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Services Director Pilar AlcivarMcCoy reported to the Council that federal grant money available for its senior brown-bag program has been reduced to $8,756, an amount that is about $4,000 less than the previous year.

The shortfall is a significant hit to the community-services program that operates on a budget of $20,000 to provide groceries every other week to about 40 lowincome seniors. The staff tries its

‘Best is yet to come’ for Bixby Knolls

see COUNCIL page 11

Sean Belk Staff Writer

Bixby Knolls, the only neighborhood in Long Beach with nine designated signs on the 405 Freeway, is now entering a new chapter. Although the State shut down the redevelopment that helped to turn the corridor along Long Beach Boulevard and Atlantic Avenue into a burgeoning attraction in the last few years through paying for social events, banners and street upgrades, City officials and business representatives said there’s still more work to do, with new improvements and developments underway. “With live theater performances and music entertainment, imagine Bixby Knolls as the entertainment destination in the city of Long Beach… just imagine for a second,” said 8th District Long

February 22, 2013

Lawsuit filed by Signal Hill, other cities against WRD for refund of water-pumping fees nears trial

Courtesy City of SH

Signal Hill will have to find a way to continue feeding its poorer senior citizens with a little less help from the Feds. At the Feb. 19 City Council meeting, Community

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Your Weekly Community Newspaper

Bags loaded with a mix of groceries await distribution to low-income seniors. Signal Hill’s food distribution program is now short about $4,000 after funding through federal community grants was significantly reduced this year. The city’s community-services department will be attempting to find sponsorships to make up for the shortfall.

Staff Writer

For more information, see page 8.

SERVING BIXBY KNOLLS, CALIFORNIA HEIGHTS, LOS CERRITOS, WRIGLEY AND THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

Signal Hill to receive less federal funding for its brown-bag program for low-income seniors

CJ Dablo

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Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association Executive Director Blair Cohn and project manager Krista Leaders conduct an opportunity drawing during the State of the District event on Feb. 20.

Beach City Councilmember Al Austin during the annual State of the District event, called “Bixby Knolls by the Numbers,” presented by the Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association

(BKBIA) at the Long Beach Petroleum Club on Linden Avenue on Feb. 20. “I’m looking so forward to working together for con-

Friday

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see BKBIA page 14

Saturday

Sunday

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Robb Whitaker, general manager of the Water Replenishment District of Southern California (WRD) addresses the Signal Hill City Council during its Feb. 19 meeting regarding the ongoing lawsuit regarding water-pumping fees that is heading to trial. Sean Belk Staff Writer

Even though a judge has ruled twice in a lawsuit brought by Signal Hill and two other cities that the Water Replenishment District of Southern California (WRD) illegally imposed fees by not complying with state law, how much money, if any, the water agency will be forced to pay back to the cities has yet to be determined in court. The controversial and complex lawsuit filed by Cerritos, Downey and Signal Hill against the WRD is entering the damages phase of the case. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge James C. Chalfant first ruled in April 2011 that the WRD’s replenishment assessments (RAs) imposed on cities and private entities for pumping groundwater from aquifers didn’t follow Proposition 218, which requires that property owners be notified and allowed to protest any rate changes. Another judge, Ralph Dau, ruled in December 2012 that the cities have the right to seek a refund for past charges and has recently set March 5 as the date for a trial-setting conference. During a status report on the litigation to the Signal Hill City Council at its Feb. 19 meeting, Steve Myrter, the City’s director of public works, said the case is significant not only because the cities

February 22 through February 26, 2013

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H O EL VE D R

Vol. 34 No. 38

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Mixed-media work on drywall (unfinished) by Shyanne Grandi

now have an opportunity to seek a return for “overcharges” imposed from 2007 to 2011, but that WRD may now be forced to comply with Proposition 218 when it adopts future rates, which he said “enables the pumpers to have a...closer review of how RAs are set.” Myrter explained that what initiated the lawsuit was the fact that the WRD has increased its water-pumping rates 83 percent in the last decade, jumping from $112 per acre-foot in 2002 to $205 per acre-foot in 2010. Even after a lawsuit was filed in 2010 to dispute the rising rates, the WRD still raised its assessments by an additional 19 percent to the current rate of $244 per acre-foot, he said. Myrter added that, last year, WRD assessments accounted for 31 percent of the City’s water department operating budget. Robb Whitaker, general manager of WRD and a Signal Hill resident for more than 10 years, however, told the City Council that the cost of importing water to replenish what cities take from underground aquifers has also increased throughout the years, which is much of the reason why the WRD has raised its rates. He said about 75 percent of the WRD’s budget is for purchasing imported water to put back into the ground, since

see WRD page 15

PRESIDENTS’ DAY

WEEKEND

SALE See page 16


NEWS

2 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

FEBRUARY 22, 2013

‘Ready Long Beach’ forum to feature KCET’s Val Zavala and earthquake experts

Eighty years ago on March 10, 1933, Long Beach was hit at 5:54pm by a 6.4-magnitude earthquake, causing an estimated $50 million in damages and 120 deaths. Following the quake, many residents had to live in tents in local parks, and they ate food provided by the National

Guard. More than 90 percent of Long Beach schools were severely damaged. Students attended classes in parks and tents for the next two years. “A lot has been learned since the 1933 earthquake, especially how residents can become prepared to sur-

vive a predicted, deadlier earthquake,” says 5th District Councilmember Gerrie Schipske. “That’s why we have put together a forum with a number of federal, state and local experts who will help Long Beach get ready for ‘the Big One.’”

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to According experts, California has a 99.7-percent chance of being devastated by a 6.7 earthquake or higher within the next 30 years. Many believe the southern portion of the San Andreas Fault would produce a magnitude 7.5 or greater if “the Big One” hits Southern California. Schipske has organized a day-long “Ready Long Beach” public forum on Saturday, March 9 and will be joined by KCET host Val Zavala, who appears on the public-affairs program SoCal Connected and is featured on the KCET special Bracing for a Quake. Ready Long Beach will be conducted at the El Dorado Community Center, 2800 N. Studebaker Rd. The program will start at 9am and include a brief, historic look at the 1933 Long Beach earthquake followed by presentations from experts at USGS, FEMA, Cal EMA, Long Beach Fire Department, CERT and American Red Cross. A light lunch will be included and then a “table top” exercise led by the representatives from the Long Beach Chapter of the American Red Cross to help participants prepare their neighborhoods. The forum will conclude at 2pm. The event is open to the public. Reservations are encouraged by calling (562) 570-6932 or emailing district5@longbeach.gov, so that the appropriate amount of materials and food can be ordered. Schipske, who is a trained member of the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT), set emer-

Val Zavala

gency preparedness as a priority for her council district by emailing and posting monthly “Ready Long Beach” alerts that include tips on how to get prepared for an emergency. She has also sponsored events over the past years in connection with The Great California ShakeOut, which provides an opportunity to practice how to be safer during big earthquakes. The Great California ShakeOut has also been organized to encourage residents to review and update emergency preparedness plans and supplies, and to secure space in order to prevent damage and injuries. The March 9 forum is the second in a series of public meetings planned to help residents become prepared. Source: City of LB

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NEWS

FEBRUARY 22, 2013

Two arrested in homicide case involving pedestrians struck by vehicle On Feb. 13, at approximately 1:45am, Long Beach Police Department (LBPD) officers were dispatched to the area of 3rd Street and Pine Avenue regarding a vehicle-versus-pedestrian accident, which resulted in the death of a female adult. Arriving officers found two individuals on the ground. Both victims were transported to a local hospital, where one succumbed to her injuries. The deceased is being identified as 24year-old Serena Medina, a resident of Long Beach. Homicide and Accident Investigation Detail Detectives responded to the scene to investigate and determine whether or not it was an intentional

act. The preliminary investigation revealed a group became involved in an altercation, two individuals were struck by a vehicle, and the vehicle fled the scene. As the investigation progressed, it became clear to investigators that it was not a typical traffic accident and was possibly an intentional act. Detectives searched for the vehicle throughout the day and late into the evening. Detectives located the suspect’s vehicle in the city of Compton and arrested 26-year-old Froylan Velazquez, a resident of Compton. On Feb. 19, the Los Angeles District Attorney’s Office formally charged Velazquez with vehicular

manslaughter and felony hit-and-run. Also, on Feb. 19, detectives arrested 26-year-old Edward Martinez, a resident of Bellflower, in connection with the incident. Martinez was booked for being an accessory and is awaiting arraignment. Anyone with information regarding the investigation is asked to contact Long Beach Police Homicide Detectives Hugo Cortes or Peter Lackovic at (562) 570-7244. Those wishing to remain anonymous may call 1-800-222-TIPS (8477), or text TIPLA plus the tip to 274637 (CRIMES), or visit LACrimeStoppers.org .

