated jthree women who are 100 or older. Goldman “has a memory like you can never believe” and loves using the slot machines in Laughlin on yearly trips with her family. “She’s very stubborn, and I think that’s what’s helping keeping her going,” Lowery said. “She’s got a very good outlook on life.” In a phone interview, Goldman gave some advice to younger generations, pointing oMe see For yourseLF out that it’s important to plan for the senior years. “Young people don’t know what it’s like to grow old, because, when you grow old, it’s (Private Studios & not cheap,” Goldman said. Apartments) One-Bedroom “Growing old is expensive, and with bathing, assistance Provide throwing your money away when (Studios, 1- & 2-Bedrooms dressing and medication monitoring. you’re young, and having nothwith Kitchen & Bath) Nursing staff available 24 hours a day! ing when you’re old, it’s not going to be easy.” 3747 ATLANTIC AVE. TLANTIC VE She also said not to “worry about everything” and to “let Call today for your complimentary lunch & tour, 7 days a week! today take care of itself,” but added “up to a point, because you CA LIC# 19160145 have to worry about tomorrow too.”

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Imitating Life

OCTObeR 4, 2013

14 questions for local artist Monica Fleming Cory Bilicko

Managing Editor

In 100 words or less, what do you do as an artist? I am an abstract artist and painter.

What motivates you to create art? I think I came out of the womb creating; it’s just what I was born to do.

How has your practice changed over time? I like to think I’ve grown as an artist just in terms of experience alone. I always like to try new forms of expression using different mediums, but I’m much more confident with paint and painting. Monica Fleming

Do you ever get artist’s block? If so, how do you combat it? I couldn't imagine an artist not getting creative blocks, but when it happens I resort to nature and music.

Beauty through the ages

What do you think your life would be like if, for some reason, you could no longer create art? I imagine I would feel lost.

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What role does the artist have in society? Art awakens the imaginaton, reminds people that everything is created out of nothingness.

Have you ever been banned or censored to any degree as an artist? “Beautiful Blue,” acrylic on canvas If so, how did you react? If not, how do you think you would react in that situation? I am working on another project that has a provocative history and pushes buttons, but that’s one of the purposes of art. Does your artistic life ever get lonely? If so, what do you do to counteract it? Being an artist can be a lonely experience because creation requires that, but that’s all a part of it. It’s not always that way... plus the shows help. What do you hope to achieve with your art? Inner joy, travel, continue to reach a larger audience, the ability to keep doing it. What are one or two primary areas of fear for you as an artist? The beginning of a painting is always the scariest; moving something from my imagination to tangibility is a bit frightening.

What are one or two factors that, when they’re in place, enable you to really flourish artistically? Music is an important part of my creation process, and the support of my friends. What jobs have you had other than being an artist? Bartender What’s your favorite color? Blue

“Dream Theatre,” acrylic on canvas Fleming will be one of the artists participating in the Long Beach Open Studio Tour on Saturday, Oct. 12 and Sunday, Oct. 13. For more information, visit lbopenstudiotour.com . To see more of Fleming’s work, visit monicafleming.com .

How do you feel when people ask you to explain the meaning of your art? I’m happy to tell the stories of each piece.

“Free From Now On,” acrylic on canvas

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CUlTURe

OCTObeR 4, 2013 Event review

SIgNAl TRIbUNe

Need some excitement in your life? 1,000 monsters are just 12 miles away Cory Bilicko

Managing Editor

When I first moved to California, I’d sometimes hear about a local Halloween attraction called “Not Scary Farm,” and I wondered, “Well, what’s the point of that?!” Luckily, I was soon set straight– that, each October, the theme park Knott’s Berry Farm is converted into “Knott’s Scary Farm.” Perhaps that homophone-based, potential confusion is the reason the park now uses “Halloween Haunt” as a nickname for the event. In any case, “Not Scary” would certainly not be the words I’d use to describe the grand affair, during which time the theme park is transformed into 160 acres of horror and mayhem. My always fun and perky friend Jenn accompanied me on Sept. 26 for this year’s opening night of the annual happening. Jenn, who, like me, is in her mid-40s, is one of those people who are pretty much willing to do anything, and she seems to have a hundred items to still check off from her “bucket list.” She was a perfect partner for the night. First and foremost, the park goes mostly dark, with what seem to be just a few sources of light here and there. As if your visibility and unease aren’t compromised enough by the darkness, fog machines are placed about every 50 feet, making it even more challenging to see what lurks around each turn... or right behind you. Ghouls and sundry creatures (1,000 of them!) lurk in the shadows and pop out at park-goers relentlessly. Some even slide on their knees right up next to people; this is rarely unsuccessful in eliciting screams from female attendees. Somehow, the locale is spacious enough to accommode 10 different “mazes,” each with its own theme and set of monsters. This year, which

