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“1,000 Palms Evening”

Oil on canvas by Gary Blackwell

See page 8

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Vol. 34 No. 33

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SERVING BIXBY KNOLLS, CALIFORNIA HEIGHTS, LOS CERRITOS, WRIGLEY AND THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

January 18, 2013

Bike-infrastructure plans proposed ‘From here to Portland’ for Los Cerritos, Bixby Knolls streets After covering a thousand miles, Your Weekly Community Newspaper

Bixby walking group celebrates its fifth year of burning calories and building friendships

Courtesy BKBIA

The Bixby Strollers walking group meets every Saturday morning to explore local neighborhoods, get some exercise and forge friendships. Courtesy City of LB

A rendering by RBF Consulting shows plans for a “roundabout” (a curbed, landscaped island median) at Pacific Avenue, 36th Street and Country Club Drive that was presented during a meeting on Jan. 9. Some residents, however, said they are against the plans due to the loss of residential parking. Sean Belk Staff Writer

After installing bicycle infrastructure on streets in downtown and along the coast that put Long

Beach on the map in the last few years, the City is now rolling its bike-friendly efforts to the north– north Long Beach that is. City officials presented resi-

dents with final plans for the nearly $1-million Pacific Avenue Bike Corridor project during a meeting at the Expo Center in

Signal Hill fights its bad grade from major gay-rights organization see ROUNDABOUT page 11

CJ Dablo Staff Writer

Signal Hill leaders Tuesday stood united in their conviction that a national gay-rights organization has it all wrong about Signal Hill’s reputation with the gay community. The Human Rights Campaign, a national gay-rights organization, offered a very low grade to Signal Hill for its municipal leadership in LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender) issues. The organization released a report late November that ranked 137 cities through-

see COUNCIL page 14

File photo

At the May 22, 2012 dedication ceremony for Long Beach’s Harvey Milk Park, 1st District Councilmember Robert Garcia (third from left) honors Signal Hill Councilmember Michael Noll (fifth from left) as a pioneer in the local LGBT community. Noll was Signal Hill’s first openly gay councilmember. Garcia also saluted Signal Hill Councilmember Ellen Ward that day for her work as executive director of the local AIDS Walk. Noll, Ward and Larry Forester are all openly gay Signal Hill councilmembers who are upset by the Human Rights Campaign’s recent low score of their city for addressing LGBT issues. Friday

76°

Saturday

Sunday

Cory Bilicko

Managing Editor

While many folks are still in the Land of Nod or just getting their first sips of caffeine, at 7:30 sharp every Saturday morning a dedicated assemblage of locals chooses to hit the streets of Bixby Knolls and begin their weekend by walking several miles. Each week, the route, which is typically between 3.6 and 3.9 miles, is different– some zigzag, some are designed to check out the progress on local street improvements, and some even involve a train. The Bixby Strollers walking group was the very first program that Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association (BKBIA) Executive Director Blair Cohn devised after he took the job in December of 2007, and he envisioned it as a way to help familiarize residents with local businesses and one another. “There was an obvious disconnect between folks that lived a block away and the services available to them right around the corner,” Cohn said. “I said we will then literally lead people around the corridors and neighborhoods to connect people to the district and to each other.”

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One-thousand miles later (or “from here to Portland,” as Cohn puts it), the Bixby Strollers are celebrating their fifth anniversary of meeting up at a nearby coffee shop, chatting a bit, then taking off at half past 7– on the dot. Cohn says 7:30am is a “fresh time” to start. “Folks can walk for an hour and still have their entire morning to themselves,” he said. “There is some socializing after the stroll, and then people start their day. I head to the boxing gym after the stroll to get my workout in.” He indicated that the routes are created based on a theme, a holiday, the weather, or a particular destination, such as Rancho Los Cerritos, Dominguez Gap, Forest Lawn Cemetery, or the Metro Line. “We have routes themed around the Olympics, Mother’s Day, and even one that goes by all the parks in the area,” Cohn said. “It is fun and challenging to come up with witty titles each week.” Sometimes the “strolls” include a special activity or focus beyond a holiday theme. “We have walked to the Metro Line, taken the train downtown and walked the watersee STROLLERS page 15

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NEWS

2 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

JANUARY 18, 2013

Two-story house engulfed by fire in SH

•LEADER SHIP •INTEGRITY • R E SU LTS

ELLEN WARD Re-Elect

SIGNAL HILL COUNCILMEMBER

MARCH 5, 2013

Paid for by Friends of Ellen Ward ID#1354259

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Los Angeles County firefighters responded to a two-story house fire on the 1600 block of East Hill Street around 12:30pm on Wednesday, Jan. 16. According to a spokesperson for the Los Angeles County Fire Department, five fire engines arrived on the scene. After conducting a search of the building, firefighters found no victims and reported no injuries. A full report on the cause of the fire had not been released as of press time.