Lindsey Middle School students join drive to donate jeans to homeless teens Source: LBPD

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

3

GARNISHING YOUR GARMENTS What General meeting Who Long Beach Chapter of the Embroiderers Guild of America Where California Heights United Methodist Church, 3759 Orange Ave. When Friday, Feb. 22 beginning at 10:30am More Info The Chapter meets the fourth Friday of every month. Call (714) 345-2338.

A NIGHTMARE-ISH EVENT? What Nino’s Kitchen Nightmares viewing party Who Nino’s Italian Restaurant Where 3853 Atlantic Ave. When Friday, Feb. 22 beginning at 6pm More Info Viewing party will include dinner and live music. Reservations preferred. Call Carina at (562) 760-8957 or email carinac2012@gmail.com .

TOUR WILLOW SPRINGS PARK What Monthly tour Who Friends of Willow Springs Park Where 2745 Orange Ave. When Saturday, Feb. 23 at 9am More Info The tour, held on the fourth Saturday of each month, is led by volunteers and focuses on the history, wildlife, plants, and new developments of the property. Call (562) 570-7777 or visit facebook.com/willowspringslb.com .

LET IT SNOW What Fourth District Snow Day Who Long Beach City Councilmember Patrick O’Donnell Where Whaley Park, 5620 Atherton St. When Saturday, Feb. 23 from 11am to 3pm More Info Event is free and will include snow, sled runs, bouncers and food. Parking will be available at CSULB’s Lot 14. Call (562) 570-6918.

Sean Belk/ Signal Tribune

Ebony Wideman, 11, (left) and De’nija Lonzo, 12, prepare bags of about 700 pairs of jeans that are being distributed to local homeless shelters as part of a campaign they participated in called Teens for Jeans through Aeropostale clothing store.

Sean Belk Staff Writer

Jeans are usually the piece of clothing that teenagers almost never get rid of, even if they’re dirty, torn or ripped up. But students at Perry Lindsey Middle School in Long Beach have surrendered their denim blues for the greater good. Sixth-graders De’nija Lonzo, 12, and Ebony Wideman, 11, were both shopping in the Lakewood Mall and came across the Teens for Jeans campaign sponsored by Aeropostale apparel retailer. The campaign, put on by DoSomething.org, a national nonprofit for youth and social change, allows students to start their own drive at their school to collect jeans to be distributed to homeless teenagers at local homeless shelters. According to the campaign’s website, one in three homeless people is under the age of 18, and there are currently 1.7 million homeless teens in the United States today. “I know some of the people who are in the shelters, and they don’t have any clothing… so I wanted to help out by giving jeans to them,” said Lonzo. Through the drive, sponsored by teacher Sue Macleod, the students have so far collected more than 700 pairs of jeans to be handed out to local homeless shelters. The students invited their friends to participate in the school’s drive, shared statistics about homelessness with their friends on social-networking sites and marketed their drive to people throughout the school. The students also worked with school administrators to decide on a location to drop off the jeans. All participants in the campaign have until Feb. 24 to donate jeans at a local Aeropostale store and receive 25 percent off a new pair of jeans for each donated pair. Each school that signs up receives a free Teens for Jeans school

banner. The top collecting elementary, middle and high schools, and the top collecting Canadian school each win $5,000, and the school that collects the most jeans wins the grand prize of $10,000, Aero hoodies with the school’s name on them and a party. Perry Lindsey Middle School is an international-studies magnet school, which last year became an International Baccalaureate World School, one of only 848 schools worldwide authorized

to deliver IB Middle Years Program, which incorporates “international mindedness” and engages students in “realworld problems” in all subject areas. “We’re just proud of our students for seizing the opportunity to help, having the drive and initiative, and being caring enough to take time off during their busy weekends to look out for the school,” said Principal Stephanie Cooper. “I’m really proud of the students here.”

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EGGS WITH THE ELKS What Monthly breakfast Who Bellflower/ Long Beach Elks Lodge 888 Where 16426 Bellflower Blvd., Bellflower When Sunday, Feb. 24 from 8am to noon More Info Breakfast costs $6.50 per person and includes eggs, bacon, sausage, hash browns, biscuits with gravy, orange juice, assorted fruit, Belgian waffles and coffee. Call (562) 866-3027 or visit elks.org .

TALKING TAXES What Luncheon Who Long Beach Lincoln Club Where 6201 E. Appian Way When Thursday, Feb. 28 at noon More Info Club will have a talk by Joel Fox, president of the Small Business Action Committee and former director of Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association. Cost is $35 for non-members. RSVP required. Email dkla1@verizon.net or call (562) 439-9390.

A LOFTY EXPERIENCE What Loft Walk 2013 Who Long Beach Heritage Where Insurance Exchange Building on East Broadway and other downtown buildings When Saturday, March 2 at 4:30pm, 5:30pm and 6:30pm More Info Tours start with hosted appetizers at Congregation Ale House then moves to the Big Red Bus for a tour of downtown Long Beach with Art Deco historian John Thomas and then the Loft Walk at the Insurance Exchange building before concluding at the penthouse for wine tasting and appetizers. Tickets are $55 ($50 members, $35 students). Call (562) 4937019 or visit lbheritage.org .

WINE NOT? What Wine-tasting fundraiser Who The Long Beach City College Latino Faculty Association Where The Willmore Wine Bar, 3848 Atlantic Ave. When Thursday, March 7 from 4:30pm to 6:30pm More Info Event will include appetizers and drinks. $35 entry fee. Funds will benefit scholarships for LBCC AB540 students. Call (562) 938-4569. BOOKWORMS, UNITE What Monthly community book club Who The Bixby Knolls Literary Society Where Elise’s Tea Room, 3924 Atlantic Ave. When Wednesday, March 13 at 7pm More Info Next month, the club will delve into The Big Sleep by Raymond Chandler. Parking is available along Atlantic Avenue. Refreshments will be provided. Call (562) 595-0081 or email info@bixbyknollsinfo.com .


OPINION

4 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Thoughts from the Publisher

by Neena Strichart

three incumbents this time. When the same incumbents ran four years ago, they faced only one challenger, Edward Villanueva. On election night, the incumbents won back their seats, and, although Villanueva was not victorious, he was able to walk away with his head held high knowing that he ran a clean campaign. Who knows, with as active as he has remained in this city, maybe he’ll run again one of these days. As the publisher of a community newspaper, I don’t look forward to local elections

I will now state the obvious: “The City of Signal Hill will be having an election Tuesday, March 6.” Between the sea of signs and banners all over town, the political mailers and door hangers arriving on our porches, as well as the coverage in this publication, one would have to be oblivious to his or her surroundings to claim ignorance of this important, upcoming, political happening. Up for grabs this go-round are three city council seats. For those not in the know– four individuals are challenging the

because we usually receive a cartload of Letters to the Editor, and when that happens I am forced to set up firm ground rules. This election cycle has been rather quiet as far as letters go. Other than at election time, we do our best to run nearly every letter that is submitted to us by mail or email and even those that are handcarried. With only one week before election, I think it’s safe to assume our letter-carrier has nothing to worry about. For those who haven’t had the chance to meet the candidates at the last two forums,

Don’t forget! e b t s u m s A B D Your ! s r a e y 5 y r e v e d file your

Thank you very much for running the article regarding my award from the Los Angeles Count Board of Supervisors [“Long Beach Golf Hall of Famer Len Kennett receives Lifetime Achievement Award,” Feb. 15, 2013]. The pictures that you used were fun for me, my wife and many of our friends. I was also pleased with the careful interview that Rachael [Rifkin] did for me. Please know that your Signal newspaper is widely read in the Bixby/Virginia neighborhood. Read fully too. I again send my thanks and best wishes. Len Kennett Long Beach

Not water under the bridge

It was with great amazement (and sadness) that I watched the individuals who have promoted “The Right to Know and Vote” proposition defend the Water Replenishment District’s fee increases at Tuesday night’s Signal Hill City Council meeting. Two court rulings have found these fee increases to be illegal because of taxpayer protections established in Proposition 218. It seems highly hypocritical that a group that insists that taxpayers need additional protections rejects the protections established for taxpayers through Proposition 218. Speakers with long presentations stated that they “didn’t think” it was good that the City had stepped up to defend its citizens against fees that were illegally increased. I for one thank the Council for joining Cerritos and Downey in this action to protect the Citizens of Signal Hill. The question that remains is, How loud would this group be screaming if the City had NOT taken action with other cities to stop these illegal fee increases? It really appears that no matter what action is taken, or for that matter, is not taken, there will always be some group that calculates politics to attack. I believe this sums it up clearly: damned if you do, more damned if you don’t. Very sad. Tom Benson Signal Hill

lp with Let the Signal Tribune he ent filing & m te ta s s s e in s u b s u o ti ti fic r you, too! fo ty n u o c e th to o g l ’l e W publication. unty o c e th in s e c ri p t s e w lo We have one of the t away! h g ri d e rt ta s u o y t e g to and the forms

S E G N A H C E M A N L A G E L n We also ru at low, low rates.