is the 41st for the “Scary Farm,” those themed attractions are Black Magic, Delirium, Dominion of the Damned, Endgames, Mirror Mirror, Pinocchio Unstrung, Uncle Willy's Slaughterhouse, The Gunslinger’s Grave, Trick or Treat and Forevermore, which is inspired by the Edgar Allan Poe story “The Raven.” Even without the spooky décor, roaming monsters and creepy walkthroughs, Knott’s boasts some other scary features– the rides. GhostRider is a wooden roller coaster located in the Ghost Town section of the park, and it’s the longest wooden coaster on the West Coast. What makes it so thrilling is that it jolts and vibrates so much as it moves that you forget who you are. It’s possibly the closest you’ll get to an out-of-body experience. If you’re turned off by a shaky, wooden coaster, and prefer instead a more modern, smoother ride, hop onto The Silver Bullet... as long as you’re cool with being turned upside-down 146 feet in the air! (If I recall correctly, that’s the moment when my derriére actually lost direct contact with the seat and I was temporarily airborne.) The Silver Bullet would prove to be the denouement of the evening, since it was shortly after we got off that ride that Jenn made it clear she was queasy and “done” for the night. She however politely offered to sit on the sidelines as I continued to enjoy the other, numerous rides we had yet to experience. Since it was approaching 1:00 in the morning, and we both had to work the next day, I figured it was probably a good time to head home. Honestly though, I could have easily stayed another two hours or so. This is the one time of year when the kid in me emerges energetically and enthusiastically, and “Not Scary Farm” is the ideal place to get in

Cory Bilicko/Signal Tribune

One of the 1,000 live frighteners at this year’s Knott’s Scary Farm

touch with and (supposedly) conquer all those primal fears: ghosts, the dark, heights and vomiting in public.

Photo by Jenn Harding

Jack-o-lanterns line the stairs just inside the front door of the “Trick or Treat” maze at Knott’s Scary Farm.

Knott’s Scary Farm/Halloween Haunt in Buena Park will be terrifying folks through Day of the Dead, Nov. 2. For more information, visit knotts.com/haunt2013 .

Cory Bilicko/Signal Tribune

Amid the smoke and darkness, the assortment of roller coasters at Knott’s Berry Farm take on an even more menacing look during the month of October. THE BELMONT SHORE BUSINESS ASSOCIATION PRESENTS

The Belmont Shore Art Walk & Sidewalk Chalk Art Contest

OCT. 19

SATURDAY 11to4

Cory Bilicko/Signal Tribune

Kids’ Halloween masks are repurposed in one of the mazes at Knott’s.

Walk the walk, see the chalk.

Where all steps lead to creativity.

Justin Rudd’s 10th Annual Belmont Shore Sidewalk Chalk Art Contest from 11 am to 4 pm attracts seasoned and emerging visual artists, as well as participants from local high schools and universities. $1,000 in cash prizes awarded at 4 pm. More info at justinrudd.com.

Young Artist Art Contest showcases student artwork from local elementary and high schools inside Belmont Shore businesses. Prizes awarded at 3:30 pm.

Artistic activities for the whole family.

Transforming sidewalks into studios.

Head to Chase Bank for: Kids’ Face Painting Ballooning Art Lessons Mural Painting

Fourteen blocks of sidewalk art and: Artist demonstrations Art for sale Enter at sabilsandy@yahoo.com belmont shore

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belmontshore.org

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10 SIgNAl TRIbUNe

The Foreigner at Long Beach Playhouse Theater review

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Courtesy LB Playhouse

Phyllis Nofts as Betty and Mitch Nunn as Froggy in Long Beach Playhouse’s production of The Foreigner Vicki Paris Goodman

In the case of the Long Beach Playhouse’s production of The Foreigner, I could talk about how the play’s flawed characters bring out the best in one another. Or the way their humanity and goodness inspire us to be better people. The play certainly entertains with its plentiful funny lines of dialogue. And when the good guys ultimately win out over the bad guys, the fact amounts to more than mere icing on the cake. Playwright Larry Shue set his play in Georgia, affording himself the chance to infuse the action with loads of Southern quirkiness. Director Gigi Fusco Meese and her splendid cast make the most of it. When British military man Froggy (Mitchell Nunn) brings his grieving friend Charlie (Greg Barnett) to a rural hunting lodge in the states for a few days of rest and relaxation, the selfdeprecating Charlie complains that he is not up to the arduous task of socialCulture Writer

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izing with the proprietor of the lodge nor her other guests. But by the time Charlie states his desire to be left alone, we already see the huge disconnect between the reality of Charlie’s clever and engaging personality and his view of himself as a terrible bore. In truth, Barnett makes Charlie maximally endearing. In any case, to honor his friend’s wish, Froggy tells naïve innkeeper Betty (Phyllis M. Nofts) that Charlie is a foreigner who speaks no English. Hence, Shue sets up the deliciously creative theatrical device that has other characters expressing their private thoughts in front of Charlie, a complete stranger, believing he understands nary a word of what they are saying. It also allows for Charlie to bear witness to a sinister plot on the part of the Ku Klux Klan to take over the lodge and make it their meeting place. Playhouse veteran Skip Blas is in his finest form in the role of Klansman Owen, the story’s villain. His highstrung character antagonizes the others with intimidating bigotry. Blas contributes mightily to the play’s dramatic tension, as well as its humor. Brianna Hill and Jeff Cheezum portray Catherine and David, a young couple planning to marry and maintain a Christian parish. Those plans go awry when Catherine finds out David is not the man she thinks he is.