Livingston Drive road work complete, with new flashing yellow arrow turn signal Motorists, pedestrians and bicyclists will benefit from a recently completed street rehabilitation project on Livingston Drive between Second Street and Termino Avenue, according to the City of Long Beach. The far-right, westbound lane was converted into a protected service road to provide a safer route for local traffic and bicyclists, while preserving parking spaces. “It doesn’t matter if you’re in a car, on a bike or on foot– this is one infrastructure improvement project that will help everyone out,” Mayor Bob Foster said. The project also features the first traffic signal in Long Beach with a flashing yellow arrow, on eastbound Livingston Drive for motorists turn-

ing north at Ximeno Avenue. The flashing yellow arrow means left turns are permitted, but the driver must first yield to oncoming traffic and pedestrians and then proceed with caution (as opposed to a solid yellow arrow, which would direct motorists to prepare to stop or complete the turn if within the intersection.) “The repaving and redesign of Livingston Drive will result in improved safety and traffic flow,” said 3rd District Councilmember Gary DeLong. “Improving our streets and sidewalks continues to be one of my highest priorities.” Only a handful of other cities in Southern California have adopted flashing yellow left-turn signals, which the Federal Highway Administration now allows as an option to improve safety and reduce traffic delays, especially at high-volume intersections. Westbound Livingston Drive previously had expanded to three lanes along the 0.4-mile stretch. The third lane on westbound Livingston Drive was reconfigured into a protected service road to provide a safer route for local traffic and bicyclists, while preserving parking spaces. Traffic engineers had conducted studies and determined that the two remaining traffic lanes will accommodate traffic flow with no adverse congestion expected. Work started in August and was completed on time and on budget. The service road is protected by a raised median, and was designated with “sharrows,” which are markings to remind motorists and bicycles to “share the road.” On eastbound Livingston Drive, the sidewalk was doubled in width to eight feet, to increase walkability. The number of traffic lanes, as well as the number of parking spaces, remains

the same. The pedestrian crossing remains at Roswell Avenue. A Long Beach Transit bus stop on Roswell Avenue that was infrequently used was removed. In an effort to improve streetscape aesthetics, concrete along part of the median was stained and “stamped” with decorative detailing. The rehabilitation also included installation of cement-concrete curbs, gutters and sidewalks, replacing and overlaying asphalt concrete pavement, and furnishing and installing pavement markers, markings and traffic striping. New catch basins with screens prevent trash from entering storm drains, and the median will accommodate future landscaping. The street was resurfaced with asphalt containing up to 15 percent recycled material, as well as recycled rubber from old tires. One of the environmental benefits associated with this project is that old tires were recycled through the use of rubberized asphalt in this project. In addition, all of the old asphalt material will be recycled into new asphalt or utilized as base material on other street projects. Road base material used on the project came from recycled concrete, rock, sand, and asphalt, and all concrete work will include recycled waste ash, diverting these materials from landfills. The project was funded from Proposition C, with no impact on the City’s General Fund, according to the City. In a separate but nearby project, the Lois Lane alley just south of, and parallel to, Livingston Drive will be closed for reconstruction, with work expected to start by early February and last for approximately three weeks, depending on weather conditions. Source: City of LB

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NEWS

JANUARY 18, 2013

Traffic accident claims life of 27-year-old man

On Tuesday, Jan. 15, at approximately 6:32am, Long Beach Police Department (LBPD) officers responded to Pacific Coast Highway (PCH) and Anaheim Street regarding an injury traffic collision, which resulted in the death of a male adult. Officers arrived and discovered a white, convertible 2001 Mitsubishi Eclipse resting on top of a large cement and steel commercial office building sign at the northwest corner of PCH and Anaheim Street, with major front-end damage. The driver, who was alone in the vehicle, was determined

deceased at the scene. Based on the preliminary investigation, detectives believe the driver was traveling northbound in the 5200 block of PCH when he sideswiped a silver 2011 Ford Edge, causing minor damage to the Edge’s left front fender. The Mitsubishi driver accelerated and drove northbound PCH, in the southbound lanes, toward oncoming traffic. The Mitsubishi driver turned westbound toward Anaheim Street, drove over the sidewalk and collided with the building sign at northwest corner of PCH and Anaheim Street.