Call 562-595-7900

Disclosure: Tom Benson is a Signal Hill Planning Commissioner. ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

MANAGING EDITOR

Stephen M. Strichart

Stephanie Raygoza

ASSISTANT EDITOR/STAFF WRITER

Sean Belk

COLUMNISTS

Jennifer E. Beaver Carol Berg Sloan, RD

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a small town just one vote can be the difference between a win or a loss for a candidate. Ask Signal Hill City Councilmember Larry Forester how he feels. Back in 2007, Larry ran as an incumbent and won back his seat by the narrow margin of one vote. Lastly, as I’ve said before in my election-themed columns, my 9th-grade government-class teacher Mr. Smith told us to watch out for candidates who do nothing but slam the other guys– he claimed it was an act of desperation because those who ran negative campaigns had nothing good to say about themselves. Let’s hope that the candidates take a page or two out of Villanueva’s campaign playbook for the next two weeks and play fair. Up until now, it appears that some have not– and that saddens me.

The “Meet Your Candidates” special section in the Feb. 15 issue should have stated that there are three open seats for the upcoming Signal Hill City Council election.

A hole in one?

Neena R. Strichart

you have one more opportunity to do so. The Signal Hill Chamber of Commerce is hosting a forum Monday evening at 6:30pm at the new Signal Hill Police Station, 2745 Walnut Ave. Signal Hill voters, please do your best to attend and participate in the event. Listen, learn, ask questions, introduce yourselves to others and meet the other interested parties at the forum. We all claim to have one thing in common– we care about this city! If you do, then prove it– VOTE! The election four years ago had approximately a 16percent turnout. That means that less than 875 voters out of more than 5,000 registered voters bothered to vote in person or by mail. I certainly hope we have a better turnout this time. If you are registered, please take the time to vote. Your vote counts in every election, but in

Mea culpa

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

FEBRUARY 22, 2013

Nick Diamantides

Shoshanah Siegel

Tanya Paz

CULTURE WRITERS

Daniel Adams Vicki Paris Goodman Gregory Spooner CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Matt Sun

EDITORIAL INTERN

Ariana Gastelum

CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Rachael Rifkin

DESIGN INTERN

Kaelyn Bruno

The Signal Tribune welcomes letters to the editor, which should be signed, dated and include a phone number to verify authenticity. Letters are due by noon on the Tuesday before desired publication date. The Signal Tribune reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, language and space requirements. The Signal Tribune does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other publications or otherwise presented in a public forum. Letters to the editor and commentaries are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Signal Tribune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, letters to the editor and commentaries are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. Letter-writers will be identified by their professional titles or affiliations when, and only when, the editorial staff deems it relevant and/or to provide context to the letter. We do not run letters to the editor submitted by individuals who have declared their candidacies for public office in upcoming races. This policy was put in place because, to be fair, if we publish one, we would have to publish all letters submitted by all candidates. The volume would no doubt eliminate space for letters submitted by other readers. Instead, we agree to interview candidates and print stories about political races in an objective manner and offer very reasonable advertising rates for those candidates who wish to purchase ads. The Signal Tribune is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. Yearly subscriptions are available for $45.

939 E. 27th St., Signal Hill, CA 90755 (562) 595-7900

www.signaltribune.com newspaper@signaltribune.com

To r e a d o r d o w n l o a d f u l l i s s u e s o f t h e S i g n a l Tr i b u n e , v i s i t

w ww. sig na ltrib une. c om


NEWS

FEBRUARY 22, 2013

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

CSULB president to speak at Antioch Church as part of CSU Super Sunday efforts

Reaching out to the local African-American community, Cal State Long Beach (CSULB) President F. King Alexander will speak at Antioch Church in Long Beach on Sunday, Feb. 24, at 10:30am as part of the California State University’s (CSU) Super Sunday, an initiative designed to inform young African-Americans about higher education and encourage them to pursue it. Additionally, Douglas Robinson, CSULB’s vice president for student services, will speak at City of Refuge in Gardena on the same day at its 8am and 11am services. “Encouraging African-American men and women to obtain a college degree is more than a university endeavor,” said Alexander, who will emphasize that college preparation begins in elementary school and discuss the pathways to college for prospective students. “It’s an important issue that requires collaboration between parents, teachers and religious and civic leaders. Building those relationships is what this Super Sunday is all about.” The two CSULB leaders are joining CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White, trustees and campus presidents who are speaking at Super Sunday events being held at nearly 100 predominantly African-American churches throughout the state in February and March. “Education is the key to a better future for California,” White said. “The CSU’s commitment is stronger than ever to motivate and encourage African-American students to prepare for college

Rancho offering information days for prospective volunteers

Rancho Los Cerritos, 4600 Virginia Rd., will provide the public an opportunity to learn about its numerous programs during one of its free upcoming Volunteer Information Days held in February. Interested individuals will be able to discover– or rediscover– the National and State Historic Landmark museum, otherwise known as “the Roots of Long Beach.” Volunteers assist the Rancho with a number of affairs, such as giving tours of the adobe house and gardens, staffing the visitor center, working in the museum shop, helping with special events, performing research, gardening, and more. The upcoming meetings will cover a series of topics that highlight how individuals can give back to their community in a fun, educational and meaningful way. Furthermore, interested individuals who want to become a house or garden docent can register for docent training classes, set to begin in March. Details will be provided at the Volunteer Information Days. Those interested may RSVP at (562) 570-1755 for either Tuesday, Feb. 5 at 3pm or Saturday, Feb. 23 at 10am. Light refreshments will be served. For more information call (562) 570-1755, or visit rancholoscerritos.org .

and earn a university degree.” The Super Sunday events, which reach more than 100,000 churchgoers, are part of the CSU’s efforts to educate students and families about the requirements to successfully enter college and obtain a degree. Those in attendance also can receive information about financial aid and the CSUMentor.edu website that provides the tools to plan and apply to CSU campuses. “This also is an opportunity for us to highlight the value of receiving a college degree,” Alexander said. “By 2018, about 60 percent of all California jobs will require a college degree, and we want to make sure that each year more African American students graduate from college and are able to compete for these jobs. Although more AfricanAmerican students are succeeding in college, we can do better.” In a recent report by The Education Trust, CSULB was recognized as one of the top 25 schools in the nation for improving graduation rates for African-American students, crediting the university’s success to imple-

menting programs– such as the Graduation Initiative and the African-American Initiative– to boost graduation rates and cut the completion gap in half for minority students. The report notes that CSULB’s six-year graduation rate for African-American students in 2004 was 38.1 percent, but by 2010 the rate had improved to 50.7 percent, an increase of 12.6 percent. After the church services, parents and students have the opportunity to talk to CSU representatives and receive a “How To Get To College” poster– a practical guide about how to prepare for college. The guide provides the list of classes that students need to take in the sixth grade through 12th grade to qualify for CSU admission. It also provides tips for parents and mentors to help students succeed. Super Sunday is produced by the CSU African-American Initiative—a partnership between CSU campuses and African

Douglas Robinson

American religious leaders with the goal of increasing college going rates among African-American students. Chancellor Emeritus Charles B. Reed founded the initiative eight years ago with the support of CSU trustees, presidents, faculty, staff, students and alumni. Over the years, CSU Super Sunday has grown in both size– it started in 2006 with 11

5

F. King Alexander

churches– as well as impact on students. For next fall, the number of applications CSU received from those self-identifying as African-American jumped by nearly 6 percent. For more information about the list of participating churches, times of service and locations, visit calstate.edu/supersunday . Source: CSULB

The Signal Hill Historical Society offers a heartfelt thank you to the following sponsors for their generous donations to our Casino Night:

Petroleum Solids Control, Inc. • Central Fishing Tool, Inc. Kluger Architects • EDCO/Signal Hill Disposal Terry Rogers, Realtor A big thank you also goes out to the following local restaurants for their tasty contributions! Big E Pizza • Black Bear Diner • Curley’s • Delius Restaurant Golden Eagle • Kashiwa • Rossmoor Pastries • Valentino’s Pizza Signal Hill Historical Society | 501 (C) (3) ID C1225895 | Federal Tax ID 33-0004198


6 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

FEBRUARY 22, 2013

SH Chamber Luncheon Date: Thursday, February 28th, 2013 Location: 4100 East Donald Douglas Dr. Long Beach, CA 90808 Speaker: Mario Rodriguez, Long Beach Airport Director

