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ST3435 - Feb. 1_Layout 1 2/1/13 11:40 AM Page 1

"Tree of Night Life" acrylic on canvas by Nairobi Tony

See page 7 for information on the exhibit where this work will be on display.

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Vol. 34 No. 35

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Participate in the 18th annual Sweetheart Sweepstakes! Pages 10 & 11

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SERVING BIXBY KNOLLS, CALIFORNIA HEIGHTS, LOS CERRITOS, WRIGLEY AND THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

Seven candidates vie for seats on SH City Council

February 1, 2013

Your Weekly Community Newspaper

Proposed tax measure dominates first of three candidate forums

Film immortalizes Signal Hill’s downhill skateboarding competition as ‘birth of extreme sports’

CJ Dablo/Signal Tribune

From left, Signal Hill City Council candidates Ellen Ward, Lori Woods, Ed Wilson, Elizabeth Wise, Robert Mendoza, Nancy Sciortino and Michael Noll during the Jan. 29 forum hosted by the advocacy group Signal Hill Community First CJ Dablo Staff Writer

Contenders for the three Signal Hill council seats up for grabs in the March 5 municipal election have reduced the decision to a choice of whether voters will want the city to remain on its course or if it needs a change. At the Jan. 29 candidate forum, four new contenders looking for a spot on the Signal Hill City

Council called for a change in leadership while the three current councilmembers defended their records as they highlighted the success of the city under their leadership. Incumbents Ellen Ward, Ed Wilson and Michael Noll have served at least 12 years on City Council together. Of the three incumbents, Vice Mayor Noll has the most seniority on the Council. He has served a total of about 20

years. The remaining four candidates are Robert Mendoza, Nancy Sciortino, Elizabeth Wise and Lori Woods. “Do you know what the five- to ten-year plan is for our community and is that plan in line with what the majority of Signal Hill residents want?” Woods asked the audience of

LBCC cuts 11 career/technical programs from its curriculum Nick Diamantides Staff Writer

Although Proposition 30 was approved by California voters last November, Long Beach City College (LBCC) still faces a budget deficit of more than $6 million.

That shortfall prompted the LBCC District Board of Trustees to discontinue instructional programs in 11 career/technical disciplines that had been offered at the college for many years. The trustees voted 4–1 to cancel the

Nick Diamantides/Signal Tribune

Long Beach City College Superintendent-President Eloy Ortiz-Oakley told the Signal Tribune that he is painfully aware of the tremendous impacts that the elimination of classes will have on students, faculty and staff. “But the [program eliminations] are critical for the long-term fiscal health of the college,” he said. Friday

Closing Sale

73°

see FORUM page 14

programs during their regularly scheduled meeting on Jan. 23. “We had always made it clear that, even if Proposition 30 passed, LBCC would still have to make cuts because of the last three years of declining revenues,” said Eloy Ortiz-Oakley, college superintendent-president. He explained that the passage of Proposition 30 significantly reduced the magnitude of the necessary reductions, but no one in the LBCC administration ever expected that the voter-approved tax increases would eliminate the need for program cuts. The LBCC programs the board of trustees discontinued are autobody technology, aviation maintenance, audio production, interior design, welding, automotive technology, real estate, photography, air-conditioning/refrigeration/ heating, diesel mechanics and see LBCC page 14

Saturday

Sunday

Monday

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Original participants and founders of the Signal Hill Speed Run, the world’s first downhill skateboarding championship that lasted from 1975 to 1978, gather at the base of Hill Street, just hours before a new documentary about the competition was to be screened at Cal State Long Beach. Original skateboarding members also signed their names and speed times on a nearby “No Skateboarding” sign. Pictured front row, from left, are: Roberto “Chuy” Madrigal, Guy “Grundy” Spagnoli, Tommy Ryan, Bob Skoldberg and John Hughes. Pictured back row, from left, are: Henry Hester, Herb Spitzer, Jim O’Mahoney (the founder of race), Jamie Hart and Cliff Coleman.

Sean Belk Staff Writer

About four years ago, co-directors Jon Corenoy and Mike Horelick set out on a journey to bring light to a relatively unnoticed subject– a downhill skateboarding competition in Signal Hill that has been called “the first X Game.” Their mission led them to produce a City-sponsored documentary that debuted last week and is being featured in several film festivals in coming months. The near 90-minute film, narrated by singer and musician Ben Harper, chronicles the Signal Hill Speed Run, a downhill skateboarding competition that ran for a brief, four-year stint from 1975 to 1978. Today, however, skateboarding anywhere in Signal Hill’s rolling streets is illegal, and only pedestrians use the hill’s steep incline for recreational activity. After a world premiere at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival last Friday, about 300 people, including City officials and original skateboarders of the run, were able to watch the film for the first time during a private screening at the University Theatre at California State

University, Long Beach on Sunday, Jan. 27. The documentary became even more meaningful to locals and the skateboarding community last week after the passing of Don “Waldo” Autry, a Long Beach native considered a skateboarding “legend” by friends and family, just days before the debut event. Although virtually unknown today, the contest, which attracted daredevils of all types, including women, achieved legendary status in its heyday and is credited with paving the way for extreme sports. “To me, the skaters of today really have no idea where they came from… and this is it,” said John Hughes, who, in his early 20s, placed second in the speed run for riding a kneeboard in 1976. Hughes, who said he thought the film was “outrageous,” said he held back tears while watching the old footage. Thrill-seeking skateboarders, brave enough to take on the more than 30-degree-angle slope of Hill Street in Signal Hill, broke world records, as the first to reach speeds of see DOCUMENTARY page 6

February 1 through February 5, 2013 Tuesday

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ST3435 - Feb. 1_Layout 1 2/1/13 11:40 AM Page 2

NEWS

2 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

FEBRUARY 1, 2013

Bixby Knolls car show cancelled this year to expand series of events in 8th District

Sean Belk

Staff Writer

After a seven-year run, the annual Bixby Knolls Dragster Expo and Car Show has come to a screeching halt. Board members of the Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association (BKBIA) unanimously agreed last week to skip the event this year to instead try something new– expand a

series of other events year-round. Eighth District Long Beach City Councilmember Al Austin told the Signal Tribune via email that he supports the BKBIA’s decision to “forego� the event this year, however, he implied that the board has not ruled out possibly bringing the event back in future years. “While the car show provided our

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community with great family fun and memories for the last seven years, our ability to continue is untenable due to several factors,� he said. “It was a very tough call for all involved, but we are looking forward to continuing and expanding events in the 8th District that support our local business corridors and inspire our neighborhoods.� Discussions, however, are already brewing about keeping the car show alive in some way or at least saving the dragster expo or merging it with other events. Organizers said the expo, which featured a “cackle fest,� attracting hot rods and famous drag racers in recent years, was a major attraction and a tribute to Southern California’s racecar and motor-sports history, particularly the Lions Drag Strip in Wilmington that lasted from 1955 to 1972. The car show, which included

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Vote Tuesday, March 5th

Mike Noll Signal Hill City Council Five Good Terms Deserves Another Mike is currently Vice Mayor and a forty-year resident. He is asking for your support to represent you for another four-year term. With your help and vote, Mike will continue to work diligently to make Signal Hill one of the finest cities in California â&#x20AC;&#x201C; one with a healthy reserve and economically sound budget.

Serving Signal Hill s 0RESENTLY 6ICE -AYOR s #URRENTLY SERVING AS 6ICE #HAIR OF 3UCCESSOR !GENCY s .OW SERVING ON THE 3TATE 0OLICY 2EVENUE 4AXATION #OMMITTEEAPPOINTED BY THE 0RESIDENT of the California League of Cities s 3ERVING AS $IRECTOR OF THE ,! #OUNTY 3ANITATION $ISTRICT AND 3OCIETY OF %NVIRONMENTALLY 2ESPONSIBLE &ACILITIES 3%2& "OARD s !PPOINTED TO THE ,ONG "EACH -EASURE + /VERSIGHT board by the Superintendent of Schools s "EFORE BEING ELECTED TO #ITY #OUNCIL -IKE SERVED ON THE CITYS #IVIL 3ERVICE AND 0LANNING #OMMISSIONS

Cory Bilicko/Signal Tribune

The annual Bixby Knolls Dragster Expo and Car Show has been postponed indefinitely so that the BKBIA can expand a series of other events. (Pictured is the car show from 2010.)

more than 200 classic cars and more than a dozen dragsters that lined Atlantic Avenue between San Antonio Drive and Bixby Road was started in 2005 by Austinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s predecessor Rae Gabelich, wife of the late, famed

race-car driver Gary Gabelich. The car show also replaced the Bixby Knolls Street Fair, which once attracted about 10,000 people and closed down the street as well.

Sean Belk

which provides security for LA Metro light rails and subways, proceeded to investigate the situation. Jaime told the Signal Tribune that the sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s department has assigned an investigator to the case and that the department already has some strong leads after obtaining still shots from Metroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s video-surveillance cameras and information from the victim. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have some pretty good information,â&#x20AC;? Jaime said. Footage shows that one suspect was wearing a maroon USC hoodie with possibly gray paints and that the other suspect was wearing a gray hoodie with blue jeans, he said. Jaime said the suspects are facing robbery charges, which could be incorporated with gang enhancements, if the incident turns out to be gangrelated, and/or assault and battery charges. The incident is the second reported violent crime on the Blue Line in Long Beach in recent months. A 19-year-old passenger was shot last November as a train stopped at the 5th Street station. Jaime, however, said violent crimes and robberies on the Blue Line are rare. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We rarely have problems down there in Long Beach,â&#x20AC;? he said, adding that the Willow Street station is one of the safest stations on the route. Sotero said he couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t confirm the frequency of such incidents on the system. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are a number of activities that happen on our system,â&#x20AC;? he said. Sotero added that LA sheriffs regularly patrol stations, and Metro has safety and security features, including videosurveillance cameras and emergency call boxes on platforms and inside each train.

