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ST3443 - March 29_Layout 1 3/29/13 11:50 AM Page 1

Vista, La Florida, Cuba, 2010

by photographer Cynthia Herrera

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Vol. 34 No. 43

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SERVING BIXBY KNOLLS, CALIFORNIA HEIGHTS, LOS CERRITOS, WRIGLEY AND THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

Judge denies request by Signal Hill, other cities to stop WRD public notices

Your Weekly Community Newspaper

743 LBUSD graduates entered CSULB as freshmen in 2012 compared to 519 in 2008

CSULB President Alexander appointed to head LSU system

Staff Writer

see WRD page 14

March 29, 2013

At College Promise anniversary event, education leaders share local success stories

Sean Belk

A judge has denied a restraining-order request by Signal Hill, Cerritos and Downey to stop the Water Replenishment District of Southern California (WRD) from sending out public notices about the agency’s rate-setting procedure to nearly 800,000 parcel owners. At issue, however, is whether municipalities or property owners should receive the public-hearing notices, a notion that the WRD claims is still up for interpretation. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Ralph Dau refused to grant the cities’ request in a court hearing on Friday, March 22, admonishing the appeal as improperly telling the WRD how to “run its business.” Patty Quilizapa, an attorney for Aleshire & Wynder who represents the cities in the case, however, said she contacted the WRD to resolve any confusion about the mailers but received no response from the agency that had already sent out notices the day before the court hearing. “[The WRD] did not inform us until right before the hearing on Friday morning that they had sent out the mailers and spent the money anyway,” Quilizapa said. “That’s why, procedurally, it doesn’t make any sense for a judge to stop something that already happened.” Quilizapa, who called the WRD’s actions a “sideshow,” contends that the mailers constitute a “waste of public funds” since a previous judge already ruled that the WRD is required to send notices to cities and other agencies, referred to as “pumpers,” which are subject to WRD fees, rather than individual parcel owners that are only indirectly charged. Judge Dau instructed the cities to take their objections to the previous judge who had made the original ruling. The WRD is responsible for replenishing groundwater that is pumped from aquifers in the Central and West Coast Basins of Southern California. The WRD charges pumpers an annual replenishment assessment (RA) that is then passed on to residents and businesses through a portion of their water bills. Signal Hill, Cerritos and Downey, in addition to Bellflower, Lynwood, Pico Rivera, the Central Basin Municipal Water District and Tesoro Refining and Marketing Company, have filed lawsuits against the WRD for not complying with Proposition 218, a state law that requires entities subject to fees imposed by public agencies be notified and allowed to protest any rate changes. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge James Chalfant has ruled twice in favor of the cities, first upholding the charge in April 2011. The recent mailer sent out by WRD is the agency’s first attempt to comply with the state law. The mailer, obtained by the Signal Tribune, states that the WRD Board of Directors is currently considering setting a new rate for the RA, not to exceed $298 per acre-foot of water removed, effective July 1. The current RA rate is $244 per acre-foot, held over from 2011 when the board voted to not increase the rate last year. According to the notice, a public hearing on the RA rate change is scheduled to take place

See more on page 10.

CJ Dablo/Signal Tribune

Middle-school students from around the Long Beach Unified School District show off their certificates for scholarships at the fifth-anniversary celebration of the Long Beach College Promise on March 21. CSULB Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs Donald Para (left foreground) was among the education leaders who joined the celebration. CJ Dablo Staff Writer

At the five-year anniversary celebration of the Long Beach College Promise, education leaders gathered March 21 at Long Beach City College (LBCC) to celebrate their commitment to helping students with their dreams of higher education. The College Promise is a program that highlights collaboration among faculty, staff and administration from Long Beach Unified School District (LBUSD), LBCC and California State University, Long Beach (CSULB).

These three institutions developed a team approach to address educational needs of students to prepare them for college. The program offers key incentives including tuition-free semesters at LBCC and guaranteed admission to CSULB to qualified local students, according to a joint press statement released by the three educational institutions. The program offers guidance counseling to kids and clear and consistent messaging starting in the fourth grade see COLLEGE page 15

CJ Dablo/Signal Tribune

Dominique Vera shares her success story as a CSULB student during the March 21 celebration of the Long Beach College Promise at LBCC.

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Just a week after celebrating the fifth anniversary of his joint venture with leaders of two other local educational institutions, California State University, Long Beach (CSULB) President F. King Alexander was unanimously appointed by the Louisiana State University (LSU) Board of Supervisors to become the system president of LSU and chancellor of Louisiana State University A&M. As president, Alexander helped strengthen ties between the Long Beach Unified School District and Long Beach City College through the College Promise, increasing the collegegoing rates of area students and reducing their need to remediate before taking college-level math and English. He also persevered in securing capital funding to construct three significant building projects. They include a $110-million state-of-the art Hall of Science, a $70 million Student Recreation Wellness Center and a new School of Nursing building. Both research and external funding increased significantly at CSULB during his tenure. “My tenure as president of Cal State Long Beach has prepared me to assume the role as the head of the Louisiana State University system,” Alexander said. “The challenges facing LSU are similar to those in California and elsewhere. Universities throughout the nation are struggling to serve more students while managing declining state revenues. At the same time, leaders in the field of higher education know the burden is on us to demonstrate that the public’s money is well spent. We also know it’s time to begin the process of modernizing our institutions so we may accommodate the see ALEXANDER page 15


ST3443 - March 29_Layout 1 3/29/13 11:50 AM Page 2

NEWS Panel discussion focuses on when senior citizens should give up driving 2 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Nick Diamantides Staff Writer

When is it time for older persons to give up their driving privilege? How can people who can no longer drive get to where they need to go? Those were among the questions answered March 21 during a panel discussion dubbed “Driving Miss Daisy, Who Will?” The Older Adult Transportation Taskforce (OATT) presented the discussion at the Alpert Jewish Community Center at 3801 East Willow St. in Long Beach. Ann Love, who recently retired from the California Department of Motor Vehicles Senior Ombudsman Program, California Highway Patrol Officer Ming-Yang Hsu, and Stephen Wrenn, Access senior mobility management counselor, took turns addressing various issues

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faced by aging drivers. The main speaker, Love, addressed the audience first. She noted that determining when a person should either limit or entirely stop driving a motor vehicle is a decision that affects the health and safety of everyone in the community, including the driver in question, passengers in his or her car, people in other cars, and pedestrians. Love said that California has a higher percentage of seniors than any other state, with 10 percent of the nation’s elderly people living here. She added that the percentage of senior citizens nationwide is steadily rising as Baby Boomers, which account for 29 percent of the country’s population, age. “By 2020, seniors will be 20 percent of the population, and by 2030 they will be 25 percent of the population,” she said. “And because Baby Boomers are more active and independent than seniors of previous generations, many of them will continue to drive.” Love explained that getting older does not necessarily mean that a person’s driving ability is diminished. “We all age differently,” she said. “Medical conditions, physical impairments, visual problems, dementia or other mental or emotional problems, and medications are the things that really affect driving, and not all seniors have those issues.” In her 45-minute presentation, Love covered a lot of ground, including signs that may indicate it’s time for a person to give up driving. “Physical

limitations that make it difficult to turn the steering wheel, step on the brake or turn your head to see what’s behind you or in the next lane are the types of things that indicate it’s time to stop driving,” she said. “Cognitive limitations can also be warning signs that a person should no longer be operating a motor vehicle.” Love then described five types of cognitive limitations, beginning with strategic errors like getting lost in familiar areas. “Needing a co-pilot while driving is another warning sign,” she added. “A co-pilot is not the same as a navigator who gives you street directions. A co-pilot is the person you rely on to give you instructions on how to drive.” Driving in an unsafe manner– like moving at 15 miles per hour on the freeway while cars around you are traveling at 60 miles per hour, or driving much too fast on surface streets– is another warning sign, according to Love. “Tactical errors like moving into the wrong lane or ignoring signs and traffic signals can also indicate it’s time to stop driving,” she said. “Operational problems like confusing the brake and gas pedal or not signaling before a turn are also warning signs.” Major or minor accidents were the last indicators described by Love. She noted that many minor accidents are never reported, and seniors have a tendency to not disclose them to their family members. “A one-time offense in any of these arenas might not warrant the end of

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EYE ON CRIME Crimes reported by LBPD • Council Districts 6, 7 & 8 Thursday, March 21 Residential burglary 11am– 2400 block Pine Ave.

Friday, March 22 Commercial burglary 6:53am– 100 block E. Willow St.

Residential burglary 7:50am– 2000 block Chestnut Ave.

Assault 7:50am– W. 21st St./Magnolia Ave.

Residential burglary 10:52am– 2300 block San Francisco Ave. Saturday, March 23 Robbery of person 2:14pm– Pacific Ave./W. Burnett St.

Sunday, March 24 Vandalism of property worth $400 or more 1am– 2500 block Long Beach Blvd.

Commercial burglary 4:50am– 1100 block E. San Antonio Dr.

Residential burglary 3:30pm– 2300 block Pasadena Ave.

Monday, March 25 Residential burglary 2:53am– 300 block E. 25th St.

Tuesday, March 26 Residential burglary 1pm– 1900 block Locust Ave.

* AS SPACE PERMITS

Crimes reported by SHPD • Citywide Thursday, March 21 Battery 9am– 1800 block Junipero Ave.

Grand theft of motor vehicle 12:24pm– 2500 block Orange Ave.

Stolen vehicle 8:15pm– E. 28th St./Walnut Ave.

Friday, March 22 Possession of stolen ID to commit forgery 8:32pm– Molino Ave./E. Pacific Coast Hwy.

DUI 11:22pm– E. Willow St./Walnut Ave.

Saturday, March 23 DUI 12:07am– Cherry Ave./E. Hill St.

Attempted auto burglary 10pm– 2700 block Gundry Ave.

Petty theft from auto 1pm– 1000 block E. 32nd St.

Sunday, March 24 Unreasonable noise 1:05am– 2300 block Lewis Ave.

Non-injury hit-and-run 1:58am– E. 32nd St./California Ave.

Monday, March 25 Stolen vehicle 9:02pm– 900 block E. 33rd St.

Tuesday, March 26 Auto burglary 12:30am– 1000 block E. 32nd St.

MARCH 29, 2013

Nick Diamantides/Signal Tribune

From left: Stephen Wrenn, Senior Mobilty Management Counselor at Access Services; CHP Officer Ming-Yang Hsu; and Ann Love, DMV retiree, participated in a panel discussion on March 21 about problems associated with older drivers.

driving, but frequent mistakes do,” Love stressed. “You need to ride as a passenger in the older person’s car to observe their driving behavior to determine whether there is a decline in driving ability.” Love then focused on the drivingretirement decision, which must happen if a friend or family member believes that an older person needs to quit driving. “You need to get consensus from other family members, including the spouse of the older driver,” she said. “Don’t accost the person or make demands. Speak reasonably. Bring up medical issues if there are any, and get a doctor to talk to the person or write them a letter urging them to quit driving.” Love also warned the approximately 110 people in attendance that transitioning from driving to non-driving is a very difficult experience. “You need to find out what are the transportation options available to them before you have the driving-retirement discussion,” she said. “You need to let them know you are not limiting them but transitioning them into other forms of transportation.” Hsu agreed. “One thing that has not changed is that whether you’re a teenager or a person in their 80s, car keys represent freedom,” he said. “Taking away a person’s car keys is not an easy thing to do.” The CHP officer stressed that most car accidents happen within two miles of a driver’s home, so thinking that it’s okay for an impaired driver to make short trips is false security. “Keep in mind that our ability to perceive a hazard and our ability to react to it take longer as we get older,” he said. “One thing older drivers should do is slow down and increase the distance between their car and the car in front of them.” Noting that Love had covered most

of the points he planned to make, Hsu talked briefly about other things seniors can do to improve their ability to drive. “They should have their eyes checked regularly because vision can decline rapidly in older people,” he said. “They should also take senior yoga classes or other exercise classes that will increase their mobility. If you cannot turn to look at what’s next to you or behind you because of a stiff neck or stiff back, you are placing yourself and others in danger.” The last speaker, Wrenn, spoke for about 15 minutes on the transportation options available through Los Angeles County Access, and other transportation providers in the county and nearby counties. “Anyone who cannot ride fixed-route transportation (public transit like bus or light rail) because of physical or cognitive limitations qualifies for transportation through Access,” he said. “We service all of Los Angeles County, and we mirror fixed-route buses and rail service within three-quarters of a mile.” Wrenn also encouraged seniors and their family members and friends to call his office for help in arranging transportation through various other organizations and agencies throughout southern California and anywhere else in the U.S. During the question-and-answer period that followed the panelists’ presentations, Love noted that AARP, AAA and several other organizations provide mature-driver improvement classes designed to help seniors overcome driving problems that they did not have in their younger years. MORE INFORMATION Access Services– (213) 270-6066 Volunteer Driver Program at JCC– (562) 506-2801 ext. 1514 cpalzer@alpertjcc.org


ST3443 - March 29_Layout 1 3/29/13 11:50 AM Page 3

NEWS

MARCH 29, 2013

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Police seeking information on north LB shooting that left 10-year-old boy in ‘critical but stable condition’

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MEET AND EAT What Bixby Knolls Supper Club Who Hosted by the Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association Where Georgie’s Place, 3850 Atlantic Ave. When Monday, April 1 at 6:30pm More Info Bixby Knolls Supper Club promotes the concept of supporting local restaurants on Monday night, which are typically slow. Residents are invited to meet, eat and support the local economy. RSVP required. Email supperclub@bixbyknollsinfo.com . STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS What Small-business seminar Who Sponsored by The State Board of Equalization Where LBCC’s Community Multi-purpose Room, 4901 E. Carson St. When Thursday, April 4 from 8:30am to 4pm More Info Seminar will cover topics from permit-holder training, audit and compliance issues, employment taxes to business marketing. Visit boe.ca.gov/sutax/sbf.htm .