RSVP REQUIRED FOR THIS EVENT (for security purposes and limited seating)

Time: 11:45 Meet at the flagpole by the benches in front (please be prompt) TOUR OF THE NEW CONCOURSE Lunch: $15.00 Members | $25.00 Non-Members Parking will be validated RSVP to treasurer@signalhillchamber.org or president@signalhillchamber.org Deadline for RSVP is February 22, 2013. Any questions 562-713-4630 Terry Rogers 

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NEWS

FEBRUARY 22, 2013

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Local eatery’s Kitchen Nightmares episode airs Feb. 22 Sean Belk

7

Staff Writer

Nino’s Italian Restaurant in Bixby Knolls is getting its moment of fame as an episode of the Fox TV reality show Kitchen Nightmares with British celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay featuring the restaurant airs tonight, Feb. 22 at 8pm on Channel 11. The episode, which took months to edit and produce, is being viewed by close to 100 people during a sold-out viewing dinner night with digital TV screens and projectors and live music. The family-owned restaurant, considered a staple in Long Beach and located at 3853 Atlantic Ave., had been left nearly untouched since first being opened in 1958 by Vincenzo and Inge Cristiano. After the couple retired, they handed the restaurant over to their eldest son Nino and their daughter Carina Cristiano Leoni. For years, the restaurant had outdated décor and wine bottles hanging from the ceiling. However, that changed after Ramsay completely revamped the restaurant’s interior and menu last year. Fox producers were scouting locally owned and operated restaurants in the neighborhood, and the restaurant was “on their radar,” said Carina, who said she had never watched the show before scouts came to town. Some of the changes implemented at Nino’s included: new paint, a new system in the kitchen, a new Viking Stove with 16 burners and two ovens, and a smaller menu. Improvements also included: cleaning the carpets; taking the wine bottles down; clearing

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Nino’s Italian Restaurant in Bixby Knolls will be featured in an episode of the Fox TV reality show Kitchen Nightmares tonight at 8pm on Channel 11.

out clutter of knick-knacks and pictures; and adding new furniture, handmade wood-farm tables, new dishes, a custom-made sign and a pasta machine. The opportunity to work with Chef Ramsay along with restaurant consultants and coaches was a one-of-a-kind experience, Carina said. “He is a world-class chef,” she said. “Chef Ramsay is charismatic and very smart and caring… He works incredibly hard and long hours.” Carina said her favorite part of the remodel is the redesigned dining area that now includes long wooden tables. “The middle dining room which they remodeled is my absolute favorite,” she said. “It’s stunning and so pretty.” So far, customers have taken to the restaurant’s new look, Carina said. “A

The Campaign Trail

The Concerned Citizens of Signal Hill (CCSH) and the Signal Hill Chamber of Commerce will co-host a Signal Hill City Council candidate forum at the Signal Hill Police Department Community Room, 2745 Walnut Ave., on Monday, Feb. 25. The forum will begin with a “public-candidate meet-and-greet” period from 6:30pm to 7pm, and the actual forum will begin at 7pm and end at 8:30pm. Each candidate will be allowed two minutes for an introductory statement and two minutes for a closing statement. Signal Hill Chamber of Commerce members and CCSH will provide questions. Each candidate will be asked the same question and given

two minutes to answer, allowing for a total of about four prepared questions for each candidate. This session will be followed by a limited number of written questions from the audience, as time allows. For more information, call (562) 375-0761 or (562) 4946215.

Bo’s Cigar Lounge, Carl Kemp, Wayne Chaney, Diane Ripley and the Committee to Re-elect Ed Wilson will host a fundraiser to re-elect Wilson to Signal Hill City Council on Wednesday, Feb. 27 from 6:30pm to 9pm at Bo’s Cigar Lounge, 4501 E Carson St. #114. The event is open to the public, and the suggested donation is $25. For more information, call (562) 429-5600.

Reckless-driving traffic stop results in LBPD’s discovery of hoax pipe bomb

On Feb. 11, around 9am, Long Beach Police Department (LBPD) officers initiated a traffic stop on a vehicle for reckless driving, in the area of Anaheim Street and Daisy Avenue, and found the driver in possession of a handgun, according to the LBPD. In the course of searching the vehicle, officers located a suspicious device resembling a pipe bomb, which resulted in the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department Bomb Disposal Unit responding to the location. The device was later determined to be a replica pipe bomb. Officers arrested the driver, Bradford Pinkham, 48 years old, for carrying a loaded handgun and possession of a hoax bomb device. Detectives furthered their investigation and executed a search warrant at the suspect's residence in the city of Phelan. With the assistance of the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department, detectives located narcotics, narcotic paraphernalia, and other evidence related to the investigation. The matter was presented to the Los Angeles Count District Attorney’s Office, and the following charges were filed: • Sale/offer to sell/transportation of a controlled substance • Possession for sale of a controlled

substance • Ex-felon in possession of a firearm • Possession of a controlled substance • Unlawful possession of ammunition

Those with additional information regarding this investigation are asked to contact Violent Crimes Detective David Ternullo at (562) 570-7250. Those wishing to remain anonymous may call 1-800-222-TIPS (8477), or text TIPLA plus tip to 274637 (CRIMES), or visit lacrimestoppers.org . Source: LBPD

lot of people like it,” she said. “Some people miss the fancy bottles that used to hang from the ceiling, but for the most part everybody loves the new décor and the simplicity to it. They really do seem to enjoy that.” Although being on reality TV was a challenge, she said it was well worth the publicity for the restaurant and the Bixby Knolls community. “Well, of course I am nervous to see it for the first time,” Carina said. “But I also am extremely thankful for their transformation and the work they did with my family and our employees. My chefs have renewed passion for what they cook again. I’m so proud and happy for them. I also firmly believe for change to truly happen, you need to get uncomfortable.”

Be sure to vote Tuesday, March 5!

Re-Elect Signal Hill Councilman

Vote March 5th

Ed Wilson

Dear Resident,

!

I am very honored and excited to be listed as a candidate in the upcoming election and hope that I have your support as you cast your vote. I am proud of my contributions towards positive changes in our community during my last term. I am looking forward to being of service to you for another four years with the same determination and passion to continue evolving our premier city forward. My focus will be to continue to secure a policy of transparency, safe neighborhoods and sustainability for the city's future.

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“Heading out” on a bike ride? Protect that noggin with a helmet!

Greenly Art Space, 2698 Junipero Ave. in Signal Hill, will host a group art show exploring the spiritual aspects of the artmaking process, with an opening on Saturday, Feb. 23 from 6pm to 10pm. The show presents artwork created over the last few months by eight artists working at the gallery. The group met together weekly, embarking on a spiritual journey of

contemplation and prayer through art-making in a variety of media. The resultant body of work has elements of both process and product, presenting aspects of spirituality which can be considered by both artist and viewer. The artists include Sarah Choi, Shyanne Grandi, Kurt Hantzsch, Kimberly Hocking, Jessica Howard, Tania Hughes, Janet Jun

and James Klein. The opening reception is free and open to the public. The gallery will be open for free public viewing Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 11am to 2pm, or by appointment by calling (562) 533-4020. The show will run through Friday, April 5.

Audiences can experience one of the most important works in the violin repertoire when distinguished violinist Stephanie Chase joins Maestro Enrique Arturo Diemecke and the Long Beach Symphony Orchestra to perform Beethoven’s Violin Concerto on Saturday, March 9 at the Terrace Theater in Long Beach. Chase’s triumphant, awardwinning performances at the

Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow led to international fame and concert tours with over 170 orchestras in 25 countries. The program will also include The Rite of Spring by Stravinsky. This selection honors the 100th anniversary of the riotous debut of Stravinsky’s ballet in Paris. Although Stravinsky’s ominous score was intended to be about primitive human rituals, Walt Disney chose it for his animated feature Fantasia to accompany the evolution of life on Earth. A pre-concert talk, led by KUSC radio personality Alan Chapman, will take place from 7pm to 7:30pm and will offer

insight into the evening’s composers and their music. Tickets are $20 to $89. Student rush tickets are available for $10 with valid ID, 90 minutes prior to the performance. For more information, call (562) 436-3203, or visit LBSO.org . All LBSO Classics Concerts take place at the Long Beach Performing Arts Center in the Terrace Theater, 300 East Ocean Blvd. Concert begins at 8pm. Doors open at 6:30pm. Concertgoers are invited to enjoy live entertainment from a local music ensemble in the lobby prior to the concert.

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FEBRUARY 22, 2013

In Living Color

COMMUNITY

Painless treatments for your windows Shoshanah Siegel Columnist

I always look at window treatments as the frosting on the cake. Sometimes you may want it to blend in, creating a monochromatic look, and other times you can make it the pièce de résistance. When it comes to design solutions, the possibilities are endless. Here are some updated triedand-true approaches, current decorating trends, and an introduction of new products.