Cheezum does a wonderful job of alternating between decency and malevolence. Arguably the most delightful character of the play is Catherine’s supposedly intellectually-challenged brother Ellard (James Paul Xavier), whose wildly successful efforts to teach Charlie to speak English warm the cockles of our hearts. As the story plays out, Ellard gains self-confidence, Catherine becomes aware of her own competence and courage, Charlie discovers his ability to effortlessly become a beloved center of attention, and Betty sees those she cares about flourish as they save her property from a terrible fate. Director Meese really nails this almost two-and-a-half-hour production, keeping the pace moving, taking full advantage of her cast members’ special talents, and timing the comedic dialogue perfectly. Sean Gray’s beautifully detailed set is fabulous. The Foreigner continues on the Long Beach Playhouse Mainstage through Oct. 26. General-admission tickets are $24; $21 for seniors; $14 for students/children. Performances are Fridays and Saturdays at 8pm, with Sunday matinees at 2pm. The Long Beach Playhouse is located at 5021 E. Anaheim St. Call (562) 4941014 for reservations and information. Tickets are also available at lbplayhouse.org .

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OCTObeR 4, 2013

Lenders

continued from page 1

nesses “predatory lenders” and claimed that the companies prey on the most vulnerable low-income communities by offering loans that come with exorbitantly high interest rates. The residents also said the area is already “oversaturated” with such short-term lenders, such as checkcashing and payday-loan businesses. That notion ultimately became the genesis for the Council to approve a one-year moratorium on such businesses in order for city staff to develop a new ordinance that was unanimously approved by the Council at its Sept. 17 meeting. Though the Council agreed to exempt Pennbrooke Financial from the moratorium since the company’s application had already been filed, the Council still ended up denying the company’s request for a CUP based on its merits. But Assistant City Attorney Michael Mais said in a phone interview that the Council’s decision was based solely on grounds of an inappropriate land use and not on conjecture of the company’s business practices, despite the opinions of some residents and councilmembers. The property straddles two separate designated land-use districts, one that is supposed to encourage pedestrian activity and the other zoned for small retail operations. But the Council determined that the short-term lender wouldn’t be suitable for the designated zones, he said. “Our argument is that Pennbrooke doesn’t fit either one of those criteria and it’s just, quite frankly, not a good fit for what has been characterized as the gateway to the Wrigley Village area,” Mais said. “The findings don’t address whether the business is a predatory lender or not. It addresses whether or not it’s appropriate land use at that location.” According to a staff report, the Council had determined that the proposed tenant “would not provide vitality or create a commercial center or provide commercial activity” as outlined in the description of an area zoned for a pedestrian-oriented retail strip. Roger Jon Diamond, an attorney representing Pennbrooke Financial, however, claims that the Planning Commission effectively disallowed the CUP but never made findings, which is required by city law. He added that the property has been vacant for seven years and city officials admit it is zoned for a financial institution. “A loan business like this doesn’t create problems for the surrounding area,” Diamond said. “There are no adverse consequences. They don’t create crime or anything. Most importantly, this property has been vacant. The client was willing to get a limited CUP for five years… So it didn’t make sense.” He said the real reason the Council denied the CUP application is that the people who opposed it are against the kind of business it is, “not because it’s a land-use issue.” Furthermore, Diamond said the down economy has prevented the property owner from bringing in

another tenant and the auto-titleloan company, which hopes to bring jobs and services, has had to pay rent on the property despite being unable to move in. “All these people clamoring for a bakery, malt shop or flower shop–why don’t they put one in?” Diamond said. “This is a business that does not pollute, doesn’t make noise, doesn’t bring in strippers... It’s discrimination against poor people. They just don’t like people who are not wealthy.” Still, Lee Fukui, a Wrigley neighborhood resident and community activist who helped thwart the company’s plans, said in an email that he doesn’t think the business will prevail in court. “It’s frivolous,” he said. “It’s what this industry does, and they have the money to do it. We argued against the proposed land-use issues on that property exclusively, which was something Pennbrooke was not expecting… Predatory lenders like Pennbrooke reduce property values and would not bring investment to our neighborhood. The Council was right in siding with the community.” Fukui said Nix Financial offers a check-cashing and auto-title-loan service just 300 feet away from the property. He added that the Wrigley gateway is also located in a former redevelopment area that residents were working on revitalizing before redevelopment was abolished by the State. Mais said Pennbrooke Financial is thus far not seeking monetary damages in the case, but it still has the right to do so. He added, however, the business would have a “slim” chance of being awarded any money.

Check-cashing ordinance Meanwhile, the Council voted 80 at a meeting last month to approve a new city ordinance that establishes new definitions and regulations for check-cashing, payday-loan, cartitle-loan, signature-loan and other financial-services businesses. Councilmember Steven Neal was absent. The ordinance prohibits new short-term lenders from locating within 1,320 feet or a quarter mile of any existing such business in neighborhood-commercial, pedestrian-oriented, planned-development and industrial-zoning districts. It also requires that: windows not be obscured by signs, dark-window tinting, shelving, racks or similar obstructions; exterior phones, security bars and roll-up doors be prohibited; all fees and regulations be displayed near the cashier/check stand and provided to customers upon checkout; and hours of operation be stated in the application and subject to review. Long Beach Development Services Director Amy Bodek said the ordinance applies only to new businesses, and existing businesses will be “grandfathered in.” Currently, there are 53 such businesses that exist in Long Beach, including 35 check-cashing businesses, 15 payday-lending businesses and three consumer-finance businesses, she said. Still, some residents said the ordinance should go even further, suggesting that the businesses be located at least 500 feet away from residential areas. At the request of