The victim has been identified as 27-year-old Trevor Stevens of Stanton. It is unknown if drugs and/or alcohol were involved, but the investigation remains ongoing. No others were injured. Those with information regarding this incident are asked to contact LBPD Accident Investigation Detective Brian Watt at (562) 5707355. Anonymous tips may be submitted by calling 1-800-222-TIPS (8477), texting TIPLA plus the tip to CRIMES (274637), or visiting lacrimestoppers.org .

The Campaign Trail

Signal Hill Community First will host a candidate forum in the Signal Hill Council Chambers, 2175 E Cherry Ave., on Tuesday, Jan. 29 from 6pm to 8pm. The public is invited to attend. The moderator will be Forrest Story, principal at Public Sector Excellence, a Long Beach leadership consulting firm. For more information, call (562) 597-4534 or email churchillca@verizon.net .

The Concerned Citizens of Signal Hill (CCSH) will host two Signal Hill City Council candidate forums next month. The first forum will be Monday, Feb 4, and the second, which will be co-sponsored by the Signal Hill Chamber of Commerce, will be Monday, Feb. 25. Both forums will begin with a “public-candidate meet-and-greet” period from 6:30pm to 7pm. The forums will begin at 7pm and end at 8:30pm. Each candidate will be allowed two minutes for an introductory statement and two minutes for a closing

Source: LBPD

statement. Questions will be provided by the Signal Hill Chamber of Commerce and CCSH. Each candidate will be asked the same question and given one minute to answer, allowing for a total of about eight prepared questions for each candidate. This session will be followed by a limited number of questions from the audience, depending on the time remaining. Locations for the forums will be announced at a later date. For more information, call (562) 375-0761.

Damon Dunn, the Republican nominee for Secretary of State in 2010, announced this week his candidacy for mayor of Long Beach. “I love Long Beach,” Dunn states on his website, damondunn.com . “It and its people have lifted me. Long Beach is one of the most socially, economically, politically and ethnically diverse cities in our nation. Long Beach has a bright future and can become one of the premier cities in this nation.” Dunn is the first to announce candidacy in the next election for Long Beach mayor.

50-year-old female bicyclist succumbs to injuries after collision

On Tuesday, Jan. 15, at approximately 7:17pm, Long Beach Police Department (LBPD) officers responded to an injury traffic collision at the intersection of Bellflower Boulevard and Atherton Street that resulted in the death of an adult female bicyclist. Officers discovered a green 2002 Honda Odyssey, just south of the intersection, and a female bicyclist lying in the middle of the roadway. Long Beach Fire Department paramedics responded and transported the victim to a local hospital. Later that evening, the victim died as a result of injuries sustained in the collision. The preliminary investigation

determined the Honda Odyssey was traveling southbound on Bellflower Boulevard on a green light. The bicyclist was traveling westbound on Atherton Street, on the north side of the intersection, when she attempted to cross Bellflower Boulevard against a red light, just south of the crosswalk, and was struck by the Honda. The driver stopped, attempted to render aid, and called 9-1-1, according to the LBPD. The victim is only being identified at this time as a 50-yearold female resident of Long Beach pending notification of next of kin. The driver, a 19-

Police seeking information related to shooting death of 25-year-old

On Wednesday, Jan. 16, at approximately 8:40pm, Long Beach Police Department (LBPD) officers responded to a shooting call in the 1700 block of Cherry Avenue that resulted in the death of a male adult. The preliminary investigation revealed that the victim, identified as 25-year-old Levert Johnson, was standing at a bus stop with a group when he was confronted by a male subject. Words were exchanged between the two, and the suspect then pulled out a handgun and shot Johnson, striking him multiple times, according to the LBPD. The suspect then fled from the scene on foot. Johnson was transported to a local hospital but was pronounced deceased shortly after arriving. The incident is being investigated as gang-related and remains ongoing. Anyone with information regarding this incident is asked to contact Long Beach Police Homicide Detectives Scott Lasch and Donald Goodman at (562) 570-5273. Anonymous tips may be submitted by calling 1800-222-TIPS (8477), texting TIPLA plus the tip to CRIMES (274637), or visiting lacrimestoppers.org . Source: LBPD

LBFD extinguishes garage fire

On Monday, Jan. 14, at approximately 11pm, the Long Beach Fire Department responded to a fully involved detached garage fire at 5500 block of Daggett Street. The fire communicated to a neigh-

boring shed, causing slight damage before being fully extinguished. The cause of the fire is under investigation, and no injuries were reported. Source: LBFD

year-old resident of Los Alamitos, was not injured and was released at the scene with no charges pending. Anyone with information regarding this incident is asked to contact Long Beach Police Accident Investigation Detective Brian Watt at (562) 570-7355. Anonymous tips may be submitted by calling 1-800-222-TIPS (8477), texting TIPLA plus the tip to CRIMES (274637), or visiting lacrimestoppers.org . Source: LBPD

