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“Sunset at South Bay,”

oil painting by Lisa Wibroe

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August 16, 2013

SERVING BIXBY KNOLLS, CALIFORNIA HEIGHTS, LOS CERRITOS, WRIGLEY AND THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

Your Weekly Community Newspaper The Guidance Center’s new spot in Central LB promises better access to kids and families with mental-health needs CJ Dablo Staff Writer

When The Guidance Center had to pick a new spot for its new headquarters, the nonprofit organization followed the standard advice for real estate: location, location, location. The center moved into its new headquarters in July and celebrated its grand opening last week at 1301 Pine Ave. to offer mental-health services to kids and their families in the community. Patricia Costales, executive director of The Guidance Center, acknowledges that the main decision to move into central Long Beach had everything to do with what her organization knew its clients needed. The center also operates satellite clinics in Compton, San Pedro, Paramount and Catalina Island, but when it came to The Guidance Center’s presence in Long Beach, there was a major problem. The center had four offices in Long Beach, and while all of the offices were in Bixby Knolls, none of their clients lived in Bixby Knolls, according to Costales in a phone interview. She added that they also needed to have administrative staff working with them under one roof. “This feels like it was meant for kids,” Costales said of the new look of the center, a building that formerly housed the Long Beach Rescue Mission’s thrift store and extra office space. Costales described how the facilities had been completely gutted and built to suit The Guidance Center’s requirements. Only the ceiling and the walls are original, and there is plenty CJ Dablo/Signal Tribune of room for community meetings and plenty of space Baby dolls from The Guidance Center are used by counto grow, according to the executive director. selors in their play-therapy kits when they work on school see CENTER page 15 campuses.

More birds, mosquitoes found with West Nile virus in LB this year; one human death reported in LA County Sean Belk Staff Writer

A total of six dead birds in Long Beach have tested positive for the mosquito-borne West Nile virus this year, with reports showing up in eastern to western parts of the city, health officials said. Samples from three mosquito traps also tested positive for the virus in addition to one trap in Signal Hill. The reports come just as health officials have confirmed the first human death attributed to the virus in Los Angeles County this year. Local health officials reported that a Carson man in his late 70s recently died after being diagnosed with the virus, though he had other complications at the time. As of press time, there were only two other known West Nile virus-related deaths reported in California this year– one in Glenn County and one in Sacramento County. Vector-control officials note that the virus is most active in South Bay areas of Courtesy LB Health Dept. A vector-control inspector packages a dead crow to be tested for West the county, such as Torrance, Carson and Nile virus. The Long Beach Health Department utilizes 23 mosquito Lomita, yet it has also drifted into Long traps to monitor the prevalence of the virus throughout the entire city. see WEST NILE page 8

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Photos by Cory Bilicko/Signal Tribune

Long Beach Police Department officers and Fire Department personnel maneuver between a triage location and the site of mass-shooting “victims” during the Aug. 13 “Active Shooter/Mass Casualty Drill” at Cal State Long Beach.

In wake of school shootings at Santa Monica and Sandy Hook, CSULB conducts multi-agency ‘mass casualty’ exercise Cory Bilicko

Managing Editor

The blood was just make-up, the screams for help only feigned, and the gunman at the center of it all nonexistent, but the more than 150 participants involved in the Aug. 13 “Active Shooter/Mass Casualty Drill” at Cal State Long Beach (CSULB) were taking their assigned duties very seriously. The event was a multi-agency mock response that involved the CSULB University Police Department, the Long Beach Police Department, Long Beach Fire Department, St. Mary Medical Center, Lifeline EMS, Pacific College and

several university departments joining together to apprehend a hypothetical shooter and treat would-be victims. The focus of the exercise, according to the university, was primarily on the CSULB Student Health Center and its staff’s ability to perform triage in the field, but the exercise was also designed to test the communications of university personnel with external agencies, the media and the public. Terri Carbaugh, CSULB associate vice president of Legislative and External Relations, was stationed at the checkin tent for the event. At 9:45 that

see CSULB page 14

Dr. Jennifer Zweig simulates treatment on a “victim” during CSULB’s mock response to an active-shooter scenario on Aug. 13.


2 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

AUGUST 16, 2013

NEW BRIDGE. NEW JOBS. NEW HEIGHTS. The new Gerald Desmond Bridge—now under construction through a partnership between the Port and other agencies—was designed and engineered to be a stunning addition to our skyline. It will also add thousands of jobs to the economy, expand a world-renowned bicycle infrastructure, and improve safety for all who cross it. Because we’re not just taking in the view, we’re looking to the future. polb.com/GeraldDesmondBridge

Thinking outside the docks

Suzanne Plezia Deputy Chief Harbor Engineer Port of Long Beach © Port of Long Beach


NEWS

AUGUST 16, 2013

Seniors in Long Beach performing-arts group sing and dance to ‘oldies but goodies’

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

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Sean Belk Staff Writer

For some performers, it’s a way to rekindle a youthful passion of years past. For others, it’s just about letting loose and having fun, while maybe enlivening the spirits of those in the audience who may not be able to get out to a live musical performance. Primetime Players, a community theatre troupe of seniors age 55 and older, is still going strong after starting more than 10 years ago at the Long Beach Senior Center at 1150 E. 4th St. The colorful cast of seniors produces about three performances a year, taking their act to other senior centers and various venues throughout the city. “We like to get the audience involved so they can sing along to some of the songs that they recognize,” said Claudette Clayton, a 77-year-old Compton resident, who joined the group six years ago. “You can say we’re catering to the senior group, because that’s our audience.” This summer, the performing-arts group is putting on a variety show called Love, Marriage and Whatever! The show, which premiered at the Long Beach Senior Center’s stage on Monday, Aug. 12, is a mixed bag of musical numbers, dance routines and comedic performances. The show, which includes a cast of about 20 people and has its own original script, is set at Lola’s French restaurant and it includes a mock wedding and various solos and duets of some of the “oldie but goodies,” such as “Que Sera Sera,” “Put On A Happy Face” and “You Make Me Feel So Young.” The show also features some funny skits, said Clayton, who added that it’s important to keep your sense of humor no matter what age you are. “The ‘whatever’ really means ‘whatever,’” chuckled Clayton, who during the show breaks into melody, as she saunters down the stage to dance with a man in the crowd, while singing the 1920s song “Why Don’t You Do Right?” Clayton said she has a little experience being on the big stage. She once performed a comedy act at the famed Apollo Theater in Harlem. But now she is happy to give singing a try. “I love to sing,” Clayton said. Barbara Klein, who directed the performance, said the production continues to provide seniors with a way to enjoy

GET ON THE FIELD What DeForest Park Futsal Courts opening Who the City of Long Beach and Partners of Parks Where DeForest Park, 6255 DeForest Ave. When Saturday, Aug. 17 at 9am More Info Mayor Bob Foster, Councilmember Steven Neal, the Department of Parks, Recreation and Marine, and Partners of Parks invite the public to attend an opening event for the DeForest Park Futsal Courts. Two tennis courts at DeForest Park have been converted to two new futsal courts. After the opening ceremony, the second annual Long Beach Futsal District Cup Tournament for boys age 8 to 17 and girls age 12 to 17 will begin at 10am. Call (562) 570-3150.

Photos by Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Lynn Brandt (left) and Caprice Rothe sing “Put on a Happy Face” during the premiere of Primetime Players’ Love, Marriage and Whatever! on Aug. 12 at the Long Beach Senior Center. being involved in the arts. This year, the group includes a cast of members who range in age from 59 to 93 years old, she said. “I really consider us a family because everyone in this group cares about each other and helps each other,” Klein said. “We all have our differences, we all have our strengths and weaknesses, but we are a family joined together.” Klein said the seniors have a diverse mix of backgrounds as well, with some who have professional experience. One of the main performers is Caprice Rothe, who is most known as the alien-movement choreographer for ‘80s films E.T. the Extra Terrestrial and Cocoon. She has also worked as a professional mime and as an actress in the 1987 parody movie Flicks. “We have some very talented people here,” said Claudia Ellis, who plays Lola in the show. Klein said the group performs about two musicals and at least one “dramedy.” Though some members may have limitations due to various medical conditions, the script is written based on what the performers are capable of doing, she said. For this summer’s performance, Robbie Danzie provided choreography.

“Normally, I announce what the show theme is going to be about two months ahead of time, so when they come in they have an idea of the kind of music that we need, and they usually select their own songs,” Klein said. “Once they’re selected, we write a script that fits the songs and fits the capabilities of the people in the show.” Bettye Little, 80, who is one of five original members of Primetime Players, said the group used to perform more serious and complex plays, but today the short acts make it easier for everyone to perform. One of the main goals of the group is to provide entertainment to seniors, many of whom may be unable to attend a more professional play or show due to physical or financial limitations, Klein said. “Our biggest intent is to make something that the audience can enjoy,” she said. “Our basic philosophy is to take shows to people who would otherwise not have the opportunity to see the show.” Primetime Players is funded through a grant from the Arts Council for Long Beach and donations. Love, Marriage and Whatever! performs: today, Aug. 16 at noon at AbilityFirst, 3700 E. Willow St.; Aug. 19 at 11am at Silverado Park Auditorium, 1545 W. 31st St.; Aug. 21 at 1:30pm at Gold Star Manor, 3021 N. Gold Star Dr.; Aug. 22 at 1:30pm at Leisure World Clubhouse 2, 13533 Seal Beach Blvd. in Seal Beach; and Aug. 23 at 1pm at the Long Beach Senior Center. The Primetime Players’ fall show in November will include Broadway show tunes. MORE INFORMATION (562) 433-1734 byrdbud2@verizon.net

Grandma Darling’s ANTIQUE MALL

From left: Ted Klein, Todd Spence, Caprice Rothe, Claudia Ellis and Larry Reid perform in Primetime Players’ Love, Marriage and Whatever!