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Councilmember Gary DeLong, city staff said they would look into the condition. Annie Greenfeld, president of the Central Project Area Council (CPAC), a key proponent of the new ordinance, said in a phone interview that the group is overall satisfied with the restrictions but will continue to work with staff on adding other conditions. “I’m just so happy that it passed,” she said. “We’re going to continue working with the City to make sure that hopefully they’ll include other areas in the ban. I think that was the first time that the community has been able to work with planning. I thought it was a terrific outcome.” Business representatives, however, spoke out against the distance requirement and called for a 1,000foot radius that was originally proposed by city staff but failed to pass because of a tie vote (3-3) by the Planning Commission. Sophia Garcia, director of government affairs for Advance America, told the Council the new ordinance is essentially a “de facto ban” on the businesses, and the restriction would limit needed jobs and services. “Consumers want and benefit from having more alternatives, not fewer,” she said. “This need is better served in a competitive marketplace.” Vanessa Lugo, government

affairs director for Check Into Cash, said the short-term-lending industry is already highly regulated by the state and federal governments and that restricting the number of businesses allowed to operate would only force consumers to apply for loans online through unregulated and unlicensed means. “If storefronts are banned completely, unfortunately this won’t eliminate the demand for payday lending,” she said. Bodek said the distance requirement is considered a “de facto buffer and cap on the number of such businesses that may come into the city.” City officials said a “hard cap” on the businesses would have brought about legal challenges. Councilmember Gerrie Schipske said she took offense to some business representatives calling the city “not business-friendly,” adding that the Council recently approved a new ordinance on liquor stores. She said there are “great concerns” regarding “what is the best and highest use” for property in areas struggling with high unemployment and poverty. Councilmember James Johnson noted that there appears to be some agreement between residents and businesses, which is a sign that both sides of the issue were fairly represented. “It’s remarkable the amount of consensus,” he said. “Most people are happy with most of the ordinance, which is a good thing.” ß

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Improvements are scheduled to begin next week on Atlantic Avenue, according to the Long Beach Department of Public Works. Work will include tree trimming, as well as removal and replacement of most of the existing concrete curbs and more than 80 percent of the sidewalk. The existing concrete street will be paved with rubberized asphalt pavement. A contractor hired by the City will do the work. During construction, Atlantic will have traffic reduced to one lane in each direction wherever work is underway. According to Public Works, steel plates will be placed at driveways to maintain access as much as possible and “business open during construction” signs will be placed on barricades throughout the construction. Additionally, on either side of Atlantic Avenue, at 33rd, Wardlow Road, 35th, 36th, 37th and Bixby Road, “no parking–street sweeping” signs will be covered to provide additional parking. Working hours will be 7am to 4pm Monday through Friday, however some night and weekend work will occur to expedite the construction. Pending no weather delays, the concrete improvements and new asphalt overlay should be completed by the Thanksgiving holiday, according to Public Works. “No parking” signs will be posted in advance of the work, indicating the dates of construction. Street sweeping may be affected during this period, but refuse pickup will remain as scheduled. Source: LB Public Works

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TST4473 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 120030652 Doc ID #0006110524322005N Title Order No. 12-0055147 Investor/Insurer No. 137248089 APN No. 7217-025-001 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 05/19/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by REGINA UGALDE, A SINGLE WOMAN, dated 05/19/2006 and recorded 6/7/2006, as Instrument No. 061249550, in Book N/A, Page N/A, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, will sell on 11/01/2013 at 11:00AM, By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2270 SARAH COURT, SIGNAL HILL, CA, 907554048. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $866,882.31. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on a property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 1-800-281-8219 or visit this Internet Web site www.recontrustco.com, using the file number assigned to this case TS No. 12-0030652. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. DATED: 07/18/2012 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-91401-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 By: - Trustee's Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. A-4418563 10/04/2013, 10/11/2013, 10/18/2013

TST4471 APN: 7216-025-035 TS No: CA08000369-131  TO No: 1446379  NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED October 20, 2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE.  IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On October 25, 2013 at 09:00 AM, Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA 91766, MTC FINANCIAL INC. dba TRUSTEE CORPS, as the duly Appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded on October 31, 2005 as Instrument No. 05 2617105 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, executed by DEVON R. AUSTIN, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN, as Trustor(s), in favor of LENDING CAPITAL, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION as Beneficiary, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of sale, that certain property situated in said County, California describing the land therein as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST  The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1865 STANLEY AVENUE UNIT #7, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the Note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said Note(s), advances if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligations secured by the property to be

PUblIC NOTICeS

sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of this Notice of Trustee`s Sale is estimated to be $362,486.75 (Estimated), provided, however, prepayment premiums, accrued interest and advances will increase this figure prior to sale. Beneficiary`s bid at said sale may include all or part of said amount. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier`s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the California Financial Code and authorized to do business in California, or other such funds as may be acceptable to the Trustee. In the event tender other than cash is accepted, the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustee`s Deed Upon Sale until funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a matter of right.  The property offered for sale excludes all funds held on account by the property receiver, if applicable. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder`s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. Notice to Potential Bidders If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a Trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a Trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same Lender may hold more than one mortgage or Deed of Trust on the property.  Notice to Property Owner  The sale date shown on this Notice of Sale may be postponed one or more times by the Mortgagee, Beneficiary, Trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about Trustee Sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call Priority Posting and Publishing at 714-573-1965 for information regarding the Trustee's Sale or visit the Internet Web site address on the previous page for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case, CA08000369-13-1. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site.  The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: September 23, 2013 TRUSTEE CORPS  TS No. CA08000369-13-1 17100 Gillette Ave, Irvine, CA 92614  949-252-8300  Joseph Barragan, Authorized Signatory SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.priorityposting.com FOR AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: Priority Posting and Publishing at 714-573-1965 TRUSTEE CORPS MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT.  ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. P1061620 10/4, 10/11, 10/18/2013