LA County sheriffs investigating Willow-Street Blue-Line station robbery

Staff Writer

Los Angeles County sheriffs are investigating the robbery of a victim, described as a 31-year-old male, who was knocked unconscious on the Blue Line platform at Willow Street and Long Beach Boulevard on Wednesday, Jan. 23. According to Sgt. Eric Jaime, the victim was waiting for a train when he was approached by two black males, described as being in their early 20s, a little more than six feet tall and weighing about 160 to 200 pounds. One of the suspects attempted to take the victimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bike, saying, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hey, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my bike,â&#x20AC;? and tried to walk off the platform with it, Jaime said. The victim, however, tried to take the bike back, and a fight broke out. At some point, the victimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cell phone fell to the floor, and one of the suspects ran off with it. As a precautionary measure, the victim, who reported being knocked unconscious, was transported to the Long Beach Memorial Medical Center, where he was treated for scrapes and abrasions, and he remained overnight for observation, said Dave Sotero, spokesperson for Metro. On Tuesday, Jan. 29, Jaime said the victim said he was â&#x20AC;&#x153;doing betterâ&#x20AC;? after suffering from nonlife-threatening injuries. Long Beach police officers first arrived on the scene at 7:26pm after being dispatched at 7:23pm. The Los Angeles County Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department,

A Balanced City Budget Mike has dedicated himself to balancing the City budget â&#x20AC;&#x201C; even under the difficult circumstances of State budget â&#x20AC;&#x153;raidsâ&#x20AC;? and a lengthy recession. His experience will continue to be invaluable to maintain vital services as he believes the city needs to be able to continue to pay for what is essential by not spending more than it earns. Money was saved when Mike supported the plan to privatize such services as school crossing guards and park security.

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With Mikeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s assistance and know-how, he has helped balance the budget while maintaining a healthy reserve, as well as being part of instituting a 5-year capital improvement program.

DURING MIKEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TENURE We have continued providing high-quality public services which are essential for a positive quality of life for our residents. Miles of streets have been resurfaced, and we can look forward to the WIDENING OF #HERRY !VE AT 0#( WITH THE HELP OF GRANT money. Graffiti abatement has also been expanded to cover the entire city as has tree trimming, sidewalk repair and traffic-signal maintenance.

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Time and Dedication !S A COMMITTED LOCAL LEGISLATOR AND businessman, Mike devotes countless hours of his time to the City Council and the City of Signal Hill. He is a team player and is dedicated to helping the City Council work together to achieve the results we need for a strong and healthy future for Signal Hill.

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ST3435 - Feb. 1_Layout 1 2/1/13 11:40 AM Page 3

NEWS

FEBRUARY 1, 2013

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Long Beach fire stations to inspect businesses, ‘assemblies’ this year to cut costs and avoid scams Sean Belk Staff Writer

Long Beach Fire Department (LBFD) personnel from each fire station in the city will be checking buildings of businesses and “assemblies” for fire-code violations this year instead of designated civilian fire-prevention-bureau staff conducting the inspections. The change is being implemented to make the inspections more efficient and cost-effective as the department enters a new staffing model in coming weeks amid recent budget cuts, said Rich Brandt, LBFD spokesperson. “With recent changes and cutbacks, we just didn’t have staff to keep up with those inspections,” he said. The inspections started last month and will continue through May. The LBFD annually conducts more than 600 inspections of assemblies, which are defined under the California Fire Code as, “the use of a building or structure… for the gathering of persons for purposes such as civic, social or religious functions, recreation, food or drink consumption or awaiting transportation…” when in excess of 50 persons. Assembly structures range from small restaurants to large churches and institutions, Brandt said. Having sworn firefighters arrive in fire engines instead of a designated fire-prevention staff member to inspect assembly structures also helps

The Concerned Citizens of Signal Hill (CCSH) and the Signal Hill Chamber of Commerce will co-host two Signal Hill City Council candidate forums this month, both of which will be in the Signal Hill City Council Chamber, 2175 Cherry Ave. The first forum will be Monday, Feb. 4, and the second will be Monday, Feb. 25.

avoid scams, he said. Last year, there were reports of imposters fraudulently propositioning businesses to charge $250 for building inspections, Brandt said. “The only people who are going to be coming out to your business is the fire department,” he said. “It’s [not] hard to tell that it’s a firefighter when they’ve got a big, red fire engine out in front.” Fire-department officials stated in a press release that the change in assembly inspections assures “the criteria evaluated are based on fire code and not a potential ploy by a private concern as was reported last year.” Brandt added that the new inspection procedure also helps businesses and fire companies to get acquainted with each other. “Local fire stations will get to meet the business owners and assembly owners on a personal level… and will also get to be familiar with all of the [inner] workings of assemblies,” Brandt said. “It’s more of a personal touch for fire departments.” He said the assembly-inspection cycle lasts through the first half of the year, while hotels and multifamily structures, such as apartments, to which fire-station personnel are already assigned, are inspected in the second half. Brandt said the department is rolling out a new program for multi-family-building inspections later this year.

PartIaL LISt oF SUPPorterS: congreSSMan aLan LowenthaL congreSSwoMan JanIce hahn

State Senator rIcarDo Lara

La coUnty SUPerVISor Don Knabe

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Sh coUncILMeMberS MIKe noLL & tIna hanSen Sh PLannIng coMMISSIoner Jane FaLLon

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MORE INFORMATION (562) 570-2560 longbeach.gov/fire

The Campaign Trail

Wilson Both forums will begin with a “public-candidate meet-andgreet” period from 6:30pm to 7pm. The forums will begin at 7pm and end at 8:30pm. Each candidate will be allowed two minutes for an introductory statement and two minutes for a closing statement. Signal Hill Chamber of Commerce members and CCSH will

eD Re-elect

Fire-department officials added that the state’s fire-code law “was developed not only using reasonable assumptions on parameters such as evacuation time but also on the experience gained from unfortunate incidents where there was significant loss of life.” Although all elements described in the inspection form may not apply to every business, fire-department officials note that the code’s requirements “provide a good reference,” adding that “awareness of the standards and attending to discrepancies before the inspection will make this process easier for all.” The following are general guidelines from the LBFD for making sure an assembly building is up to fire code: • assure that certifications for protection systems such as cooking-hood extinguisher, fire sprinklers, fire alarms and portable fire extinguishers are up-to-date • decorative wall coverings and materials such as drapes and even Christmas trees are to be fire-resistive • emergency exits are to have “panic hardware” and an open and clear pathway identified by a lighted sign (all are to have at least two code compliant exits)

provide questions. Each candidate will be asked the same question and given two minutes to answer, allowing for a total of about four prepared questions for each candidate. This session will be followed by a limited number of written questions from the audience, as time allows. For more information, call (562) 3750761 or (562) 494-6215.

For Signal Hill City Council

TAKE A TURTLE TREK What Sea turtle walk Who Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust When Saturday, Feb. 2 from 8am to 10am Where San Gabriel River More Info This tour of the Los Cerritos Wetlands meets at the driveway/inland entrance to Los Cerritos Wetlands on the corner of 1st Street and PCH at the Long Beach/Seal Beach border. Closed-toe shoes required. Children under 16 must be accompanied by an adult. Email ejlambe@verizon.net or call (714) 357-8576.

COMMUNITY ASSEMBLY What Community assembly Who Long Beach Councilmembers Al Austin and Steven Neal When Saturday, Feb. 2 from 9am to 11am Where Houghton Park Community Center, 6301 Myrtle Ave. More Info Residents may learn about the design of the new north branch library, meet North Division Commander Robert Luman and learn about other neighborhood issues, events and concerns. Call (562) 570-6685 or visit district8@longbeach.gov .

LUNCH AND LECTURE What Cultural discussion and luncheon Who The Long Beach branch of American Association of University Women When Saturday, Feb. 2 at 11am Where Long Beach Yacht Club, 6201 Appian Way More Info Emad Samir, an Egyptian native, will speak about Middle Eastern culture and social life with particular emphasis on the status of women and girls. Cost of the luncheon is $32. Call (562) 799-8479 or visit aauw-longbeach.org .

MEET AND EAT What Supper club Who Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association When Monday, Feb. 4 at 6:30pm Where Café Bixby & Pizza, 3900 Atlantic Ave. More Info Bixby Knolls Supper Club is the simple concept of supporting local restaurants on a Monday night, which is typically a slow night. Residents are invited to meet, eat and support the local economy. Visit supperclub@bixbyknollsinfo.com .

GET DOWN WITH DOWNTOWN What Annual Celebrate Downtown event Who Downtown Long Beach Associates When Thursday, Feb.7 from 5pm to 9pm Where The newly completed Promenade between Broadway and 3rd Street More Info This free event will highlight downtown projects including the transformation of the former Press-Telegram building led by Millworks and the Willmore Heritage Garden, in addition to featuring feature live music and food tastings from local restaurants. Call (562) 436-4259 or visit downtownlongbeach.org .

CHOCOLATE, TEA AND CONVERSATION What Culinary class Who Rancho Los Alamitos Historic Ranch and Gardens When Saturday, Feb. 9 from 10am to 1:30pm Where Rancho Los Alamitos, 6400 Bixby Hill Rd. More Info The event will include a cooking demonstration by Chef Debbi Dubbs, as well as a Valentine tea. Jan Livingston Brady will present “Tied by the Apron Strings,” a discussion regarding the role of women in the American home during the 19th and 20th centuries. Call (562) 431-3541 or visit the Rancho’s website at rancholosalamitos.org .

MIXER AT THE MARKETPLACE What Monthly meeting Who The Success Network Where Corner Bakery, 6507 E. PCH in The Marketplace When Wednesday, Feb. 13 from 7:30am to 9am More Info The meeting is open to small-business leaders seeking networking opportunities with other professionals. Breakfast is available at the restaurant. Contact Katja Jones by calling (562) 685-8532 or emailing katja@yourspaciousness.com .

ARTWORK AND NETWORK What 2nd Thursdays Mixer Who The Signal Hill Chamber of Commerce Where Gina M. Woodruff Gallery, 5555 East Stearns St. #203 in Long Beach When Thursday, Feb. 14 from 5pm to 8pm More Info The mixer will feature live music, appetizers and desserts, a silent art auction and prizes. Call Gina Woodruff at (562) 519-1614 or email ginawoodruff@yahoo.com .