HoW To AVoID PRoBATE

Probate is a very costly and long process that can last from 9 to 18 months in most cases. Fortunately, there are several alternatives available that remove the asset from one’s probatable estate while that person is still alive. Naming a beneficiary on life insurance policies, IRA’s, 401(k)’s, and annuities before your death assures the asset is transferred straight to the chosen beneficiary. Joint Tenancy is where the owner of the asset names a co-owner of an account or real property. Caution: Joint tenancies have risks as the co-owner has the same rights to the asset as the original owner and a loss of Stepped-up valuation. Pay-on-death Accounts are similar to naming a beneficiary in that the bank account owner completes banking paperwork which names the person(s) who will receive the bank account upon the bank owner’s death. Lifetime Gifts given during your life avoids probate because probate only applies to those assets owned at time of death. A Living Trust is very beneficial when dealing with titled real property and other assets. A complete estate plan included in the Living Trust includes many ancillary documents that protect you financially, physically and allows for peace of mind.

ELIZABETH ARNETT VOZZELLA Attorney at Law • (562) 426-9876 www.Vozzella4Law.com

HAGGLE DAY AUG. 17, NOON–5PM

Meet Grandma Darling’s dealers & haggle for the best prices!

LABOR DAY SALE 8/24 - 9/2 10-50% OFF Now taking consignments for our outdoor architectural antique/garden center

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MEALS AND MELODIES What 3rd Saturdays Gourmet Food Truck Night in Belmont Heights Who Meals on Wheels of Long Beach and The Belmont Heights United Methodist Church Where Belmont Heights United Methodist Church, 317 Termino Ave. When Saturday, Aug. 17 from 5pm to 9pm More Info This month, The Jazz Angels, a youth musical group that focuses on “preserving jazz for tomorrow” will perform. Admission is free, and donations are welcome. The fundraiser supports meal programs for low-income, homebound seniors, veterans and the disabled in Long Beach and Signal Hill. Visit mowlb.org or call (562) 439-5000.

JAMMIN’ MUSICAL What Musical comedy Who Jammin’ Music Where Bixby Knolls Christian Church, 1240 E. Carson St. When Saturday, Aug. 17 at 7:30pm and Sunday, Aug. 18 at 6:30pm More Info Jammin’ Music will host a production of Aladdin. Call (562) 490-0220.

SPEND THE DAY AT BIXBY PARK What 4th Annual Free Children’s Public Theater Who Friends of Bixby Park Where Bixby Park, 130 Cherry Ave. When Sunday, Aug. 18 starting at 11am More Info Performance by Bob Baker Marionettes will begin at 11am. At 4pm, there will be a fundraiser, in which attendees may purchase food from local gourmet food trucks. Then, Long Beach Cinematique will present an outdoor screening of Mary Poppins. Visit friendsofbixbypark.org . YOU’RE INVITED What Housing Element Workshop Who City of Signal Hill Where Signal Hill Park Community Center, 1780 E. Hill St. When Monday, Aug. 19 from 5:30pm to 7:30pm More Info The City will conduct a workshop about the Housing Element Update for 2013-2021 to receive public input and share information about the legal requirements and purpose of the Housing Element. Call Colleen at (562) 989-7344 or email cdoan@cityofsignalhill.org .

LOTS OF MUSIC What Concert in the Park(ing Lot) Who Office of 8th District Long Beach Councilmember Al Austin and the Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association Where In the parking lot of It’s a Grind Coffeehouse/Domino’s Pizza at The Bixby Center, 4245 Atlantic Ave. When Monday Aug. 19 at 6:30pm More Info The event features a musical performance by Jungle Fire, an Afro/Latin funk music band. Attendees are encouraged to bike and walk to the event, bring their out chairs and enjoy local dining options. Visit bixbyknollsinfo.com .

WEIGH IN ON THE BUDGET What 8th District community budget meeting Who Office of 8th District Long Beach Councilmember Al Austin Where Expo Arts Center, 4321 Atlantic Ave. When Wednesday, Aug. 21 at 6:30pm More Info Attendees will be able to hear from city management about the proposed Fiscal-Year 2014 budget and how it will affect city services. Residents will be able to ask questions and provide input on how the City should prioritize city resources. The presentation will also include a discussion on how to invest $45 million in “one-time” revenues in the next fiscal year. Call (562) 570-6685 or visit district8@longbeach.gov .

GET WISE ON GROUNDWATER What Historic signing ceremony Who Water Replenishment District of Southern California (WRD) and Sanitation District of Los Angeles County Where San Jose Reclamation Plant Wet Control Room, 1965 Workman Mill Rd. in Whittier When Wednesday, Aug. 28 at 10am More Info This historic signing ceremony will mark the continuation of a 50-plus-year recycled-water partnership between the sanitation districts and WRD, with hopes of ensuring a plentiful water supply through such programs as the WRD’s Groundwater Reliability Improvement Program. Tours of the reclamation plant will be offered after the ceremony. Call (562) 275-4215 or email grip@wrd.org .


4 SIGNAL TRIBUNE COMMUNITY AUGUST 16, 2013 Long Beach Animal Care Services offering additional spay/neuter vouchers this month

For the rest of August, Long Beach Animal Care Services will distribute spay/neuter vouchers in person at the PD Pitchford Companion Animal Village, 7700 East Spring St. Animal Care Services usually offers a limited number of vouchers on the first Thursday of the month, but because of community support, the program has been increased this month, and

vouchers are being offered each day Animal Care Services is open this month. Vouchers are only valid at participating veterinary hospitals and clinics, and they will only be distributed to Long Beach residents and the Long Beach Animal Care Services contract cities of Los Alamitos, Cerritos, Seal Beach and Signal Hill. Only one voucher will be distributed per

household. Additional vouchers may be distributed upon request subject to availability and supervisor approval. All five cities within the Animal Care Services jurisdiction require dogs to be licensed. In Long Beach, cats are required to be licensed with current rabies shots and spayed/neutered. In order to qualify for a voucher, pet owners must pro-

OPINION

vide proof of address through photo ID or utility bill. Owners must pay the remaining balance of the spay or neuter procedure directly to the veterinary hospital. Animal Care Services will reimburse the veterinary hospital for up to $30 of the procedure. Availability and pricing will vary. Those interested may call ahead for pricing and appointment information. A full listing

of participating veterinarians can be found at longbeach.gov/acs under “Spay & Neuter Programs.” The Animal Care Services Village is open Wednesday through Friday from 10am to 5:30pm and Saturday and Sunday 10am to 4pm. It is closed on Mondays, Tuesdays and holidays. Source: City of LB

Thoughts from the Publisher by Neena Strichart

Today, my friends, is the 36th anniversary of the death of Elvis Presley. Aug. 16, 1977 was a very sad day for me. I was a huge fan since about age 7, and in high school was pretty much alone in my love of the hip-swiveling hunk. Most of my girlfriends were smitten by other musical icons or groups of the day, ie: The Beatles, Three Dog Night (Becky, I’m talking about you), Bobby Sherman, The Monkees, or David Cassidy. Although I am a grown woman now, I still consider my Elvis years to be the sweetest and will forever be grateful for the 40 live performances I had the opportunity to enjoy, and I still cherish the scarves Elvis gave me from the stage of the Hilton Hotel in Las Vegas. Three or four of the seven came with a kiss! When I’m in the mood for an Elvis fix, I still pop in an Elvis-movie DVD, listen to the Elvis station on Sirius radio or play one of my Elvis greatest hits CDs in the car. When I really want a heavy-duty dose of Elvis, Steve and I drive down to Azteca Mexican Restaurant in Garden Grove. They have great food (the owner is a family member of the folks who used to own Mexico City Restaurant in north Long Beach). Located at 12911 Main St. in historical downtown Garden Grove, this eatery has great food, great margaritas, and an atmosphere of all Elvis all the time– including wall-to-wall posters, statues, memorabilia, music, and Elvis movies playing on big-screen televisions in the restaurant and adjacent bar, the Crooner’s Lounge. For details, check out Azteca’s website aztecaoc.org . As I have said before when writing about Elvis, whether you enjoyed his records, concerts and movies, or not, you have to admit he was and still is a very important part of our American fabric. And for those who claim he is still alive, I must disagree. If he were still alive, he would have called by now. Elvis may have “left the building,” but he is still in my heart... and I am proud to call myself a lifelong fan– a fan who saw him in concert 40 times. A part of my office Elvis collection

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LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Strengthening your Corps