Courtesy LBPD

Surveillance video from a gas station at Del Amo and Long Beach boulevards showing male subjects who were involved in a scuffle on March 22 that led to the shooting of a 10-year-old boy and another innocent bystander Sean Belk Staff Writer

Police are seeking information about a shooting in north Long Beach last Friday, March 22 that involved gunfire striking two innocent bystanders, including a 10-year-old boy who remains in “critical but stable condition.” At about 8pm, a dispute between male subjects broke out, escalating into shots being fired at a gas station at Del Amo and Long Beach boulevards, said Nancy Pratt, spokesperson for the Long Beach Police Department (LBPD). The boy was reportedly struck by gunfire in the back while sitting in a vehicle with his parents at the gas station. The boy’s parents rushed him to the North Patrol Substation, located at 4891 Atlantic Ave. Police then transported the boy to a local hospital, where he received medical attention. Pratt said a second victim later arrived at the hospital, sustaining what appeared to be “nonlife-threatening injuries.” Pratt did not release any further information about the second victim but said, however, that both were innocent bystanders. On Monday, March 25, regarding the boy’s condition, she said, “We’re keeping our fingers crossed that he is going to fully recover from this incident.” Pratt also said LBPD had not apprehended any suspects. The LBPD recently released video surveillance footage captured at the gas station and continues to seek the public’s help in providing information about the incident. Eighth District Long Beach City Councilmember Al Austin, who spoke to the boy’s father at the hospital less than 12 hours after the shooting, confirmed on Monday that the boy is expected to recover. Austin added, “One of the first things out of his son’s mouth this morning was, ‘Did they catch the guy who did this to [me]?’ The incident is one of four separate shootings that occurred in Long Beach last week. The first shooting occurred in the 1st Council District last Monday, March 18, at approximately 6:30pm when officers were dispatched to the area of 8th Street and Main Avenue. After an officer made initial contact with a male Hispanic subject, the suspect fled on foot and began firing rounds from a handgun at the officer. Patrol units secured the perimeter for nearly three days before detectives, on Thursday, March 21, were able to identify and arrest 24-year-old Juan

Carlos Vasquez, a Long Beach resident and known gang member who was booked for attempted murder of a police officer and is being held without bail. The second shooting to occur in Long Beach was in the 8th Council District. On Thursday, at approximately 10:40pm, an officer-involved shooting occurred in the 4500 block of Orange Avenue, which stemmed from the investigation of a robbery that occurred on Monday. According to LBPD, robbery detectives began investigating and working with north division patrol officers to identify a possible suspect. Through their ongoing efforts, a suspect was identified. A patrol officer working the case with the detectives then attempted to detain the suspect, however, the suspect fled from the officer on foot. As the officer began running after him, believing the suspect was armed based on the overt actions made by the suspect, the officer discharged his firearm, according to LBPD. The suspect was struck by gunfire and transported to a local hospital where he is listed in “stable condition.” The officer was not injured during the incident and no gun was found at the scene. The suspect has been identified as 39-year-old Long Beach resident Matthew Frushon, who is facing charges of robbery and assault with a deadly weapon. The Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office is conducting an independent investigation of the shooting, as they do with all officer-involved shootings that occur in Los Angeles County that result in injury or death, according to LBPD. Lastly, a shooting occurred on Sunday, March 24, at approximately 11pm, in the 9th Council District in the area of 69th Street and Long Beach Boulevard, which resulted in the death of a male adult. When officers arrived, they discovered the victim, identified as 37-year-old Rogelio Aguirre-Lopez of Compton, down on the ground. Aguirre-Lopez was pronounced deceased at the scene. Witnesses informed officers that the suspect was still in the area, and officers were directed to a nearby apartment complex where they took the suspect into custody, according to LBPD. Based on the preliminary investigation, it was determined there had been a dispute between the suspect and the victim, who is the stepfather of the suspect, which resulted in the shooting. The suspect has been identified as 19-year-old Joel Torres of Long Beach. He has been booked for murder and is being held at the Long Beach city jail on $1 million bail.

In light of the recent shootings, Councilmember Austin said more funds should be spent on public safety to ensure the LBPD has enough resources and personnel to combat what appears to be a surge in gunrelated, violent crimes. “The general perception out there is that there is an increase [in violent crime],” he said. “We’ve seen a number of shootings recently, and I’m obviously very concerned about that, not only about my district but throughout the city. I think it’s going to be up to the City Council to take some serious decisive action toward public-safety funding in this next round of budget negotiations… I’d like to see some funding restored, especially for our gang enforcement units.” Austin added that many of the incidents “could be avoided” if there were more programs to deter young people from becoming involved in crime and gangs. “Anytime you have a shooting or gun play in my district or anywhere in our city, one shooting is one too many,” he said. “I think we need to be smart with our public-safety recourses, but also doing all we can to get guns off the streets and to educate the community about the perils of gun violence.” He also said that the LBPD has recently reopened the north patrol substation for a set schedule of hours four days a week after being closed or opened intermittently for the past several years. The front desk at the substation is now staffed Tuesday through Friday from noon to 5pm. “That’s a start,” Austin said. “Obviously, I would like to have our police station as a resource 24 hours a day, because of events just like the one that happened the other night and so someone can be there and respond to emergency situations in the north Long Beach area. But right now there are set hours for the north Long Beach police station.” Among the services now available to residents at north division during the hours they are open are filing and receiving police reports and issuing garage-sale permits, in addition to any other service for which residents may need law enforcement. Those with information regarding the shooting at Del Amo and Long Beach boulevards or those who recognize witnesses in the video are asked to contact Detective Jessie Fragoso at (562) 570-7370. The video may be viewed at youtube.com/watch?v= vawrna6ILc8&feature=player_embed ded .

MEET YOUR CITY AUDITOR What Community meeting Who North Long Beach Community Action Group Where North Division Police Substation, 4891 Atlantic Ave. When Sunday, April 7 from 2pm to 4pm More Info During this event, Long Beach City Auditor Laura Doud will provide a presentation on her office and two audits, including one for business licenses and nonprofit Partners of Parks, which help secure corporate funding for parks in Long Beach. To RSVP, call (562) 428-7710.

AN UNPROHIBITED DISCUSSION What Book talk Who El Dorado Neighborhood Library Where 2900 Studebaker Rd. When Saturday, April 13 at 10:30am More Info Claudine Burnett, local historian and author, will introduce her new book, Prohibition Madness: Life and Death in and around Long Beach, California, 1920-1933. Light refreshments will be provided. Call (562) 570-3136 or visit lbpl.org .

FA-LA-LAAAA What LA Opera Series Who LA Opera and the El Dorado Neighborhood Library Where El Dorado Neighborhood Library, 2900 Studebaker Rd. When Saturday, April 13 at 2pm More Info The LA Opera Lecture Series will provide insightful talks that address history, literature, philosophy and fine arts within the context of opera. LA Opera’s Community Educators and a team of trained volunteer experts will present. The LA Opera offers a chance for attendees to be entered into a drawing for an opera-related gift to be given out at the end of the presentation. Call (562) 570-3136.

STATE OF YOUR HEALTH What Community forum Who Sponsored by 5th District Councilmember Gerrie Schipske Where Houssels Forum at Long Beach Memorial, 2801 Atlantic Ave. When Monday, April 15 at 5pm More Info Councilmember Gerrie Schipske, State of California Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Region 9 Director Herb K. Schultz will examine The Affordable Care Act and its effects on Long Beach. Call (562) 570-6932.

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ST3443 - March 29_Layout 1 3/29/13 11:50 AM Page 4

4 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Thoughts from the Publisher

by Neena Strichart

With last week’s Wednesday officially the first day of spring, I find it necessary to declare, “Spring is in the air!” Whether you celebrate the beginning of the season in a secular or non-secular fashion, it is most certainly a time to enjoy the beauty around us. Flowers are blooming (unfortunately, so are allergies), little girls are donning their Easter finery, picnics and other outdoor events are plentiful, and the weather is generally mild and enjoyable. My fondest memory of this time of the year was the Easter gathering we attended with a group of some of my parents’ closest friends– the Smirniotis family. When I was 13, Dad drove Mom and me to a large park in Irvine to celebrate Easter with what could only be described as an enormous Greek-style family reunion hosted by George and

OPINION

Alice Smirniotis. I will never forget my surprise at seeing a full-sized lamb being cooked over an open fire. Until then, my only experience with rotisserie-style food had been chickens I had seen cooking in a grocery store or restaurant. The food smelled and tasted amazing, and I had a ball visiting and having fun with the dozens of folks in attendance. Of course there were music and dancing to add to the festivities! Fast-forward nearly 40 years. While dining with Steve a few years back, I casually mentioned the event to the owner of the restaurant– a lady named Tina Lilis (she owns The Pizza Place down on Broadway in Long Beach), her eyes started to tear up and she whispered gently to me, saying that she is the daughter of George and Alice. I couldn’t believe what I was hearing. I then remembered playing with the two daughters named Tina and Nikki (not sure of the spelling– sorry). Although they were a few years younger than I, we had spent many occasions playing together at their various family functions– weddings, baptisms, etc. In fact, her Uncle Steve had given me my first job at 15 years of age working

MARCH 29, 2013

for him and his wife Sandy at their fast-food place called Wimpy’s located over on Long Beach Boulevard. A year or two later, I again was sharing my memories of that Easter picnic, this time with Jack Skandalakis, the owner of Café Bixby. He gave me a huge smile and declared that he had been there, too! It was the first outing he had attended since coming to America from Greece at 18 years old– just a week earlier! I couldn’t believe it. What a small world! Earlier this week I was again telling the story and bragging to Jimmy at Big E Pizza in Signal Hill that Easter will be the 45th anniversary of meeting Jack Skandalakis. Imagine my shock when Jimmy disclosed that he too had been at that very same picnic. He laughed at the look on my face and remarked that he was only 2 years old at the time and had been baptized just nine months earlier! With this story now told, I say spring may be full of new beginnings, but for me it is also a time to reflect on years gone by and the many relationships we have forged no matter the season.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Time to backpedal?

The (approved?) bike infrastructure plan seems to be a solution to a problem that does not exist. Everyone living in Bixby Knolls can see that our streets, parks [and] wetlands are already used extensively by bicyclists, joggers, strollers, picnickers, school groups and nature enthusiasts. And why do they come here? Could it be because there is easy access to our neighborhood, plenty of parking, safe streets and the most tranquil environment available in Long Beach? And the residents– are they really complaining because they don’t have bike lanes that lead directly to our fabulous retail establishments on Atlantic Avenue? I don’t think so. Meaning that the people pushing through this lousy plan are pretty much taking their lead from the Army Corps of Engineers who never saw a river that wouldn’t be oh-so much better with a dam no matter what its ultimate impact. And I’m afraid that that’s exactly the type of thinking we are about to experience when we install unwanted/unneeded bike lanes, traffic signals and roundabouts. Once we remove enough parking spaces, add enough bike lanes and traffic signals and ramp up the use of our neighborhood, we will have damaged the very things that made it so attractive to the residents and visitors in the first place. Not only that, but their stated objective, make it safer for bicyclists, is a fabrication– there is not one major study that shows designated bicycle lanes improve safety (bicycleinfo.org, bicycledriving.org). Quite the opposite– bicycle lanes, like crosswalks, often give riders a false sense of security and can lull riders into dangerous situations. And all this approved by the majority of our residents? The 69 percent of the 130 who attended a (secret) meeting and approved the plan– 89.7 people– represent a majority of the approximately 4,600 residents of Bixby Knolls? Less than 2 percent speak for the majority? Try sending every household a mail-in ballot, and see how the residents really feel. So leave Bixby Knolls as it is– a pleasant, quiet neighborhood not compromised by unnecessary/unwanted bicycle lanes, traffic signals and roundabouts. Alex Victor Long Beach

Survey says...