ED WILSON PLEDGES TO:

¥ Represent the people first ¥ Maintain government accountability - & trans parency ¥ Maintain a balanced budget ¥ Transition to renewable energy sources ¥ Diversify city revenues ¥ Enhance residents quality of life ¥ Invest in Signal Hill

W

ILSON S

Q UALIFICATIONS:

¥ Mayor 2000, 2005, 2010 ¥ City Council 1997-present ¥ Signal Hill?Sustainable Committee 2009-present ¥ President Gateway Cities 2004/05 ¥ President LA?Division CA?League of Cities 2001/02 ¥ Executive Board CA?League of Cities 2002-2004 ¥ Miller Children s Hospital Advisory Board 2010-present ¥ Board Member Rivers &?Mountain Conservancy 2004present ¥ Board member LA?County Board of Sanitation 1997present ¥ Board member LA?Economic Development Corp 2001/03 ¥ Board Member LBCC foundation 2002-present

Vote March 5 Paid for by Committee to Re-elect Ed Wilson | ID#940841

Experience Matters

3


ST3435 - Feb. 1_Layout 1 2/1/13 11:40 AM Page 4

COMMUNITY

4 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Rancho offering information days for prospective volunteers

Signal Hill Parks & Recreation Commission invites the public to attend:

PUBLIC WORKSHOP REGARDING PROPOSED SIGNAL HILL PARK ELECTRONIC MESSAGE CENTER

Wednesday, Feb. 13, 6pm Signal Hill Park Community Center 1780 E. Hill St., Signal Hill Please call Community Services for details

(562) 989-7330

OPINION

Thoughts from the Publisher by Neena Strichart

With January behind us, and Groundhog Day being tomorrow, it is now time to gear up for Valentine’s Day. Anyone who has been a long-time reader of the Signal Tribune knows that this time of year is when we sponsor our biggest feature of the year– our Sweetheart Sweepstakes. Today is the kick-off for the 18th event. With this promotion, our readers cut out entry coupons that appear during the next two weeks in the Signal Tribune and take them to any or all of the 24 participating advertisers to enter the drawings for our awesome prize packages. Check out pages

The pink and red buckets and decorated boxes at participating businesses serve as receptacles for the Sweetheart Sweepstakes.

FEBRUARY 1, 2013

inside the issue for entry coupons, rules and prize list. This year’s prizes are amazing, and I find it heartwarming that so many local businesses chose to participate by donating such generous items. I still can’t believe we were able to put together such a fine array of prizes. This year’s promotion will run today and next Friday. The last chance to enter will be Wednesday, Feb. 13 at noon. After that time our staff members will pick up all the entry boxes. Once we have them in our hot little hands, we will take them to the office, count the entries, mix ‘em up, draw the winners and then contact those lucky folks by telephone. The winners’ names will appear in our Feb. 15 issue.

Our goal in sponsoring the Sweetheart Sweepstakes is to encourage our readers to patronize local businesses. By cutting out and then dropping off the coupons in the “specially marked boxes or pink buckets” at participating businesses, our readers have an opportunity to visit the participating advertisers and familiarize themselves with those merchants’ goods or services. Our intention is to give our readers a fun reason to visit some local

Rancho Los Cerritos will provide the public an opportunity to learn about its numerous programs during one of its free upcoming Volunteer Information Days held in February. Interested individuals will be able to discover– or rediscover– the National and State Historic Landmark museum, otherwise known as “the Roots of Long Beach.” Volunteers assist the Rancho with a number of affairs, such as giving tours of the adobe house and gardens, staffing the visitor center, working in the museum shop, helping with special events, performing research, gardening, and more. The upcoming meetings will cover a series of topics that highlight

how individuals can give back to their community in a fun, educational and meaningful way. Furthermore, interested individuals who want to become a house or garden docent can register for docent training classes, set to begin in March. Details will be provided at the Volunteer Information Days. Those interested may RSVP at (562) 570-1755 for either Tuesday, Feb. 5 at 3pm or Saturday, Feb. 23 at 10am. Light refreshments will be served. For more information call (562) 5701755, or visit rancholoscerritos.org .

Source: Rancho Los Cerritos

Kenneth H. Britton

shops or restaurants they may have never visited before. For those of you who plan to participate, please don’t just run in and throw your entry in the various boxes. Do take the time to look around and shop or dine at the establishment that so graciously helped sponsor the sweepstakes. Keep in mind there are rules– you cannot enter by mail, fax or email; and don’t just drop your entry through the mail slot– it will be thrown away. You must go inside the business and drop your entry into the specially marked container. Also, you may only enter once a day at each business. Do remember to put the right coupon in the right box, or you’ll be disqualified! Remember, take the time to shop or eat while you’re there. Who knows, you may just discover your new favorite shop or restaurant! A big thanks goes out to all the folks who so generously donated for our contest. We appreciate your participation. Many of you have donated for all 18 years– you’re the greatest! So, my dear readers, with a total of 15 prize packages in all, the odds are in your favor...so enter, and enter often. If you don’t enter, you can’t win! Note: To Mother, my husband Steve, staff of the Signal Tribune and participating businesses– NO! For the 18th time, you cannot enter, so stop asking! And don’t think you can fool me with a phony name and cell-phone number! I’m smarter than I look!

June 25, 1930–January 21, 2013

A celebration of life for Kenneth H. Britton will take place this morning: Friday, February 1, at 9:30am at Curley’s Café, 1999 E. Willow St. SH Ken was an important part of Signal Hill’s Historical Society and served as membership chair for many years. He loved Signal Hill and Curley’s Café. Please join those whose lives he touched for a celebration of Ken’s life.

C O M M E N TA RY

Time-tested medic response on the Long Beach chopping block

Big changes have been proposed for emergency medical services in Long Beach, and the impact will be felt by taxpayers waiting for an ambulance. City officials intend to begin an experimental program to split up the two-person paramedic teams that have served Long Beach for decades. This will result in Long Beach residents being subjected to a program studying the effects of further reducing ambulance coverage. The proposal seeks to eliminate two more of Long Beach’s 13 remaining ambulances and cut another 21 firefighter/medics– all on top of the 12 firefighter/medics that were recently cut from Station 8. Annually answering well over 50,000 emergencies– both medical and fire– the LBFD [Long Beach Fire

Department] has continually refined medical responses to provide the most efficient model possible to the Long Beach community. This current “crewdeployed medic” response model is proven to rapidly provide life-saving medics at your front door at a moment’s notice, beginning with a team of four firefighter/medics on a fire engine. Every Long Beach firefighter is an emergency medical technician– a “medic.” The firefighter/medic dual role allows for rapid response and seamless operations at emergency scenes; firefighter/medics can rapidly treat and assess patients and are also able to enter hazardous environments and render care as a patient is rescued from a burning house or extricated from a car with the Jaws of Life.

by Rex Pritchard Long Beach Firefighters President

For transportation, teams of two advanced life support (ALS) firefighter/medics respond in rescue ambulances to only the most critical emergencies. This team administers medication, interprets complex heart rhythms, establishes a breathing tube, and monitors vital functions, all while contacting a nearby hospital, communicating the orders for vital procedures, and documenting precisely every action taken. In the emergencies that do not require advanced life support, these “advanced medics” leave the scene and move on to the next critical call while a more basic form of transportation is provided. This built-in flexibility is the true value of the LBFD’s current system– the correct resources are utilized

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

MANAGING EDITOR

Stephen M. Strichart

Neena R. Strichart

Stephanie Raygoza

ASSISTANT EDITOR/STAFF WRITER

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STAFF WRITERS

CJ Dablo

COLUMNISTS

Jennifer E. Beaver Carol Berg Sloan, RD

Nick Diamantides

Shoshanah Siegel

engine, a ladder truck, and an ambulance will be required to medical emergencies just to meet minimum response criteria. This change in medic response was dictated in the LBFD’s budget by city officials who exhibit very little understanding of how this change would affect service. It leaves Long Beach with fewer ambulances and fewer firefighters on the streets, and the citizens who need firefighter/medics in the most critical moments of their lives will be the ones who pay the price. As the world changes, Long Beach firefighter/medics continue to adapt and advance. But the proposal to dismantle advanced life support teams represents another tremendous step backwards for the City of Long Beach and its citizens. DESIGN EDITOR

Cory Bilicko

ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS

Jane Fallon

on each and every call. There is no excess in the system, and complete teams are used exactly where they are needed. This is also where the proposed changes will most significantly affect our community. This experimental program would leave fewer transporting ambulances and ties the “advanced medics” to non-critical ambulances. The experiment will generate budgetary and operational waste by sending advanced medics where they are not needed. Advanced medics will be waiting in extended hospital triage queues and committed on non-critical medical calls while truly critical patients will be relying on two separate additional LBFD units being close enough to help. In some cases, the response of a fire

Leighanna Nierle

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/WEBSITE MANAGER

Tanya Paz

CULTURE WRITERS

Daniel Adams Vicki Paris Goodman Gregory Spooner CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Matt Sun

EDITORIAL INTERNS

Andrea Ciccolini

Ariana Gastelum

CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Rachael Rifkin

DESIGN INTERN

Kaelyn Bruno

The Signal Tribune welcomes letters to the editor, which should be signed, dated and include a phone number to verify authenticity. Letters are due by noon on the Tuesday before desired publication date. The Signal Tribune reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, language and space requirements. The Signal Tribune does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other publications or otherwise presented in a public forum. Letters to the editor and commentaries are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Signal Tribune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, letters to the editor and commentaries are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. Letter-writers will be identified by their professional titles or affiliations when, and only when, the editorial staff deems it relevant and/or to provide context to the letter. We do not run letters to the editor submitted by individuals who have declared their candidacies for public office in upcoming races. This policy was put in place because, to be fair, if we publish one, we would have to publish all letters submitted by all candidates. The volume would no doubt eliminate space for letters submitted by other readers. Instead, we agree to interview candidates and print stories about political races in an objective manner and offer very reasonable advertising rates for those candidates who wish to purchase ads. The Signal Tribune is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. Yearly subscriptions are available for $45.