TST4472 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TSG No.: 7301301706 TS No.: 2001-005906-F00 (THE FOLLOWING REFERENCE TO AN ATTACHED SUMMARY IS APPLICABLE TO THE NOTICE PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR ONLY) NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED July 27, 2009. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On October 31, 2013, Sage Point Lender Services, LLC, as duly appointed Trustee WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT drawn on a state or national bank, cashier's check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a cashier's check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state, or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (Payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN BELOW MENTIONED DEED OF TRUST Executed by: DANIEL ANGULO, AN UNMARRED MAN Recorded on August 04, 2009, as Instrument No. 20091190766, of Official Records, in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, California Date of Sale: October 31, 2013 at 09:00 AM Place of Sale: at the Vineyard Ballroom of the Doubletree Hotel Los Angeles-Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2201 SAINT LOUIS AVENUE 104C, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 APN # 7215017-021 The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of this Notice of Sale is $368,429.53. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful

bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to the return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (800) 280-2832 or visit this Internet Web site WWW.AUCTION.COM, using the file number assigned to this case 2001-005906-F00. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: September 25, 2013 Sage Point Lender Services, LLC 400 Exchange, Suite 110 Irvine, CA 92602 949-2659940 Iuliia Calloway FOR TRUSTEE'S SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL (800) 280-2832 or visit WWW.AUCTION.COM SAGE POINT LENDER SERVICES, LLC MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. A4418346 10/04/2013, 10/11/2013, 10/18/2013

TST4458 TSG No.: 7953921 TS No.: CA1300252127 FHA/VA/PMI No.: APN: 7211-026-159 Property Address: 2599 WALNUT AVENUE NO. 340 SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 11/04/2004. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 10/10/2013 at 10:00 A.M., First American Title Insurance Company, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 11/16/2004, as Instrument No. 04 2963481, in book , page , , of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, State of California. Executed by: VOTHY C. SOM AND SONY SOM, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (Payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States) Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN THE ABOVE MENTIONED DEED OF TRUST APN# 7211-026-159 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2599 WALNUT AVENUE NO. 340, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 he undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $255,790.55. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust has deposited all documents evidencing the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and has declared all sums secured thereby immediately due and payable, and has

caused a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be executed. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (916)939or visit this Internet Web 0772 http://search.nationwideposting.com/propertySearchTerms.aspx, using the file number assigned to this case CA1300252127 Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the immediately be scheduled sale may not reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Date: First American Title Insurance Company 6 Campus Circle, 2nd Floor Westlake, TX 76262 First American Title Insurance Company MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE FOR TRUSTEES SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL (916)9390772NPP0221020 To: SIGNAL TRIBUNE 09/20/2013, 09/27/2013, 10/04/2013

TST4457 / 2013 183421 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: FARM LOT 59, 2076 Eucalyptus Ave., Long Beach, CA 90806. Registrant: LONG BEACH LOCAL, 2076 Eucalyptus Ave., Long Beach, CA 90806. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Sasha Kanno, President. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on September 3, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: September 13, 20, 27, & October 4, 2013. TST4459 / 2013 192114 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: WAKKLE WAKKLE, 209 E. N Street, Wilmington, CA 90744. Registrant: MARYLET B. CAMOU, 209 E. N Street, Wilmington, CA 90744. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Marylet B. Camou. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on September 12, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: September 20, 27, & October 4, 11, 2013. TST4461 / 2013 191122 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: KINDRED SPIRITS REHAB, 11239 Bos St., Cerritos, CA 90703. Registrant: MARIE VINAS, 11239 Bos

OCTObeR 4, 2013

St., Cerritos, CA 90703. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Marie Vinas. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on September 11, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: September 20, 27, & October 4, 11, 2013.

TST4463 / 2013 196243 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: M SHANTI PHOTO, 3109 Roxanne Ave., Long Beach, CA 90808. Registrant: MIRANDA STRATFORD, 3109 Roxanne Ave., Long Beach, CA 90808. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Miranda Stratford. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on September 18, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: September 20, 27, & October 4, 11, 2013.

TST4467 / 2013 198745 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: HEART THE MOMENT, 5308-B E. 2nd St., Long Beach, CA 90803. Registrant: JACOB'S MUSICAL CHIMES, INC., 5308-B E. 2nd St., Long Beach, CA 90803. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Fern Solomon, President. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on June 1, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on September 20, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: September 27, & October 4, 11, 18, 2013. TST4468 / 2013 198747 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: 1. FAMILIES FOR BIBLE MEMORY ASSOCIATION, 2. FBMA, 11722 209th St., Lakewood, CA 90715. Registrant: 1. ERIC RAINSFOR ARMSTRONG, 2. DARLENE ROSE ARMSTRONG, 11722 209th St., Lakewood, CA 90715. This business is conducted by: a Married Couple. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Eric R. Armstrong. The registrant have not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on September 20, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: September 27, & October 4, 11, 18, 2013.

TST4470 / 2013 199255 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: SHORTCAKES, 1746 Grand Ave., Unit 4, Long Beach, CA 90804. Registrant: CYNTHIA SHORT, 1746 Grand Ave., Unit 4, Long Beach, CA 90804. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Cynthia Short. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on September 23, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: October 4, 11, 18, 25, 2013.