Sean Belk’s March 22 article about the planned changes for the streets of the Los Cerritos neighborhood reflects the line that Dave Roseman’s office disseminates. The City only puts out one side of the picture. I would hope a follow-up article will reflect the more public opinion. At the January 9 community meeting, Mr. Roseman solely informed residents of the changes we could expect. It was not a dialogue. It was not an “outreach” as staffer [Long Beach transportation planner Steve] Tweed calls it; it was an announcement of agenda. The attendees at that January 9 meeting were handed a survey form that did not record residence area. Many of the attendees were not residents of Los Cerritos or Wrigley Heights, where the meeting was not widely known, but were bicycle enthusiasts who heard about the meeting through their associations. The survey questions were slanted; the results open to interpretation. Please, Mr. Belk, walk the neighborhood. Contact the Los Cerritos Neighborhood Association and the residents of Wrigley Heights. Talk with the people who live here. You are not getting a balanced picture from City employees. Many residents of Mr. Johnson’s 7th District have expressed strong opposition to the planned traffic signal at Wardlow and Pacific. Mimi Fox Long Beach

Mea Culpa

In an article and a photo caption for the story titled “TV show Bar Rescue renames and makes over cantina located in both Signal Hill and Long Beach” in the March 22 issue of the Signal Tribune, the establishment’s owner should have been identified as Lona Lee.

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ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/WEBSITE MANAGER

Tanya Paz

CULTURE WRITERS

Daniel Adams Vicki Paris Goodman Gregory Spooner CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Matt Sun

EDITORIAL INTERNS

Ariana Gastelum Brandy Soto

CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Rachael Rifkin

DESIGN INTERN

Kaelyn Bruno

The Signal Tribune welcomes letters to the editor, which should be signed, dated and include a phone number to verify authenticity. Letters are due by noon on the Tuesday before desired publication date. The Signal Tribune reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, language and space requirements. The Signal Tribune does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other publications or otherwise presented in a public forum. Letters to the editor and commentaries are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Signal Tribune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, letters to the editor and commentaries are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. Letter-writers will be identified by their professional titles or affiliations when, and only when, the editorial staff deems it relevant and/or to provide context to the letter. We do not run letters to the editor submitted by individuals who have declared their candidacies for public office in upcoming races. This policy was put in place because, to be fair, if we publish one, we would have to publish all letters submitted by all candidates. The volume would no doubt eliminate space for letters submitted by other readers. Instead, we agree to interview candidates and print stories about political races in an objective manner and offer very reasonable advertising rates for those candidates who wish to purchase ads. The Signal Tribune is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. Yearly subscriptions are available for $45.

939 E. 27th St., Signal Hill, CA 90755 (562) 595-7900

www.signaltribune.com newspaper@signaltribune.com


ST3443 - March 29_Layout 1 3/29/13 11:50 AM Page 5

MARCH 29, 2013

U.S. Postal Service to close mail-processing center in Long Beach by this summer Sean Belk Staff Writer

As part of ongoing cutbacks to postal services, the United States Postal Service (USPS) plans to close the mail-processing center at 2300 Redondo Ave. in Long Beach and consolidate the operations with a facility in Los Angeles by this summer, said Richard Maher, spokesperson for USPS in Los Angeles and Orange counties. The Redondo Avenue facility, which serves Signal Hill and Long Beach residents and businesses, is one of 140 mail-processing centers across the country that the USPS has identified for consolidation. USPS officials have said the consolidations are due to declining first-class mail volumes caused by online transactions, rising retiree-benefit costs and diminishing revenue. After Congress failed to pass legislation last year to stave off cuts, the USPS decided in May 2012 that it was going forward with the cost-cutting measures. Phase 1 of consolidations that started last summer were expected to resume in February after being halted last September due to the November elections and the holiday mailing season, Maher said. An official date of when the Long Beach facility will be consolidated, however, has not yet been set, he said. “We never had a date set for Long Beach and still don’t,” Maher said. He added that the USPS is required to notify employees 90 days in advance of any action that may impact employment. “We have begun talking to employees, and we’re anticipating this [consolidation] happening this summer,” Maher said. No additional community meetings are scheduled since the publicreview process in anticipation of the mail-processing center’s closure has already been completed, he said.

“We’ve been pretty transparent,” Maher said. Plans call for consolidating mailprocessing operations in Long Beach with the Los Angeles facility located at 7001 S. Central Ave. The consolidation will be similar to the processing plant in Pasadena that was consolidated with Los Angeles last year. USPS officials estimate that combining the Long Beach processing and distribution services with Los Angeles will save the USPS more than $16 million annually, resulting in the reduction of nearly 600 postal-service positions. Maher said USPS employees are expected to either retire or move to other positions, such as mailcarrying, adding that the USPS has already reduced its workforce by more than 140,000 employees over the last four years through attrition. While mail-processing will be consolidated, the post office on Redondo Avenue that offers P.O. box services, bulk business mail drop-off and retail services, such as postage sales and money orders, will remain open, Maher said. The USPS, however, has not determined the long-term future of the property on Redondo Avenue, he added. Maher said plans could involve relocating the facility, subdividing the property or moving in other operations. The USPS, meanwhile, is implementing other cost-cutting measures in addition to the consolidations. Last year, the USPS decided to make changes to first-class mail service in which mail delivered outside of a specific service area arrives in two days rather than overnight. In February, the USPS announced plans to stop mail delivery on Saturdays, a new delivery schedule effective Aug. 5 that would generate cost savings of approximately $2 billion once fully implemented. ß

NEWS

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

5

Federal ‘sequester’ may spell more cutbacks for LBUSD and less grants, financial aid for colleges

Sean Belk Staff Writer

Though Congress has passed a continuing resolution, signed by President Barack Obama on Tuesday, March 26, that extends federal spending through Sept. 30 and prevents a government shutdown, the so-called “sequester” that calls for slashing federal programs, including those for education, so far remains in place. The more than 5-percent, across-theboard cuts likely stand to curtail funding for educational programs throughout the United States in the 2013-2014 school year, particularly reducing money for early childhood and special education, scaling back the eligibility for university grants and trimming certain college-student financial-aid programs. Although things could change as the President outlines a budget plan in the next few weeks, education departments across the country are bracing to receive a total cutback of $2.6 billion, according to education officials. In California, public schools anticipate losing a total of about $87.6 million in federal funding for primary and secondary education, according to the nonprofit Organizing For Action (OFA), an advocacy group formed out of the Obama election campaign that is rallying residents in an effort to repeal sequestration. The Long Beach OFA Neighborhood Team, which consists of about 75 local residents from the greater Long Beach area, gathered last Friday, March 22 in front of Buffum Total Learning Center, a former elementary-school campus that now provides early-childhood and special-education services. “We know that this is a bad decision because research shows that for every dollar we invest in early-childhood education can save us more than $7 later by boosting graduation rates, reducing teen pregnancy rates and even reducing incidents of violent crime in our community,” said Uduak Ntuk, a petroleum engineer for the City of Long Beach, who is leading the local “super chapter.”

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Uduak Ntuk, leader of the Long Beach chapter of Organizing For Action, a political action group formed out of the Obama election campaign, speaks during a demonstration with about 25 other members of the group at Buffum Total Learning Center in Long Beach in a call to repeal federal sequestration. Long Beach Unified School District (LBUSD) is expecting to be hit with a nearly $3.5-million annual reduction of federal funding, according to Chris Eftychiou, LBUSD spokesperson. He said the school district is expected to receive about $800,000 less in federal special-education funding after slashing the school district’s annual $15.5 million in annual federal special-education funding by the more than 5-percent, across-the-board cut. Eftychiou added, however, that the reduction is just a “subset” of the entire amount of sequestration cuts and the school district has yet to determine how much special education would be impacted. “How these cuts would be implemented remains to be seen, so it would be difficult to say exactly how it might impact specific special-education services,” he said. “We do not yet know the specificity on how these reductions might play out.” Eftychiou said the school board will look at sequester cuts in the context of the entire LBUSD budget, which is due by June 30.

“Reductions that we’re making in one area of our budget may help to soften the blow of reductions (including sequester reductions) elsewhere in the budget,” he said. “Special education, for instance, has long encroached upon our general fund because the state and federal governments provide insufficient funds to cover the true costs of those programs. So a cut in special-education funds may not necessarily mean a reduction in service. It could instead mean further encroachment on the general fund. Of course, that means that you have to cut something else out of your general fund to cover the encroachment.” Felton Williams, LBUSD board member, said some of the cuts might include less funding for professional development, reduced non-instructional services such as health guidance, increased class sizes and potential impacts to federal construction bonds that would affect the school district’s bond rating. He also mentioned, however, that there may be the potential to use state categorical funds to provide some “flexibility” in making the cuts.

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ST3443 - March 29_Layout 1 3/29/13 11:50 AM Page 6

NEWS

6 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Experts discuss possibilities of new park development in LB, other ‘compact’ cities Sean Belk Staff Writer

Although Long Beach spans 50 square miles, the highly populated and densely built-out city has a disproportionate amount of park space that continues to be edged out by commercial and residential development, according to local experts. Some parts of the city, such as the east side, which contains the 450-acre El Dorado Park, have a healthy amount of open space and recreational land in comparison to the amount of surrounding residents. Yet other areas, such as the west side, are considered “parkpoor” and have only one acre of parks per every 1,000 residents. Efforts are afoot, however, to turn that ratio around by forming partnerships between a wide-ranging cross section of groups, from government

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officials, business representatives, community members and city planners to designers, nonprofits and policy makers. The goal is to develop creative ways to make park space more a part of daily life for all residents alike. A group of experts specializing in different fields, from policy and city management to design and land-use planning presented various open-space projects in Long Beach and other cities during a panel discussion on Monday, March 5 titled “Park Development In Compact Cities” at the Rooftop Solarium of the Willmore Building in downtown Long Beach. The Los Angeles Chapter of the United States Building Council, the national nonprofit organization known for developing the Leadership, Energy and Environmental Design building rating system, organized the event. Panelists included: Melani Smith, principal of Melendrez Design Partners and Long Beach planning commissioner; Phil Hester, former director of the Long Beach Parks, Recreation & Marine Department; and Ata Ul Malik Khan, program manager for the Harbor Community Benefit Foundation. Brian Ulaszewski, a local architect and executive director of nonprofit design studio City Fabrick, moderated the event. Hester, who was called a “magician” when it comes to finding new park space in Long Beach during the 12 years he led the City’s parks, recreation and marine department, presented concepts on the Long Beach RiverLink, a program of the San Pedro Bay Estuary Project that strings 265 acres worth of park developments along a portion of the Los Angeles River from Queensway Bay to the Artesia Freeway. The plan, which was launched as an update to the City’s Open Space Master Plan, is considered a major step toward adding park space to areas of Long Beach that are lacking recreational land use, he said. “As a part of the evaluation we did of all the park properties, it was very obvious the west side, central and north

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Long Beach were very park-poor,” Hester said. “We have all these parks on the east side of town, but from the standpoint of the central, west and north Long Beach, you have about one acre per thousand [residents]… That’s a dense part of the city.” Park space, including trees and foliage, often lowers ambient temperatures through shade, resulting in less energy usage and a more “beautiful, comfortable city” that attracts business and shoppers, while also catching particulate matter and increasing oxygen, according to presentation materials. Hester said the RiverLink project also involves: adding greenbelts; constructing pedestrian walkways that link roads, bike paths and riverbanks; and building a nature center at DeForest Park. “We have a really nice El Dorado Nature Center… we need a nature center on the L.A. River,” he said. Smith, meanwhile, revealed plans from her design firm for new park development over the 134 Freeway in Glendale, which she said suffers from the same lack of open space as Long Beach. The project, called Space 134, includes building a “green loop” with five acres of new open space in the next one to five years and eventually build-

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A project called Space 134 being proposed in Glendale includes building a “green loop” with five acres of new open space in the next five years and eventually building 28 acres of “animated” open space in the next two decades, complete with a nature garden, trails, playfields and an outdoor theater, also creating potential for economic development.

ing 28 acres of “animated” open space in the next two decades, complete with a nature garden, trails, playfields and an outdoor theater, also creating potential for economic development. Experts also touched on using park space as a “buffer” to air quality and noise pollution caused by industrial development and port expansion. Khan presented an overview of the 30-acre, more than $77-million Wilmington Waterfront Park, formerly known as the Harry Bridges Boulevard Buffer Project. Some architects consider the park, which was opened in 2011, as a West Coast version of New York’s High Line that turned an abandoned rail line into an innovative park development. The Wilmington park exists between the unincorporated area and the Port of Los Angeles and was developed as an alterative to creating a 20-foot-high, one-mile wall to block pollution from terminal expansion, Khan said. He added that the park project was developed through local environmental activism that forced the Port to create a harbor community mitigation trust fund that became the basis for a community-benefits foundation. “Already, while there still is more

activity in the distance, the immediate surrounding community [doesn’t have to] wake up every morning with the site of the port everyday. They have a place to play, and it’s used very heavily every day,” Khan said. Ulaszewski, who designed the Armory Park at Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., Alamitos Avenue and 6th Street, also used the event to reveal a new proposal being developed by City Fabrick to create a buffer to a proposed railyard project, known as the Southern California International Gateway (SCIG). The park project, being called “The Yards,” has various different alternatives, but, in general, proposes to create 350 acres worth of park space situated between railroad systems, adjacent to the Terminal Island Freeway, near an intermodal container transfer facility and underneath Southern California Edison power lines. The SCIG project that was approved by the Los Angeles Harbor Commission and is being proposed by the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway has received heavy criticism from the Long Beach City Council and various environmental groups that have appealed the massive neardock facility, favoring on-dock rail instead. Ulaszewski, however, said the mitigation is needed regardless of where rail expansion is located because of increasing truck traffic. He said the park proposal could be one part of the solution. “Even with the on-dock or off-dock, there are still potential impacts that need to be mitigated,” Ulaszewski said. For more information on “The Yards” proposal, visit cityfabrick.org .