As our economy struggles to recover, it’s important to remember our youth struggling in this job market. Youth unemployment continues around 17 percent, with millions either not in school or working. We risk an entire generation missing out on important formative experiences. We thank Rep. Frederica Wilson (Florida) for introducing the Youth Corps Act, H.R. 3061 in Congress and bringing attention to the unemployment crisis. The bill will help those interested start their own Youth Corps where they’re needed and re-engage youth in education and the workforce. New and existing Youth Corps would focus on getting youth into college or training, an industry-recognized certification or credential, meaningful employment or military service. The Conservation Corps of Long Beach works here in Long Beach, California as a comprehensive “Youth Corps” development program that provides leadership skills and work ethic through a crew-based strategy of service and conservation projects. We also provide important educational and workforce development programming. As part of The Corps Network’s 127 members, we help 27,000 youth yearly nationwide. A recent study found volunteers have a 27-percent higher chance of finding a job after being unemployed than non-volunteers, which rose to 51 percent for those without high-school diplomas. Youth Corps offer a proven model of reconnecting youth out of work or school, or even those that aren’t, with further education and the job market. As youth unemployment remains high, we plan to help many youth gain important experience but know the Youth Corps Act would be a big help. We hope our U.S. Representatives will add their support. Mike Bassett Executive Director Conservation Corps of Long Beach

Questions or comments? (562) 595-7900 PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Neena R. Strichart

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

MANAGING EDITOR

Stephen M. Strichart ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS

ASSISTANT EDITOR/STAFF WRITER

Sean Belk

Jane Fallon

Barbie Ellisen COLUMNISTS

Jennifer E. Beaver Carol Berg Sloan, RD

DESIGN EDITOR

Cory Bilicko

STAFF WRITER

CJ Dablo

Shoshanah Siegel

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Leighanna Nierle ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/WEBSITE MANAGER

Daniel Adams Vicki Paris Goodman EDITORIAL INTERNS

Ariana Gastelum

Brandy Soto

Tanya Paz

CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Rachael Rifkin

The Signal Tribune welcomes letters to the editor, which should be signed, dated and include a phone number to verify authenticity. Letters are due by noon on the Tuesday before desired publication date. The Signal Tribune reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, language and space requirements. The Signal Tribune does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other publications or otherwise presented in a public forum. Letters to the editor and commentaries are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Signal Tribune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, letters to the editor and commentaries are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. Letter-writers will be identified by their professional titles or affiliations when, and only when, the editorial staff deems it relevant and/or to provide context to the letter. We do not run letters to the editor submitted by individuals who have declared their candidacies for public office in upcoming races. This policy was put in place because, to be fair, if we publish one, we would have to publish all letters submitted by all candidates. The volume would no doubt eliminate space for letters submitted by other readers. Instead, we agree to interview candidates and print stories about political races in an objective manner and offer very reasonable advertising rates for those candidates who wish to purchase ads. The Signal Tribune is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. Yearly subscriptions are available for $50.

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AUGUST 16, 2013

Nelson Academy students in SH get new traffic signal at 20th St./Cherry Ave.; other street improvements planned

Sean Belk Staff Writer

Students who cross Cherry Avenue on their way to and from school in Signal Hill will have a safer passage when they return from summer break next month, thanks to a partnership between the City and the school district. A new traffic signal and crosswalk at 20th Street and Cherry Avenue in front of Jessie Elwin Nelson Academy middle school is now in place to alleviate the potential dangers for students crossing Cherry Avenue, a busy thoroughfare that often becomes congested with vehicles in the afternoon hours. Signal Hill city officials and the Long Beach Unified School District worked together on funding the $322,000 traffic-signal project to create a fully signalized intersection. A majority of the funding, about 90 percent, came from a federal Highway Safety Improvement Program grant. In addition, the school district paid about $15,000 toward the new city infrastructure, according to school officials. The City allocated about $20,000 toward the project, according to a Signal Hill capital-improvement-project list. Southern California Edison is expected to power the signal poles as early as next week, said Steve Myrter, director of Signal Hill Public Works, in a phone interview. He said the non-signalized crosswalk at Cherry Avenue and 19th Street will be removed, and students and other pedestrians are encouraged to use only the new signalized crosswalk to get across that section of the street. LBUSD spokesperson Chris

Eftychiou said there are no known reports that Cherry Avenue is especially unsafe for children but the new traffic signal provides an added layer of safety. “We haven’t heard concerns expressed about safety at the intersection, but the project provides an extra measure of precaution,” he said. Myrter said the project was completed just in time for students returning from summer break. For Nelson Academy, which has a yearly enrollment of about 850 students in grades six through eight, school starts on Sept. 4. The new traffic signal, however, isn’t the only change coming to Cherry Avenue. Cherry Avenue widening After several years of delays, the long-awaited second leg of construction on the Cherry Avenue Widening Project is expected to begin this year. The more than $6.7-million project involves easing traffic congestion along a section of Cherry Avenue between 20th Street and Pacific Coast Highway. Cherry Avenue is classified as a “major thoroughfare” that provides direct access to the I-405 Freeway, seaports and airports. The street is also Signal Hill’s main commercial corridor, with the Signal Hill Auto Center and three surrounding retail shopping centers located there. For years, however, the street has created a “bottleneck” for drivers during peak rush-hour traffic. In the 1980s, Signal Hill widened portions of the street within its city limits from Spring Street to 19th Street. However, the rest of the street (from 19th Street to PCH),

NEWS

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Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Students of Jessie Elwin Nelson Academy will be able to use a new fully signalized crosswalk to get across Cherry Avenue at 20th Street when they return from summer break on Sept. 4. The project was funded through a federal grant in addition to money from Signal Hill and the Long Beach Unified School District.

which resides in Long Beach, was left untouched. Since then, traffic has continued to back up all the way up the street, sending some drivers to cut through the nearby neighborhoods to avoid traffic and find a quicker route. The City of Signal Hill has been able to allocate traffic-impact funds and received state and federal grants for the upgrades. Still, the project encountered several delays, mainly due to statebudget problems. While Long Beach was forced to withdraw $1 million from the project, the State has since reinstated its original $2.7-million grant. The new street-widening project calls for two new traffic lanes, one going northbound and one going

southbound. Plans also call for adding a new right-turn lane on southbound Cherry Avenue at PCH and a new travel lane that would extend approximately 300 feet beyond the PCH intersection to provide through traffic with an opportunity to merge once past the intersection. The addition of these new traffic lanes required the City to purchase new public right-of-way space, which was completed last summer. Myrter said in a phone conversation on Tuesday, Aug. 13 that the City Council is expected to vote on awarding a contract for the project in September after bids went out in February. Once Caltrans provides authorization, construction may start in late fall, he said.

Capital improvements In total, Signal Hill has nearly $19 million allocated for capitalimprovement projects in 2013 and 2014, including $7 million in street projects, $320,000 in park projects (including a $50,000 community garden), $70,000 for a new electronic sign for the Civic Center and $7 million in redevelopment-bond funds for a new library. In terms of street projects, Signal Hill is planning to install Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) improvements to the intersection at Temple Avenue and 28th Street through a federal grant. The City is also planning sidewalk improvements, including new asphalt, along Walnut Avenue, Hill Street, 23rd Street and 28th Street. ß


6 SIGNAL TRIBUNE Local nonprofit to host its third Casino Night fundraiser For the third year in a row, the nonprofit Food Finders will host its Viva Las Vegas Casino Night. The fundraiser will take place on Saturday, Sept. 21 at the Alpert Jewish Community Center, 3801 E Willow St., beginning at 6pm. Proceeds will support Food Finders’ Food Rescue Program,

AZTECA M R EXICAN ESTAURANT

From the family that brought you Mexico City Restaurant in Long Beach– Azteca Mexican Restaurant has been offering authentic Mexican cooking for over 50 years!

Home of Aunt Connie’s famous garlic sauce and the original GARLIC TACO!

CROONER’S

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“Where the King lives”

Open Tuesday through Sunday 11am-10pm for food Crooner’s Lounge open until 2am!

which has been on a steady track all year in providing enough food for 40,000 meals a day, according to Patti Larson, the organization’s executive director. “We’ve invited all the Long Beach mayoral candidates to come play, and so far the majority have confirmed they’ll join us that evening,” Larson said. Blackjack, Roulette, Craps and a Poker Tournament will all be included at the event. Erhart’s Catering will provide food, and Sweet and Saucy and Rossmoor Pastries will provide desserts. A silent auction will feature specialty jewelry, spa visits, travel opportunities, amusementpark passes, Hearst Castle tickets, SCUBA dive classes and culinary and floral design experiences. The evening will kick off at 6pm with music from DJ Mark Samson, cocktails and silent auction, followed by gaming and food at 7pm. Tickets to the event are currently on sale online at foodfinders.org, with prices set at $45 per person, $80 per couple and $20 for a seat in the Poker Tournament. Each ticket purchase includes casino cash to spend. Sponsorships are available for any businesses that wish to support hunger relief. Contact Lisa Hoffmaster at (562) 598-3003, ext. 103 or lisah@foodfinders.org to find out more. MORE INFORMATION foodfinders.org

12911 Main Street Historical Downtown Garden Grove

(714) 638-3790

aztecaoc.org

Man who jumped off Belmont Pier rescued but now on life support

The Long Beach Police Department (LBPD) released information on Aug. 11 regarding the rescue of a man who had allegedly jumped off the Belmont Pier that afternoon. According to the LBPD, that day, at approximately 12:03pm, the Long Beach Fire Department Dispatch Center received a 911 call regarding a male subject who jumped off the pier into

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On Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2013, at approximately 2:46am, Long Beach Police Department (LBPD) officers responded to the 2100 block of West Pacific Coast Highway (PCH) regarding an injury traffic accident. The accident resulted in the death of a male adult. Officers arrived and discovered that a burgundy 1997 Chevy Lumina had collided with a red 18-wheeler semi-truck. The Lumina driver was alone in the vehicle and apparently died as a result of the accident. The semi-truck driver was uninjured. The Lumina driver was a 62-year-old resident of West Covina. The semi-truck driver is a 67-year-old resident of Los Angeles. The Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office will confirm the deceased driver’s identity.