Go solar I always love a challenge. So when a recent client decided to remodel his home and make an upstairs family room into his bedroom, he was concerned because he was being blinded by the sun’s rays and the room felt like a furnace with heat coming from the French doors. Also, he didn’t want to obstruct the beautiful view of his landscaping and trees. I remembered seeing blinds in New Zealand which were sleeklooking, made of mesh, and provided UV protection while leaving the view intact. I was thrilled to learn that they can be found at Lowes and Home Depot.

You’re on a roll Like the solar shades, there are many other blinds which roll up. There still are the plastic, white roller shades which have been around for ages, but now they come in a variety of patterns and colors and are made of more durable and lightweight materials. There’s even a website that sells window shades featuring your favorite college logo. These days the trim come in numerous styles, and to make rolling up the shade even easier, you can purchase designer pulls that hang from the bottom of the shade.

light, so I can see what’s going on outside, but it’s not just an open window, so I have some privacy,” she says. “I think it works in so many different environments.” What a great way to create a Zen-like feel for your bathroom or bedroom.

Budget alternative to wooden shutters I love wooden shutters but have opted for the cheaper alternative of two-inch wooden blinds. These come in real or faux wood. For more of a vintage look, look for ones that have a wide cloth tape that covers the cords. For more elegance and a mixture of hard and soft, check out ones where the tape is made of velvet.

Before you shut the curtain Curtains are still a great choice. You may select heavier fabrics for the winter months to keep the cold out, and then trade these out for lighter weight ones during warmer climate. Be sure to make your selections based on your decorating style and colors of your décor. Going vintage? Check out vintage fabrics on etsy.com . For a more contemporary look, go graphic. Stripes going vertical and horizontal continue to be a great modern look. Keeping window treatments high and wide is a good

way to avoid interfering with the movement of French doors. Or just hang a panel of color and texture on either side of the doors. To make your windows appear taller, hang curtains closer to the ceiling.

Just a little bit of fabric Valances are still featured as a perfect dressing for windows. They can be the ideal item to unify the room’s color palette and can be tailored to fit any style. For an up-to-date look, bring in more graphics, geometric shapes, and modern color schemes. Most window treatments such as roller shades, cellular shades, wood and metal blinds, come with a small valance which finishes off the look and hides the mechanisms.

More than one solution Multiple windows don’t mean you need to use identical window treatments; just keep the colors similar. Also, I encourage you to use the layered look. Combine roller shades, solar panels, Roman shades, or sheers in the middle, with curtain panels on the side. You get the idea; mix and match. How’s it hanging? This is an area that has no limits. Rods can be made of wood or metals forged or fabricated with different

9

Shoshanah Siegel/Signal Tribune

The writer designed and painted this valance in primary colors to complement the other world handcrafts displayed in her kitchen. colors and finishes. Window treatments can even be hung with rings and clips on a wire. And when it comes to finials, I don’t know where to begin. They can be metal, glass, plastic, wood… let your imagination go wild. For inspiration check out ehow.com/way_5682320_homemade-decorative-curtain-rodfinials.html .

Shoshanah Siegel provides color consulting as well as space planning, remodeling, upgrading and staging through her firm Your Color Diva. She can be contacted at (562) 427-0440 or at shoshanah.siegel@gmail.com or yourcolordiva.com . Adding medium-taupe curtain panels along with the cellular shades provides not only warmth but privacy.

Keep things on track Instead of the vertical blinds of the ‘80s, there is now a new and popular panel-track system. Not only does Ikea sell these panels in neutral colors, but they also have some in attractive geometrics and floral patterns. What is great about this system? You can mix and match the panels.

The Roman shade Here is a little, fun fact. In the Roman Colosseum, pleated curtains were hung from poles to offer protection from the sun. However, the original shades were vertical and today they are horizontal. These days, Roman shades come in a variety of colors, fabrics, and styles. Any material that folds onto itself fits into this category.

On a cellular level These blinds have been around a while, but check out the new colors and patterns. They now come with and without cords. What is ideal about these blinds is the ability to have them go top down or bottom up, tailoring to whatever your needs are for privacy and light. Carriann Kids has a whole line of blinds that have great colors and designs for kids/adults.

No more heavy metal Metal is still a current trend, but the materials are now lighter in weight but more durable. Check out Levolor’s cordless look, which comes in a variety of colors. Also, metal blinds now come in trendier and wider two-inch slats.

Go organic Exposed wood grain in blinds and natural woven shades are joining the ranks of bamboo as a popular choice. Many of the new blinds even come with their own valance. Cindy O’Reilly, product development manager for Smith+Noble, has them in her home. “They let in diffused

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

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10 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

CULTURE

FEBRUARY 22, 2013

CSULB to host 43rd annual pow wow celebration

Photo by David J. Nelson/CSULB

The 43rd annual pow wow at Cal State Long Beach will feature American-Indian dancing, arts, crafts, and food on March 9 and 10.

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California State University, Long Beach’s (CSULB) annual pow wow, an American-Indian social celebration, will return to the campus’s Central Quad on Saturday, March 9 and Sunday, March 10. Admission and parking are free. The 43rd annual two-day event, which will feature AmericanIndian dancing, arts, crafts, and food, will begins at 11am each day and run until 10pm on Saturday and 6pm on Sunday. In addition to contests and intertribal dancing, there will be gourd dancing with dancer registration closing at 2pm on March 9. All

dancers and drums are invited.

Members of the head staff and their affiliations are: • Master of Ceremony– John Dawson (San Carlos Apache) • Arena Director– Victor Chavez (Diné) • Head Man Dancer– Adrian Phoenix (Paiute/Tohono O’odham) • Head Lady Dancer– Kristian Smith (Cheyenne River Sioux) • Host Northern Drum– Changing Spirits • Head Southern Singer– Phillip Hale (Diné) • Host Gourd– Golden State Gourd Society

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Saturday’s schedule of events will be: gourd dancing, 11am; grand entry, 2pm.; dancer registration closing, 2pm; AmericanIndian Student Council Special, 4pm; dinner and California Indian Presentation, 5pm; and retire colors and dance out, 10pm. On Sunday, the schedule of events will be: gourd dancing, 11am; grand entry, 2pm; and awards, retire colors and dance out, 6pm. Native foods such as mutton and beef stew, Navajo tacos, fry bread and Indian burgers will be on sale at the event, and AmericanIndian vendors will be selling both traditional and contemporary American-Indian art. The largest spring event of its kind in Southern California, the pow wow at CSULB is focused on displaying the university’s strong American-Indian presence. The event is presented by CSULB’s American-Indian Studies Department, American-Indian Student Council, American-Indian Student Services, Student Life and Development, the Division of Student Services, and Associated Students Inc. For more information about the event, e-mail powwow@csulb.edu, call (562) 985-8528 or visit csulb.edu/divisions/students/sld/am erican_indian_services/pow_wow . A campus map and directions can be found at csulb.edu/maps . Source: CSULB

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FEBRUARY 22, 2013

Council

continued from page 1

best to include fresh food and even proteins like meat and cheese in their bi-weekly grocery bags and not a lot of packaged food, according to the community-services director. While the City is also supporting the senior food distribution with its general funds, less federal money means more pressure for the community-services department to seek out other revenue sources to keep the program alive. Alcivar-McCoy said in a follow-up interview Wednesday that her department would prefer to seek sponsorships to make up for the $4,000 shortfall and not ask for more money from the City’s general fund. The City has already budgeted $8,000 for the program for this year, according to the community-services director. The program’s significance to the city’s poor senior community hit home for Vice Mayor Michael Noll, who remembered past luncheons that the city staff hosted for the seniors around Christmas time. “It’s so heartwarming to see how appreciative they are of what staff has done,” Noll said at Tuesday’s Council meeting. “And they’ve become very close friends of staff, and it’s very well deserved and a wonderful program.” Signal Hill resident and city council candidate Nancy Sciortino said she knew one woman in the program who is grateful for her share of groceries. “And some of these senior citizens, they’re barely able to make rent,” Sciortino said. “And she looks forward to her bag…I think it’s a great cause, and I hope that we can just keep it up for them.” Signal Hill only qualified this year to receive about $58,000 in federal money in the form of a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG). Only a portion of this money could be spent on the senior food distribution program, and Alcivar-McCoy acknowledged that the amount of $8,756 is the maximum amount the City could allocate for the senior brown-bag program under the grant. The community-services director said that the remaining amount of grant money will be allocated to street and sidewalk improvements. The total federal money available this fiscal year through these block grants has been reduced by nearly 32 percent, according to Alcivar-McCoy. She acknowledged Tuesday that there have been federal funding cuts, but she also explained how the grant money available to Signal Hill was reduced due to the changing demographics of the city. Both Alcivar-McCoy and Micheal Neal, who works for the consulting firm Willdan and manages the CDBG grant for Signal Hill, point to 2010 census data as one of the primary