EDCO services not affected by Cesar Chavez Day

There will be no delay in EDCO’s waste- and recycling-collection services during the week of April 1 as a result of Cesar Chavez Day. EDCO’s customer service office will also remain open. This includes Park Waste and Recycling Services and Signal Hill Waste and Recycling Services. Source: EDCO


ST3443 - March 29_Layout 1 3/29/13 11:50 AM Page 7

MARCH 29, 2013

COMMUNITY

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Signal Hill resident’s new business aims to advocate for individuals through various bureacratic processes

Signal Hill resident Robert Schlesinger this month launched Advocates In Action, a business which aims to assist seniors, intellectually or physically disabled persons and single parents in California with challenges they may face while trying to secure muchneeded medical or governmental services. Schlesinger developed the concept for his new advocacy business as a result of successfully navigating California’s bureaucratic medical and governmental road blocks on his own behalf. Schlesinger says that, for nearly three decades, he has learned to overcome obstacles and barriers he has confronted as a result of being born with mild cerebral palsy. Conquering battles with teachers, physicians, government officials and government services, he has triumphed on nearly every front, including obtaining his own early Social Security benefit, according to Schlesinger, and he now seeks to share his experience to help others in need. “I’ve been a self-advocate all of my adult life, and now I’m thrilled to be in a position to put my experience to good use in helping others get the results they need in a faster and more efficient manner,” Schlesinger said. “As your advocate, we help you clear hurdles or power through the brick walls you’re experiencing in government or medical environments and empower you to build relationships with these professionals, who can be indifferent or even

intimidating and cause you to lose hope. We help relieve the stress of paperwork and get answers for you as you learn how to get the necessary services you need to live a full and functional life moving forward.” A native of Long Beach and current resident of Signal Hill, Schlesinger says working with Advocates In Action begins with a free, no-obligation consultation to assess a potential client’s needs and goals. Once on board, clients will be in contact with Advocates on a regular basis, including weekly or asneeded counseling sessions around key and related issues, according to Schlesinger. Should the advocate discover a need for additional counseling for other reasons, clients will be provided with an appropriate referral. While Advocates In Action can help individuals with an array of issues, the company specializes in insurance and Medi-Cal, Social Security benefits and case management, placement in assistedliving or skilled-nursing facilities, general medical-case management, and patient-care issues. Advocates In Action also will offer educational-advocacy services, helping the disabled who are

As part of April’s Distracted Driving Awareness Month campaign, the Signal Hill Police Department (SHPD) will be ticketing those texting or operating hand-held cell phones during the month of April, according to the department. Drivers who break the law and place themselves and others in danger will be cited with no warnings. The current minimum ticket cost is $159, with

subsequent tickets costing at least $279. Last April, more than 57,000 tickets were written statewide for texting and hand-held cell use. There were nearly 450,000 convictions in 2012. “We all know that talking on our cell phones while driving is distracting, but that doesn’t stop some people from continuing to do it,” said Signal Hill Police Department Chief

Langston “This effort is intended to educate our community about the dangers of cell-phone use while driving. We hope that once people see the statistics and realize the danger involved, they will change their driving habits to help protect themselves, their families, and others on the road.”

continued from page 5

Cuts to other critical Department of Education Title III and Title V programs (e.g., Hispanic-Serving and Strengthening Institutions programs) that ensure a pipeline to success for first-generation and under-represented minority students could see a reduction amounting to more than one-half million dollars across the CSU. Cal State Long Beach President F. King Alexander, who was selected this week as the new president of Louisiana State University, said in a prepared statement that his primary concern about cuts to university research pro-

grams, student financial aid and other services is the potential ripple effect it may have on the state’s economic growth. “The governor’s budget is predicated on the basis that our economy is beginning to grow,” he said. “Sequestration could shatter that economic scenario and push California back toward recession-era budget cuts. If this were to happen, Governor Brown’s efforts to provide moderate and gradual re-investments in our universities could fail to become a reality.” ß

Rob Schlesinger

transitioning from high school to college, or guiding parents through the individualized education program (IEP) process to secure contracts for their child’s services. “Our advocates are here to assist individuals in every way possible,” Schlesinger said. “We want to build confidence with those involved that their needs are being addressed, and at the same time empower them by teaching the necessary skills to navigate and become self-advocates should similar issues occur in the future.”

SHPD to take part in Distracted Driving Awareness Month campaign

Sequester

“It’s a special hit for us to try to absorb that cost, and I’m not quite sure how we’re going to do it,” he said. “We can find other ways to get around it by covering certain items in the budget and moving certain programs around.” Long Beach City College (LBCC), which has already cut 11 career/technical disciplines due to state budget cuts, is expected to receive a cut of $58,000 in federal funding for student financial-aid programs, said Mark Taylor, spokesperson for LBCC. He said funding for opportunity grants are to be reduced by $42,772, or approximately 7 percent, while work-study funding would be cut by about 2 percent, or $14,732. The California State University (CSU) system may also be impacted. Under sequestration, the CSU currently anticipates federal funding reductions in excess of $22 million for fiscal year 2013. While the Pell program is exempt from sequestration, programs subject to the cuts include campus-based aid programs, aid to minority-serving institutions, TRIO and GEAR UP, which are pipeline programs for CSU students. In addition, supplemental educational opportunity grants (SEOG) and workstudy programs are to lose up to $1.5 million, eliminating awards for more than 1,400 students. Funding for improving teacher quality and reforming teacher preparation will be cut almost half a million dollars at the CSU, slowing the pace of improvement and innovation.

7

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Congressmember Lowenthal displays Pride flag outside DC office in solidarity with LGBT community

On the same day this week that the United States Supreme Court heard arguments regarding the constitutionality of California’s Proposition 8, Congressmember Alan Lowenthal (CA-47) was displaying the rainbow Pride flag outside his Washington, D.C. and district offices in support of LGBT Americans and marriage equality. “My offices are flying the Pride flag– proudly I might add– in solidarity with not only my LGBT constituents, but LGBT Americans everywhere,” Lowenthal said. According to the offices of the Architect of the Capitol and the House Historian, it is likely that Lowenthal is the first member of Congress to formally display a Pride flag outside a Congressional office. Members of Congress have permanent fixtures outside each office to accommodate three flags, with two spaces going to the American flag and the member’s state flag. The third slot is often used for a personal selection of the Congressmember.

Lowenthal, whose district includes one of the nation's largest LGBT communities, has been an advocate of marriage equality his entire adult life, according to a press release from his office. “My office was told that we may be the first to fly a Pride flag in the Cannon House Office building– the oldest of the House office buildings,” Lowenthal said. “I am honored to be the first, and I am certain I will not be the last. Marriage equality is a right– a right that should be shared by everyone. Whether our LGBT brothers and sisters have a constitutional right to marry in the United States, let alone in California, should not even be in question. If flying the Pride flag outside my office can make one person stop and think about the advancements that are needed in our country, then that is a victory. “Proposition 8 and the Defense of Marriage Act are oppressive and regressive policies that label a large group of my constituents as

second-class citizens and deny hard-working Americans the freedom to love and marry whomever they choose. It should not take a Supreme Court Justice to prove that love is love. My intention is to fly this flag until marriage equality

Signal Hill Police Chief Michael Langston has been appointed to the State 9-1-1 Advi-

sory Board by Gov. Jerry Brown. Langston’s appointment was announced by the Governor’s Press Office on March 20. The board advises the California 9-1-1 Emergency Communications Office on matters pertaining to policies, practices and procedures for the California 9-1-1 Emergency Communications Office; technical and operational standards for the California 9-1-1 system consistent with the National Emergency Number Association (NENA) standards; and on other matters related to emergency communications as well as promoting communications between public-safety answering points (PSAPS). Langston is one of two representatives appointed by the Governor to the Advisory Board on the recommendation of the California Police Chiefs Association. The appointment is to a two-year term that is unpaid and does not

require Senate confirmation. Langston was already serving as the Police California Chiefs Association’s representative on the Peace Officer Standards and Training Public Safety Dispatcher Advisory Committee (POST PSDAC), a group of PSAP professionals. “I look forward to serving on the State 9-1-1 Advisory Board,” Langston said. “There are many challenges that our PSAPS are facing and will be facing with technology that is Signal Hill Police Chief Michael Langston changing right before our eyes. We rely on cellular telephones, text messag- we stay ahead of technology ing and social media now more changes to ensure the reliability than ever before. Hard lines are of our 9-1-1 systems.” disappearing. It is important that Source: SHPD

The Signal Hill Chamber of Commerce is seeking donations for its booth at the upcoming Signal Hill community garage sale in May. Donations that are in good condition may be dropped off at The Under-

shirt, 931 E. 27th St. Accepted items include small electronics, garden tools, small furniture, luggage, toys, games (with all pieces included), clothing (no undergarments), purses, jewelry, shoes, CDs, DVDs, books,

bedding. towels, small kitchen items and dishes. Donations will be accepted through April 29. For more information, call Shari Blackwell at (562) 426-8939.

The office of 6th District Councilmember Dee Andrews is conducting a book drive to benefit the students at Lincoln Elementary School. Coined the AOC7 Book Drive (which refers to the area that includes Anaheim Avenue, Orange Avenue, Cherry Avenue and 7th Street), the book-collection event is the precursor to the AOC7 Literacy Fair, which will take place at MacArthur Park, 1321 E. Anaheim St. from 10am to 1pm on Saturday, May 11. The fair will include music, multicultural dances, literacy booths and storytelling. Each child in attendance will receive free books to encourage them to read throughout the summer vacation. Donations accepted include new or slightly used children books, and the goal is to collect

500 of them by April 30. Drop off locations are:

Courtesy Lowenthal’s office

Congressmember Alan Lowenthal (CA-47) says he is displaying the rainbow Pride flag outside his Washington, D.C. and district offices until same-sex marriage is legalized.

is the law of the land. Hopefully, the Supreme Court will find both Prop 8 and DOMA unconstitutional and resolve this issue once and for all.”

SHPD chief appointed to State 9-1-1 Advisory Board

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Donations welcome for community fundraiser

First Friday Earth Month Silent Auction Benefitting The Surf Rider Foundation STOP BY AND PLACE YOUR BIDS FRIDAY APRIL 5TH FROM 5:00PM – 8:00PM GR EAT I TEM S FOR A GR EAT CA US E CHECK US OUT ON FACEBOOK FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF ITEMS TO BE ACUTIONED OFF

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Book-drive organizers seeking donations to benefit Lincoln Elementary students

Neighborhood Resource Center 425 Atlantic Ave. Monday–Thursday, 10am–7pm; Friday, 8am–5pm

Lincoln Elementary School 1175 E. 11th St.

The Center Long Beach 2017 4th St.

National Guard Armory 2200 Redondo Ave. Monday–Friday, 9am–4pm

Mark Twain Library 1401 E. Anaheim St.

For more information, contact the 6th District office at (562) 570-6816.


ST3443 - March 29_Layout 1 3/29/13 11:51 AM Page 9

MARCH 29, 2013 In Living Color Springing into action to bring the season into (and outside of) your home

TAKE A SPRING BREAK

Shoshanah Siegel Columnist

Spring is in the air. Beautiful flowers, sunny skies, and billowy clouds– at least for some of the country. No matter where you live, think spring. This is a time to bring the season into your home, inside and out, and from top to bottom.