FOLBA

Pet of the Week:

Kringle

We’re still trying to get all our Yuletide-named pets good homes where they’ll be called Frank or Sweetiekins. But maybe you’ll want to stick with Kringle, and that’s this guy’s name! Kringle, about a year and a half old, was camera shy at first, but by the time the photo shoot was over, he was a regular snuggler. In fact, he’s sure to be ready for next year’s family holiday photo. Ask for A482233 on the shelter side of the Companion Animal Village at 7700 East Spring St., (562) 570-PETS.

Sponsored by:

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

3

PEACEFUL CELEBRATION What 25th Annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Peace & Unity Celebration Who City of Long Beach When Saturday, Jan. 19 from 12:30pm to 5pm Where Martin Luther King, Jr. Park, 1950 Lemon Ave. More Info The free cultural event includes performances by The Lowrider Band, formerly known as War, and various other musical artists. Call (562) 570-6816 or visit longbeach.gov .

MEET COMMANDER What Meet North Division Patrol Commander Robert Luman Who Long Beach Police Department When Tuesday, Jan. 22 at 6pm Where North Division Sub Station, 4891 Atlantic Ave. More Info Local residents may contact Jan Carlos Reyes, patrol resource officer, at (562) 570-9827 or email lbpdnorth@longbeach.gov .

GET IN THE NETWORK What Business networking mixer Who Long Beach Area Chamber of Commerce When Thursday, Jan. 24 from 5pm to 7pm Where Hotel Current, 5325 E. Pacific Coast Highway. More Info Cost of the networking mixer is free for chamber members and $20 for non-members. Appetizers and bar will be provided. Email kdesimas@lbchamber.com or visit lbchamber.com .

OPEN HOUSE AT BLAST What Open house Who Long Beach Better Learning for All Students Today (BLAST) When Friday, Jan. 25 from 3pm to 6pm Where 737 Pine Ave., Suite 201 More Info Refreshments will be provided during this free event, which provides a chance for residents to meet the organization’s Executive Director Jenifer Finley and see how the new BLAST office remodeling is coming along. Call (562) 437-7766 or email info@lbblast.org .

NIGHT ON THE GREEN What Fundraising event Who Long Beach Poly High School baseball program When Friday, Jan. 25 from 6pm to 9:30pm Where Old Ranch Country Club, 3901 Lampson Ave. in Seal Beach More Info This fundraising event includes an auction/dinner in which Chase Utley, Philadelphia Phillies second baseman and former Jackrabbit, will attend and have his No. 7 jersey retired. A $60-donation includes dinner and parking. Email Coach Toby Hess at thess@lbschools.net .

EGGS WITH THE ELKS What Monthly breakfast Who Bellflower/Long Beach Elks Lodge 888 When Sunday, Jan. 27 from 8am to noon Where 16426 Bellflower Blvd. More Info Breakfast will be open to the public at $6.50 per person. The meal includes eggs as you like them, bacon, sausage, hash browns, biscuits with gravy, orange juice, assorted fruit, Belgian waffles and coffee. Call (562) 4262478.

COMMUNITY ASSEMBLY What Community assembly Who Long Beach Councilmembers Al Austin and Steven Neal When Saturday, Feb. 2 from 9am to 11am Where Houghton Park Community Center, 6301 Myrtle Ave. More Info Residents may learn about the design of the new north branch library, meet North Division Commander Robert Luman and learn about other neighborhood issues, events and concerns. Call (562) 570-6685 or visit district8@longbeach.gov .

SCHOLARLY LUNCHEON What Cultural discussion, luncheon Who The Long Beach branch of American Association of University Women When Saturday, Feb. 2 at 11am Where Long Beach Yacht Club, 6201 Appian Way More Info Emad Samir, an Egyptian native, will be speaking about Middle Eastern culture and social life with particular emphasis on the status of women and girls. Cost of the luncheon is $32. Call (562) 799-8479 or visit aauw-longbeach.org .

MEET AND EAT What Supper club Who Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association When Monday, Feb. 4 at 6:30pm Where Cafe Bixby & Pizza, 3900 Atlantic Ave. More Info Bixby Knolls Supper Club is the simple concept of supporting local restaurants on a Monday night, which is typically a slow night. Residents are invited to come together to meet and eat and support the local economy. Visit supperclub@bixbyknollsinfo.com .