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Realignment

continued from page 1

are more offenders in county jails and more offenders in these facilities who would be serving sentences that typically last from one to three years. “Plus we’re having a different sort of breed of offender,” Fischer said, describing how inmates used to serve only a short time in the county jail before moving on to a state prison. He said they are now serving their full sentences in county jail. The realignment program had been criticized when it first rolled out two years ago. Signal Hill Police Chief Michael Langston acknowledged in a telephone inter-

view Monday that the goals of realignment to reduce the recidivism rate and keep people from going into prison are at least good causes. However, the police chief added, prior to realignment, there was a lack of programs for individuals following their release...programs like job assistance or substance-abuse treatment. “The biggest concern is that realignment came before those programs were put in place,” Langston said, explaining that there weren’t many programs already established to “help people stay out of trouble, not reoffend and not go back to prison.” Langston added that it is possible that the law-enforcement community will be more supportive of

NeWS

AB 109 and realignment as more programs develop. “And again I think that the biggest challenge is that all the pieces of the puzzle for prison realignment were not in place before prison realignment became the law,” Langston concluded, “and so we’re kind of chasing our tail to get all those things put in place to make this thing work.” Fischer agrees that there aren’t enough programs or resources throughout most of Los Angeles and Orange counties, adding that “this is new uncharted territory for us for the last two years.”

Both Signal Hill and Long Beach police departments are paying close attention to how to handle criminals following their release. The brunt of the responsibility of checking on post-release offenders still lies with the county’s probation department, but police departments have carved out their own role. Earlier this summer, Long Beach opted to form the Public Safety Realignment Team, which consists of officers and a staff sergeant. Ultimately this team is part of the police department’s fieldsupport division under the deputy

CITY OF SIgNAl HIll

TST4474 NoTICE INVITING BIDS A-1 Sealed bids will be received at the office of the City Clerk, City of Signal Hill, California, until 10:30 a.m. on October 22, 2013, and on the same day shortly thereafter, they will be publicly opened and read for the “Street and Sidewalk Improvements at 23rd Street, Project No. 686, CDBG Project No. 601579-13” project, in accordance with the Specifications therefore. Bids must be made on the forms provided for this purpose, addressed to the City Clerk, City of Signal Hill, marked "Bid for “, followed by the title of the project and the date and hour for submitting bids. Bids are required for the entire work as described in the Bid Schedule and the Specifications. The work to be accomplished under this contract includes the rehabilitation and construction of sidewalk, curb & gutter, driveway, concrete block slough wall and parkway drainage along the north side of 23rd Street between Orange Avenue and Walnut Avenue. A-2 All work must be completed within twenty (20) working days after receipt by the Contractor of the notice to proceed from the City. The contract documents, which include the Specifications, may be obtained at the City of Signal Hill Department of Finance, for $20 or $25 if requested by mail. The documents are entitled “Street and Sidewalk Improvements at 23rd Street, Project No. 686, CDBG Project No. 601579-13.” A-3 Bids will not be received unless they are made on a proposal form furnished in the Contract Documents by the City of Signal Hill. Each bid must be accompanied by cash, certified check, cashier's check or bidder's bond, made payable to the City of Signal Hill for an amount equal to at least ten percent (10%) of the amount bid, such guarantee to be forfeited should the bidder to whom the contract is awarded fail to enter into the Contract. A-4 All bids are to be compared on the basis of the lump sum or itemized bid items shown in the Bid Schedule(s). Bids will not be accepted from the Contractors who are not licensed in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 9, Division III of the Business and Professions Code of the State of California. The Contractor shall be required to possess a Class A or Class C8 license at the time the contract is awarded. A-5 Attention is directed to the provision in Section 1777.5, 1777.6 and 1777.7 of the California Labor Code and Title 8, California Administrative Code, Section 200 et 4 seq. concerning the employment of apprentices by the Contractor of any subcontractor under the Contractor. A-6 Before a Contract is entered into with the successful bidder, the bidder shall present evidence in writing to the City Clerk, City of Signal Hill, that he has a current combined single limit liability policy with aggregate limits for Bodily Injury and Property Damage in the amount of two million dollars ($2,000,000). A-7 Prevailing Wage Statement: This is a federally-assisted construction project. Federal Labor Standards Provisions outlined in the HUD-4010 form, including the prevailing wage requirements of the Davis-Bacon and Related Acts (DBRA) will be enforced. The “current Federal Wage Decision” is the one in effect 10-days prior to the bid opening date and can be found on-line at http://www.wdol.gov. In the event of a conflict between Federal and State wages rates, the higher of the two will prevail. The Contractor’s duty to pay State prevailing wages can be found under Labor Code Section 1770 et seq. and Labor Code Sections 1775 and 1777.7 outline the penalties for failure to pay prevailing wages and employ apprentices including forfeitures and debarment. A-8 Attention is directed to Government Code Sections 4590 and 14402.5 permitting the substitution of specified and approved securities for contract retention of funds. All such securities shall be subject to the review and approval of the City Attorney of the City of Signal Hill. A-9 The successful bidder will be required to furnish a payment bond in an amount equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the contract price and a faithful performance bond in an amount equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the contract price, and said bonds shall be secured from a surety company satisfactory to the City Attorney of the City of Signal Hill. A-10 The City of Signal Hill reserves the right to reject any and all bids, or delete portions of any and all bids or waive any informality or irregularity in the bid or the bid procedures and shall be the sole judge of the bids received. A-11 Conflict of Interest: In the procurement of supplies, equipment, construction, and services by sub-recipients, the conflict of interest provisions in 24 CFR 85.36, OMB Circular A-110, and 24 CFR 570.611, respectively, shall apply. No employee, officer or agent of the sub-recipient shall participate in selection, or in the award or administration of a contract supported by Federal funds if a conflict of interest, real or apparent, would be involved. A-12 Federal Contract Clause and Provisions: This is a federallyassisted construction project. Attention is directed to requirements and documents listed in this Notice Inviting Bids, and Appendices A and B of the bid documents including but not limited to the sections regarding the EEO Clause, Notice of Requirement for Affirmative Action, Federal EEO Specifications, Civil Rights Act of 1964, Age Discrimination Act of 1975, Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Contracting with Small & Minority Firms, Women’s Business Enterprise, Compliance with Clean Air and Water Act, and Conflict of Interest. By order of the City of Signal Hill. Posted at Signal Hill City Hall on: Published in the Signal-Tribune on: Oct. 4 and Oct. 11, 2013.