reasons behind the decrease in funds. “Some of the key indicators that factor in the formula went the wrong direction for us,” Neal told the Council. Councilmember Larry Forester acknowledged that the grant funds could only be used for needs of the low-income areas. He asked Neal to explain what the census data said about Signal Hill. “Obviously, somehow, we are less needy than we were before?” Forester asked. “Particularly in comparison to other communities,” Neal replied. Alcivar-McCoy said in a follow-up telephone interview Wednesday that the program budgets about $500 a year for every senior in the program. Since the program is targeted to serve only low- and extremely low-income seniors, the community-services director emphasized how the staff does qualify the individual participants through an application program every year. She confirmed that this is the first time the City will be seeking large sponsorships to aid the senior food distribution program. At Tuesday’s meeting, Mayor Tina Hansen suggested another route to help raise money. “I mean, obviously, large sponsorships [are] nice,” Hansen said. However, the mayor thought there might be another avenue of help for the food program. She described how families or individuals could sponsor a senior in the community and how the effort could turn into a teachable moment. “I think that leads to conversations,” Hansen said. “You know, especially with kids…that some people have more, and some people don’t, and...what needs to happen to make sure that everybody has enough.”

Other City Council highlights Library anniversary Signal Hill Librarian Gail Ashbrooke announced that, in honor of the library’s 85th anniversary, the public has been invited to participate in “Signal Hill Reads Together,” a city-wide community reading program. Signal Hill author Marty Steere’s novel of space exploration, Sea of Crises, has been selected to launch the reading program. Steere will discuss his book at the Signal Hill Library on April 17. The library has planned other events around the theme of space. Polling-place change Voters in Precinct 6450004A have been directed to vote in the General Municipal Election at the Family Church at 2094 Cherry Ave. These voters, who generally live in the neighborhoods east of Cherry Avenue and south of Skyline Drive, received a map in the sample booklet which incorrectly noted an old location, according to a staff report

NEWS

from City Clerk Kathee Pacheco. The voters have already been notified in writing of the polling-place change. The Council voted at the Feb. 19 meeting to send a phone reminder to voters in this precinct to vote at the Family Church on March 5.

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

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TST4298 Trustee Sale No. 12-00774-5 Loan No. 0030209944 APN 7216002-028 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED April 22, 2004. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On March 14, 2013, at 09:00 AM, Doubletree Hotel Los Angeles-Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650, Vineyard Ballroom, Power Default Services, Inc., as the duly appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded on May 4, 2004, as Instrument No. 04 1107769 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, CA, executed by: STEVE G. BLASKO, ANDREA M. BLASKO, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS, as Trustor, in favor of AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE ACCEPTANCE, INC. as Beneficiary, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of sale, that certain property situated in said County, California describing the land therein as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2621 EAST 20TH STREET #3, SIGNAL HILL, CA The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining unpaid balance of the obligations secured by and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust (together with any modifications thereto). NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder`s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 1-800-280-2832 or visit this Internet Web site www.auction.com, using the file number assigned to this case 12-00774-5. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligations secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of this Notice of Trustee`s Sale is estimated to be $344,025.94 (Estimated), provided, however, prepayment premiums, accrued interest and advances will increase this figure prior to sale. Beneficiary`s bid at said sale may include all or part of said amount. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier`s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the California Financial Code and authorized to do business in California, or other such funds as may be acceptable to the trustee. In the event tender other than cash is accepted, the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustee`s Deed Upon Sale until funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a matter of right. The property offered for sale excludes all funds held on account by the property receiver, if applicable. DATE: 02/19/2013 POWER DEFAULT SERVICES, INC., Trustee By: Fidelity National Title Company, its agent 11000 Olson Drive Ste 101, Rancho Cordova , CA 95670, 916-6360114 By: Megan Curtis, Authorized Signature SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT HYPERLINK "http://www.auction.com" www.auction.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 1-800-280-2832 P1021983 2/22, 3/1, 03/08/2013

TST4297 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.S. No.: 9985-1653 TSG Order No.: 93736 A.P.N.: 7217-027-005 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 08/02/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NBS Default Services, LLC, as the duly appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded 08/10/2007 as Document No.: 20071882190, of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, executed by: JOSEPH E. PECOT, JR., A MARRIED MAN, AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY, as Trustor, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable in full at time of sale by cash, a cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state). All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and state, and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. Sale Date and Time: 03/25/2013 at 11:00 AM Sale Location: By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2421 AMELIA COURT, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made in an "AS IS" condition, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon,

as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit: $575,970.15 (Estimated). Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call, (714)730-2727 for information regarding the trustee`s sale or visit this Internet Web site, https://www.lpsasap.com/, for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case, T.S.# 9985-1653. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder`s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The Declaration pursuant to California Civil Code, Section 2923.5(a) was fulfilled when the Notice of Default was recorded on 11/13/2012 NBS Default Services, LLC 301 E. Ocean Blvd. Suite 1720 Long Beach, CA 90802 Phone:800-766-7751 Fax: 562-983-5379 For Trustee Sale Information Log On To: https://www.lpsasap.com/ or Call: (714)730-2727. NBS Default Services, LLC, Gaby Ospino "We are attempting to collect a debt, and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose." A-4362432 03/01/2013, 03/08/2013, 03/15/2013 TST4296 TSG No.: 7447819 TS No.: CA1200248841 FHA/VA/PMI No.: APN: 7148-018-022 Property Address: 3310 GUNDRY AVENUE SIGNAL HILL, CA 90807 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 07/10/2003. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 03/14/2013 at 10:00 A.M., First American Title Insurance Company, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 08/01/2003, as Instrument No. 03 2207988, in book , page , , of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, State of California. Executed by: LA TAUSHA C. BOWLER AND GERALD W. BOWLER, WIFE AND HUSBAND, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (Payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States) Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN THE ABOVE MENTIONED DEED OF TRUST APN# 7148-018-022 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 3310 GUNDRY AVENUE, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90807 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $167,388.07. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust has deposited all documents evidencing the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and has declared all sums secured thereby immediately due and payable, and has caused a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be executed. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (916)939-0772 or visit this Internet Web http://search.nationwideposting.com/propertySearchTerms.aspx, using the file number assigned to this case CA1200248841 Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the tele-

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phone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse. First American Title Insurance Company First American Title Insurance Company 3 FIRST AMERICAN WAY SANTA ANA, CA 92707 Date: FOR TRUSTEE'S SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL (916)939-0772 First American Title Insurance Company MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.NPP0213623 SIGNAL TRIBUNE 02/22/2013, 03/01/2013, 03/08/2013 TST4293 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 10-0141714 Doc ID #0001001886442005N Title Order No. 10-8-508633 Investor/Insurer No. N/A APN No. 7215-020-021 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 04/22/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by LATEEF T FRANKS, A SINGLE MAN, dated 04/22/2005 and recorded 5/2/2005, as Instrument No. 05 1017867, in Book , Page , of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, will sell on 03/11/2013 at 9:00AM, Doubletree Hotel Los Angeles-Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650, Vineyard Ballroom at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2244 SEA RIDGE DRIVE, SIGNAL HILL, CA, 90755. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $1,316,617.72. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. If required by the provisions of section 2923.5 of the California Civil Code, the declaration from the mortgagee, beneficiary or authorized agent is attached to the Notice of Trustee's Sale duly recorded with the appropriate County Recorder's Office. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on a property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 1-800281-8219 or visit this Internet Web site www.recontrustco.com, using the file number assigned to this case TS No. 10-0141714. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 By: - Trustee's Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. A-4358276 02/15/2013, 02/22/2013, 03/01/2013

TST4295 Title No. 6451274 ALS No. 2012-4157 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT OF A LIEN, DATED MARCH 6, 2012. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT: On March 13, 2013, at 9:00 AM, ASSOCIATION LIEN SERVICES, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to a certain lien, recorded on March 9, 2012, as instrument number 20120376768, of the official records of Los Angeles County, California. WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR LAWFUL MONEY OF THE UNITED STATES, OR A CASHIERS CHECK at: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA 91766. The street address and other common designations, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2506 E Willow #303, Signal Hill, California 90755 Assessor's Parcel No. 7214-009-108 The owner(s) of the real property is purported to be: Anthony Castro and Myriah B. Castro, husband and wife as joint tenants The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designations, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of a note, homeowner's assessment or other obligation secured by this lien, with interest and other sum as provided

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therein: plus advances, if any, under the terms thereof and interest on such advances, plus fees, charges, expenses of the Trustee and trust created by said lien. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $17,887.58. Payment must be in cash, a cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state bank or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings & loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. The real property described above is being sold subject to the right of redemption. The redemption period within which real property may be redeemed ends 90 days after the sale. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may contact Priority Posting & Publishing for information regarding the trustee’s sale or visit its website www.priorityposting.com for information regarding the sale of this property. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the website. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. The beneficiary of said Lien hereto executed and delivered to the undersigned, a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located. Date: February 8, 2013 Association Lien Services, as Trustee P.O. Box 64750, Los Angeles, CA 90064 (310) 207-2027 By: Alvin Okoreeh, Trustee Officer P1020357 2/15, 2/22, 03/01/2013

TST4282 / 2013 005551 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NaME STaTEMENT The following person is doing business as: MIKO'S SPORTS LOUNGE, 3550-B Long Beach Blvd., Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: ENAID'S WAY, INC., 622 E. 37th St., Long Beach, CA 90806. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Damitresse Yancey, President. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 9, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 1, 8, 15, 22, 2013.