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OPINION

4 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

JANUARY 18, 2013

Thoughts from the Publisher

by Neena Strichart

Some of my favorite television programs are reality shows. Although I love oldie sitcoms like The Dick Van Dyke Show, I Love Lucy and such, reality shows really tickle me. Three of my favorites are Project Runway, Ax Men and Sister Wives. Yes, I am a complicated woman of varied interests! When I received a call last Friday informing me that the show Bar Rescue would be filming Saturday night in our area, Steve and I jumped at the chance to participate in the action. We were especially pleased to learn that the subject of the show would be Lona’s Wardlow Station, a local bar/eatery that sits halfway (literally) between Signal Hill and Long Beach. I went over to the location, 1174 E. Wardlow Rd., around noon on Saturday to scope things out. The folks run-

ning things let me know that the big reveal would take place around 9:30 or 10 that very night! Rushing back home, I told Steve that if we wanted to get in on the filming we’d need to get make sure we were there in time. After having a nice dinner at home, we headed over to the area across the street from Lona’s for a beverage or two at Roxanne’s to celebrate their second anniversary. Around 9pm, I peeked out the window and saw that folks were lining up at Lona’s for the filming. We said goodbye to those we were chatting with at Roxanne’s and walked the short distance to over to Lona’s. WOW! When we saw the brand-new lighted sign proclaiming the new name of the establishment, Lona’s City Limits Cantina, along with the enormous outdoor painting on the east side of the bar declaring the

same, we knew we were in for something spectacular. After waiting in line for about an hour we were all allowed inside– all 100 of us! The place looks great! It is brighter and more comfortable than ever. The new specialty drinks and new house-special menu are bound to be hits with the patrons. Most importantly, Lona looks happy and excited. We weren’t allowed to take pictures inside during the filming, so we’ll have to share those with our readers when we do a follow-up article on the new Lona’s City Limits Cantina. We’ll give the folks at Lona’s a couple of weeks to settle in before we do a detailed story on the “new” place. (Note: We don’t have an exact date for the airing of the show– but were told it would be March or April. We’ll keep you posted.)

Courtesy Anytime Animal Control

Skunk update: After capturing three opossums in a six-day period, we finally caught the skunk yesterday morning! Yippee! Thanks to Rick at Anytime Animal Control for his expertise, use of his trap and quick response to pick up and relocate the skunk! We’ll call again if we need his help … (760) 822-0952.

Something on your mind?

Let it count

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

March 5 is election day for the City of Signal Hill. There are three incumbents and four challengers for seats on the Signal Hill City Council. The future direction of the City will be in the hands of our elected officials. These are important times for all of us to be active in the world around us, starting with our city of choice. Here’s how– vote. As of Nov. 5, 2012, there were 5,923 active registered voters in Signal Hill. In the March 2011 City Council election, only 986 ballots were cast. Are you one of the 4,937 residents who didn’t vote? Can’t get to the polls? Vote by mail. Here’s how: (from the office of the Signal Hill City Clerk) A voter may apply to be a permanent VBM (Vote By Mail) voter at any time. As a permanent VBM voter, one no longer has to apply for a VBM ballot for each election. A ballot is automatically mailed to the voter for each election in which one is eligible to vote. Here is the link to the form: lavote.net/VOTER/PDFS/PERMANENT_VBM_APP.pdf To apply for a regular VBM ballot, the voter may use the application on the back of the sample ballot booklet or may simply send a letter to the election official with the request. The request must include the voters name and address, with a mailing address if different from the residence address. The VBM period for the March 5 election is Feb. 4 to Feb. 26. Remember– in the last election one candidate was re-elected by a single vote. It’s your city. Your vote counts!

Visit our website and leave a comment! Share your opinions with us & other readers!

Louise Cunningham Concerned Citizens of Signal Hill Committee

www.signaltribune.com ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

MANAGING EDITOR

Stephen M. Strichart

Neena R. Strichart

ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS

Jane Fallon

Stephanie Raygoza

ASSISTANT EDITOR/STAFF WRITER

Sean Belk

STAFF WRITERS

CJ Dablo

COLUMNISTS

Jennifer E. Beaver Carol Berg Sloan, RD

Nick Diamantides

Shoshanah Siegel

DESIGN EDITOR

Cory Bilicko

Leighanna Nierle

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/WEBSITE MANAGER

Tanya Paz

CULTURE WRITERS

Daniel Adams Vicki Paris Goodman Gregory Spooner CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Matt Sun