939 E. 27th St., Signal Hill, CA 90755 (562) 595-7900

www.signaltribune.com newspaper@signaltribune.com


ST3435 - Feb. 1_Layout 1 2/1/13 11:40 AM Page 5

FEBRUARY 1, 2013

NEWS

In with the new

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

5

Signal Hill’s new police station opens to serve community ‘well into the next century’

Sean Belk Staff Writer

Government officials and community leaders commemorated the grand opening of the Signal Hill Police Department’s new state-ofthe-art police station and emergency operations center (EOC), which a crowd of local residents were able to tour on Saturday, Jan. 26. The ceremony included a flagraising by the police department’s honor guard led by Capt. Ron Mark,

with assistance from Cub Scout Pack 206 Den 14 and Girl Scout Troop 1853. U.S. Rep. Alan Lowenthal, State Senator Ricardo Lara and State Assemblymember Bonnie Lowenthal also attended the grand opening, giving their first commemorative plaques of recognition of the year. The ceremony took place just three days before the police department’s relocation. The new 21,500-square-foot see SHPD page 15

Photos by Neena Strichart/Signal Tribune

Sgt. Russell Hefte (left) and Lt. Christopher Nunley (right) Tuesday morning remove the temporary “closed” signage in front of the new Signal Hill Police Station which by nature of its removal serves as an unofficial opening of the facility.

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

(From left) Signal Hill City Manager Ken Farfsing, Vice Mayor Mike Noll, Mayor Tina Hansen, Councilmember Ed Wilson, Deputy City Manager Charlie Honeycutt and Councilmember Larry Forester during the January 26 grand opening of the new Signal Hill police station

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The new Signal Hill Police Station received its first call shortly after the official telephone “switch-over” took place Tuesday morning at 10am. Receiving the call is Ariane Wright, one of the city’s dispatcher/jailers. According to Wright, the city receives between 50 and 100 emergency 911 calls a day.

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ST3435 - Feb. 1_Layout 1 2/1/13 11:40 AM Page 6

6 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Documentary continued from page 1

more than 50 miles per hour. Whether standing up, lying down or on their knees, competitors, who wore dazzling leather suits and helmets, barreled down the hill for the fastest times. The hill, which the speed run’s founders described as a “rollercoaster,” was also famous for the Model T Hill Climb in the 1920s. Despite the danger, however, the City of Signal Hill permitted the skateboarding competition that was first staged and promoted by Skateboard and Hang-Glider magazine publisher Jim O’Mahoney, now owner of the Santa Barbara Surf Museum. The run was started as part of the Guinness World Records TV show, and the contest went on to become an annual event with dozens of competitors, drawing crowds of 5,000 people and receiving coverage by television news crews and Sports Illustrated. Guy “Grundy” Spagnoli, who later became a professional surfer, completed the first attempt down the hill without any practice runs, clocking in at 50.2 miles an hour. One year later, Sam Puccio Jr. rode down on his back on a homemade skateboard, passing the finish line at 54 miles per hour. That skateboard would become the unofficial prototype for what is used today in “street luge” races. The speedsters eventually started bombing down the hill in “skate cars”– metal, enclosed, aerodynamic skateboard contraptions that required parachutes for stopping. Some of the risk-takers, however, ended up careening into the crowd and open traffic, since the skate cars were hard to steer. Some racers wiped out in injurious falls and neardeath accidents, which caused the City to eventually close the books on the contest. “Basically, the accidents started adding up, and the City of Signal Hill decided in 1979…to not give out a permit again for another speed run,” Horelick said. “That was sort of the death of the speed run there, but skateboard racing still continues and did move on to other places.” For some racers, however, injuries were life-changing. Tina Trefethen, a champion hang-glider, was 21 years old in 1978 when she crashed into a pole coming down the hill at approximately 58 miles an hour. The major accident landed her in the hospital after breaking her wrists and several ribs, and she had to have a lung removed. Watching the series of events unfold on the big screen was “very emotional,” she said in a phone interview. “It was pretty hard for me to watch some of that,” said Trefethen, who said she stays busy today fabricating and engineering ultra-light airplanes and racecars. “It‘s very amazing I’m alive… I appreciate every day… I wonder, ‘What if that never would have happened to me?’” Filmmakers Horelick and Corenoy first came across vintage skateboard photos of the run after purchasing a skateboard shop and the Tunnel Skateboard brand in 2005. Horelick, an author who graduated with a master’s degree in screenwriting from USC, and Corenoy, who has worked as

Thursday, February 14 at 5:30 and 8:30pm

director for the reality-TV series The Real World after graduating from New York University, then both approached the City of Signal Hill and the Signal Hill Historical Society to be involved in the research and making of the documentary. For years, that part of the city’s history has gone relatively overlooked, except for artwork in Cherry Park that commemorates the skate cars. Signal Hill City Manager Ken Farfsing said that an article in the L.A. Times written by Horelick in 2007 noted that the City had not properly honored the race. Although the City has highly honored the City’s wellknown oil history, there were no plaques or monuments about the speed run, which is why Farfsing said he wanted to make sure the City collaborated with the directors on the documentary. In 2010, the City’s redevelopment agency awarded the directors a contract to produce the film, and the rest was “history,” he said during the screening. “They didn’t realize in the late 1970s that they were really giving birth to a brand-new sport,” said Farfsing, who added that “street luge,” although not yet an Olympic sport, was added to the X Games in 1995. He said the speed run is also considered the launching pad for downhill skateboarding and other extreme sports, such as big-wave riding and snowboarding. “You really are pioneers,” Farfsing said. The documentary is the fourth film about Signal Hill’s history sponsored by the City. Other documentary films include: Signal Hill, a Diamond in the Rough (2006); History of the Hancock Refinery Fire (2008); and Successes of the Redevelopment Agency (2009). Horelick said The Signal Hill Speed Run is showing again at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival Saturday, Feb. 2, and then at the San Luis Obispo International Film Festival in March.

Photo by Chuck Saccio

Mike McCreary participating in the 1977 Signal Hill Speed Run

NEWS

FEBRUARY 1, 2013

Don ‘Waldo’ Autry remembered as old-school skateboarding ‘legend’

Sean Belk Staff Writer

Don “Waldo” Autry, a Long Beach native and local hairstylist, who passed away last Tuesday, Jan. 22, is remembered by friends, family and patrons as an old-school skateboarding “legend” and “super-nice guy.” He was 55. Autry was scheduled to attend a private screening of the new documentary The Signal Hill Speed Run, in which he was featured for competing in the 1976 downhill skateboarding speed contest in Signal Hill. However, he died just days before the film’s debut. According to Gail Krause, spokesperson for the Orange County Sheriff’s Department, Autry was found dead in his van on the 200 block of Main Street in Seal Beach, nearby where he worked as a hair stylist at Upstairs Downstairs Beauty Salon. Although an autopsy of the body has been conducted, Krause said his cause of death is still pending toxicology reports and biological studies. She said results aren’t expected to be released for several weeks. The coroner concluded that he actually died the day before his body was found, Krause added. With a more than 25-year skateboarding career, Autry was featured on the cover of skateboarding magazines and revered for inventing signature moves riding in riverbeds, pools, pipes and tunnels. He was also featured in the 1972 surf film 5 Summer Stories. Customers noted online that he used to tell skateboarding stories while styling hair. Mike Horelick, co-director of the

Photo by Mike Horelick

Don “Waldo” Autry, seen here with his signature green hair, passed away on Tuesday, Jan. 22, just days before a local screening of the new documentary The Signal Hill Speed Run, in which he was featured. Signal Hill documentary, stated in a message on Facebook that Autry was respected as a “fantastic skateboarder and a legend in the sport.” Autry was a “true character, who had a warm heart and a great sense of humor,” Horelick added. “As a kid, he walked around town with a pet raccoon on his shoulder. As an adult, he continued to compete in street luge, beating out others less than half his age.” During the documentary screening last week, skateboarding colleagues paid tribute to Autry with a moment of silence. Herb Spitzer, a fellow skateboarding competitor in the Signal Hill Speed Run, said he recalled Autry as a “wild man,” who “belonged in Cajun country.” He added that Autry

was a skateboarding innovator and “had a really outgoing personality.” Ed Economy, also a fellow oldschool skateboarder, said he met Autry while skateboarding in riverbeds as a teenager and they stayed close friends for 30 years. Economy said he remembered Autry disappearing for months at a time and people would say, ���Where’s Waldo?” One time they went down the hill in Signal Hill on a bike together and ended up in the hospital, he said. Afterwards, he recollected Autry saying, “Wasn’t that rad?” Economy said, “I always called him Waldo Knievel. He was afraid of nothing,” adding that Autry was “one of the best skaters of the time,” who was “doing things nobody else ever did.”

Photo by Bobby Smith

Don “Waldo” Autry is seen bombing down the Hill Street slope during the 1976 competition of the Signal Hill Speed Run.

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ST3435 - Feb. 1_Layout 1 2/1/13 11:40 AM Page 7

FEBRUARY 1, 2013

No-theme, open-call exhibit to display range of styles

Gallery Expo will host the works of 17 artists, selected from a recent open call of no particular theme, in its group exhibit that opens Friday, Feb. 1. The art ranges from contemporary to Steam Punk and back to the old favorites of more traditional art. New to Gallery Expo is Long Beach artist Connie DK Lane, with her larger-than-life, in-your-face, contemporary, three-dimensional statements constructed of foam, fabric, rope, nails, papier-mâché and found objects. Another area artist new to Gallery Expo is Nash Bellows, a painter who uses bright colors and figurative work to represent many aspects of her personality. Her work deals with the various ways people create identities in life. Nash says that most people only see the external shell of one another and base their viewpoints on material aspects. Nash’s art shows what she personally deems excessive in her life, such as food, family influence and personal possessions.