Spring cleaning The cozy items we had for the winter months can now be stored away. Look for new ways to store and organize your life. Remember the three Bs: baskets, boxes and bowls. Spring cleaning can also take place on the outside of your home. This is the time of year when I clean windows, get rid of spider webs, and touch up paint if needed. No matter what the season, painting the front door is a great, inexpensive way to not only liven up your porch; it can be easily changed for a whole new look. Be sure to greet your guests with pots full of spring flowers and perhaps a wreath.

Nature-inspired color palettes A gallon of paint is one of the cheapest ways to change a space and can be easy enough to do yourself. Select colors that makes you feel happy; paint an accent wall or the whole room. Is there a color you have always wanted to try? Now is the perfect time.

Be a wallflower Are you a renter or afraid to commit to wallpaper? Easily removable wallpapers can now be found through quite a few companies. These include: Sherwin Williams, Swag Paper, Tempaper, and Murals Your Way. They are easy to apply and remove, and they come in an array of colors, patterns, and styles.

Stickers with style Peel-and-stick wall decals are also in abundance and provide fun graphics for any theme or décor. This new wave of decorating can be found at many stores such as: Michaels, Costco, Lowes, Home Depot, Target, and the Dollar Tree. These decals are great to dress up a headboard or other furniture. Some decals even feature romantic and inspirational phrases.

Pull the rug out from under you Change out your rugs from dark, cozy colors to lighter and brighter ones. You can make the style and color blend in with the rest of your décor or find one that makes a bold statement and is a conversation piece. Don’t forget about your outdoor spaces. These days, rugs are truly indoor/outdoor and feature many more patterns and colors. What a great way to bring continuity of color throughout your home.

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SIGNAL TRIBUNE Flings for Spring

9

The City of Signal Hill will host its Spring Fest 2013 on Saturday, March 30 from 9am to noon at Signal Hill Park, 2175 Cherry Ave. Free activities will include egg hunts for children ages 4 to 10, a bunny trail for toddlers, an animal magic show and Signal Hill Police Department child identification cards. A $2 wristband will allow children access to additional activities that include train rides, crafts, games, bounce houses and a visit with the bunny. The egg hunt schedule will be as follows: 9:30am for 4- and 5-year-olds; 10am for 6- and 7-year-olds; and 10:30am for 8-, 9- and 10-year-olds. The free animal magic show will take place at 11am on the amphitheater stage. Each child must bring his or her own basket or bag to gather eggs. In the event of inclement weather, the event will be canceled. For more information, contact the Community Services Department at (562) 989-7330. Fourth District Councilmember Patrick O’Donnell will host a spring egg hunt on Saturday, March 30 at 10am at Los Altos Park, 5485 Stearns St. There will be activities for the whole family to enjoy. For more information, call O’Donnell’s office at (562) 570-6918. California Heights United Methodist Church and Children’s Center, 3759 Orange Ave., will host an Easter event for children through 5th grade on Saturday, March 30 from 10am to noon. The event will include an Easter-egg hunt, crafts, games, a visit with the Easter Bunny, and more. Admission and activities are free. Children must be accompanied by adults, who are encouraged to bring their cameras. For more information, go to calheightsumc.org or call (562) 595-1996.

Shoshanah Siegel/Signal Tribune

The writer’s vintage five-finger vases, made in Portugal, are perfect when she only has a few flowers to display.

Change out the look of your headboard by wrapping it with a yard of floral fabric. Hang inexpensively painted frames that feature a piece of floral wallpaper, pressed green fern leaves, or pictures of botanical art. To add some reflection and glitz, paint your furniture with metallic-colored paint. For even more bling, apply small mirrors to the front of your drawers. Any botanical print can be cut out and applied to furniture using spray adhesives. Spray adhesives can be found at any office-supply store, home-improvement centers, and artsupply stores. Feel free to bring these creative ideas to the rest of your home. Depending on the season, one of my white lamp shades in my living room is forever changing. For spring, I have adorned the shade with metallic-colored leaves I purchased from a local arts-and-crafts store.

Flowers and fruit This time of year the supply of fruit and flowers is endless. Why not display a bowl of bright-green Granny Smith apples on your coffee table, and then bring this color into the fabric of your pillows and other accessories. Fruits such as kumquats or other hard berries add a splash of color at the bottom of a vase. They also provide a col-

orful anchor for yellow daffodils and other spring flowers. Even just a few leaves with a sprig of flowers can add a nice, cheerful touch. If you have ever grown sweet peas, you know how prolific they are, and they end up being displayed everywhere in your home. They not only provide beautiful colors, but their sweet smell definitely makes you know that spring is here. I also love growing Peruvian lilies or alstroemeria, which come in numerous colors and last forever.

Change your focus Instead of facing your fireplace, rearrange your furniture to have a view of the outdoors and gardens. Now is also the time to start creating outdoor spaces for family and guests. Take advantage of the season’s sales and change out old and faded cushions and pillows. If needed, refresh your outdoor furniture with new paint or stain. Enjoy the beauty of the season and lighten up!

Shoshanah Siegel provides color consulting as well as space planning, remodeling, upgrading and staging through her firm Your Color Diva. She can be contacted at (562) 427-0440 or at shoshanah.siegel@gmail.com. More of Siegel’s writing may be found at thebright.com .

The Wrigley Area Neighborhood Alliance will present its “Easter on the Green” on Saturday, March 30 from 2pm to 4pm on the median at 20th Street and Daisy Avenue. The event will include two egg hunts. The first will be for children 2 to 6 years old. Sign-in will be from 2pm to 2:30pm, and the hunt will begin right after sign-up ends. The second will be for 7- to 10-year-olds, with a sign-in from 3pm to 3:30pm, and the hunt will begin shortly thereafter. The event will also feature a cake walk, for which the suggested donation is $1 per ticket. Approximate times will be 2:15pm, 2:45pm, 3:15pm and 3:45pm. Other family-friendly activities will include Easter-egg decorating from 2pm to 4pm, ringand bean-toss games, refreshments and baked goods. For more information contact Maria at wrigleyalliance@gmail.com or (562) 427-5021.


ST3443 - March 29_Layout 1 3/29/13 11:51 AM Page 10

CULTURE

10 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

MARCH 29, 2013

Local photographer integrates her community and culture into photos Brandy Soto Editorial Intern

Growing up in a place where ethnicity and family are prized possessions, Cynthia Herrera has always known how to capture the essence of cultural being. Her childhood and Cuban background would become trademarks of her art as a photographer and, ultimately, how she identifies herself. Having received her first camera at the age of 10, she began capturing perceptive images that would later chronicle her jour-

neys and surroundings in everyday life. “Instead of traditional images, I made pictures of empty spaces, objects, my feet, so I could ‘see’ where I was walking,” Herrera said. “I wanted documents of marks being made in the world.” Herrera was born in Los Angeles, California, on June 6, 1977 to Fernando and Sonia Herrera. She was raised in Huntington Park, a community of collective Hispanic cultures struggling to make a living. Her childhood consisted of doing whatever she could to help provide for her

family. She recalls each Saturday morning being a family event, in which they would all slice strawberries and at 5am, while most children were sound asleep, Herrera would accompany her father on drives to the market. She says these experiences have provided a meaningful outlook on life and helped her grow as a person. “I am the product of all of these stories,” Herrera said. “My story would be a layered one of then and now. Through family stories, I was and remain very attached to my family history but produce artwork about living in a contemporary, culturally layered context.” She would go on to pursue an education in photography and later become a more developed artist and art educator. Whether she was in or out of school, she learned most through hands-on experiences in art programs offered by her community. She brought up one of her very first mentors, Genevieve Barrios, who allowed her a space to connect with art at the Bowers Museum of Cultural Art in Santa Ana. “As an arts facilitator, this space brought together local artists, community organizers and educators to create projects for youth in the community,” she said. “Here I was able to engage as not just a student but as a producer of culture.” She has found that photography gives her an outlet to capture the ideologies of connection and identity, and transform them into “tangible objects.” She has participated in various art festivals locally and most recently, the Mathaf: Arab Museum of Modern Art. Lately, she has been working on the You

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Are Here Project and Project DOHAAber Bridge U.S. to Qatar. These activities are designed to give today’s youth the thoughtful outlook Herrera has gained from contemporary art and culture– “personal and community identity through cultural production.”

In photography, what is the biggest challenge you have been faced with? The biggest challenge I am faced with as a photographer is integrating photography as a historically object-based art form into the world of community engagement and social practice.

Do you think about placement before you begin a project, or do you freestyle in the moment? As I am making photographs in a particular context there is not much preconception. It is the place and the moment that dictates a story on a first outing. From there, after editing and finding something that strikes my interest, I will further investigate found themes. Most composition happens in the editing process

Is there a special technique or theme that has become a staple of your photographs? The theme of most of my work is the embodiment of personal and community histories in spaces. I investigate intersections of experience within communities.

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How has your photography developed over the years? Over the years my photography has developed from a practice of simply documenting a moment to evolving into constructions. Through photographs I don’t just document, but construct interpretations of the ordinary to tell stories about an identity and history. Is there a photograph or series that you favor more than others? I don’t favor any one series more than others. I do hold my work of documentary photography in Cuba very personally, creating my own relationship with my cultural history and reconciling that with my family experience.

With the constant growing of social media, do you feel that modern photography is transforming? I do feel that photography is shifting from the precious object to a translation. Through social media and Internet, mass reproduction of images and constantly shifting contexts within which they are viewed changes meaning and impact of an image. It is up to the artist to use these new spaces as content for meaning in their work.

How do you feel about others’ interpretations of your art? I think others’ interpretations of my work are a great reflective process for me. I like to hear about the nuances others see in my images and the meanings developed from their own histories they bring to the reading of a photograph. Is there anything you hope people can take away from your photos? I hope people see beauty in the everyday.

Which type of setting do you work best in? Streets. My work often starts in the centers and offshoots of shared spaces.

Are there any artists that influenced your photography? William Eggleston and Stephen Shore have influenced me in terms of looking. These two artists capture the mundane and made cinema. Stories were told in simple compositions of obscure ordinary places. Walker Evans influenced me in terms of the power of photography. Evans’s work, Cuba, helped to create the ethos of Cuba. His photographs are part of the visual construction of the U.S. “idea” of a place.

How has your art shaped who you are today or who you want to be? My work as an artist has shaped how I engage with my community. I now create projects that engage youth and empower Sushi, Tempura, &?Traditional Favorites communities to tell, document their own stories and see themselves and not just the Tues, Wed,Thurs 4:30pm-6:30pm embodiment of culture but as cultural producers. off *Sapporo* Premium Draft Beer

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ST3443 - March 29_Layout 1 3/29/13 11:51 AM Page 11

CULTURE

11 ICT stages engaging and believable production of McNally’s Master Class MARCH 29, 2013

Vicki Paris Goodman Culture Writer

Years ago, as a violin student, I attended a couple of master classes given by virtuosic icons– violinists like Isaac Stern and Yehudi Menuhin. An audience of serious and semi-serious pupils of the violin and other classical stringed instruments would comprise the class who were there to witness a genius of world fame work individually with one or more promising and– make no mistake– very fortunate students. Of course the idea was to glean anything and everything one could from witnessing the lesson. After all, a single spoken gem or two from Heifetz or Perlman had to be worth a lifetime or more of instruction from an unknown teacher, right? Well, at least there was always that potential. In any case, master classes were generally quite inspiring, if not thor-

oughly enlightening. And sometimes attendees were treated to a story or two– one or more juicy tidbits not generally known about the idol we all wished to emulate, most of us knowing we never would. Playwright Terrence McNally’s Master Class makes the theater audience its “class” while former operatic diva extraordinaire Maria Callas engages in self-aggrandizing and biographical discourse that is both revealing and entertaining. As Callas in International City Theatre's new production, Gigi Bermingham strikes a palatable balance between insufferable prima donna and fallible human being– something not all who have been cast in this role have managed, or perhaps even attempted. The stories of Callas’s destitute childhood, her single-minded commitment to her musical craft, her failed first marriage, the heartwrenching unrequited love affair with

Courtesy ICT

Gigi Bermingham strikes a palatable balance between insufferable prima donna and fallible human being in International City Theatre’s production of Master Class.