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TST4460 lEGAl NoTICE NoTICE INVITING INTERESTED CoNTRACToRS FoR THE 2014 FoRMAl BID lIST Cerritos Community College District (“District”) is inviting all interested licensed contractors who wish to formally bid construction projects at the District to be prequalified for select trades. The District will consider for prequalification contractors and subcontractors who submit the required prequalification package and materials.

OCTObeR 4, 2013

chief of the patrol bureau, according to Sgt. Aaron Eaton, a spokesperson for the Long Beach Police Department. Eaton said in a telephone interview Wednesday that this particular team has been established to follow up with offenders who are considered PRCS, or post-release community supervision. Eaton explained that the team has been instructed to hold offenders accountable if they are not fulfilling their probation obligations and to ensure that individuals have access to mental-health and drug treatment. Eaton described how crucial the team will be in developing an overall plan for the department to assess the impact of realignment and determine a course of action. “Through their…hard work,” Eaton said, “we’ll be able to come up with a plan and work towards dealing with these probationers as best we can to keep the community safe.” Eaton estimated that there are roughly 1,000 individuals in Long Beach who are considered PRCS, but he added that some individuals under county probation may be living in drug-treatment facilities in the city with residences outside of Long Beach. Through AB 109, Long Beach does have money to fund its efforts. Eaton confirmed that Long Beach has been allocated $525,092 of AB 109 funds that will pay for straight time, overtime and investigative work, in addition to training officers to identify and prioritize compliance checks on probationers. Signal Hill also has some funds through AB 109. According to Langston, his police department received $25,000 to pay for costs related to following up with individuals who are considered PSP, or post-supervised released persons. He described how there is a detective in his department who regularly works with these individuals in collaboration with a county probation officer who is embedded with the police department. Langston said that this county probation officer’s primary responsibility is to look after PSPs and the other individuals in the general area who are on probation. Langston said that currently there are only two PSPs living in Signal Hill. Originally, the city had 16. He confirmed that some have moved from the city, while in other cases, the term of supervision ended. ß

FOLBA

Contractors may download a copy of the formal bid prequalification package from the District website at www.cerritos.edu/purchasing/formal-bid-prequalification and send the completed package to the following address no later than Friday, October 11, 2013. Cerritos College Attn: Purchasing Department 11110 Alondra Blvd., Norwalk, CA 90650 562-860-2451 x 2243 The formal bid prequalification period will be for calendar year 2014.

The District is interested in local business participation for their bond construction projects.  Cerritos College, with the assistance of its program manager Tilden-Coil Constructors, Inc., will be hosting three contractor outreach seminars in 2013.  The seminar will be a workshop to assist contractors on key points in turning in a successful prequalification package.   The outreach seminars will be held at Cerritos College in the Teleconference Center (LC155). The Contractor outreach events are scheduled as follows: Friday, October 25 from 10:00 – 11:30 am Thursday, October 31 from 10:00 – 11:30 am Friday, November 15 from 10:00 – 11:30 am