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Governor signs Lowenthal bill closing citation loophole

Gov. Jerry Brown signed AB 443 by Assemblymember Bonnie Lowenthal (D-Long Beach) on Aug. 13, closing a loophole that had allowed scofflaws to avoid paying parking citations by transferring their vehicle registration to a family member, according to a press release issued by Lowenthal’s office. “I am always looking for ways for government to be more efficient and effective,” Lowenthal said. “When some people take advantage of the system to dodge their debts, it impacts all of us. With AB 443, Long Beach and communities across the state will realize more of the revenues they are entitled to from

Source: LBPD

parking citations without having to raise fees for those that play by the rules.” Under existing law, registered owners of vehicles with unpaid parking citations can transfer their vehicle registration to a family member to avoid paying the citations. The vehicle transfer fee is $15, considerably less than an overdue parking citation. With AB 443, all parking citations must be paid prior to transferring the vehicle registration between family members. By improving the ability of local jurisdictions to recover unpaid citation revenues, this bill ensures that cities and counties are able to fully recover unpaid citations which can total millions

More than 50 community members rode on a bus for seven-plus hours in order to participate in a committee hearing in which Senator Ricardo to Lara’s (D-Long Beach) bill SB 811, was being heard. The aim of the bill is to ensure that communities along the I710 Freeway have the ability to provide input about freight impacts and public-health issues. According to the bill, residents of the project corridor should be able to recommend efforts towards mitigation and local benefits with confidence that their suggestions

Source: Lowenthal’s office

“This is a serious crime, which can cause catastrophic results, as laser beams can cause temporary loss of vision to a pilot while attempting to navigate an aircraft weighing several thousand pounds,” states the Long Beach Police Department. “The beam can also cause permanent damage to the eye’s retina.” Source: LBPD

will be considered. “I am very proud of my resilient constituents who left their homes at midnight in order to have their voices heard in Sacramento,” Lara said. “This bill could help improve the air quality and overall health of communities along the corridor that have suffered from decades of freeway-related pollution and a lack of investment.” According to a press release issued by Lara’s office, the I-710 corridor is an essential component of the regional, statewide and national transportation

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of dollars annually, Lowenthal said. “AB 443 just makes sense,” said Long Beach Mayor Bob Foster. “This bill levels the playing field for car owners by eliminating an opportunity for scofflaws to erase debt by selling their vehicle to a family member.” AB 443 was sponsored by the City of Long Beach and supported by the League of California Cities and the California Public Parking Association. It received broad, bipartisan support in the legislature, according to Lowenthal’s office.

Suspect arrested for discharging laser at LB police helicopOn the night of July 24, a 20-year-old Long Beach male a laser at an aircraft, along with the equivalent federal ter adult was arrested for pointing a laser light at “Fox,” a Long charge, and was held on $20,000 bail.

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Investigators believe the semi-truck was slowing to stop or completely stopped in the center turn lane, facing westbound on PCH, preparing to make a left turn into a service station. The Lumina was traveling eastbound on PCH in the numberone lane. The Lumina veered left and collided with the front of the semi-truck. Those with information regarding the incident are asked to contact Long Beach Police Collision Investigations Detective David Lauro at (562) 570-7355. Those wishing to remain anonymous may call 1-800-222-TIPS (8477), text TIPLA plus the tip to 274637 (CRIMES), or visit LACrimeStoppers.org .

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department paramedics were waiting, and then they transported him to a local hospital, according to LBPD. The man is currently on life support. For additional information, contact Commander Alex Avila of the Long Beach Police Department Port Police Division at (562) 570-7961.

Traffic accident results in death of 62-year-old

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the ocean. The caller believed this was a suicide attempt and said the man was wearing a backpack. At approximately 12:12pm, police divers pulled the man from the water. His backpack was filled with sand. The man was placed aboard a waiting lifeguard rescue boat, immediate life safety measures were rendered as he was transported to the dock where fire-

Lara’s ‘environmental justice’ bill passes Assembly Committee on Transportation

starting Sept. 1 (See below)

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AUGUST 16, 2013

Beach Police Department (LBPD) helicopter. According to the LBPD, the helicopter was in the air on patrol when the pilot noticed a laser beam entering the cockpit from down below more than once. The pilot was able to spot a suspect in the 1400 block of Warren Avenue and directed patrol units to that location. Officers located the suspect, took him into custody and recovered the laser. The suspect was booked for discharging

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system, serving both passenger and goods movement vehicles, and, as so, it will be one of the nation’s largest and most critical public works projects. “As a resident of Cudahy, I live one block away from the I-710 freeway,” said Adam Ochoa, participant in the inaugural class of Young Senators, representative of Communities for a Better Environment and Senior at South Gate High School. “Our homes, our schools and our lives are right next to it. I know the expansion of the 710 Freeway is important, but my family’s quality of life is also important and should not be left out of the discussion surrounding the corridor project.” Specifically, the bill codifies the motion approved by the I-710 EIR/EIS Project Committee on Jan. 31, 2013 to include Community Alternative 7, the communities’ proposed build option, as a project build option in the re-circulated version of the EIR. The measure requires the lead agency to study the Community Alternative 7 build option in its entirety and report back to the Legislature the identified mitigation and community benefits that will be included in the project. “Over the last 10 years, 710 corridor communities have been working to ensure that the 710 has real improvements,” said Angelo Logan, executive director of East Yard Communities for Environmental Justice. “Today, side by side with Senator Lara, community members came together to ensure that the Assembly Committee on Transportation was responsive to the needs of the community.” The bill passed out of the Assembly Committee on Transportation on a 10-2 vote. The bill now moves on to the Senate Appropriations Committee. For more information, visit senate.ca.gov/lara . Source: Lara’s office


NEWS

AUGUST 16, 2013

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Portions of eastbound SR-22, northbound I-405, southbound I-405 to close for 20 hours this weekend

7

Map provided by the Orange County Transportation Authority suggesting detours during this weekend’s construction

The southbound I-405 connector to the eastbound SR-22 Freeway has been reconstructed in order to make room for the new carpool connector, according to the Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA). Once construction on the new connector is complete, the old connector will be demolished. In order to do so, portions of the eastbound SR-22, northbound I-405 and southbound I-405 freeways will be closed for approximately 20 hours this weekend, from 9pm on Saturday, Aug. 17 to approximately 5pm on Sunday, Aug. 18.

What will be closed: • Northbound I-405 Freeway will be closed at Valley View Street • Southbound I-405 Freeway will be closed between the I-605 Freeway junction to the eastbound SR22 connector (near Valley View Street) • 7th St./Eastbound SR-22 will be closed at southbound I-405 Freeway junction

Recommended detours Here are some recommended detours for those heading north on the I-405 during the weekend of

the bridge demolition: From Northbound I-405, use one of the following (outlined in orange) Exit Beach Blvd. and turn right Take westbound SR-22 on-ramp to reconnect with northbound I405 Exit Westminster Ave. (East) and turn left Turn right on Bolsa Chica Rd. Take the westbound SR-22 onramp to reconnect with the northbound I-405 Exit Valley View St. and turn left onto Garden Grove Blvd. Turn right on Valley View St. Take westbound SR-22 to reconnect with the northbound I-405

Here are some recommended detours for those heading south on the I-405 during the weekend of the bridge demolition: From Southbound I-405 use one of the following (outlined in green) Exit Studebaker Rd. and turn right Turn left on E. 2nd St./Westminster Ave. Continue on Westminster Ave. to access southbound I-405 Merge onto northbound I-605 Exit Katella Ave. and turn right

Turn right on Valley View St. to access southbound I-405

From Southbound I-605 use the following detour (outlined in green) Exit Willow St. and turn right Turn left on Studebaker Rd. Turn left on E. 2nd St./Westminster Ave. Continue on Westminster Ave. to access southbound I-405 From 7th St./Eastbound SR-22 use the following (outlined in green) Merge onto northbound I-605 Exit Katella Ave. and turn right Turn right on Valley View St. to access southbound I-405 Source: OCTA