Aristotle Onassis, and her ultimate rise to arguably unparalleled operatic greatness pour forth in a dazzling display of animated storytelling. Surprisingly, the instruction of three “lucky” students is distinctly secondary to Callas’s life narrative. Indeed, the relatively brief instructional segments are mere asides. As such, McNally has invented one of the most ingenious devices I’ve ever encountered for theatrically recounting a biography. While the sometimes amusing and often profoundly sad memoir plays out, Callas is occasionally “interrupted” by the entrance of one of the students who would receive the coveted personal attention. In Master Class the trio of students include one young man and two young women, all prepared to impress Callas with the talent their teachers, families and fellow students have no doubt assured them they possess. Given Callas’s self-involved temperament, at first I wondered if she were capable of imparting to any student something of value. I half expected a series of comparisons designed to inflate her own ego while deflating the spirit and self-confidence of the student– the more gifted the student, the harsher the treatment. I braced myself for such an eventuality. Happily, it appears McNally draws Callas as a more multi-dimensioned character. She does offer valuable advice. Never mincing words, however, one female singer (played perkily and with fine operatic voice by soprano Danielle Skalsky) is dismissed as a limited eternal amateur, while another (soprano Jennifer Shelton dazzles in the role) could go somewhat further. The young man (tenor Tyler Milliron gives a spirited performance), however, takes Callas’s breath away. We are gratified, if a bit stunned, to find her wishing him well for a successful future career upon admitting she can find nothing lacking in his performance. Of course, it is curious that Callas

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

finds fault with the two young women, and not the young man. Coincidence? Or is the young tenor simply less threatening to Callas’s own fragile ego? Perhaps McNally intended to leave his audience grappling with this unanswerable question. Pianist James Lent masterfully accompanies the vocalists while competently singing alternate vocal parts to fill in where helpful– well done! Jeremy Mascia offers a bit of welcome, if overdone, comic relief as the beleaguered stagehand. ICT’s excellent production, directed by Todd Nielsen on J.R.

Bruce’s attractive and versatile set, is engaging, believable, and extremely well cast– an outstanding evening of theater. Master Class continues at International City Theatre through April 14. Tickets are $45 for Friday and Saturday evening performances and for Sunday matinees, $38 for Thursday evening performances. Evening performances are at 8pm; Sunday matinees are at 2pm. ICT is located in the Long Beach Performing Arts Center at 300 East Ocean Blvd. Call (562) 4364610 for reservations and information. Tickets are also available online at InternationalCityTheatre.com .

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ST3443 - March 29_Layout 1 3/29/13 11:51 AM Page 12

12 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

TST4315 Title No. 6231293 ALS No. 2011-7007 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT OF A LIEN, DATED MARCH 12, 2012. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT: On April 10, 2013, at 9:00 AM, ASSOCIATION LIEN SERVICES, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to a certain lien, recorded on March 15, 2012, as instrument number 20120404979, of the official records of Los Angeles County, California. WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR LAWFUL MONEY OF THE UNITED STATES, OR A CASHIERS CHECK at: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA. The street address and other common designations, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2209 Bay View Drive , Signal Hill, California 90755 Assessor's Parcel No. 7215-014-065 The owner(s) of the real property is purported to be: Steen D. Sprouffske, unmarried man The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designations, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of a note, homeowner's assessment or other obligation secured by this lien, with interest and other sum as provided therein: plus advances, if any, under the terms thereof and interest on such advances, plus fees, charges, expenses of the Trustee and trust created by said lien. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $17,634.06. Payment must be in cash, a cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state bank or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings & loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. The real property described above is being sold subject to the right of redemption. The redemption period within which real property may be redeemed ends 90 days after the sale. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may contact Priority Posting & Publishing for information regarding the trustee’s sale or visit its website www.priorityposting.com for information regarding the sale of this property. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the website. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. The beneficiary of said Lien hereto executed and delivered to the undersigned, a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located. Date: March 8, 2013 Association Lien Services, as Trustee P.O. Box 64750, Los Angeles, CA 90064 (310) 207-2027 By: Alvin Okoreeh, Trustee Officer P1026742 3/15, 3/22, 03/29/2013

TST4326 Trustee Sale No. 255494CA Loan No. 0709249742 Title Order No. 1031270 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 02-01-2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 04-19-2013 at 9:00 AM, CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded 02-09-2006, Book N/A, Page N/A, Instrument 06 0305428, of official records in the Office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California, executed by: MILLICENT DICKINSON, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN, as Trustor, WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA, as Beneficiary, will sell at public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Sale will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to the Deed of Trust. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Place of Sale: BEHIND THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED IN CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, POMONA, CA Legal Description: PARCEL 1: UNIT NO. 17, AS SHOWN AND DESCRIBED IN THE CONDOMINIUM PLAN FOR TRACT 35227, RECORDED ON DECEMBER 18, 1981 AS INSTRUMENT NO. 81-1244757. PARCEL 2: AN UNDIVIDED 1/82 INTEREST AS TENANT IN COMMON IN LOT 1 OF TRACT 35227, IN THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 970 PAGES 71 AND 72 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. EXCEPT THEREFROM UNITS 1 TO 82, INCLUSIVE, AS SHOWN AND DESCRIBED IN THE CONDOMINIUM PLAN REFERRED TO IN PARCEL 1. ALSO EXCEPT THEREFROM A PORTION OF SAID LAND, THE TITLE TO AND OWNERSHIP OF AN UNDIVIDED 8 PERCENT OF ALL OIL, GAS AND OTHER HYDROCARBON SUBSTANCES UNDER SAID LAND, OR WHICH MAY BE EXTRACTED FROM OR PRODUCED FROM OR UPON SAID LAND, PROVIDED SUCH OIL, GAS OR OTHER HYDROCARBON SUBSTANCES ARE DISCOVERED AND PRODUCTION IS COMMENCED WITHIN A PERIOD OF 10 YEARS FROM JANUARY 30, 1946, AND UPON THE HAP-

PUBLIC NOTICES

PENING OF SUCH EVENTS, THEN GRANTOR`S RESERVED INTEREST SHALL CONTINUE SO LONG AS OIL OR GAS OR ANY HYDROCARBON SUBSTANCES ARE PRODUCED OR ARE CAPABLE OF BEING PRODUCED FROM SAID PROPERTY, AS RESERVED AND EXCEPTED IN THE DEED FROM MAURICE S. HUBBELL AND RUTH B. HUBBELL, HIS WIFE TO ARGUS MOYLE, A WIDOWER, DOING BUSINESS AS MOYLE OIL COMPANY, DATED JANUARY 30, 1946, RECORDED ONE JUNE 26, 1946, IN BOOK 23389 PAGE 101, OFFICIAL RECORDS. EXCEPT THEREFROM, ALL OIL, OIL RIGHTS, NATURAL GAS RIGHTS, MINERAL RIGHTS, AND OTHER HYDROCARBON SUBSTANCES BY WHATEVER NAME KNOWN, TOGETHER WITH APPURTENANT RIGHTS THERETO, WITHOUT, HOWEVER, ANY RIGHT TO ENTER UPON THE SURFACE OF SAID LAND NOR ANY PORTION OF THE SUBSURFACE LYING ABOVE A DEPTH OF 300 FEET, AS EXCEPTED OR RESERVED IN INSTRUMENTS OF RECORD. PARCEL 3: AN EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR BALCONIES/PATIO PURPOSES OVER THAT PORTION SHOWN AND DESCRIBED IN THE CONDOMINIUM PLAN WITH A LETTER DESIGNATION B'' AND ''C'' C17, AS SHOWN IN SAID CONDOMINIUM PLAN. PARCEL 4: AN EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR PARKING PURPOSES OVER THAT PORTION SHOWN AND DESCRIBED IN SAID CONDOMINIUM PLAN AS P87 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $216,756.16 (estimated) Street address and other common designation of the real property: 1903 TEMPLE AVE #121 SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 APN Number: 7216-021-062 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". In compliance with California Civil Code 2923.5(c) the mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent declares: that it has contacted the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure; or that it has made efforts to contact the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure by one of the following methods: by telephone; by United States mail; either 1st class or certified; by overnight delivery; by personal delivery; by e-mail; by face to face meeting. DATE: 03-26-2013 CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY, as Trustee ROSAURA ARMENTA, ASSISTANT SECRETARY California Reconveyance Company 9200 Oakdale Avenue Mail Stop: CA2-4379 Chatsworth, CA 91311 800-892-6902 CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY IS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. For Sales Information: www.lpsasap.com or 1-714-730-2727 www.priorityposting.com or 1-714-573-1965 www.auction.com or 1800-280-2832 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, this information can be obtained from one of the following three companies: LPS Agency Sales & Posting at (714) 730-2727, or visit the Internet Web site www.lpsasap.com (Registration required to search for sale information) or Priority Posting & Publishing at (714) 573-1965 or visit the Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com (Click on the link for “Advanced Search” to search for sale information), or auction.com at 1-800-280-2832 or visit the Internet Web site www.auction.com, using the Trustee Sale No. shown above. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. P1029317 3/29, 4/5, 04/12/2013

TST4327 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE Trustee Sale No. 127040-11 Loan No. 0193798 Title Order No. 142773505 APN 7216-002-026 TRA No.: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 08/11/1998. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 04/19/2013 at 10:00AM, MORTGAGE LENDER SERVICES, INC. as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 08/20/1998 as Document No. 98 1478857 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California, executed by: KURT VAUGHN AND WAYNE LEE, as Trustor, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States, by cash, a cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state). Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County, California describing the land therein: SEE EXHIBIT "A" ATTACHED HERETO AND MADE A PART HEREOF Exhibit “A” A Condominium Comprised Of: Parcel 1: That portion of lot 1 of tract no. 33939, in The City Of Signal Hill, in The County Of Los Angeles, State Of California, as per map recorded in book 904 page 15 of maps, in the office of the County recorder of said County, shown and defined as unit 1 on that certain condominium plan for said tract (the “ condominium plan” herein) recorded on October 26, 1978 as instrument no. 78-1190217 official records, of said County, and referred to in that certain declaration of covenants, conditions, and restrictions, and easements for Villa Hermosa Vista (the “declaration” herein) recorded on October 10, 1978, as instrument no. 781124791 official records of said County, and Amended on October 16, 1978 as instrument no. 78-1147383 official records. Parcel 2: An undivided one-twenty-first interest in and to those portions of lot 1 of tract no. 33939, shown and defined as “common areas” (the “common area” herein) on the condominium plan and in the declaration. Except therefrom all crude oil, petroleum gas, brea, asphaltum and all kindred substances and other minerals under and in said land, as reserved by Gerson B. Reynolds and Wanda K. Reynolds, husband and wife, in deed recorded October 14, 1977 as instrument no. 77-1137103 official records. Also except

all right and interest in and to all oil, gas, minerals and subsurface material below a depth of 500 feet without right of surface entry as reserved by R. B. J. Development Company, a General Partnership, in deed, recorded May 24, 1979 as instrument no. 79-558917, official records. Parcel 3: A non exclusive easement for ingress, egress and support, over, across and through all of the common areas of the project, to the extent provided in article XXIII of the declaration and subject to the limitations set forth therein, which non exclusive easement shall be appurtenant to parcel 1 above and shall be for the benefit of grantee, his successors, assigns, guests, tenants, servants. licensees and invitees. The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2621 EAST 20TH STREET UNIT 1, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90804. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit: $113,659.16 (Estimated). Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. The Beneficiary may elect to bid less than the full credit bid. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located and more than three months have elapsed since such recordation. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (916) 939-0772 or visit this Internet Web site www.nationwideposting.com using the file number assigned to this case 127040-11. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: 03/22/2013 MORTGAGE LENDER SERVICES, INC. 81 BLUE RAVINE ROAD, SUITE 100, FOLSOM, CA 95630 (916) 962-3453 Sale Information Line: (916) 939-0772 or www.nationwideposting.com. TARA CAMPBELL, TRUSTEE SALE OFFICER. MORTGAGE LENDER SERVICES, INC. MAY BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NPP0215088 To: SIGNAL TRIBUNE PUB: 03/29/2013, 04/05/2013, 04/12/2013 TST4323 Loan No.: FREEMAN RESS Order No.: 75035 A.P. NUMBER 7215-027-063 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE UNDER DEED OF TRUST YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED March 15, 2007, UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that on 04/12/2013, at 9:00 A.M. of said day, behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA, RESS Financial Corporation, a California corporation, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to the power of sale conferred in that certain Deed of Trust executed by MARKESE FREEMAN, an Unmarried Man recorded on 06/01/2007, in Book n/a of Official Records of LOS ANGELES County, at page n/a, Recorder’s Instrument No. 20071326299 , by reason of a breach or default in payment or performance of the obligations secured thereby, including that breach or default, Notice of which was recorded 12/10/2012 as Recorder’s Instrument No. 20121894739, in Book n/a, at page n/a, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, lawful money of the United States, evidenced by a Cashier’s Check drawn on a state or national bank, or the equivalent thereof drawn on any other financial institution specified in section 5102 of the California Financial Code, authorized to do business in the State of California, ALL PAYABLE AT THE TIME OF SALE, all right, title and interest held by it as Trustee, in that real property situated in said County and State, described as follows: Portion Lots 9 and 10, Block "P", per Book 9, pages 2 and 3, being also a portion of Parcels "A" and "B" per Certificate of Compliance recorded November 12, 2002, as Instrument No. 022721165. The street address or other common designation of the real property hereinabove described is purported to be: 2749 EAST 21ST STREET, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 . The undersigned disclaims all liability for any incorrectness in said street address or other common designation. Said sale will be made without warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, or other encumbrances, to satisfy the unpaid obligations secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest and other sums as provided therein; plus advances, if any, thereunder and interest thereon; and plus fees, charges, and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of said obligations at the time of initial publication of this Notice is $113,749.67. In the event that the deed of trust described in this Notice of Trustee's Sale is secured by real property containing from one to four single-family residences, the following notices are provided pursuant to the provisions of Civil Code section 2924f: NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware

that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee's sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-573-1965 or visit this Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com, using the file number assigned to this case 75035. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not be immediately reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Dated: 03/13/2013 RESS Financial Corporation a California corporation, as Trustee By: Bruce R. Beasley, President 1780 Town and Country Drive, Suite 105, Norco, CA 92860-3618 (SEAL) Tel.: (951) 270-0164 or (800)343-7377 FAX: (951)270-2673 Trustee’s Sale Information: (714) 573-1965 www.priorityposting.com P1027069 3/22, 3/29, 04/05/2013