Returning Long Beach artist Nairobi Tony was born and raised in Kenya and moved to California in 1965 at age 12. He draws with a fountain pen and describes himself as a self-taught, “outsider” artist whose subjects include cosmic energies and cats. He is influenced by the flow of the ink and the spur of the moment. Many of his works are done in a stipple fashion and have an African folk art look and feel. Other new and returning artists in the exhibit are Peter Rameriz, Amaya Shannon, Douglas C. Orr, Vincent Mattina, Diane Modafferi, Kindle Lynn Reeder, Olga Teri Tyralla, David Rodriguez, Lori Ann Clark, Mike Schelly, Marcus Smith, Geoffrey Kieran, Kellie Thomas-Walker and Fernando Alvarez. The exhibit will open to the public Friday, Feb. 1 between 6pm and 10pm and then be open Feb. 2, 8, 9, 15, 16 and 22 between 4pm and 8pm. Gallery Expo, which is free and open to the public, is

CULTURE

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

7

“Tree of Night Life,” acrylic on canvas, by Nairobi Tony

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CULTURE 8 SIGNAL TRIBUNE FEBRUARY 1, 2013 ‘Laissez les bon temps rouler’ The House is alive with the sound at the First Fridays Art Walk of music (and gay fornication)

The First Fridays Art Walk on Feb. 1 will “laissez les bon temps rouler” (let the good times roll) by bringing Mardi Gras to Bixby Knolls with Dixieland music, food, king cake, mask-making and beads. Long Beach’s Mardi Gras Queen Kelli Johnson and King John Royce will lead attendees around Atlantic Avenue during the event. Participants may stop in at each business to collect beads and see what each has to offer. Other ingredients of the night will include: live art, music, beaded goats, Cajun cuisine, Toaster Music’s “Sound Lab,” creation stations, break dancers, the one-man “band” Timstrument, interactive art projects, free books, gift items and antiques. Attendees may also experience the “Great L.A. Air Raid of 1942” in 15-minute performances at the Richard Goad Theatre, 4250 Atlantic Avenue (with special guest– 8th District Councilmember Al Austin). Seventh District Councilmember James Johnson’s “First Books at First Fridays” at the Dana Branch

Library will feature LBUSD Board of Education Member Diana Craighead as the guest reader beginning at 5:30pm. Austin’s “Council on Your Corner” will be set up at Atlantic Avenue and Burlinghall Drive to “meet and greet” attendees. Attendees may dine on “Art-Lantic” Avenue at one of the local restaurants then grab the Big Red Bus to travel from venue to venue via designated stops at the participating businesses. Bella Cosa, 3803 Atlantic Ave., will have information about First Fridays, maps, business info, and restaurant recommendations from 6:30pm to 8pm. When the businesses start to close, “First Fridays After Hours” begins with dining and entertainment at: Nino’s Italian Restaurant, 3853 Atlantic Ave.; The Factory, 4020 Atlantic Ave.; and E.J. Malloy’s, 4306 Atlantic Ave. MORE INFORMATION firstfridayslongbeach.com

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Cory Bilicko Culture Writer

Currently bringing Edgar Allan Poe’s The Fall of the House of Usher to life with some very contemporary (but not cloyingly ostentatious) updating is Long Beach Opera, in their epic retelling of the short story, which is an almost by-the-book Gothic-horror tale. Poe had a knack for characterizing and personalizing our profoundest fears– putting into words those feelings that overcome us in times of terror or trepidation and helping us to see that “the willies” is a universal emotion. The Fall of the House of Usher, being no exception, recounts first-hand the experiences of the narrator as he travels to a far-off “mansion of gloom” to comfort and assist an ill childhood friend with whom he, incidentally, hasn’t had contact in many years and about whom he knows virtually nothing. How does a production company take such a personal account that describes, in unsettling details, one man’s internalization of his fears and then project it into a grand opera? What Long Beach Opera has done is to: give its actors a tremendous, foreboding, dynamic set in which to play; make minor tweaks here and there to modernize the story’s time period; and dig deep into the subtext to unearth (or fabricate?) a homosexual bond between the two main characters that manifests in an intense and (literally) thunderous fornication of their newly forged relationship. That ominous set consists of four cold, stone-looking pillars on wheels that are easily moved about the stage (at San Pedro’s Warner Grand Theatre) by eight stagehands, billed as supernumeraries. The members of this crew, by the way, don the typical allblack attire you’d expect; however, these dudes are really decked out in late-20th Century Goth getups and hairdos (two of the strokes of modernity), and they’re integrated into the production as characters themselves. They personify the House of Usher– a fitting directorial choice, since the Poe tale casts the house front and center as a character. Their manipulation of the pillars creates a living, breathing structure where the narrator (here, bestowed with the name William) and his sickly companion Roderick interact with each other and the various rooms of the home, along with Roderick’s sister Madeline (Suzan Hanson). Madeline is also very ill (or is she?), and there are revelations made about her that force William, and the audience, to question the nature of her

SIGNAL TRIBUNE’S FOCUS

ON

Photo by Keith Ian Polakoff

Lee Gregory embodies Poe’s narrator and Ryan MacPherson is his sickly, longlost friend in Long Beach Opera’s The Fall of the House of Usher. existence. This opera’s score was composed by Philip Glass, who describes his work as “music with repetitive structures.” In that vein, Hanson is tasked with providing very repetitious, ghostly, lyricless utterances throughout. These haunting sounds seem to be stripped directly from the film score of a 1960s Bmovie horror flick, and there’s an affectation to them that almost induces a chuckle. Nevertheless, the seemingly derivative nature of these chords doesn’t in the least detract from their effectiveness in cultivating a spooky atmosphere. Indeed, it’s the kind of thing that you willfully give into so you can better enjoy the ride– like throwing your hands into the air during a roller-coaster’s plummet. In the original story, the narrator, who is not identified by name, receives a letter from Roderick Usher, requesting his company as a source of “cheerfulness” to inspire “some alleviation of his malady.” One of the first signs that Long Beach Opera’s interpretation is being presented in modern day is that, in the opening scene, William (Lee Gregory) is using a computer tablet, probably an iPad, to read the invitational message from Roderick (Ryan MacPherson). William then uses a cell phone to book his flight to visit him. These elements don’t read as anachronisms, however; they work to illustrate the timeliness of Poe’s writing. Clothing and modes of transportation and communication are updated just enough, without a heavy-handed irony. Shortly before he shows up as Roderick’s butler, bass-baritone Nick Shelton appears as a flight attendant on William’s trip. (In an instance of masculine beauty, when Shelton does

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get to open his mouth and show his singing chops, he unveils a mesmerizing voice with a rich, wonderful tone.) Another actor who wears two hats, almost literally, is Jonathan Mack, who, like Shelton, seamlessly transitions from one supporting character to another with ease. It’s fun to watch a capable actor evoke a contemporary archetype (in Mack’s case, the cab driver who transports William from the airport to the house of horrors) with only slight mannerisms and the subtlest of facial expressions. This production’s most glaring deviation from Poe’s original work is the development of a homosexual interplay between William and Roderick. What at first appears to be a reinterpretation that takes liberties with a classic story turns out to be the manifestation of an interesting read on the story’s symbolism. As a matter of fact, a cursory search of the Internet yields a few essays and theses on homosexuality in Poe’s literature, as well as writings questioning and investigating the author’s own sexual orientation. Although there is no explicit mention of the two main characters fornicating, it is a useful avenue to explore in that it provides drama and a physical incarnation of their connection. Many classics of literature are void of gay characters, ostensibly because of social norms during the time in which they were written, so to treat William and Roderick as homosexuals incidentally, when Poe’s writing lacked any reference to their romantic or prurient relationships with women, seems valid. Playing up the romance/sexuality between the two men could be argued as perfectly appropriate here, since this is, after all, a story in which reality is questioned. Further support for the gay component can be found in the ethereal nature of sister Madeline. Does she even exist? After she supposedly dies, and the two men bury her to avoid doctors using her body to investigate her mysterious illness, William finally has the opportunity to see her face for the first time. He remarks that she looks identical to Roderick, who then reveals that she was his twin. By burying his feminine, diseased counterpart (who may actually still be alive), is Roderick suppressing his homosexuality? Perhaps what we’re witnessing is only a hallucination. A fantasy? A madman’s nightmare? Possibly, it is the narrator himself who is the mad one, and we’re along for the strange trip. Long Beach Opera will continue to bring about The Fall of the House of Usher at The Warner Grand Theatre, 478 W. 6th St. in San Pedro, on Saturday, Feb. 2 at 8pm and Sunday, Feb. 3 at 2pm. Ticket information is available at longbeachopera.org or by calling (562) 432-5934.


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CULTURE

FEBRUARY 1, 2013

An exceptional Jud V. Williford leads first-rate cast in taking ICT audiences Around the World in 80 Days Vicki Paris Goodman Culture Writer

I never saw the purportedly madcap movie Around the World in 80 Days that’s based on the book by Jules Verne. It featured cameo appearances by practically every Hollywood star of its day. Instead, the play, adapted for the stage by Mark Brown, employs five local actors to deliver the 39 roles! These actors are so talented that the likes of Frank Sinatra and David Niven won’t be missed. The year is 1872, and English gentleman Phileas Fogg has accepted a high-stakes bet that he cannot circle the planet in the then barely possible span of 80 days. The wager of 20,000 English pounds amounts to most of his fortune. A mathematical man of remarkable logic and numerical precision, Fogg is confident of his prospects, even allowing for inclement weather, human error, and a variety of unforeseen events. Of course, unanticipated calamities occur in spades to challenge Fogg’s best laid plans. And these mishaps of varying magnitude provide the fodder for the suspense, laughter, and romance that ultimately make the play such a delight. That said, the play could not succeed without a first-rate cast capable of the physical and spoken comedy necessary to pull it all off. While the play incidentally presents something of a clinic in global time zones, the audience is treated to foreign accents that unexpectedly comprise some of the most comical bits. In International City Theatre’s current production, Michael Uribes is endearing as Fogg’s courageous and fiercely loyal servant Passepartout. His antics provide some of the funniest moments of all. Melinda Porto ably delivers several male characters before settling into her primary task portraying the lovely and charming Aouda, the Indian woman who Fogg and Passepartout rescue from a ceremonial pyre in which she is to be sacrificed. As the British detective who follows Fogg believing he is a fugitive robber, Brian Stanton displays ineptitude and pratfalls that seem to know no bounds. Mark Gagliardi’s gruffness and exaggerated inanity make his portrayals some of the most colorful. I suppose I even smiled at the overdone British stereotyping of Americans as unrefined and clueless. So be it. But none of it would entirely come together without Jud V. Williford, who is an exceptional Phileas Fogg. His ample stature, quiet confidence, and serenely charismatic presence bely his self-effacing refusal to