EDITORIAL INTERNS

Andrea Ciccolini

Ariana Gastelum

CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Rachael Rifkin

DESIGN INTERN

Kaelyn Bruno

The Signal Tribune welcomes letters to the editor, which should be signed, dated and include a phone number to verify authenticity. Letters are due by noon on the Tuesday before desired publication date. The Signal Tribune reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, language and space requirements. The Signal Tribune does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other publications or otherwise presented in a public forum. Letters to the editor and commentaries are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Signal Tribune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, letters to the editor and commentaries are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. Letter-writers will be identified by their professional titles or affiliations when, and only when, the editorial staff deems it relevant and/or to provide context to the letter. We do not run letters to the editor submitted by individuals who have declared their candidacies for public office in upcoming races. This policy was put in place because, to be fair, if we publish one, we would have to publish all letters submitted by all candidates. The volume would no doubt eliminate space for letters submitted by other readers. Instead, we agree to interview candidates and print stories about political races in an objective manner and offer very reasonable advertising rates for those candidates who wish to purchase ads. The Signal Tribune is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. Yearly subscriptions are available for $45.

939 E. 27th St., Signal Hill, CA 90755 (562) 595-7900

www.signaltribune.com newspaper@signaltribune.com


ST3433 - Jan 18_Layout 1 1/18/13 12:05 PM Page 5

NEWS

JANUARY 18, 2013

LB police: report that prompted lockdown at Bancroft Middle School was erroneous

5

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Parents wait in line at Hubert H. Bancroft Middle School to pick up students after police and school officials put the school on lockdown on Monday, Jan. 14 following a report of an armed man seen on campus. Sean Belk Staff Writer

Plug in and Go Metro. Metro.

Metro M etroBriefs o Briefs

GATEWAY GATEWA TEWAY CITIES

Sean Belk/ Signal Tribune

Long Beach Unified School Safety Officer Okabe (far right) releases students to parents waiting at the entrance of Hubert H. Bancroft Middle School that was put on lockdown after a report of an armed, “unauthorized person” was seen on the campus on Monday, Jan. 14.

campus and Pan Am Park located across the street, but no suspect was found at that time. The lockdown was lifted at about 1:45pm, after which time many students were released since hundreds of parents, some who appeared distraught, arrived at the campus to pick up their children. Some students said they were frightened by the ordeal, especially after the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newtown, Conn. on Dec. 14. “I don’t think I’ve ever been that scared in my life,” said Jacob Smith, a 12-year-old 7th-grader who added that, while hearing a chopper over-

Cory Bilicko/ Signal Tribune

Hundreds of parents wait outside of Hubert H. Bancroft Middle School on Monday, Jan. 14 to pick up their children after a report of an armed, “unauthorized person” on campus led to a more than two-hour lockdown at the school. It was later determined that the male subject in question was a 19-year-old former student.

head and seeing police checking the classroom with guns in their hands, he “wasn’t sure what was happening.” The brief lockdown comes as security and police presence at school districts have received national attention. “We are all certainly more vigilant in light of the Connecticut shooting,” said Chris Eftychiou, spokesperson for the Long Beach Unified School District (LBUSD). “Though, just as before that shooting, we fully deploy our 25 armed personnel in and around schools every day, including 15 School Safety officers, plus four supervisors and the chief, including the five LBPD officers at our large high schools.” Since Lakewood High School is located in the city of Lakewood, that school has one of the 15 School Safety officers instead of an LBPD officer, he added. In Long Beach, high schools are staffed with armed police officers, middle schools have campus security officers and elementary-school staff members are trained to contact School Safety or dial 911 if appropriate. LBUSD School Safety officers and Long Beach Police Youth Services officers patrol throughout the district and can respond rapidly in case of emergency, according to a statement from the school district. LBUSD also works with the LBPD on Operation Safe Passage, which allocates additional police officers to the neighborhood surrounding campuses before school and after school. ß

Metro Installing EV Charge Stations Metro is the >rst transit agency in the nation to introduce electric vehicle (EV) charge stations at rail station parking lots. Five Metro Rail stations will have them: Union Station, Sierra Madre Villa, Universal City, El Segundo, and Willow. Riders with EVs can charge their cars while using the Metro system. More at metro.net/ev.

Get Your ExpressLanes Transponder Thousands of motorists are getting through tra;c faster by reeway, using the new Metro ExpressLanes on the I-110 Harbor Freeway which will soon be expanded to a 14-mile stretch on the I-10. ® All you need is a FasTrak asTrak account and transponder; to get yours, visit metro.net/expresslanes net/expresslanes.