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two different agencies monitoring for outbreaks. GLACVCD only monitors mosquito traps in a portion of the city, mostly eastern Long Beach, with one sample site located near Bixby Ranch and another site near the intersection of Avalon and Del Amo Boulevard. County vector-control officials also look to reduce mosquito breeding in certain areas. The City, however, has its own vector-control program that monitors the entire city through the Long Beach Health and Human Services Department. The department utilizes 23 mosquito traps dispersed throughout the city in addition to four chicken coops, in which chickens are used to gauge the prevalence of the virus. Nelson Kerr, Environmental Health Bureau manager for the Long Beach Health and Human Services Department, said Los Angeles County in particular appears to be seeing more West Nile virus cases than most other parts of California this year. “Los Angeles County is having more activity than most of the other counties in the state,” he said. “This virus kind of ping-pongs back and forth

between north and south. So it will be up north for a while, and then it will come back down south. This year, it looks like the epicenter is more in the south.” In Long Beach, the last person to die from West Nile virus was in 2004, when an 88-year-old woman fell victim to the disease. In California, so far this year, there have been three deaths and 37 human cases from 16 counties that have tested positive for the virus, according to the California Department of Public Health website. In terms of taking precaution, Kerr said people in general should follow the “five Ds”: DEET (repellent); Dress (in pants and long-sleeve shirts); Drain (stagnant water); Doors (with adequate screens); and the Dead-bird program. The health department also advises to avoid mosquito-infested areas, especially at dawn and dusk, when the insects are most active. Kerr said to report a dead bird, call the dead-bird hotline at (877) WNV-BIRD. MORE INFORMATION westnile.ca.gov longbeach.gov/health

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Beach, which was the first city in the county to report a dead bird with the virus this year. West Nile virus, which is common in California and other parts of the United States, is most prevalent during hot summer months. In May, a dead crow was found with West Nile virus near El Dorado Park on the 7000 block of East Spring Street. Shortly thereafter, another deceased and infected crow was found in the same area on the 2000 block of Studebaker Road, according to Levy Sun, spokesperson for the Greater Los Angeles County Vector Control District (GLACVCD). Since then, four other birds were reported, with one in Long Beach’s 1st Council District in the harbor area, one in the 4th District near Cal State Long Beach, one in the 5th District near the Long Beach Airport and one in the 7th District near the Los Angeles River. Birds with West Nile virus have also been found in Downey and San Pedro. As for Signal Hill, there have been no dead birds reported yet, however a

means that it’s here to stay in the LA County area,” Sun said. “It’s going to occur every year, no matter what.” Humans mostly contract the disease through mosquito bites. Mosquitoes, also called “vectors,” can spread the disease to humans and animals after feeding on infected birds, according to the California Department of Public Health’s website. The virus is not spread through touching or kissing a person, and contracting it through a blood transfusion is rare, the website states. Historical data show that young children and adults over the age of 60, particularly those with medical illnesses, are more susceptible to dying from the virus, however, young adults may be just as much at risk, Sun said. He said about 80 percent of people who contract West Nile virus don’t show any symptoms and often don’t know they have it until they try to donate blood. “A lot of times they are really healthy individuals without having any actual symptoms,” Sun said. Also, he said the virus is found not only in crows, but other corvid-family birds, such as jays, kestrels and finches. Long Beach is lucky in that it has

MAGNOLIA AVE

continued from page 1

mosquito trap located on the 2000 block of Rose Street tested positive for the virus during a routine surveillance test last month. Sun said a slight rise in reports might mean that either more people are becoming aware of the problem and are reporting dead birds, or there in fact may be an increase in West Nile virus activity in the Long Beach area. Whatever the case, people should take extra precautions to guard from mosquitoes this year, he said. “I would say people should not be alarmed, but this is just a good indication that people should take some measures and precaution to protect themselves from mosquitoes,” Sun said. Sun and other health officials point out that West Nile virus is “endemic” to parts of California, meaning the disease is regularly found throughout the state. The virus, which originated in Africa, started showing up in the United States in 1999, when the first cases of the disease were reported. Since 2003, there have been 130 reported deaths caused by the virus in California alone, according to state statistics. “What a lot of people don’t know is West Nile virus is endemic, which

AVE

West Nile

NEWS

SANTA FE

8 SIGNAL TRIBUNE


!"#$%&'%(")*+,%-",,% !"#$%&'%(")* +,%-",,% S T CULTURE Open-studio tour organizer incorporates Danish heritage into her own art /6&7% -&./"*)%0,121*#%3&45/6&7% -&./"*)%0, 121*#%3&45 AUGUST 16, 2013

Brandy Soto Editorial Intern

Each week, from now until the weekend of the Long Beach Open Studio Tour on Oct. 12 and 13, the Signal Tribune will profile a different artist from the event. Lisa Wibroe, curator and coordinator for the tour, provided some insights and background on the tour in an interview this week.

How did you first get involved in the Open Studio Tour? I was first invited to a tour that was called the Mid City Tour and then Craig Watson, after that tour, asked me if we could do that tour every year because they do it every other year and so, I went to the group that put that tour together and they said “no.” They didn’t want to. So I asked them if I could put together a tour, and then I would do their off years, and so we’d have every year covered. So, we agreed to that, and then I put together the Long Beach Open Studio Tour. Then the Mid City Tour didn’t stop doing the tour in October, which October is Arts Month in Long Beach, so the arts counselor, Craig Watson, asked me if I could just do it every year so there would be some big event during Arts Month here in Long Beach, and that’s

IGNAL

how it all got started.

You began in 2009. How has it changed since then? It gets bigger every year. That’s the basic change. We invite several more artists to come, and we go into different hubs. I started out with just two hubs in California Heights, and everything was on that side of town and then another year I grew– I included some arts that were in the Belmont Heights area, and now I’m starting a hub in the El Dorado Estates area for the first year, which will be growing next year. So the areas grow every year…I call them hubs. We have four this year.

Do you think the Open Studio Tour will continue to expand?

RIBUNE

It’s really great for the artists to see who the other artists in their community... are and how they have their set-up in their own studios. We all have our own studios, and it’s nice to see how other artists set it up. We get ideas from each other, What are the greatest challenges you we end up supporting each other at the have been faced with in coordinating events, and so it’s really kind of connecting us together in many ways that we the tour? Well, it’s easy to find artists– that’s not weren’t connected before, and it allows the problem. It’s just coordinating, you the public to see where the artists are in know, 40-some odd people. I invite the their own community. I mean, you have artists, I go to their studios and check no idea how many people come over them out, I have to put all their promo from my community and go “I didn’t stuff together. It’s just getting responses know you were an artist!” People from from everybody so I!"#$%&'%(')%*&+,% can move on. over here go, “I’ve never% even been to this part of town before,” and stuff like That’s the hardest part, honestly. %-,*.,,'%/012%('!%3012%$+% % % lbopenstudiotour.com that. So, this really opens it up for the In what ways is the tour beneficial to Long Beach Open Studio Tour coordinasee ARTIST page 12 tor Lisa Wibroe the artists that participate? Yes, as the tour grows each year, I am thinking about limiting the number of artists to 50. It is getting to be a challenge to get all the artists’ names to fit into the brochure.

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9

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45678%9:;9:<7=:>8<%?5@@%A:%<:9B:C% :;9 %? Colleen:9 B % Associate Planner Hours: Mondays 10-4 Doan, (562) 989-7344 | cdoan@cityofsignalhill.org Tuesdays - Saturdays 10-6


10 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

CULTURE A 16, 2013 Alice in Wonderland adaptation cleverly incorporates characters from Peter Pan UGUST

Daniel Adams Culture Writer

When it was offered to me to write this review on a brand-new show entitled Ravens and Writing Desks, I sheepishly admit that I became overly excited because I, being fond of calling myself the world’s most devoted Alice in Wonderland fan, immediately recognized the title of this piece as a reference to the Mad Hatter and his eternally unanswered riddle to Alice: Why is a raven like a writing-desk? Wow! The opportunity to view a newly written movement piece designed by Post Mortem Movement Theatre piqued my interest, and I accepted the assignment wholeheartedly. The Garage Photo by Devin Workman Theatre, working in combination with Clayton Steacker as the energy-infused White Rabbit and Tian Walker as Alice Alive Theatre, is the venue where Post

in Post Mortem Movement Theatre’s production of Ravens and Writing Desks

Mortem is performing Ravens and Writing Desks throughout the month of August. I arrived at the theatre doors at 7th Street and Long Beach Boulevard for the 8pm performance early, allowing myself time to street-park, feed the meter of course (no one gets free parking in Los Angeles, after all), and made my way into the theatre. Now, in the past, I myself have performed in theatres so small the Dormouse would’ve moved out of them to sleep in a teapot for better comfort, but I have to take my hat off to Garage and Alive theatres for making their home inside one of the smallest performance spaces I’ve encountered. But the issue of space should never deter one from enjoying a live performance! I grabbed a program and was delighted to see the list of characters I adored so much, including Alice, White Rabbit, Cheshire Cat, Mad Hatter, and her majesty the ever-murderous, trumpeting, Queen of Hearts. The list continued with March Hare of course, The Caterpillar, certainly, and Dormouse, Father Williams, Peter, Wendy, The Bear, The Faun and The Fox. Wait a moment! Had I read that correctly? Peter (Pan?) and Wendy? And The BEAR? There’s no bear encountered in Alice’s trip through Wonderland! And then I read… Director’s Note: “The piece you are about to see was inspired by the works of Lewis Carol but is not a direct retelling of Alice in Wonderland.” (Note to Garage Theatre: Please check the spelling on Mr. Carroll’s name and reprint, thanks.) Ah, now I understood better what I was in for; and there is something wonderful about viewing reinterpretations of classic works. Well, we got exactly that with Angela A. Lopez’s and Ryan McClary’s macabre writing, vision, and choreography in Ravens and Writing Desks. Forget all you know, or think you know, about Alice in Wonderland and start anew, because this is not exactly Lewis Carroll’s fanciful tale of the growth-and-shrink serum-imbibing curious “7 and ½