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believe he could be entitled to the love of the woman he desires. Beyond that, Williford lends Fogg a patience, kindness, and decency seldom seen, even in times gone by. He is, therefore, a character worthy of literary history and remembrance. Pretty unusual for a character in a play that is clearly not a dramatic work. Most important of all, Williford and Porto establish a yearning chemistry that could heat the room. Without sacrificing the laughs, the undercurrent of desire that gradually builds between Fogg and Aouda adds an element that gives the play the meaning it needs and deserves. Being opening night, one or two minor prop and wardrobe “malfunctions” occurred. This cast didn’t miss a beat, ad-libbing character-appropriate dialogue to fit the occasion as if it were written into the script. What I appreciated perhaps most of all was the easy pace of the action, where I had feared a tempo far more frantic. One minor criticism: In the opening scene, Porto plays Fogg’s dismissed prior servant. There is a noticeable disconnect between the initial implication that Fogg is rigid and uncompromising, and his subsequent and consistent depiction as a man of uncommon for-

giveness. Allison Bibicoff directs this excellent production in which Staci Walters’s very effective set amounts to little more than a backdrop representing a giant map of the world, with Fogg’s route clearly marked. Backlights show the entourage’s current location at any given time, and well camouflaged openable “windows” in the map allow for characters to peek through to deliver comic and explanatory lines of dialogue. In the end, Fogg barely misses his timely return to London. Or does he? And what of the stalemate that exists between him and Aouda? You’d best see a performance of this entertaining and inspiring production to find out. Around the World in 80 Days continues at International City Theatre through Feb. 17. Tickets are $45 for Friday and Saturday evening performances and for Sunday matinees; $38 for Thursday evening performances. Evening performances are at 8pm; Sunday matinees are at 2pm. ICT is located in the Long Beach Performing Arts Center at 300 East Ocean Blvd. Call (562) 436-4610 for reservations and information. Tickets are also available online at InternationalCityTheatre.com .

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

9

Photo by Suzanne Mapes

From left, Jud V. Williford is an exceptional Phileas Fogg, and Michael Uribes is endearing as his courageous and fiercely loyal servant Passepartout in ICT’s production of Around the World in 80 Days.


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10

Prizes

FEBRUARY 1, 2013

CUPID’S CHOICE

Overnight stay at Quality Inn Signal Hill (with continental breakfast) • Champagne Basket from Wine Country Two $25 gift certificates from Kashiwa Restaurant • Pair of tickets for Long Beach Playhouse “Love in Bloom” original painting by Cory Bilicko • Scented candle from Capital Investment Advisers Two bags of Gimbal’s Cherry Lovers Candies

BEARY COZY VALENTINE PACKAGE Breakfast For Two from Black Bear Diner ($25 Bear Bucks) • Two Black Bear Diner Coffee Mugs Black Bear Diner His & Hers Fleece Jackets • Black Bear Diner Teddy Bear Dinner For Two from Black Bear Diner ($50 Bear Bucks)

presented by the Signal Tribune

ROMANCE ON YOUR MIND? Dinner for two at Buono’s Authentic Pizzeria • Pair of tickets for Long Beach Playhouse Couples photography sitting plus print courtesy of Vangie Ogg Photography Custom couples framing courtesy of Andazola’s Gallery Fluffy, red, heart-shaped pillow from About U • Two bags of Gimbal’s Cherry Lovers Candies

U LTIMATE PRIZE HIGH ON LOVE!

OH-SO UTTERLY ROMANTIC!

• Fly the skies on this Beaches Day Tour for two courtesy of Sunset Flying (Fly over: Queen Mary, Los Angeles

Two $25 gift certificates from Kashiwa Restaurant • Pair of tickets for Long Beach Playhouse Chocolate-Scented Teddy Bear from Signal Tribune • Avon bubble bath from Kat Evans Box of Truffles from Signal Hill Fresh & Easy • Two bags of Gimbal’s Cherry Lovers Candies

Airport, Manhattan Beach, Palos Verdes, Trump Golf Course & the Horseshoe, Catalina Island, Ports of Los Angeles & Long Beach, Vincent Thomas Bridge & Sea Launch) $399 value!

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• $100 gift card for dinner from Delius Restaurant • One-time-use camera, film developing and surprises from Tuttle Cameras • Giant Teddy Bear from Signal Tribune • Box of Truffles from Signal Hill Fresh & Easy • Two bags of Gimbal’s Cherry Lovers Candies

All courtesy of The Undershirt in Signal Hill: Cozy plush throw for 2 & Spa Set 2 Mugs & Sleepytime Tea • Ladies’ Bamboo nightshirt & Men’s Bamboo T-shirt Romance Novel, Candle & Bath Salts (packaged in a large zippered tote bag) –Value $180

INSURING YOUR LASTING LOVE All courtesy of Brenda Soto Bryan Insurance Agency: $50 dinner gift certificate Two AMC movie tickets • Gift certificate for a box of candy

GRAND PRIZE RIDING ROMANCE

TASTY LOVIN’ FOR TWO

• PEDIWAGON Belmont Shore excursion for party of 14! (lbpediwagon.com) $370 value! • Energy snack basket from Jumpstarter Bodyfuel Bars • Dozen cupcakes from Alsace Lorraine Bakery • 14 bags of Gimbal’s Cherry Lovers Candies

$25 gift card courtesy of Blackbird Café • Pair of tickets for Long Beach Playhouse Bottle of wine and 4 wine glasses from Signal Tribune • Cuddly Teddy Bear from Signal Tribune Box of truffles from Signal Hill Fresh & Easy • Two bags of Gimbal’s Cherry Lovers Candies

SO HAPPY TO BE IN LOVE! Dinner for two at Buono’s Authentic Pizzeria • Two tickets for Long Beach Playhouse Cuddly Stuffed Tiger from Signal Tribune • Three-month post office box rental at UPS Store #4466 Scented candle from Capital Investment Advisers • Two bags of Gimbal’s Cherry Lovers Candies

SUPREME PRIZE SPA-LIKE SPLENDOR

• Enjoy a 1 hr. couples massage in your home while a chef prepares dinner! Courtesy of G-Spa Massage Clinic (gspa.massagetherapy.com) $300 value! (includes appetizer, main course, dessert, & wine or champagne or love cocktails) • Cuddly Teddy Bear with heart-shaped button from Signal Tribune

A DAY OF DELIGHT Pancake Mix, Maple Syrup & Hot Cocoa Mix from Fresh & Easy • $50 gift certificate for Donato’s Hair Salon Coffee basket courtesy of Starbucks/Signal Hill • Pair of tickets for Long Beach Playhouse Dinner for two at Le Yen Restaurant • Box of truffles from Signal Hill Fresh & Easy Two bags of Gimbal’s Cherry Lovers Candies

HoW To PlAY

™ Clip out participating merchants’ coupons from the Signal Tribune on Feb. 1 and Feb. 8, 2013. ™ Take each coupon to the store featured on the coupon and deposit into the official entry box. (Don’t forget to fill in your name, address and phone number so that we can call to let you know what prizes you’ve won!) ™ That’s it. Now, isn’t that simple? Winners will be announced in the Feb. 15, 2013 edition of the Signal Tribune.

oFFICIAl RUlES 1. Use the coupon from the Signal Tribune to enter at each participating business. No faxes, photocopies, or mail-ins allowed. 2. Only one (1) entry per store per day. 3. No purchase necessary. 4. Must be at least 18 years old to enter. 5. One winner per family. Winners agree to allow the Signal Tribune to publish their names. 6. Employees and family members of the Signal Tribune, participating businesses and other sponsors are not eligible. 7. Winners chosen by random drawing Feb. 13, 2013. Winners will be notified by telephone and announced in the Feb. 15 edition of the Signal Tribune. 8. Entrants agree to release the Signal Tribune and all participating merchants and sponsors of any liability related to participating in the contest and/or acceptance and use of any prizes awarded. 9. Prizes are not transferable.

FOR A DELIGHTFUL DUO Pancake Mix, Maple Syrup & Hot Cocoa Mix from Fresh & Easy His and Hers gift certificate for Goldhill Hair Salon • Coffee basket courtesy of It’s A Grind/Signal Hill Pair of tickets for Long Beach Playhouse • $25 gift card at Bamboo Teri House Box of truffles from Signal Hill Fresh & Easy • Two bags of Gimbal’s Cherry Lovers Candies

SO UTTERLY IN LOVE! Dinner for two from Patricia’s Mexican Restaurant • Two passes for Museum of Latin American Art Scented candle from Capital Investment Advisers • Box of truffles from Signal Hill Fresh & Easy Chocolate-Scented Teddy Bear from Signal Tribune • Two bags of Gimbal’s Cherry Lovers Candies

LOVING YOU IS SO EASY! Dinner for two from Guadalupe’s Grill Restaurant • Two passes for Museum of Latin American Art Scented candle from Capital Investment Advisers • Box of truffles from Signal Hill Fresh & Easy Chocolate-Scented Teddy Bear from Signal Tribune • Two bags of Gimbal’s Cherry Lovers Candies

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SWEETHEART SWEEPSTAKES

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PUBLIC NOTICES

TST4279 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.S. No.: 9985-1077 TSG Order No.: 7272006 A.P.N.: 7216-020-093 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 05/17/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NBS Default Services, LLC, as the duly appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded 06/01/2006 as Document No.: 061197959, of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, executed by: WILLIAM G. COSTA, AN UNMARRIED MAN, as Trustor, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable in full at time of sale by cash, a cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state). All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and state, and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. Sale Date and Time: 02/19/2013 at 11:00 AM Sale Location: By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2600 EAST 20TH STREET #201C, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made in an "AS IS" condition, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit: $479,759.24 (Estimated). Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call, (714)730-2727 for information regarding the trustee`s sale or visit this Internet Web site, https://www.lpsasap.com/, for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case, T.S.# 99851077. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder`s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The Declaration pursuant to California Civil Code, Section 2923.5(a) was fulfilled when the Notice of Default was recorded on 10/11/2012 NBS Default Services, LLC 301 E. Ocean Blvd. Suite 1720 Long Beach, CA 90802 Phone:800-7667751 Fax: 562-983-5379 For Trustee Sale Information Log On To: https://www.lpsasap.com/ or Call: (714)730-2727. NBS Default Services, LLC, Gaby Ospino "We are attempting to collect a debt, and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose." A-4352842 01/25/2013, 02/01/2013, 02/08/2013 TST4281 TSG No.: 7354658 TS No.: CA1200248173 FHA/VA/PMI No.: APN: 7148-001-030 Property Address: 3300 CALIFORNIA AVENUE SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 09/15/2003. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 02/21/2013 at 10:00 A.M., First American Title Insurance Company, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 09/22/2003, as Instrument No. 03 2782876, in book , page , , of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, State of California. Executed by: NICHOLAS L. LIDDI JR.