TST4316 APN: 7216-018-018 TS No: CA05002533-12-1 TO No: 1325084 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE  YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED December 11, 2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.  On April 8, 2013 at 09:00 AM, Vineyard Ballroom at Doubletree Hotel Los Angeles-Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650, MTC FINANCIAL INC. dba TRUSTEE CORPS, as the duly Appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded on December 20, 2006 as Instrument No. 06 2830189 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, executed by DANIELA VLNKOVA, AND IGOR VLNKA, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS, as Trustor(s), in favor of AMERICA`S WHOLESALE LENDER as Lender and MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as nominee for Lender, its successors and/or assigns, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of sale, that certain property situated in said County, California describing the land therein as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST    The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1916 JUNIPERO AVENUE, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755-6012   The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein.  Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the Note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said Note(s), advances if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust.  The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligations secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of this Notice of Trustee`s Sale is estimated to be $373,127.77 (Estimated), provided, however, prepayment premiums, accrued interest and advances will increase this figure prior to sale. Beneficiary`s bid at said sale may include all or part of said amount. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier`s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the California Financial Code and authorized to do business in California, or other such funds as may be acceptable to the Trustee. In the event tender other than cash is accepted, the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustee`s Deed Upon Sale until funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a matter of right. The property offered for sale excludes all funds held on account by the property receiver, if applicable.  If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder`s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. Notice to Potential Bidders  If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a Trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a Trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same Lender may hold more than one mortgage or Deed of Trust on the property.  Notice to Property Owner  The sale date shown on this Notice of Sale may be postponed one or more times by the Mortgagee, Beneficiary, Trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about Trustee Sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call Auction.com at 800.280.2832 for information regarding the Trustee's Sale or visit the Internet Web site address www.Auction.com for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case, CA05002533-12-1. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale.  Date: March 9, 2013 TRUSTEE CORPS TS No. CA05002533-121  17100 Gillette Ave, Irvine, CA 92614  949-2528300  Stephanie Hoy, Authorized Signatory    SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ONLINE AT www.Auction.com FOR AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL  AUCTION.COM at 800.280.2832  TRUSTEE CORPS MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.  P1026562 3/15, 3/22, 03/29/2013          TST4331 / 2013 050756 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: AEH PHOTOGRAPHY, 25735 Perlman Place Unit A, Stevenson Ranch, CA 91381. Registrant: ALEXIS EVE HARRINGTON, 25735 Perlman Place Unit A, Stevenson Ranch, CA 91381. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Alexis Harrington. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business

MARCH 29, 2013

name on February 25, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on March 14, 2013.

TST4332 / 2013 058242 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: PACIFIC OFFICE MANAGEMENT, 5540 El Jardin St., Long Beach, CA 90815. Registrant: DONALD R. YANCY, 5540 El Jardin St., Long Beach, CA 90815. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Donald R. Yancy. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on March 25, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: March 29, & April 5, 12, 19, 2013. TST4333 / 2013 060078 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: BELLE'S GIFT SHOP, 6481 Atlantic Ave. #107, Long Beach, CA 90805. Registrant: DAVID ETHRIDGE, 6481 Atlantic Ave. #107, Long Beach, CA 90805. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: David Ethridge. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on March 15, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on March 26, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: March 29, & April 5, 12, 19, 2013.

TST4334 / 2013 060079 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: GK MEDIA, 2271 Grand Ave., Long Beach, CA 90815. Registrant: KRIS GRAGSON, 2271 Grand Ave., Long Beach, CA 90815 This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Kris Gragson. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on March 26, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: March 29, & April 5, 12, 19, 2013.

TST4311 044414 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: UNITED SECURITY TRAINING CENTER, 3639 Atlantic Ave., Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: UNITED SECUITY SERVICES, 3639 Atlantic Ave., Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Candice L. Wright, CFO. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on March 5, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 6, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: March 8, 15, 22, 29, 2013.

TST4312 / 2013 025235 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: LEVEL UP ENTERTAINMENT, 1066 E. 46th St., Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: STELLAR EVENT SERVICES, LLC, 1066 E. 46th St., Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: a Limited Liability Company. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Dianna Manson, President. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on January 1, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 6, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: March 8, 15, 22, 29, 2013. TST4313 / 2013 044097 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: EAST LONG BEACH CURVES, 6536 E. Spring St., Long Beach, CA 90815. Registrants: 1. ROBERT E. GREEN, 2. ROSE MARIE J. GREEN, 2945 Ladoga Ave., Long Beach, CA 90815. This business is conducted by: a Married Couple. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Robert E. Green. The registrants have not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 6, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: March 8, 15, 22, 29, 2013


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TST4335 / Case No. NP015334 Notice of Petition To Administer Estate of: IMA lEE GARNETT To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of IMA LEE GARNETT A Petition For Probate has been filed by MARIA HILL O'DWYER in the Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles. The Petition For Probate requests that MARIA HILL O'DWYER, be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The Petition requests the decedent’s will codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The Petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act with limited authority. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain and very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A Hearing on the petition will be held on April 18, 2013 at 1:30 PM in Dept. 4 located at 415 W. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach, CA 90802. If You Object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections, with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If Your Are A Creditor or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above.You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: MARIA HILL O'DWYER, 1132 E. 16th St., LONG BEACH, CA 90813. Attorney for Petitioner: Elizabeth Vozzella, Esq., 3553-A Atlantic Ave. #187 Long Beach, CA 90807. Pub. Signal Tribune, March 29, & April 5, 12, 2013

TST4310 / 2013 028797 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: LITTLE ENCOURAGEMENTS, 4580 Atlantic Ave. #7123, Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: ITORO ESEME UDOFIA, 4482 N. Banner Dr. #1, Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Itoro Eseme Udofia. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on February 11, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 11, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: March 8, 15, 22, 29, 2013.

TST4317 / 2013 049167 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: CS PAUL, 627 Pine Ave., Long Beach, CA 90802. Registrant: PAULA A. ELIAS, 627 Pine Ave., Long Beach, CA 90802. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Paula A. Elias. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on March 12, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: March 15, 22, 29, & April 5, 2013. TST4314 / 2013 046278 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. TOM AND JERI FLORIST, 2. CHRISTENSENS, 5353 Cherry Ave., Long Beach, CA 90805. Registrant: POPATIA CORPORATION, 9573 Cedar St., Bellflower, CA 90706. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Sheila Mamdani, President. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on July 11, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on March 8, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: March 15, 22, 29, & April 5, 2013.

TST4321 / 2013 040655 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: NAIL BEAUTY 4U, 10732 Arrowood St., Temple City, CA 91780. Registrant: KRISTY TRINH TRAN, 3849 Cypress Ave., El Monte, CA 91731. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Kristy Trinh Tran. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 28, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: March 22, 29, & April 5, 12, 2013.

TST4322 / 2013 034182 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: BETTY SUE NIBBLES, 1405 E. 1st St., Apt. 7, Long Beach, CA 90802. Registrant: RACHEL CERDENIO, 1405 E. 1st St., Apt. 7, Long Beach, CA 90802. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Rachel Cerdenio. The

registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on February 20, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 22, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: March 22, 29, & April 5, 12, 2013.

TST4324 / 2013 051657 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: RINCON CHICO CANTINA & GRILL, 2476 Santa Fe Ave., Long Beach, CA 90810. Registrant: MARIO L. MIRAMONTES, 3186 Locust Ave., Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Mario L. Miramontes. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on March 14, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: March 22, 29, & April 5, 12, 2013.

TST4325 / 2013 054753 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: CENTURION JET, 5250 W. Century Blvd., Ste. 617, Los Angeles, CA 90045. Registrant: MICHAEL HENRIQUEZ, JR., 5112 Keynote Ave., Long Beach, CA 90808. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Michael Henriquez. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on March 19, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: March 22, 29, & April 5, 12, 2013. TST4320 / 2013 040703 STATEMENT oF ABANDoNMENT oF USE oF FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: NAIL BEAUTY 4 U, located at 10919 Freer St., Temple City, CA 91780. The fictitious business name referred to above was filed on February 9, 2010, original File No. 2013 040636, in the County of Los Angeles. Registrant: HUA PHUONG, 9746 E. Loftus Dr., Rosemead, CA 91770. This business is conducted by: an Individual. Signed: Hua Phuong. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 28, 2013. Pub. The Signal Tribune: March 22, 29, & April 5, 12, 2013.

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ST3443 - March 29_Layout 1 3/29/13 11:51 AM Page 14

14 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

CITY OF SIGNAL HILL TST4330 NoTICE oF PUBlIC WoRKSHoP

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT on Tuesday, April 9, 2013, the Planning Commission of the City of Signal Hill, California, will conduct a public workshop at 7:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers located at City Hall, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, to consider recommendations on the following: SITE PLAN DESIGN REVIEW 13-02

AT THE MARCH MEETING PLANNING COMMISSION HELD A WORKSHOP TO PROVIDE DIRECTION ON A PROPOSED CHANGE TO A PREVIOUSLY APPROVED TWO-STORY 18,994 SQUARE FOOT MEDICAL OFFICE BUILDING AT 845 WILLOW STREET FOR WHICH APPROVALS HAD EXPIRED. THE CHANGE WAS TO FLIP THE BUILDING ORIENTATION SO THE REAR WAS FACING THE WILLOW STREET FRONTAGE. A SECOND WORKSHOP IS SCHEDULED TO REVIEW CHANGES TO THE REAR ELEVATION. Applicant: Ware Malcomb for 2H Construction

ALL INTERESTED PERSONS are hereby invited to attend this Workshop to present written information, express their opinions or otherwise present evidence on the above matter.

THE FILE containing information relative to the proposed project may be inspected by the public between the hours of 7:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Fridays, in the Community Development Department at City Hall. THE PUBLIC IS INVITED to submit written comments to the Community Development Department prior to the Planning Commission workshop. Written comments may also be submitted at the workshop or via email at scharney@cityofsignalhill.org FURTHER INFORMATION on this item may be obtained at the City of Signal Hill Community Development Department located at 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, or by calling Scott Charney at (562) 989-7343. Published in the Signal Tribune newspaper: March 29, 2013 Posted in accordance with S.H.M.C. Section 1.08.010 on or before: March 29, 2013 Mailed to affected property owners: March 29, 2013

CITY OF SIGNAL HILL TST4328 NoTICE oF A PUBlIC WoRKSHoP

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Tuesday, April 9, 2013, the Planning Commission of the City of Signal Hill will conduct a public workshop at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chamber located at City Hall, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, to consider the following: CONSTRUCTION TIME LIMITS

THE PLANNING COMMISSION WILL CONDUCT A WORKSHOP TO CONSIDER IMPLEMENTATION AND PROCEDURAL CRITERIA FOR REASONABLE CONSTRUCTION TIME LIMITS AND EXTENSION OPTIONS. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS are hereby invited to attend this public workshop to present written information, express their opinions or otherwise present evidence on the above matter. If you wish to legally challenge any action taken by the City on the above matter, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public workshop described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City prior to or at the public workshop.