$6.8 Million Approved F For Blue Line Safety The Metro Board of Directors approved spending $6.8 million on pedestrian swing gates along the Metro Blue Line corridor to enhance safety. The swing gates will come down to block pedestrians when a train passes. Light-emitting diode (LED) warning signs will also be installed at crossings.

Go Metro To See The L A Clippers Paul and the rest of the L A Watch Blake Gri;n, Chris P Clippers as they continue to take the rest of the NBA by storm this season at STA STAPLLES Center. Metro has several connections to g get to STA STAPLES Center including g the Metro Silver, Blue and Expo lines which w all let you o= adjacent to the arena. For connections, visit metro.net.

Metro Ridership Increases Rising gas prices, an improv oving economy and new service on the Metro Expo and Oran ange lines have all contributed to n boosting Metro’s ridership numbers. The number of riders on Metro Rail soared by 23% while w bus ridership increased nearlyy 5% in 2012 as compared to 2011.

If you’d like to know more, visit metro.neet.

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The report of a man carrying a gun on the campus of Hubert H. Bancroft Middle School in Long Beach that prompted a brief lockdown at the school on Monday, Jan. 14 was erroneous, according to a statement released by the Long Beach Police Department (LBPD) the day after the incident. Through a follow-up investigation, it was determined that “a gun was never actually seen on campus,” said Long Beach Police spokesperson Nancy Pratt in a statement. Detectives were later able to identify the male subject in question as a 19year-old former student, who was interviewed by police. It was determined that he had been on school grounds to visit former teachers, Pratt said. On Monday, the middle school was put on a more than two-hour lockdown after Long Beach police officers received a report at approximately 11:30am of an armed, “unauthorized person” at the campus. Long Beach Police Sgt. Aaron Eaton said that a student first reported the account to school staff. Long Beach police officers immediately responded, and the school followed safety procedures while police conducted a systematic search of the campus, located at 5301 Centralia St. Witnesses provided police with a description of the suspect. Police searched the entire school


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NEWS

6 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

JANUARY 18, 2013

Mayor Foster’s State of the City 2013: Long Beach on track for fiscal recovery, but work still to be done Sean Belk Staff Writer

Despite dealing with the effects of the State’s fiscal crisis in addition to its own continued structural deficit, the City of Long Beach passed major milestones last year and is on track to economic recovery with business activity and City finances on the rebound, said Mayor Bob Foster in his 2013 State of the City address on Jan. 15 at the Center Theatre in downtown. He cautioned, however, against reckless spending and added that there is still “a long way to go to truly modernize this City.” In his seventh address, Foster, the City’s 27th mayor, whose second term ends next year, said if development projects are any indication of the City’s economic health, Long Beach continues to recover from the recession, and City revenue, although still down, has become more stable. As of December statistics, the City had an unemployment rate of 11.2 percent. “While the economy does not yet have the strength we all desire, growth has returned, employment is modestly up, business activity is increasing and this City continues on the road to better financial footing,” he said. “The increase in economic activity in the form of consumer spending, the rebound in the real estate market and the up tick in development projects provide an important barometer on revenue levels that have been unpredictable for the better part of

four years.” A major achievement hailed by Foster was the recent landmark pension-reform agreement approved this month by the Long Beach City Council and the International Association of Machinists (IAM). The new capstone agreement, which was approved in a majority vote by IAM members on Jan. 9, completes the City’s three-year effort to reform City employee pensions that included agreements with fire- and police-department unions as well. Foster said, in all, the pension reforms are expected to save the City nearly $250 million over the next decade. The IAM agreement alone is expected to result in an ongoing annual savings of approximately $3.8 million in the General Fund and $11.8 million in all funds, according to City officials. Through fiscal year 2023, the amendment is to save the City an estimated $40.1 million in the General Fund and $125.5 million in all funds. “I am very proud to report that after much time and toil, and with the great cooperation of our City employees, we now have substantial and meaningful pension reform across the city,” he said. Although the City’s finances are recovering, Foster warned local government officials not to fall into the “trap” of “spending beyond their means” by using one-time City revenues, such as income from oil, for ongoing expenses and programs. He also cautioned not to repeat previous mistakes and bad policy decisions, such as increasing employee

benefits during flush periods, which was the case in early 2000. “Strong character is needed to resist these temptations and prioritize the greater good over your own political benefit,” Foster said. “The public deserves that you treat its money with more care than you would your own.” He said the City has been able to maintain its bond ratings after a majority of the City Council stood firm on fiscal policy. However, Foster said Fitch’s rating service has reminded the City that deviating from this fiscal policy to not use one-time revenue for ongoing expenses could cause a downgrade of the City’s rating. “With better times on the horizon, let us please not forget these lessons,” he said. “Please let us not make the same mistakes. And let us hold fast to the disciplines we have adopted. We can do better; we should do better; and, indeed, we must do better. The well-being of the next generation depends on it.” Foster also praised the City’s major developments, including the Long Beach Airport’s $45-million brand new passenger concourse that opened in December, a new courthouse and billion-dollar projects moving forward at the Port of Long Beach, such as the Middle Harbor and the Gerald Desmond Bridge replacement projects. He said over $4 billion of construction and 4,000 construction jobs annually at the Port, will “cement our Port as the