AND DIANE P. LIDDI, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (Payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States) Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN THE ABOVE MENTIONED DEED OF TRUST APN# 7148-001-030 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 3300 CALIFORNIA AVENUE, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $261,482.62. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust has deposited all documents evidencing the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and has declared all sums secured thereby immediately due and payable, and has caused a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be executed. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (916)939-0772 or visit this Internet Web http://search.nationwideposting.com/propertySearchTerms.aspx, using the file number assigned to this case CA1200248173 Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse. First American Title Insurance Company First American Title Insurance Company 3 FIRST AMERICAN WAY SANTA ANA, CA 92707 Date: FOR TRUSTEE'S SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL (916)939-0772 First American Title Insurance Company MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NPP0212616 SIGNAL TRIBUNE 02/01/2013, 02/08/2013, 02/15/2013

TST4275 / 2013 005463 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: CADRE MANAGEMENT SOLUTIONS, 2622 E. Catalina Dr., Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: DARCI FERSCH, 2622 E. Catalina Dr., Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Darci Fersch. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 9, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of trights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 11, 18, 25, & February 1, 2013.

TST4277 / 2013 009008 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: A-1 BEST PLUMBING, 2480 Brayton Ave., Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: COASTLINE ENVIRONMENTAL SOLUTIONS, INC., 2480 Brayton Ave., Signal Hill, CA 90755 This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct.

Signed: Vincent Attardo, President/CEO. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on December 1, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 14, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 18, 25, & February 1, 8, 2013.

TST4276 / 2012 253147 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: M & D HOLDINGS, 4215 Chestnut Ave., Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: KEITH McCARTY, 4215 Chestnut Ave., Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Keith McCarty. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on December 21, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 18, 25, & February 1, 8, 2013. TST4282 / 2013 005551 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: MIKO'S SPORTS LOUNGE, 3550-B Long Beach Blvd., Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: ENAID'S WAY, INC., 622 E. 37th St., Long Beach, CA 90806. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Damitresse Yancey, President. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 9, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 1, 8, 15, 22, 2013.

TST4283 / 2013 015788 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: BUILDING BLOCKS FOR SUCCESS TUTORIAL SERVICES, 3808 Hathaway Ave. Unit 632, Long Beach, CA 90815. Registrant: MARIA JOHNSON, 3808 Hathaway Ave. Unit 632, Long Beach, CA 90815. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Maria Johnson. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 23, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 1, 8, 15, 22, 2013.

TST4284 / 2013 015776 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: ZIZILU, 2322 Monte Verde Dr., Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: RAZAN ALJABBAN, 2322 Monte Verde Dr., Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Razan Aljabban. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 23, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 1, 8, 15, 22, 2013.

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“I think it will be a great loss, personally,” said Dave Mandella, a Seal Beach resident who volunteered his time to organize the car show since the beginning. “I’d just hate to see it go. It was just such a great thing for the community and business owners.” Blair Cohn, executive director of the BKBIA, said that the board had been weighing the costs and benefits of the car show with the councilmember during three previous meetings. However, canceling the event this year came out of discussions about the cost of BKBIA and city council staff time to raise funds and organize the event for several months and “debate” about whether the event actually benefits local businesses, he said. The sentiment from the business community, Cohn said, is that street vendors deter potential customers from shops along the corridor, and chairs and tents often block storefronts. Cohn said the BKBIA executive board agreed that if the organization and council staff were to raise the $50,000 to $72,000 it takes to put on the car show, that money could be used for boosting other events all year round that have proven to be a draw for local businesses. He said it costs about $10,000 just to shut down the street for a one-day event. The change, Cohn said, would allow major sponsors, such as the Port of Long Beach, to put their names on 10 events instead of just one. He said the car show is 95-percent funded by sponsorships and fivepercent funded by car-entry and vendor fees. Cohn said another major factor in the cancellation was that, although the show has grown since its inception, attendance and the number of car entrants have been relatively stagnant in recent years. According to BKBIA’s statistics, last year’s car show saw about five less car entries over the previous year, decreasing from 240 to 235 cars, and 12 less vendors, dropping from 56 to 44 vendors. “There has been some growth, but it’s kind of plateaued,” he said. “If we were getting up to 500 cars and people clamoring to show… it would be a different story.” Cohn said the goal now is to raise funds to boost events that have had a “positive impact on business,” such as the BKBIA’s cash mob, supper club, Concerts in the Park(ing) Lot and First Fridays art walk. He said the BKBIA also plans to raise more funds for the Expo Arts Center and expand with new events in other neighborhoods such as the Virginia Country Club and the North Village areas. Loyal car entrants and organizers noted that the car show wasn’t as big as others, such as in Seal Beach and

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Belmont Shore, but said the event’s attendance was at its highest last year, tripling from about 5,000 people in its first year to about 15,000 people in recent years. “This was the biggest event in Bixby Knolls, as far as I know,” said Rick Lorenzen, owner of Price Transfer, who regularly entered a collection of about a half dozen classic 1950s to 1970s cars. North Long Beach community activist Dan Pressburg said canceling the car show “diminishes the quality of life” for surrounding neighborhoods as well. “I think it’s something that everybody has appreciated … and has made Bixby Knolls that much more unique,” he said. Gabelich, who admitted that the event required a “perfect storm” to make it possible, said any notion that

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the event wasn’t successful is “doing a disservice to everyone who worked hard on it,” adding “it was very successful, and every year it got better.” She said she would stay on board if the community protests to keep it alive. “If we hear an outcry from the community that they would really like to see it continue, I will stay on board to make that happen,” Gabelich said. “Let’s hope it’s not over.” ß

Crimes reported by LBPD • Council Districts 6, 7 & 8

Friday, Jan. 25 Commercial robbery 2:40pm– 700 block E. Pacific Coast Hwy.

Crimes reported by SHPD • Citywide

Thursday, Jan. 24 Non-injury hit-and-run 8:21am– E. Hill St./Walnut Ave.

Non-injury hit-and-run 4:31pm– Junipero Ave./E. Willow St.

Friday, Jan. 25 Under the influence of alcohol, drugs 11:09pm– 2000 block Junipero Ave. Suspect in custody

DUI 11:26pm– E. 17th St./Walnut Ave. Suspect in custody

Identity theft 4:05pm– 2200 block Ohio Ave.

Saturday, Jan. 26 DUI 2:14am–700 block E. Spring St. Suspect in custody

Attempted grand theft 4:34am- 2700 block E. Willow St.

Shooting at inhabited dwelling 6am– 2500 block Cherry Ave.

Battery 1:09pm– 1800 block E. Spring St.

Attempt residential burglary 1:15pm– 900 block Nevada St.

Auto burglary 1:49pm– 3000 block California Ave.

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EYE ON CRIME Thursday, Jan. 24 Commercial burglary 7:35pm– 800 block W. Pacific Coast Hwy.

13

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carpentry. The 11 programs will still be available during LBCC’s spring semester but will be eliminated entirely beginning with the fall 2013 semester. A little more than

24,000 students are enrolled in classes at LBCC. Approximately 450 of them will be directly impacted by the program cuts. “We are going to work with all these students to make sure they are able to complete their program, if not at LBCC, then at some other college,” said Mark Taylor, director of college advancement, public affairs and governmental relations.

“I am painfully aware of the tremendous impacts these reductions will have on our students, faculty and staff, but [the program eliminations] are critical for the long-term fiscal health of the college,” Ortiz-Oakley noted. “LBCC is still extremely committed to career technical education despite these reductions.” A couple of weeks ago, when the board of trustees publicized the fact that, on Jan. 23, it would be

Forum

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more than 50 people who packed into the Council Chamber for the candidate forum. “Let’s get a new generation of leaders on the council that can open up these ideas, bring them forward to the community to become more inclusive on that.” Woods drew some groans from the otherwise silent audience when she attacked the record of the council. “While they have worked hard to get us where we are today, I think we can safely see that we’ve seen all they have to offer,” Woods said. “Current council has had many years to show us the best they have to offer.” Woods expanded on one idea to implement an emergency plan for every neighborhood and encourage neighborhood leaders to complete emergency response training. Woods’s theme of dissatisfaction with the current leadership was often repeated by the other challengers. Sciortino drew a dark picture of the city. “I also think that crime’s up and the economy’s hurting and our residents are struggling all over the state, not just in Signal Hill,” Sciortino said. “These are difficult times for our city and our residents, and I want to get our city back on a solid economic footing, and we must start by changing the political status quo and the politicians in City Hall. I believe the core function of local government is to serve the residents, not the other way around.” Incumbent Ward dismissed the dismal portrait of the city outright. “People talk about a financial crisis. This city doesn’t have a financial