THE PUBLIC IS INVITED to submit written comments to the Community Development Department, prior to the Planning Commission workshop. Written comments may also be submitted at the public workshop. FURTHER INFORMATION on this item may be obtained at the City of Signal Hill Community Development Department located at 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, or by emailing Selena Alanis, Assistant Planner at salanis@cityofsignalhill.org or calling at (562) 989-7341. Published in the Signal Tribune newspaper per Gov’t Code (§65091(a)(3)(1)) March 29, 2013 Posted in accordance with S.H.M.C. Section 1.08.010: March 29, 2013

NEWS

WRD

continued from page 1

on May 10 at WRD’s headquarters at 4040 Paramount Blvd. in Lakewood. During the court hearing last Friday, WRD General Manager Robb Whitaker cited comments made by Signal Hill City Attorney David Aleshire, partner in the law firm working on behalf of the cities, at a Feb. 19 Signal Hill City Council meeting. As reported by the Signal Tribune, Aleshire stated that the court hasn’t determined whether the WRD would be required to notify the more than 800,000 property owners or 200 pumpers in both Central and West Coast Basins of rate changes under Proposition 218. “The question is if the WRD assessment, in this context, would be for the pumpers as opposed to the individual parcels,” Aleshire said during the City Council meeting. “That is something that is not deter-

mined at this point in time. It’s not determined who you would give the notice to and how you go about doing that, and I think that’s something that the WRD would have to look at with their legal counsel.” Quilizapa, however, argues that Judge Chalfant has already ordered that public notices be sent to the pumpers, not the parcel owners, adding that the cities have sent letters to WRD informing the agency of the original court order. She said “hearsay” at a public meeting doesn’t constitute evidence. “I am the lead attorney in the litigation,” said Quilizapa. “…There is nothing to interpret. We already know it’s the pumpers, but the WRD has really undertaken this as a sideshow.” On the day of the court hearing, the WRD also issued a press release with a subhead stating, “Cities flipflop on notifying residents about

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CITY OF SIGNAL HILL TST4329 NoTICE oF A PUBlIC WoRKSHoP

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Tuesday, April 9, 2013, the Planning Commission of the City of Signal Hill will conduct a public workshop at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chamber located at City Hall, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, to consider recommendations on the following:

DRAFT COMPLIANCE PLANS AND RECLASSIFICATION FOR TWELVE TRUCKING YARDS

THE PLANNING COMMISSION WILL REVIEW DRAFT COMPLIANCE PLANS FOR TWELVE TRUCKING YARDS AND CONSIDER CHANGING THE USE CLASSIFICATION FOR UP TO NINE TO STORAGE YARDS. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS are hereby invited to attend this public workshop to present written information, express their opinions or otherwise present evidence on the above matter.

THE PUBLIC IS INVITED to submit written comments to the Community Development Department, prior to the Planning Commission workshop. Written comments may also be submitted at the public workshop. FURTHER INFORMATION on this item may be obtained at the City of Signal Hill Community Development Department located at 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, or by emailing Colleen Doan, Associate Planner at cdoan@cityofsignalhill.org or calling at (562) 989-7344. Published in the Signal Tribune newspaper: March 29, 2013 Posted in accordance with S.H.M.C. Section 1.08.010: March 29, 2013 Mailed to affected property owners and tenants: March 29, 2013

CITY OF SIGNAL HILL TST4319 NoTICE oF VACANCIES

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION PLANNING COMMISSION PARKS & RECREATION COMMISSION

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that due to terms expiring on May 31, 2013, three vacancies each exist on the Signal Hill Civil Service, Planning, and Parks & Recreation Commissions. The City of Signal Hill will be conducting a recruitment to fill each vacancy. All interested residents are encouraged to apply. To serve as a Civil Service, Planning, or Parks & Recreation Commissioner, you must be a U.S. citizen, 18 years of age or older; and a registered voter and resident of the City at least 29 days prior to the date of appointment. Each member shall continue to reside in the City for the duration of the term of office (Signal Hill City Charter Section 602).

If you are interested in serving as a Commissioner, please call (562) 989-7305 for an application. Applications are also available in the City Clerk’s office, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Monday–Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. You may also apply on the City’s website at HYPERLINK "http://www.cityofsignalhill.org" www.cityofsignalhill.org. Applications must be accompanied by a letter of interest. Applications will be accepted until Monday, April 15, 2013, at 5:30 p.m. Published in the Signal Tribune on March 22 & 29, and April 5 & 12, 2013.

MARCH 29, 2013

water rates,” while quoting both Aleshire and Signal Hill City Manager Ken Farfsing. The press release also provided a statement from WRD Board President Albert Robles, who said the WRD board decided to send notices to parcel owners as a way to make sure all ratepayers are notified. “We believe the decision to communicate to all residential and business parcel owners insures that no one is excluded from our ratesetting efforts and lends to a more transparent public process,” Robles stated in the press release. Aleshire, however, said his comments quoted in the press release were taken “out of context” and the discussion during the City Council meeting, attended by Whitaker, was meant to serve as a “dialogue” with the WRD in an effort to come up with a “non-litigation solution” rather than be used in court proceedings. “We thought we were having a dialogue with them,” Aleshire said. “Instead, they rushed to court [and] they rushed the notices out without working out these issues that we disagree with… How do I get the cities to work with [the WRD] when, every time we start to get into a serious conversation, [the WRD does] something? They issue a press release and they try to back us into a corner. So, it’s very hard to convince the city councilmembers that [the WRD is] acting in good faith.” Quilizapa added that sending public notices to parcel owners rather than the pumpers creates “confusion” and appears to be a veiled attempt to lessen the cities’ rights to protest rate changes. For instance, it would be harder to gather a majority protest from 800,000 parcel owners (more than 400,000 parcel owners required) rather than from the 200 pumpers (more than 100 pumpers required). “Our perception is that they have taken this as a way of diluting the pumpers’ protest rights so they can successfully pass any fee that they want,” she said. The mailers are also a “waste of public funds,” said Quilizapa, who added that she estimates sending out the notices to parcel owners cost the WRD between $400,000 and $800,000, including postage and printing costs. “[The WRD has] to guard very closely what they do with those funds,” she said. Edward Casey, attorney for the WRD, deferred questions regarding the mailers, which he said is a matter outside of litigation, to WRD staff. Whitaker did not return phone calls seeking comment before press time. Meanwhile, the cities involved in the litigation have received criticism from the Central Basin Water Association (CBWA), a group of utility agencies that hold rights to pump groundwater. The CBWA has recently sent letters to various cities involved in the litigation, taking issue with the cities withholding RA payments for nearly two years since the original court ruling. The pumpers so far collectively owe about $13.5 million in RA payments to the WRD and are keeping the payments in liability funds until the court awards damages, said Quilizapa, who added that making the payments to the WRD would be a “gift of public funds.” The damages phase of the case that would determine how much the cities would be paid back for charges in prior years that the WRD imposed without complying with state law has yet to go to trial, she said. Quilizapa said Judge Dau had initially scheduled a trial-setting conference to take place in May but the hearing may likely be rescheduled again. ß


ST3443 - March 29_Layout 1 3/29/13 11:51 AM Page 15

MARCH 29, 2013

College

continued from page 1

and onwards so that students and parents understand what they need to do to enter college and succeed in college, LBCC President Eloy Oakley said in an interview prior to the event Thursday. “And we help them realize that it’s not just a dream,” Oakley added. “It is a definite reality that they can go to college, and we have the doors wide open for them.” He attributed part of the success of the program to student motivation, but he also pointed to the major collaborative efforts between all three institutions as a key to the success of the program. “I think the most important factor has been the willingness of the three institutions to work to tear down barriers for the students and to really look at how to create a seamless pathway for them so that

Alexander

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next generation of tech-savvy students who are in the elementary and secondary pipeline and soon will be seeking college degrees.” “President Alexander has been an exceptional leader during one of the most challenging times for public higher education our state has ever faced,” said California State University (CSU) Chancellor Timothy P. White. “As president, he has earned the respect of faculty, staff and students at his campus, from his peers across the California State University, and from leaders of higher education throughout the nation. King’s work with the federal government, along with his advocacy efforts to preserve access for students in California, is particularly commendable. I am grateful for President Alexander’s service and wish him the best in his next endeavor.” An interim president will be appointed upon Alexander’s departure, and the Chancellor and CSU Board of Trustees will begin a national search for a permanent replacement. “LSU is getting an outstanding leader in F. King Alexander,” said Bob Linscheid, chair of the CSU Board of Trustees. “Under his direction, California State University, Long Beach has increased its programmatic offerings, facilities and awareness on a national scale that resulted in a learning environment that drew over 80,000 applications this year– the most of any CSU campus. President Alexander has always worked to further the CSU mission of an affordable and accessible, high-quality education, and his efforts were critical in offsetting the effects of years of devastating budget cuts to ensure that CSULB is one of the best educational values in the country.” Alexander will participate in the 2013 CSULB graduation ceremonies. “I look forward to continuing my work at Cal State Long Beach over the next few months,” he said. “I am especially excited to be a part of this year’s upcoming commencement ceremonies where I will have one more opportunity to shake the hand of every 2013 CSULB graduate and wish them suc-

NEWS

they’re not stumbling along trying to figure things out just because the institutions don’t talk to each other,” Oakley said. The numbers of admissions to CSULB have increased. The fiveyear progress report announced that 743 LBUSD graduates entered CSULB as freshmen in 2012 compared to 519 LBUSD graduates in 2008, according to a press statement. The report also highlights a 500-percent increase in English course completions and 200-percent increase in math course completions. One young woman’s story highlighted the success of the program. Now an international business major, Dominique Vera looked back at her own pathway to college with deep roots in the Long Beach public education system. She started off as a kid at Burbank Elementary School and attended Long Beach Poly High School. She said she had thought all the best universities were on the East

Coast, but when she realized quickly that she could no longer afford the university she was attending in Massachusetts, she made her way back home to Long Beach to attend LBCC. She then transferred to California State University Long Beach (CSULB) and is now considering a second major in hospitality management. “If you get anything out of this, just understand…the value and the opportunities are here,” Vera said in a speech directed to nearly 200 people who packed into the auditorium. “Learn from my mistakes…I realized that everything was waiting here in Long Beach for me. Why go away when you have the best here?” The celebration culminated in an awards ceremony where about 30 students from middle-school LBUSD received scholarships that ranged from $50 to $250. However, leaders acknowledged the challenges that the program had

cess.” Long Beach Mayor Bob Foster chaired the CSULB presidential selection committee that brought Alexander to the university. “During his tenure, President Alexander elevated CSULB to one of the top public universities in the nation despite a period of tremendous financial challenges in this state,” Foster said. “King’s energy and passion for the mission of the public university system is infectious, and his talents will be missed here in Long Beach. I am sorry to see him go but wish him nothing but success at LSU.” Former Long Beach Mayor Beverly O’Neill is an alumna of CSULB. “I really believe we were lucky to have him at Cal State Long Beach for the past seven years,” she said. “He has made a difference at the university, which has advanced in so many ways. In particular, he worked closely with the Long Beach Unified School District and Long Beach City College to form a strong partnership for students of Long Beach to help them flow from kindergarten through graduate school. President Alexander has been a great source of pride for the greater Long Beach community, and I know that he is going to do extremely well in his new position at Louisiana State University.” Alexander partnered with Long Beach Unified School District Superintendent Christopher J. Steinhauser and Long Beach City College President Eloy Ortiz Oakley on the College Promise venture. “I greet the news of President F. King Alexander’s appointment at President-Chancellor at Louisiana State University with sadness and great pride,” Oakley said. “His commitment to our community and students as exemplified by the Long Beach College Promise will be deeply missed in Long Beach. These same traits set him apart as a higher-education leader who understands the connection of public education institutions to the communities they serve. He has been a true partner of Long Beach City College, and his leadership has helped secure the success of the Long Beach College Promise for generations to come. I am

sure he will produce similar results at LSU.” Steinhauser said that LSU is very fortunate to get Alexander as its president-chancellor. “He has done wonderful things to elevate the stature of Cal State Long Beach, and he has remained a true friend of our K–12 school system during some difficult times for California’s public schools,” Steinhauser said. “We are saddened to see King leave, but we know that wherever he goes, he will have a tremendous, positive impact upon the lives of students. I’m personally grateful for all that he has done to help ensure equity and access to a college education for all students in our community, and I wish him all the best.” Alexander will remain president of CSULB through June.

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faced. The program began in 2008, just before a recession and before the State again announced major cuts to public higher education. Donald Para, who serves as CSULB’s provost and senior vice president for academic affairs, acknowledged in his address that CSULB had to reduce overall enrollment by 2,000 students. “This is a celebratory day,” Para said in an interview Thursday. “Nonetheless, I have to say that we are so financially challenged right now, and we are redirecting resources that we have put in other places toward seeing that our students continue to succeed. But the path we’re on right now is not sustainable, so without some additional funding…it will remain for us a pri-

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ority, but it will be challenge.” He said, however, that they still look forward to seeing their numbers increase and emphasized that there is a commitment from all three institutions to support the program. Cuts to educational programs were also emphasized by a group of student protestors who briefly interrupted the celebration. Marshawn Frasier, a 32-year-old auto-trade student at LBCC, was among the protestors who held up signs in the meeting. Frasier said she had two classes to complete before LBCC cut the program. She criticized the college’s decision to cut the program and said the administration took raises at the same time. “It’s about them, not about us,” Frasier said. ß

Source: CSULB

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