TST4283 / 2013 015788 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NaME STaTEMENT The following person is doing business as: BUILDING BLOCKS FOR SUCCESS TUTORIAL SERVICES, 3808 Hathaway Ave. Unit 632, Long Beach, CA 90815. Registrant: MARIA JOHNSON, 3808 Hathaway Ave. Unit 632, Long Beach, CA 90815. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Maria Johnson. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 23, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 1, 8, 15, 22, 2013.

TST4284 / 2013 015776 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NaME STaTEMENT The following person is doing business as: ZIZILU, 2322 Monte Verde Dr., Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: RAZAN ALJABBAN, 2322 Monte Verde Dr., Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Razan Aljabban. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 23, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 1, 8, 15, 22, 2013.

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TST4285 / 2013 014780 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NaME STaTEMENT The following person is doing business as: PLUMBING BY EDWARD, 1016 Concord St., Costa Mesa, CA 92626. Registrant: EDWARD HERNANDES, 1016 Concord St., Costa Mesa, CA 92626. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Edward Hernandez. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 23, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 8, 15, 22, & March 1, 2013.

TST4286 / 2013 016949 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NaME STaTEMENT The following person is doing business as: GARTH'S JELLY DONUT, 3350 E. 7th. St. #128, Long Beach, CA 90804. Registrant: CHRISTOPHER KRAMME, 630 Magnolia Ave. Apt. 202, Long Beach, CA 90802. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Christopher Kramme. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 24, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 8, 15, 22, & March 1, 2013.

TST4287/ 2013 019221 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NaME STaTEMENT The following person is doing business as: BEACHCRAFTERS, 4350 Atlantic Ave., Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: MICHELE WILLIAMS, 36 Gaviota Ave., Long Beach, CA 90802. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Michele Williams. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on December 7, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 29, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 8, 15, 22, & March 1, 2013.

TST4288 / 2013 020238 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NaME STaTEMENT The following persons are doing business as: 1. CHERRYWOOD PROPERTY SERVICES, 2. CHERRYWOOD PROPERY HOLDINGS, 2201 E. Willow St. Suite D#185, Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrants: 1. STEVE LEWIS, 2. JUNE LEWIS, 3265 Orange Ave., Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: a Married Couple. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Steve Lewis/June Lewis. The registrants have not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 30, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 8, 15, 22, & March 1, 2013.

TST4291 / 2013 024386 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NaME STaTEMENT The following person is doing business as: DIAL PRINTING, 633 Terrylynn Place, Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: HMS INDUSTRIES, INC, 633 Terrylynn Place, Long Beach, CA 90807 This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Phillip Sigman, President. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 5, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 8, 15, 22, & March 1, 2013.

TST4292 / 2013 024887 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NaME STaTEMENT The following person is doing business as: PROFIT BUSINESS BROKERS, 133 Argonne Ave., Long Beach, CA 90803. Registrant: MITCHELL BARNEY, 5318 E. 2nd St., Suite 640, Long Beach, CA 90803. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Mitchell Barney. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 5, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 8, 15, 22, & March 1, 2013.


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CALL THE SIGNAL TRIBUNE AT 562-595-7900 TST4294 / 2013 021829 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NaME STaTEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. DDR PROJECTS, 2. DEVIL DOLL RECORDS, 3546 Gaviota Ave., Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: JOHN GELDBACH, 3546 Gaviota Ave., Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: John Geldbach. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name in January, 1996. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 31, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 15, 22, & March 1, 8, 2013.

TST4300 / 2013 027860 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NaME STaTEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. CHARIS LONG BEACH, 2. CHARIS NONPROFIT, 2701 E. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach, CA 90803. Registrant: JAMES K. LEWIS, 2701 E. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach, CA 90803. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: James K. Lewis. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 8, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 22, & March 1, 8, 15, 2013.

TST4301 / 2013 031522 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NaME STaTEMENT The following person is doing business as: BRAWNY BUILT, 1441 E. 28th St., Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: BRANDON HOLSTEIN, 5833 Gaviota Ave., Long Beach, CA 90805. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Brandon Holstein. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 14, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 22, & March 1, 8, 15, 2013.

TST4302 / 2013 033106 FiCTiTioUS BUSiNESS NaME STaTEMENT The following person is doing business as: LOS ANGELES ROBOTICS CLUB, 4619 Paramount Blvd., Lakewood, CA 90712. Registrant: ANNIKA O'BRIEN, 4619 Paramount Blvd., Lakewood, CA 90712. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Annika O'Brien. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on February 19, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 19, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 22, & March 1, 8, 15, 2013.

TST4303 / Case No. NS026435 orDEr To SHoW CaUSE For CHaNgE oF NaME SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, 415 W. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach, CA 90802. PETITION OF NhatVy Nu Ton For Change of Name. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: 1. Petitioner NHATVY NU TON, filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name: NHATVY NU TON to Proposed Name: JANET NU TON. 2. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, shy the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: March 27, 2013; Time: 1:30 P.M.; Dept. H, Room 53. The address of the court is the same as above. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, THE SIGNAL TRIBUNE, 939 E. 27th. Street, Signal Hill, CA 90755: February 22, & March 1, 8, 15, 2013. ___//ss//___ Joseph E. DiLoreto, Judge of the Superior Court Dated: February 13, 2013

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14 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

NEWS

EYE ON CRIME Crimes reported by LBPD – Council Districts 6, 7 & 8

Friday, Feb. 15 Residential burglary 2:20pm- 700 block W. 19th St.

Assault with firearm 6:49pm- 1800 block Chestnut Ave. Commercial burglary 7:40pm- 1100 San Antonio Dr.

Saturday, Feb. 16 Commercial burglary/shoplifting 3:25pm- 800 block E. Pacific Coast Hwy.

Assault with firearm 5:48pm- 200 block E. Pleasant St.

Sunday, Feb. 17 Garage/residential burglary 10:30am- 2100 block Olive Ave.

Crimes reported by SHPD – Citywide

Friday, Feb. 15 Stolen vehicle 2:41am- 3500 block E. Pacific Coast Hwy. Auto burglary 11:36am- E. Hill St./Obispo Ave. Strong-arm robbery 5:26pm- 2400 block Cherry Ave.

Saturday, Feb. 16 Stolen vehicle recovered 1:02am- E. Spring St./Cherry Ave. DUI 2am- 2700 block Walnut Ave.

Exhibiting firearm 3:55am- 1800 block Junipero Ave.

Robbery (person) 7:46pm- 2400 block California Ave. Three juvenile suspects Vandalism; property damage 9:10pm- 1500 E. Burnett St. Suspect identified

Tuesday, Feb. 17 Vandalism ($400 or more) 9:15pm- 1800 block Temple Ave.

DUI 11:23pm- Orange Ave./E. Spring St.

Monday, Feb. 18 Commercial burglary 8:15am- 2400 block Cherry Ave.

Identity theft 8:28am- 2400 block California Ave.

Tuesday, Feb. 19 DUI 2:19am- Cover St./Cherry Ave.

Wednesday, Feb. 20 DUI 2:43am- E. Hill St./Ohio Ave. Suspect in custody.

Kidnapping 10:07am- 2100 block Cherry Ave.