NEWS

FEBRUARY 1, 2013

voting on the proposed program eliminations, 5th District Long Beach City Councilmember Gerrie Schipske issued a press release urging the board to keep the aviation maintenance program intact at LBCC. “There are four major airports besides the Long Beach Airport in the area and approximately 40 smaller airfields in the region where graduates of this valuable program may find jobs from this training,” Schipske wrote in the release. “In such a difficult economic climate, it’s critically important that our schools train people for good-paying jobs such as aviation maintenance.” She added that she believes most of LBCC’s aviation-maintenance students would not be able to find an alternative program to finish their training in that field. In response to Schipske’s press release, Roberto Uranga, president of the LBCCD Board of Trustees, wrote her a letter on Jan. 23 to explain the board’s rationale for eliminating the program. In the letter, which was also released to the press, Uranga stressed that the decision to discontinue the aviation-mainte-

nance program came after extensive research and analysis by LBCC’s Academic Council and Executive Team, and presentations by the affected program faculty and students. “As I am sure you are aware, the need to reassess LBCC’s programs comes as a result of the loss of more than $7.5 million in funding after several consecutive years of budget cuts from the State of California,” Uranga wrote. “Even with the passage of Proposition 30 and with the Governor’s January budget proposal, LBCC still faces a $6.4-million deficit and millions of dollars in deferred revenues for the current and future academic years.” Uranga stressed that LBCC’s administration and the board of trustees found ways to reduce expenditures by $7.9 million during the past four years. “Despite those efforts, further cuts are needed to close a structural deficit that continues to present challenges to our course offerings and to meeting the needs of our growing student population,” Uranga noted. “In fact, LBCC continues to serve more students than its budget appropria-

tion funds.” He explained that although the elimination of the 11 programs will save an estimated $2.4 million, that savings will not completely close the current budget shortfall. “But it will allow the college to focus the revenues it receives from the state on better meeting the needs of the majority of our students,” he said. Ortiz-Oakley agreed with Uranga, stressing that the college’s shrinking resources have forced the administration to make painful decisions in order to do the most good for the majority of students. “Our research indicates that there is a dwindling amount of jobs locally in the aviation-maintenance field,” he added. Taylor outlined the seriousness of the college’s budget woes and the measures the school has taken to meet those challenges. He explained that during the past three years LBCC has absorbed $10.9 million in revenue reductions– a 9.7-percent reduction in revenues from the state. “LBCC implemented $5.1 million in classified and management staff reductions at the beginning of this academic

year,” he said. “We eliminated 43 classified positions and 12 management positions, and reduced the assignment of an additional 96 classified positions.” Ortiz-Oakley said it is probable that more cuts will have to be implemented, and the administration will continue its efforts to find ways to reduce expenditures while offering the best educational opportunities possible to its students. He added that the amount of money the college will receive as a result of Proposition 30 is unknown at this time.“Proposition 30 guarantees the percentage of revenues LBCC will receive annually but does not guarantee the amount,” he said. “No one can predict the amount of additional revenues that will be raised because the economy has still not fully recovered from the recession of a few years ago.” Ortiz-Oakley noted that LBCC will continue to strongly support career technical education (CTE) as it has throughout its history. “The board has made a commitment to support CTE,” he said. “That is a commitment I will keep.”

crisis,” Ward said. “We have 60 percent of our operating capital in reserve.” Ward also talked about how the city has enjoyed a two-percent increase in revenue and highlighted how the City has done an “outstanding” job with the budget, noting how it currently has $10 million in reserve accounts. Noll agreed with Ward’s description of a city that is moving forward. “Signal Hill has a balanced, $17.2million budget and uncertainties fund– we call it a ‘rainy day’ account of over $5 million,” the vice mayor said at the candidate forum, as he described how city leaders helped bring restaurants, retail stores and auto sellers Cadillac and Fiat to the city. “We have succeeded where other cities have failed,” Noll continued. “Signal Hill has lived within its means. I believe my experience is invaluable in maintaining vital services without raising taxes and employee layoffs.” Wilson, who has served on the Council for 16 years, agreed with the other two incumbents, noting that the city was able to make it through a recession “without layoffs, furloughs or cutting services.” “In short we are doing pretty well and viewed as one of the premier cities in LA County,” Wilson said Tuesday. The four challengers also made a proposed measure that would significantly change Signal Hill’s charter a central issue in their campaign. The measure dubbed “Taxpayer’s Right to Know and Vote” would change the

charter as it relates to taxes, bonds and fees. It has not yet been scheduled to be on any future ballot. All four challengers have said that they have actively campaigned for the measure and helped obtain signatures for the petition to get it on the ballot. Wise advocated for the measure at Tuesday’s forum. “This concerns us– that if City Council has enough power to put taxes on us without our knowledge or our vote,” Wise said. Wise, who owns a paralegal business in the city, says that she drew on her background as a paralegal to scrutinize the measure. “I am that nerd that reads all those small prints that nobody else likes to read,” Wise said. She acknowledged that Signal Hill’s city attorney has voiced some issues with the language of the measure, but she argued that it could be reworked in cooperation with the city attorney. Ward, Noll, and Wilson, however, pointed out some of the concerns with the measure. “I have really mixed feelings about this because I feel this was… presented to a lot of taxpayers in a way that they were kind of misled because they were telling people that we could raise property taxes,” Ward said, explaining that Calif. Prop. 13 could not allow them to do so. “I think this is a poorly written communication,” Ward concluded but added that if the people do eventually vote on it, she would adhere to their wishes. She cited one concern that assessments for the California Crown district would no longer be set by the City through a public hearing and that

the whole city would have to vote on the assessments for that neighborhood. Noll added to Ward’s concern, stating that when fees and extra charges for dog licenses, bus passes and dial-a-taxi go up, it would have to be voted on by the entire population. He emphasized that every time there is an election, the cost runs about $30,000 or more. “I think that it needs to be aired out and it needs to be adjusted so we don’t have these fears that the city attorney is talking about,” Noll said, adding that he was “open to it, but it has to be cleaned up.” Wilson, who is by profession an accountant, however, voiced a willful stance against the measure, saying he “would not vote for anything that would put the economic stability of this city at risk.” He explained that when taxes must end in 10 years, it would put the city at a major disadvantage. He further described how bonds would be affected. “When you go to bond, if you don’t have the revenue stream that exceeds that bonding period, then you can’t bond,” Wilson said. “So if all your taxes end every 10 years, the maximum you could bond for would be 10 years and, in fact, anywhere in that time stream, you would have to bond for less than that. That would make infrastructure almost impossible in this city...we have to look at the practical realities of what we’re talking about, and it is talking about ‘Do we continue to have Signal Hill as a city or not?’ And that will be the vote.” Challenger Mendoza, who has also been an active advocate with the proposed taxpayer measure, said that he circulated the petition and also brought up another issue about the city’s fiscal health.

“The City of Signal Hill owes $800,000 in water,” Mendoza told the audience. “Right now, today. They owe 18 to 20 months of water bills, and it needs to be taken care of. We can’t keep bragging about how well we’re doing if we’re not paying our bills.” It was a surprise to Noll, who said he would look into the water bill. According to Deputy City Manager Charlie Honeycutt in an interview Wednesday, the unpaid bills are related to a lawsuit against the Water Replenishment District (WRD). The amount is held in an escrow account pending the resolution of the lawsuit. The incumbents also spoke about the proposed library building, explaining that the City did have public meetings that included members of the community. Mendoza said that he and other founding members of the advocacy organization Signal Hill Community First were not at all involved in the planning of the council forum. Woods and Sciortino are also founding members of the organization, which sponsored Tuesday’s candidate forum. Wise is not a founding member of the organization. She is an active proponent of the taxpayer measure, an initiative that was circulated by Signal Hill Community First. All seven candidates were given all of the questions about five days in advance of the forum. Maria Harris, who is one of the founding members of the community group, explained that the organization wanted to be fair so that the voters would be informed on their positions. “That’s why they had a time to prepare, because in that way, they’re able to tell us with some thought about… how they see the issues that residents raised and how they propose to address them,” Harris said.

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Probate is a very costly and long process that can last from 9 to 18 months in most cases. Fortunately, there are several alternatives available that remove the asset from one’s probatable estate while that person is still alive. Naming a beneficiary on life insurance policies, IRA’s, 401(k)’s, and annuities before your death assures the asset is transferred straight to the chosen beneficiary. Joint Tenancy is where the owner of the asset names a co-owner of an account or real property. Caution: Joint tenancies have risks as the co-owner has the same rights to the asset as the original owner and a loss of Stepped-up valuation. Pay-on-death Accounts are similar to naming a beneficiary in that the bank account owner completes banking paperwork which names the person(s) who will receive the bank account upon the bank owner’s death. Lifetime Gifts given during your life avoids probate because probate only applies to those assets owned at time of death. A Living Trust is very beneficial when dealing with titled real property and other assets. A complete estate plan included in the Living Trust includes many ancillary documents that protect you financially, physically and allows for peace of mind.

ELIZABETH ARNETT VOZZELLA 426-9876 www.Vozzella4Law.com

Attorney at Law • (562)


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FEBRUARY 1, 2013

SHPD

continued from page 5

facility on Walnut Avenue between 27th and 28th streets replaces the aging 13,000-square-foot former police station in the Civic Center on Hill Street, increasing the headquarters by 8,500 square feet. Signal Hill Mayor Tina Hansen said the project required the community, police department and City officials to be “patient,” which led to the best end result. “We are a city that has a vision,” she said. “We know where we want to go. It may take us a while to figure out how to get there, but we are also a city that is patient. We don’t rush into decisions or judgments… We have an outstanding staff and city attorney who know just when to act to make that vision a reality. In Signal Hill, we love what seems to be impossible.” She said the project was first planned 12 years ago by then Police Chief Don Pedersen, who was looking to modernize the station’s EOC after the 9/11 terrorist attacks. The new modern station was built to serve the city’s growing population of more than 11,000 residents since the former station was constructed almost 60 years ago for a community of only 4,000 residents, Hansen said. She added that police officers for years worked in cramped offices the size of a closet and even interviewed witnesses in hallways, but “always gave their all.” The nearly $18-million project was funded through former Signal Hill Redevelopment Agency bonds and required “no new taxes, fees or assessments,” Hansen said, adding

NEWS

that the project also required a lengthy legal process to acquire the land that was broken into 7,000 shares since the oil property was left over from prospecting days in the 1920s. The City ended up purchasing the land for $314,000, she said. The new station, which has a total of seven modern jail cells and one sobering cell, houses a state-ofthe-art dispatch center and EOC that Hansen said will “improve the City’s ability to assist the community after a natural disaster and provide mutual

aid to other communities.” She added that the building is also energy-efficient and the structure will likely qualify for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification. “The design takes advantage of the natural daylight, and solar power will offset the energy demand,” Hansen said. “This new station will serve our community well into the next century and even has room for expansion on the north side, if needed.”

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

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