exactly” year-old. A notable performance in this movement piece was that of Tian Walker as Alice. She really put her all into her dance, movement and expression in playing our heroine in search of herself. And it cannot be easy to play a girl who loses who she used to be while traveling through a Wonderland of uncertainly and confusion. Dancing and playing alongside her as the Queen of Hearts is another talented young performer, Jessica Rae Slagle, who very much impressed with her presence onstage. Jessica took over the show when she entered as the villainous monarch, and there was no doubt at that point who was in charge. Her dance performance with the rest of the cast to the Yeah Yeah Yeahs’ “Heads Will Roll” is not to be missed! Alexis Udo-Udoma was charming and performed wonderfully as Wendy (yes, Peter Pan’s Wendy). She stood out even while portraying the sensitive side of Pan’s friend before us despite the craziness going on around her in Wonderland/Neverland. I raise a cup of tea to the following performers as well who really made their marks in the show: Clayton Steacker as the energy-infused White Rabbit, Sayaka Miyatani as the “head” of The Caterpillar (another wonderfully weird performance not to be missed), and Cory Storey as the March Hare. Everyone in the cast really gave their all and believed in what they were doing to provide an energetic, interesting and fun dance performance for the audience. Mixed with some fantastic song choices and interesting (if not oftentimes creepy, strange, sometimes sensual) choreography and lighting effects, I think Ravens and Writing Desks could very well answer that unanswered riddle. But you’ll have to discern that for yourself, now won’t you? Ravens and Writing Desks runs Aug. 2– 31, and performances are Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays at 8pm, with Thursdays offering 2-for-1 tickets. Performances take place at The Garage Theatre, 251 East 7th St. Tickets are $20 on opening and closing nights, $18 general admission on all other nights, and $15 students/seniors/teachers. Visit thegaragetheatre.org, email contact@ thegaragetheatre.org, or call (562) 433-8337.

FOLBA

Pet of the Week:

Olivia

Lovely 2-year-old Olivia’s human moved and had to surrender her to our shelter. According to the surrender form, Olivia’s very sweet and great with children, other cats and other animals. But here at the shelter, she’s frightened at suddenly living in a cage, despite her friendliness to the shelter staff members, who offer loving care. She needs a loving, stable environment to help her feel safe again. Meet Olivia at the Companion Animal Village at 7700 East Spring St., (562) 570-PETS. Ask for ID#A502042.

Sponsored by:


SIGNAL TRIBUNE

AUGUST 16, 2013

11

The Signal Hill Chamber of Commerce’s Monthly Membership Luncheon will be held Thursday, August 22, 2013, from 12-1:30 pm in the Signal Hill Park Community Center at 1780 East Hill Street (behind the Library).  Doors open at 11:45 am for networking and the program starts at noon.  The speaker will be Michael Sheldrake, owner/operator of Polly's Gourmet Coffee and President of the Belmont Shore Business Association, with a presentation on "How to Compete with the Chain Stores" and how his store survived the big-name coffee shops.  Enjoy a delicious lunch catered by The Great Plate while mingling with other members of our business community, local officials, and legislative representatives.  Non-members are welcome.  Cost is $25 per person but will be discounted to $15 for 2013-2014 dues-current members with advance non-refundable reservations made before noon on the day before the luncheon. Please make your reservations by e-mail to Treasurer@SignalHillChamber.com .

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Bixby Knolls Car Wash & Detail Center

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German Wine Dinner

Friday, Aug. 23 at 7:15 pm $82 per person plus tax & tip

Ph: 562-713-4630

email: trogers@coldwellbanker.com

© 2004 Coldwell Banker Corporation. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT Incorporated. If your property is listed with another broker, this is not intended as solicitation.

Reception 2011 von Buhl Riesling Sekt Brut 1st Course Seasonal Squash and Caramelized Onion Ravioli, Housemade Ricotta Stuffed Squash Blossum, Corn Pudding 2011 Schloss Lieser Estate Riesling Medium Dry 2nd Course Braised Pork Cheek, Trio of Baked Farm Apples, Celery and Fennel 2008 Reinhold Haart Piesporter Goldtropchen Riesling Kabinett, EL 3rd Course Fried Oysters, Green Curry Aioli 2011 Monchhof Mosel Slate Riesling Spatlese 4th Course Leg of Lamb stuffed with Farm Root Vegetables, Chimichurri 2009 Becker Red Wine Cuvee, “Guillaume” 5th Course Dessert – Rumtopf (traditional Rum Pot dessert) Coffee

2951 Cherry Avenue, SignAl hill For reservations, call 562-426-0694. w w w. d e l i u s r e s t au r a n t . c o m


12 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Artist

continued from page 9

community and opens it up for the artists to make connections as well. It’s all about making connections.

As an artist, you participate in the tour as well? Yes, my studio is always on the tour.

I noticed that your pieces, like “Solar Power” and the “Beowulf Box” are very intricate. Is there a special technique you use in making these pieces? Actually, my whole paradigm– my model– is to use something, found objects of some sort, because I’m a commissioner. I’m on the Sustainability Commission, so it’s very important for me to be environmentally correct, so I always try to find a piece, a found object, and work from there. Also, my degree from Cal State Long Beach is three-dimensional art, so I’m trained in metal, I’m trained in woodworking, I’m trained in lots of different fields… so I have a really well-rounded eduction. So, that’s how I was able to do the metal, and the ceramic, and the silk paintings, and the oil paintings. I can do everything because of what they taught me there, which is really cool. TST4436 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 110149049 Title Order No. 11-0136821 APN No. 7214-003-008 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 08/10/2004. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by AUSTIN V PLONG, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY, dated 08/10/2004 and recorded 8/13/2004, as Instrument No. 2004-2089829, in Book N/A, Page N/A, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, will sell on 09/05/2013 at 9:00AM, Doubletree Hotel Los Angeles-Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650, Vineyard Ballroom at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2424 WALNUT AVENUE, SIGNAL HILL, CA, 90755. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $472,012.19. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on a property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 1-800-281-8219 or visit this Internet Web site www.recontrustco.com, using the file number assigned to this case 11-0149049. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. DATED: 03/31/2012 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063

So, I get motivated by found objects, and I take it from there.

Where do you find the materials you use? Oh, that’s really interesting. Sometimes things that people are going to throw out, like there was a business around the corner from me… they were throwing out some table tops, and I used them. I put mosaics on them. A lot of stuff people are throwing out, quite honestly, that’s how I start. From trash to treasure.

Several of your pieces are mosaics, or patterned. I also saw a lot of peacocks. What inspired this? I grew up in [a place] where we actually had peacocks, and I could actually beckon peacocks to come onto the property at dusk. So, there were peacocks all around, and I was fascinated with their color; I just loved the color they put out and the iridescence so, I was really infatuated with that. And then, a lot of the Viking and mermaid stuff is because every summer– I’m a first-generation from Denmark– and every summer I go back and visit my family in Denmark and so, The Little Mermaid from Hans Christian Andersen was always in my purview, as well as all the Viking history, you know, I

CULTURE

grew up with all that too. That is part of my art, and I try to put the feminine into the Viking art because it was mostly male-oriented, so I kind of put the mermaids and females and stuff into it to make it my own.

You mentioned that you add feminine qualities to your Viking pieces. Does this empower you as a woman? Do you hope it inspires girls, such as your daughter? It sounds cliché, but it does give me a sense of empowerment. Viking women were highly respected, and their contribution to Viking society valued. However, we tend to focus on the warrior aspects of this culture, so I try to bring the female element into the historical perspective. I have created Viking Vixen Ware/Wear to blur the lines of the warrior image.

Also, you said your pieces are reminiscent of your trips to Denmark. Is the creative process nostalgic for you? Yes, I am very nostalgic about Denmark, enjoyed living there, and am proud of my heritage. My father was in the Resistance against the Nazi occupation in World War II. My daughter just came back from studying a year at Aalborg University in my dad’s home town. She was able to

AUGUST 16, 2013

stay in a dorm for the descendants of Resistance Fighters, which was an honor. I do think my love for Denmark rubbed off on her as she has applied to and been accepted into a masters program there. I have always been intrigued by the remnants of Viking ships and Viking art and bring that aesthetic into my own work. Both “Beowulf Box,” mixed media my parents have documented extensive family trees that go way back– one going to support that. They wanted of my relatives started the Wibroe me to do something more practical, Brewery– but the lineage doesn’t go so I actually went back to school several times and pursued many differback to the Viking age...yet! ent degrees, and when my daughter You received your degree in 3-dimen- was going into kindergarten, I sional media, but prior to that, you decided, “I’m going to pay for my received a degree in psychology. What own school. I’m going to get that art degree I always wanted.” It was what was the reason for that? Well, actually, I’ve always been an I wanted to be, and I had to have it! artist since high school. I’ve ventured into many different degrees For more information, or to view a because my parents didn’t want to map of the studio locations, visit pay for a degree in art. They weren’t lbopenstudiotour.com . ß