Residential burglary 10:30am- 900 block Las Brisas Way

FEBRUARY 22, 2013

BKBIA

continued from page 1

tinued success and new horizons in Bixby Knolls… So stay tuned because the best is yet to come.” During the event, Blair Cohn, executive director of the BKBIA, presented a list of accomplishments over the past five years and said plans are for the community to continue taking new risks. The nonprofit organization is governed by a board of directors and receives funding to promote and enhance the corridor through an annually assessed fee on retail, service and professional businesses. “We may jump off some cliffs, we may get a little edgy, but we’re going to make it happen,” Cohn said before the large crowd that attended the event. In the past five years, the BKBIA has launched a series of clubs, events and programs aimed at making the business corridor more “connected” with local neighborhoods. “We started to see that if we offer more into our community and connect it all back into the businesses, we have something there,” Cohn said. “So everything really is what I call ‘smoke and mirrors.’ It’s fun. It’s social but connects it back.” Groups such as the Bixby Strollers, community happy hours, supper-club

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dinners, the Kidical Mass family bike rides and a literary society have helped bridge the gap between businesses and local residents, he said, adding that the district is “walking, eating, reading, biking and celebrating together.” During the same time that the BKBIA launched its series of programs and events, however, the association, through the infusion of redevelopment funding, has also helped give the district a “facelift.” In the past five years, Bixby Knolls has seen 40 properties painted, 50 feet of sidewalk repairs, the construction of the Expo Arts Center, and the installation of 60 bike racks and 35 feature banners. In addition, three and a half miles of streets have been repaired. The BKBIA does have its challenges, including having to spread out improvements equally among neighborhoods and streets, keeping the corridor safe from crime and homeless encampments, Cohn said. He added, however, that recent improvements are finally giving Bixby Knolls the attention that it deserves after being an unnoticed part of Long Beach for years. “I grew up on the east side, and Bixby Knolls became a space that was far away, and I didn’t know much about it,” Cohn said. “We’re going to change everything. We’re going to be noisy, we’re going to be a little bit ‘out there,’ but that’s fine. We want to tell about everything we’re doing.” Plans for the future include revamping the BKBIA’s website, using social media such as Facebook and collaborating with local neighborhood groups, he said. A few developments in the works are: two new restaurants, including a Spanish-and-Japanese fusion restaurant by local chef Dave Santiago; a bakery known as Sweet and Saucy moving from east Long Beach; and a property owner of 3939 Atlantic Ave. planning to donate a 1,700-to-2,000square-foot-space for an art collective. He also said Larry H. Parker is closing escrow on the purchase of the former Arnold’s restaurant building at 3925 Atlantic Ave. that will house about 60 employees. “The sum of all the projects and improvements have reshaped Bixby Knolls into a truly vibrant and active business district,” Cohn said. “With all the best schemes, large and small, from the poetry box to the Summer Shutters photo contest to the cash mob, we’re going to try everything… I’m not saying we’re going to paint zigzags in the street and risk public safety, but if we know it makes a difference for somebody’s business or somebody’s experience by being in Bixby Knolls, then we’re going to do it.” ß

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FEBRUARY 22, 2013

WRD

continued from page 1

judgments granted for pumping rights in the 1960s “far exceeds” the natural replenishment of aquifers. Whittaker said WRD has seen an average 8-percent per-year increase in the cost of purchasing water, adding that the Metropolitan Water District interrupted its replenishment category for the first time in 50 years, forcing the WRD to pay higher costs. He said the WRD has issued a $63-million bond to pay for projects that would reduce the agency’s dependency on imported water. “We too are affected by water costs,” Whittaker said. “We’re facing the same sort of issues. We’re trying to develop local projects that will offset our demand for imported water … so we can get away from that issue.” Still, City Attorney David Aleshire said the underlying issue in the case is how Proposition 218 will impact how WRD sets its rates. Currently, the WRD sets “uniform” rates for pumpers in the Central and West Coast basins of the southeastern portion of Los Angeles County, a 420-square-mile area that includes more than 40 cities and nearly 4 million residents, accounting for 10 percent of the State’s population. Signal Hill and other cities that are located in the Central Basin, however, claim they are subsidizing the benefits of water users in the West Coast Basin, where it costs more for WRD to replenish water due to having to manage more “sea water barriers” that separate freshwater from salt water, according to Myrter. Aleshire said WRD’s unwillingness to settle the case is being spurred by political pressures, since the WRD may have to charge West Coast ratepayers more for pumping water than Central Basin water users if the agency were forced to comply with Proposition 218. “The political problem for WRD is that if they accept our argument, the people in the West Coast Basin are going to be paying a lot more,” he said. “That creates a lot of political conflict in terms of their board with accepting this idea that really there shouldn’t be a uniform rate within these two basins, and I think really that is the underlying problem that has prevented us from working this out.” Also in dispute is how much “underflow” water runs from the Central Basin to the West Coast Basin, which is the main argument that WRD is using for implementing uniform rates. Aleshire said the court hasn’t determined whether the WRD would be required to notify the more than 800,000 parcel owners or 200 pumpers in both Central and West Coast Basins of rate changes under Proposition 218. Whitaker, however, said a major concern for the WRD is the cost of the notifications. He also said both parties need to resolve the issue over how much underflow movement there is in the inner basin. He added there could be a “long debate” about previous studies that have determined how much underflow there has been historically versus how much there is now that could continue to drag out the lawsuit. “It’s not necessarily a matter of WRD being afraid of notifying anyone and there being a protest vote… a lot of it has to do with this inner basin issue,” he said. “It’s a concern about the cost and what it would cost to do that. We have a very large service area.” Signal Hill City Manager Ken Farf-

sing, however, said complying with Proposition 218 is more than just giving notice and requires a protest hearing, in which if a majority of property owners protest fees, WRD wouldn’t be able to raise rates. “It gets to accountability of the WRD for their rate increases to all of their member agencies and every resident and business that’s paying water rates in the Central Basin and also the West Coast Basin,” he said. One of the issues brought up is the fact that the ruling in 2011 led Signal Hill and the two other cities in the case to stop paying their water replenishment assessments to the WRD since the attorneys representing the cities determined that it would constitute a “gift of public funds.” According to Signal Hill’s finance department, the City currently owes the WRD $975,653 as of the end of December that the City is keeping in a liability fund until the court awards damages. The case, however, has sparked other lawsuits since Judge Chalfant’s ruling in 2011. Currently, the cities of Bellflower, Lynwood and Pico Rivera, along with the Central Basin Municipal Water District and Texasbased oil company Tesoro have filed similar lawsuits against the WRD and have withheld payments as well. According to attorneys for the WRD, the entities now owe about $16 million to the WRD. The WRD has so far failed to receive an injunction from the courts to thwart the entities from continuing to not pay their assessment fees. In a phone interview with the Signal Tribune, Ed Casey, attorney for the WRD, said Judge Dau now wants both the WRD and the cities to provide their input on a plan to “manage” the eventual trial. Casey said he is confident the WRD will prevail in the case. “We are very confident at prevailing at trial for a number of different reasons, but most importantly we believe we’ll be able to show that the cities of Cerritos, Downey and Signal Hill have been taking the cheapest source of water in this region, mainly ground water, from the Central Basins and not paying for it,” he said. “We also think that we’ll be able to show that these cities, while not paying the [WRD] the replenishment assessment, may have been charging residents, through their own water bills, for the amount of the replenishment assessment.”

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Casey added that the judge has already voted down a federal claim brought by the cities seeking a refund on the basis that the WRD infringed on constitutional rights, and he added that the statute of limitations only allows the cities to claim a refund for one year rather than five years. Casey said the WRD is disputing refunds for any years of prior charges. A Signal Hill City staff report notes, however, that the court ruled in favor of the cities, concluding that the cities complied with any claim requirement and that the damages claim now proceeds to trial. “WRD filed a motion that sought to say that the third cause of action had no basis as a matter of law,” said Lindsay Tabaian, an attorney for the cities. “The judge determined that wasn’t the case and the city had the right to proceed to the damages phase with respect to state law.”

In addition, Aleshire refuted claims by the WRD that the entities are simply “freeloaders” looking to pump water for free. “We don’t want this for free,” he said. “If they would go through a proper noticing and a proper hearing process, we could scientifically go through if this underflow exists and what the appropriate charge is for each basin. We’d be happy to pay, but evidently, not withstanding our saying that, we have to just go down this litigation road to the bitter end.” After the City Council meeting, Myrter said that, if the court rules that WRD must pay back funds, however, “ratepayers would definitely get the benefit.” However, he added that the courts would determine the exact terms. In addition, Aleshire said the WRD still has a right to appeal the judge’s ruling on Proposition 218 in

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

15

addition to any damages awarded to the cities. Still, as litigation costs continue to mount, representatives from both the City and the WRD said it would be in the best interest of ratepayers to work out a settlement, possibly through scientific studies to come up with an assessment agreement. “We would be happy to try and come up with a way of sorting this out without litigating to the nth degree, but so far those discussions haven’t gone to a place where we could just work it out through an agreement,” Aleshire said. “We’re certainly always open to that conversation and would prefer to deal with it around the table than through litigation.” Whittaker agreed with the sentiment. “That would be very important for us to try and sit down and work some of these issues out instead of fighting in court.” ß


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