CERRITOS COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT

By: Mark B. Logan, C.P.M., CPPO, Director of Purchasing

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OCTObeR 4, 2013

Council

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situation without the City having to resort to litigation. “What we’re talking about is continuing to invest in the city or to have the money go someplace else,” said Signal Hill Vice Mayor Ed Wilson during an Oct. 1 meeting of the Successor Agency to the former Signal Hill RDA. “I, for one, would rather see the money in Signal Hill.” The item was brought up by City Treasurer Emerson Fersch mainly to dispel rumors from some residents that the library project was moving forward or being funded. Councilmember Tina Hansen said reports that the City is planning a groundbreaking are false. “That’s not true and has never been true,” she said. City Manager Ken Farfsing said current law requires that proceeds from bonds issued after the State’s deadline be dispersed among taxing entities, such as Los Angeles County (50 percent), Long Beach Unified School District (20 percent) and the Los Angeles County Fire Department (18 percent). Signal Hill would only get 0.7 percent of the $8.6 million, he said. Farfsing said, however, there are still problems with that approach since the City, acting as the Successor Agency to the former RDA, wouldn’t be able to defease the entire amount since the City is still legally required to make annual bond payments or face default. He added that the situation could create problems with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). “The way we look at it is the governor and the legislature put together this legislation in kind of a knee-jerk reaction, not really thinking through not only the IRS consequences, but the whole financial consequences of it,” Farfsing said. “Also the fact that it was taking money from public projects that basically employ construction workers. There are ripple effects.” Hansen pointed out that cities had no way of knowing the State’s deadline, which was set through legislation just months after the RDA issued bonds. “So basically cities were supposed to have a crystal ball and know that, at the time they approved it, three months later or four months later or two months later, the governor and the legislators were going to pass some bill that went back and froze those [bond proceeds],” she said. The State’s current law has halted a number of projects in other cities, affecting about 50 to 60 issued bonds and at least $500 million in projects throughout the state, Farfsing said. A number of those projects included libraries, police stations and street repairs, he said. One attempt to reinstitute the bonds, however, is AB 981, authored by Assemblymember Richard Bloom (D-Santa Monica). The bill would allow successor agencies and successor housing entities to use proceeds from bonds issued prior to June 28, 2011 instead of the current deadline, effectively allowing Signal Hill to expend the money needed for the new library’s construction. Though the bill has bipartisan support from the State Senate and Assembly, it has been put on hold at the request of Gov. Jerry Brown’s office and is due for reconsideration during the next legislative session, possibly next year, Farfsing said. “We don’t know how that bill is going to do, obviously,” he said. “It does have legislative support. Whether the governor changes his position, we just don’t know.”

In a phone interview, Sean MacNeil, chief of staff for Assemblymember Bloom, said the governor has agreed to a policy meeting on the bill starting this month, but it would still have to get out of its “house of origin” and move to the Senate by the end January 2014 to stay alive. MacNeil said there’s still “a long ways to go” for the bill to pass the legislature and be signed by the governor, but the governor wouldn’t have committed to policy discussions if he wasn’t open to possibilities. He said the bill is, in many ways, a “last-gasp effort” to make projects work for some cities and fix “what some people thought were unintended design of the original proposal” but the legislation “won’t work for everyone.” MacNeil said some projects, such as freeway overpasses, have been in the works for eight years but are now halted, leaving cities to be sued by Cal Trans. “You have the State suing the city for something that the State did,” he said. “How crazy is that?” In Signal Hill, the bond proceeds for constructing the new library may have other consequences as well, city officials said. Deputy City Manager Charlie Honeycutt said the City is able to use proceeds from bonds issued by the former Signal Hill RDA for demolishing the existing library and the now vacated police station, since the bonds were issued in 2009. But since the library project is still in limbo, the City will likely have to demolish the buildings at different times, which would likely increase costs, he said. “It will clearly be more expensive to do the demolition in two phases,” Honeycutt said. “I don’t know what that cost is, but we’ll have to bring in another contractor, and there will be mobilization costs and insurance costs. There’s added expense.” Honeycutt said the current library is expected to remain open during the police station’s demolition, which will likely take place in early 2014. City Attorney David Aleshire said costs for the library project could eventually grow as time goes on. “There’s also the related issue that the bond was structured based upon the estimates of the cost of constructing the library at that point in time,” he said. “This passage of time working this problem out eventually may erode your budget, and there may be need to come up with additional funding, eventually.” Hansen, who has been a longtime proponent of the Signal Hill library, said she will “fight tooth and nail” to keep the bond proceeds, adding that the current library “underserves” the community and a new technologically advanced facility, expected to total 15,000 square feet, is needed. “I know that there are people who think that we shouldn’t build this library,” Hansen said. “I know there are people who think that libraries are obsolete. All I know is that, anytime I go to any kind of family event at the library, it’s bursting at the seams.” Other Council highlights: Presentations During the Council meeting, Mayor Michael Noll introduced Jose Padilla, a new maintenance worker for the Signal Hill Public Works Department. Noll, along with Signal Hill Police Chief Michael Langston, also recognized graduates of the police department’s Citizens Academy, which concluded on Sept. 17.

NeWS

Strategic plan The Council unanimously voted to enter into a contract with Fairbank, Maslin, Maullin, Metz & Associates (FM3) to conduct “resident satisfaction survey” as part of efforts to update the City’s Strategic Plan. The Council approved a budget adjustment of $27,850 for completion of the fiscal impact report.

Housing element City staff presented the Council with a “road map” for updating the Signal Hill Housing Element, which sets land uses and guidelines for development as part of the City’s General Plan and is the only element that requires State approval. The City has already conducted two community workshops as part of the housing-element update

process in which residents provided input on the City’s housing needs. According to city staff, the Regional Housing Needs Assessment (RHNA) requires that the City accommodate at least 169 new units for the next eight years, however, the City is planning for a total of 201. For affordable housing, requirements call for 71 units, but the City is expecting 78 units. For moderate housing, the State mandates 28 units, but the City is planning for 35. And for above-moderate housing, the City is required to plan for 70 units when the City is expecting 88 units. The State is also requiring new legal mandates, including providing accommodations for emergency homeless shelters, special housing, transitional housing and supportive housing. City Manager Farfsing said

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some of the new state mandates are likely to bring about “controversies” as the City moves forward with the housing-element update process and approves new ordinances. According to a staff report, the housing-element update is due to the State by Oct. 15. However, the City still has until February 2014 to meet the State’s deadline for an eight-year cycle for future updates, or face being reverted to a four-year cycle.

Speaker time Mayor Noll directed staff to look into the possibility of limiting public comments for speakers to three minutes.

The next Council meeting will be held at the Council Chamber on Tuesday, Oct. 15. ß


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