PUBLIC NOTICES

Phone/Sale Information: (800) 281-8219 By: Trustee's Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. FEI # 1006.169315 8/02, 8/09, 8/16/2013   TST4441 Title Order No. 92102-932206-09 Trustee Sale No. 2007-2443 Reference No. HOA118-218OV APN No. 7216-035-011     NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE UNDER A NOTICE OF A NOTICE OF DELINQUENT ASSESSMENT AND CLAIM OF LIEN YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A NOTICE OF DELINQUENT ASSESSMENT DATED 11/6/2008. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.    Notice is hereby given that on 9/10/2013 at 9:00 AM S.B.S. LIEN SERVICES As the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Notice of Delinquent Assessment, recorded on 11/13/2008 as Document No. 20082002148 Book Page of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California,  The original owner: BLAKE HUTTON  The purported new owner: BLAKE HUTTON, EDUARDO CARRERA, ELVIRA RAMIREZ,  JULIANA TERAN, RENE JURADO  , WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, (payable at the time of sale in lawful money of the United States, by cash, a cashier’s check drawn by a State or National bank, a check drawn by a state of federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state.): Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA 91766. All right, title and interest under Notice of Delinquent Assessment in the property situated in said County, as more fully described on the above referenced assessment lien. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2180 VILLAGE WAY SINGAL HILL, CA 90755 The undersigned trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum due under said Notice of Delinquent Assessment, with interest thereon, as provided in said notice, advances, if any, estimated fees, charges, and expenses of the Trustee, to-wit: $11,245.49 accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. The claimant, SIGNAL HILL VILLAGE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION under said Notice of Delinquent Assessment heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located and more than three months have elapsed since such recordation. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks invovled in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this

property, you may call FOR SALES INFORMATION, PLEASE CALL (714)573-1965 or LOG ONTO or visit this Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com using the file number assigned to this case 2007-2443. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. THE PROPERTY IS BEING SOLD SUBJECT TO THE NINETY DAY RIGHT OF REDEMPTION CONTAINED IN CIVIL CODE SECTION 1367.4(C) (4). PLEASE NOTE THAT WE ARE A DEBT COLLECTOR AND ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. FOR SALES INFORMATION, PLEASE CALL (714) 573-1965 or LOG ONTO www.priorityposting.com. Date: 8/8/2013 S.B.S. Lien Services, 31194 La Baya Drive, Suite 106 Westlake Village, CA 91362 Annissa Young, Trustee Sale Officer WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. P1054748 8/16, 8/23, 08/30/2013                 TST4438 APN: 7214-009-223 TS No: CA07000343-11-1 TO No: 1052658 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE    YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED October 28, 2008. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.  On August 30, 2013 at 09:00 AM, behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA 91766, MTC FINANCIAL INC. dba TRUSTEE CORPS, as the duly Appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded on November 3, 2008 as Instrument No. 20081943774 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, executed by RANDALL SUMMY, AND, SIVYU CHIA, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS COMMUNITY PROPERTY WITH RIGHT OF SURVIVORSHIP, as Trustor(s), in favor of SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC. as Lender and MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as nominee for Lender, its successors and/or assigns, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of sale, that certain property situated in said County, California describing the land therein as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST  The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2516 E. WILLOW ST 201, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755  The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein.  Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the Note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said Note(s), advances if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust.  The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligations secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of this Notice of Trustee`s Sale is estimated to be $390,308.35 (Estimated), provided, however, prepayment premiums, accrued interest and advances will increase this figure prior to sale. Beneficiary`s bid at said sale may include all or part of said amount. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier`s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the California Financial Code and authorized to do business in California, or other such funds as may be acceptable to the Trustee. In the event tender other than cash is accepted, the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustee`s Deed Upon Sale until funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a matter of right. The property offered for sale excludes all funds held on account by the property receiver, if applicable.  If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder`s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse.  Notice to Potential Bidders  If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a Trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a Trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to

free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same Lender may hold more than one mortgage or Deed of Trust on the property.   Notice to Property Owner  The sale date shown on this Notice of Sale may be postponed one or more times by the Mortgagee, Beneficiary, Trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about Trustee Sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call Priority Posting and Publishing at 714-573-1965 for information regarding the Trustee's Sale or visit the Internet Web site address on the previous page for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case, CA0700034311-1. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale.  Date: July 30, 2013 TRUSTEE CORPS  TS No. CA07000343-111 17100 Gillette Ave, Irvine, CA 92614 949-2528300   Karen Talafus, Authorized Signatory   SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.priorityposting.com FOR AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: Priority Posting and Publishing at 714-573-1965  TRUSTEE CORPS MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. P1053128 8/9, 8/16, 08/23/2013 

TST4435 / Case No. NS027392 oRDER To SHoW CAUSE FoR CHANGE oF NAME SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, 415 W. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach, CA 90802. PETITION OF Marilyn Mangini, For Change of Name. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: 1. Petitioner MARILYN MANGINI, filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name: LIBERTY LUCIA MANGINI to Proposed Name: DANIEL LIBERTY MANGINI. 2. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, shy the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: September 3, 2013; Time: 8:30 A.M.; Dept. G, Room 51. The address of the court is the same as above. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, THE SIGNAL TRIBUNE, 939 E. 27th. Street, Signal Hill, CA 90755: August 2, 9, 16, 23, 2013. ___//ss//___ M. Vicencia, Judge of the Superior Court Dated: July 23, 2013

TST4417 / 2013 124572 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. SO CAL PRIDE WEDDINGS, 2. SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA PRIDE WEDDINGS, 3. PRIDE AND JOY WEDDINGS, 4. PRIDE AND JOY WEDDINGS SO CAL, 5. PRIDE WEDDINGS SO CAL, 6. SO CAL PRIDE AND JOY WEDDINGS, 7. SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA PRIDE AND JOY WEDDINGS, 3315 Knoxville Ave., Long Beach, CA 90808. Registrant: LINDA BARRA, 3315 Knoxville Ave., Long Beach, CA 90808. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Linda Barra. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on June 14, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: July 12, 19, 26, & August 16, 2013.

TST4434 / Case No. NS027378 oRDER To SHoW CAUSE FoR CHANGE oF NAME SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, 415 W. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach, CA 90802. PETITION OF Donnie Keith Freeman, For Change of Name. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: 1. Petitioner DONNIE KEITH FREEMAN, filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name: DONNIE KEITH FREEMAN to Proposed Name: DOMENIQ X. 2. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, shy the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: August 26, 2013; Time: 8:30 A.M.; Dept. 11, Room 31. The address of the court is the same as above. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, THE SIGNAL TRIBUNE, 939 E. 27th. Street, Signal Hill, CA 90755: August 2, 9, 16, 23, 2013. ___//ss//___ Ross M. Klein, Judge of the Superior Court Dated: July 15, 2013

TST4432 / 2013 151669 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: TURBO PRINTS LLC, 1345 W. 14th St., Long Beach, CA 90813. Registrant: TURBO PRINTS LLC, 1345 W. 14th St., Long Beach, CA 90813. This business is conducted by: a Limited Liability Company. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Naturbo Ayala. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on April 22, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on July 22, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: July 26, & August 2, 9, 16, 2013.

TST4439 / 2013 151968 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. TOOLLODGE, 2. TOOLLODGE TOOL DRAWER ORGANIZER, 1061 Park Ave. Suite 107, Long Beach, CA 90804. Registrant: CONFIDENCE INTERVAL LLC, 1061 Park Ave. Suite 107, Long Beach, CA 90804. This business is conducted by: a Limited Liability Company. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Melinda A. Young, Managing Member. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on July 22, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: August 9, 16, 23, 30, 2013. TST4440 / 2013 162537 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNTING SERVICE, 2450 Orange Ave., Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: 1. ALFREDO PERALES JR., 2. DEBRA RAE TODD, 1551 Ravenna, Wilmington, CA 90744. This business is conducted by: who or what. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Alfredo Perales Jr. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on August 5, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on August 5, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: August 9, 16, 23, 30, 2013.


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Sunday, Aug. 11 Non-injury hit-and-run 8:56pm– E. Willow St./Orange Ave.

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Friday, Aug. 9 Battery 8am– 3500 block Elm Ave.

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14 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

CSULB

continued from page 1

morning, she was intently focused on a task on her cell phone but explained that her activity should not be misconstrued as rude; she and everyone else involved in the exercise were being observed by an evaluator team consisting of individuals from Long Beach Airport Emergency Management and Public Affairs, Long Beach Public Health Department, Long Beach Fire Department, Emergency Management Program professors from CSULB and police officers from multiple agencies. Shortly thereafter, she had a free moment to provide some background information on the event, which she described as the culmination of months of preparation. “St. Mary Medical Center has been training our health-care professionals for about six months on proper field triage procedure,” Carbaugh said. “Our communications staff have been working for the past several months on how to appropriately notify

ating r b e l e C w our neon! locati

people through the emergency-notification system. Today we tested our emergency-notification system that went out to about 17,000 people who are in our database. They received phone messages, email messages, text messages.” That test also extended to the university’s website, as well as its Twitter feed and Facebook page, according to a press release issued by CSULB later that day. Carbaugh stressed the importance of those affiliated with the campus to include themselves in the emergencycommunications process. “It’s probably important for the public to know that the text-messaging system is an opt-in, so we encourage everybody who is a faculty, staff or student on campus to sign up for CSULB alerts so that, in the event that something like this happens, we can notify them immediately via text,” she said. She also explained that the drill’s organizers are promoting a threepronged approach to those who find themselves in an emergency situation

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with an attacker. “What we’re trying to practice is the ‘run, hide, fight’ drill,” she said. “So, we’ll inform folks on campus that once an active shooter has been identified, they should run and escape if they can. If they’re in harm’s way, they should hide, lock the doors, be quiet, get out of the way as quickly as possible. As a last-case scenario, you want to fight.” Carbaugh cited recent tragic incidents at other schools as impetuses for the drill. “If you look at the...Santa Monica shootings, the Sandy Hook Elementary shootings, this has become a strong component of our overall emergency-preparedness plan,” she said. “So, just as we prepare for earthquakes, fires, floods, we’re now in preparation for active shooters on campus. A little bit of a different technique– it’s instantaneous and moves very quickly, whereas an earthquake, fire or flood, it might be over the span of several days. So, we’re really testing our system, our capacity, so that firstresponders, our communicators, know what to do in advance to save lives.” Amid the backdrop of screaming sirens and the flurry of organized chaos that morning, one of the pockets of activity was positioned on a large tarp just west of Parking Lot 7, where doctors, nurses and crisis counselors were triaging and treating the injured and the traumatized. One of the numerous conversations that took place was between a female counselor and a man who had no apparent physical injuries but was clearly behaving as if he was in shock. His condition was also indicated by an information sheet attached to a laniard around his neck. After a medic had escorted the man to the tarp, where he was helped into a seated position, the counselor approached him, knelt down to meet his eye level and asked him, “Can I help you right now?” After he responded with “sure,” she told him, “I know the medical folks will be checking on you, but I just want to make sure that you’re okay. You look pretty shaken up; how are you doing?” He described what he’d witnessed and said he felt angry. “So you actually saw people getting shot,” she said, to which he replied, “Yeah. If there was more gun control, none of this would have happened.” The counselor was sympathetic and empathetic in her words and manner,

AUGUST 16, 2013

Cory Bilicko/Signal Tribune

Emergency personnel transport a shooting “victim” to an ambulance as part of the Aug. 13 “Active Shooter/Mass Casualty Drill” at Cal State Long Beach.

and she asked him if he’d be willing to talk to police to share information. He said he would be willing to do so and that he also wanted to contact his congressman. Then, Janice Braun, a radiologic technologist from the campus’s Student Health Center, and Kate Clark, a nurse practitioner who works for the university, arrived to also help him. Many of the “victims” were actually student nurses from Pacific College in Costa Mesa. Lucille Sevigny, a nursing instructor from that college, was not actively taking part in the event, but she was one of the numerous observers on the sidelines that day. She helped in providing the nursing students to play the parts of those who were injured in the shooting. “We told them that [the drill] was available and that it offered clinical hours and that emergency response is an important part of what nursing is about,” Sevigny said. “We picked a class of termfour students– today’s their last day, so they’re going out into the community, they’re going out to jobs, they’re going to be working in hospitals. So they know now, first-hand, that– hopefully not– but if something like this should happen, they’ll have had some experience.” She explained that each person playing a victim was given a backstory before the event and that the characters they played were not necessarily people similar to themselves. “You’re given a scenario– ‘Who are you? You’re a 56-year-old woman who was walking on the campus and got shot in the foot’– that kind of thing,” she said. “Then they act it out.” Sevigny believes that using students from nursing programs provides a level of authenticity that can be helpful in the drill. “It’s nice to use student nurses because, if [they are supposed to] have a brain injury, they should know what to do with a brain injury,” she said. Mentioning that her background is in psychiatric nursing, Sevigny said conducting these types of drills is important nowadays because potential perpetrators now have easy access to information on how to carry out their destructive plans, thanks to the media and Internet. “Twenty, 25 years ago, you would hear people say, ‘I wonder how you do this or how you do that.’ Now you go on the Internet, and you can figure out how to make a bomb. You have a lot of copycats. You hear about what happened at Columbine, then you find out it happened at another school,” she said. “So, I think with TV, the Internet, and all that kind of stuff, some people who are– obviously you have to be mentally deranged to do something like this– now have access to how to do it.” Sevigny said she thinks it’s not the violent ideas that are new, just the availability of instructional information. “When I first started practicing psychiatric nursing, people had all these wild ideas but no understanding or ability to figure out how to do it,” she said. “So that’s part of why we’re seeing an increase in the numbers. I

don’t know that as a fact, but it seems that way to me, based on my experience.” Another CSULB official who was at the drill was Signal Hill resident Jonathan Rosene, who is the emergency management and preparedness coordinator for the university. Relatively new to his title, Rosene was hired for that position in November of last year, after receiving a master’s degree from CSULB in emergency management administration and having worked with the University Police Department in other roles for five years. Rosene said his goal is to make CSULB a disaster-resilient university and that it is drills such as the one Tuesday that make that goal possible. “The scenario involved an active shooter with mass casualties. We all wish that we didn’t have to prepare for such events, but it is a reality we face, and it cannot be ignored,” he stated in an email he sent the Signal Tribune after the event. “A major focus point of the exercise was the use of our CSULB Student Health Center and its staff’s ability to perform field triage in the event that outside first-responders are unable to get to the university quickly. Our staff, students, faculty and visitors should understand how seriously we take being prepared. By testing and honing our abilities, we become better prepared to respond to a range of hazards that we might face.” Rosene said it is critical for the university to conduct drills with other responding agencies within the greater Long Beach area to learn from one another, develop relationships, and meet each other before a real disaster happens. He called Tuesday’s drill “a great success.” “CSU Long Beach police officers responded to and neutralized the shooter within minutes of arriving on scene,” he said. “We triaged and transported 30 victims in various conditions and severity of injuries. We successfully sent an emergency notification message to over 13,000 students, staff and faculty on campus.” Rosene said the drills aren’t expected to go perfectly and that, if they do, something went wrong. “We use experts and evaluators to help find those gaps so we can be better prepared for the real thing,” he said. According to Rosene, the drill provided valuable information about the various agencies’ capabilities, limitations and available resources. “It is incredible what comes out of simply getting agencies together to solve a common problem: tools, techniques, communication strategies and lessons learned from past experience, to name a few,” he said. “The greatest thing we learned is that we have a talented and incredibly capable group of first-responders and volunteers in this city, and I am more confident than ever that we can successfully respond to and recover from the hazards we face today.” ß


AUGUST 16, 2013

Center

continued from page 1

CJ Dablo/Signal Tribune

The Guidance Center, a nonprofit organization that has offered mental-health services to children and families in the area, has moved to its new location at 1301 Pine Ave.

NEWS

Painted a cheerful green color, the new headquarters at the corner of Pine Avenue and Anaheim Street offers a myriad of mentalhealth services geared towards the young people in the local community. The organization is contracted by the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health, but it is also supported by grants and donations so that it can offer various programs including individual and family counseling, group therapy, community education, and case management. The center helps kids as young as newborns and as old as 18 years of age and even offers help to parents in the welfare-to-work program if they have mental-health issues that prevent them from finding and keeping a job. In addition, the center offers services at the school districts in Long Beach and Paramount and even two schools in the Los Angeles Unified School District. They also have a program to offer counseling in the home if the family is so chaotic that they can’t make a regular appointment at the Center every week. Costales, who is also a therapist, acknowledged that the Center sees a lot of kids who are very frightened when they walk through the doors. Many of them have some involvement with Child Protective Services. Costales’s list of the kinds of clients the

Center’s counselors take under their wings can be heartbreaking. There are kids who are homeless or have marginal housing, kids who have been abused, kids with a father in jail, kids who don’t know where their mom is, and kids who suffer from anxiety. Costales emphasized the importance of its local ties in order for the center to be effective. “There’s still so much stigma around getting mental-health services,” she said, adding that if the center is part of the community and offers health fairs, community events, or PTA meetings, people would feel more comfortable reaching out for help. It was also ideal to be in a place where clients could walk or bike there. “By being part of the neighborhood, we’re less mysterious, and so ideally people will be more likely to make that phone call,” she concluded. Costales talks excitedly about the possibilities of changing the trajectory of a child’s life even if the circumstances that brought a child to the center may be very grim. She calls their services “preventative care,” explaining that the future of these children hasn’t been written yet. By helping them

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

15

now, she says, there’s a chance their story can be changed. There are a number of testimonials on the center’s website. There’s one soft-spoken young man who describes how he was kicked out of his home at the age of 17 and lived on the streets for six months. He smiles shyly as he talks of how his counselor listened to him and helped him. Another woman tells how her young son was so anxious that he couldn’t be by himself, not even to eat. She describes her son’s transformation and how a therapist helped him develop selfconfidence and face his fears. “I’m not scared, Ma,” the boy with the round face and big brown eyes tells her. “No more?” the mother asks, beaming at her son. “No!” her son replies emphatically. The executive director acknowledges that others may see her work as depressing. “But kids are resilient,” Costales said, “and if you can help them find hope again, it’s really, really cool to see that process and to see that happen…to watch someone graduate from care, and know you’re sending them off, and they’re going to be okay. It’s a really remarkable experience.” ß

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SIGNAL TRIBUNE

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St3511 august 16 layout 1