Sean Belk/ Signal Tribune

Long Beach Mayor Bob Foster delivers his seventh State of the City address on Jan. 15 at the Center Theatre in downtown.

LB Police Commander Luman takes reins of North Patrol Division see STATE OF THE CITY page 14

Sean Belk Staff Writer

Sean Belk/ Signal Tribune

An audience of about 15 people attended a recent community meeting hosted by 8th District Long Beach City Councilmember Al Austin (standing, left) at Mirage Coffeehouse in Bixby Knolls to introduce North Patrol Division’s new police commander, Robert Luman (standing, right).

Long Beach Police Commander Robert Luman took on one of his new duties as the North Patrol Division’s new commander-in-chief last Saturday, Jan. 12, by hearing concerns from local residents while outlining his goals and priorities during a community meeting hosted by 8th District City Councilmember Al Austin at Mirage Coffeehouse in Bixby Knolls. Luman, who has been with the Long Beach Police Department for nearly 23 years and served as the police commander for the West Patrol Division for nearly three years, takes the place of former commander Galen Carroll, a veteran Long Beach police officer who took a position in December to become the police chief for the City of Modesto. During the meeting that provided free coffee, Luman said he was pleasantly surprised to see an active crowd of community members on Saturday morning. “I’m really excited to see this many people here– this is awesome,” he said to an audience of about 15 people that included former 8th District

Councilmember Rae Gabelich. Laurie Angel, a north Long Beach community activist, said she would like to see the police stay involved in the community. “I think we have a really good relationship here with the police. I hope that continues,” she said. Luman, who has a wife and two teenage daughters, said the most valuable attribute he brings to north Long Beach, which he called the “top of the town,” is his expertise in “community policing,” relying on neighbors for tips and information that often lead to arrests, a tactic he plans to continue to utilize. “The essence of community policing is trying to get to the root of the problem,” he said. Luman said he has worked on a variety of assignments at the police department, such as violent crimes, gangs, narcotics and internal affairs, while most recently transferring from the Emergency Operations Division, responsible for the City’s Port police, Airport police, Homeland Security, dispatch/communications center and security grants. Although Luman acknowledged see COMMANDER page 14

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JANUARY 18, 2013

Parents start petition to save Millikan’s JROTC program, slated to be cut by school year’s end Sean Belk Staff Writer

Concerned parents and local residents have started a petition to save Millikan High School’s Army Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) program, which is slated for cancellation by the end of the school year. Long Beach Unified School District (LBUSD) Superintendent Christopher Steinhauser notified parents in a Nov. 30 letter that the program would be eliminated by end of the 2013-14 school year as part of the district’s costcutting efforts as the school district grapples with a continued budget crisis. Currently, 128 of the high school’s 11th- and 12th-graders are enrolled in the program. Steinhauser told parents that federal funding for the program falls short of expenses, creating an encroachment on the district’s General Fund or operating budget– a scenario that he said the “school district can no longer afford.” Although voters passed Proposition 30, expected to provide state funding to save some programs, LBUSD still faces a $20-million structural deficit that has required the elimination of summer school this year, the loss of teacher positions, the closure of a school and decreasing funding for other programs. In a last-ditch effort, however, parents and residents are pleading with school officials in a petition to “recon-

sider” the planned cancellation of Millikan’s JROTC program. Fifth District Councilmember Gerrie Schipske shared a link via email on Wednesday, Jan. 16 for constituents to download the petition form, urging residents to help. The school’s JROTC program, led by Sgt. Christopher Sarmiento, has been a “critical part of 5th District events, including Freedom Fest, the annual Wreaths Across America ceremony at Rosie the Riveter Park, and The Long Beach Rosie the Riveter Foundation’s ‘We Can Do It!’ Awards,” Schipske stated. The petition notes that JROTC programs at other LBUSD high schools are not being cancelled and that the school district is “required” to finance the program completely, adding that the district receives military subsidies to pay for instructor salaries in addition to uniforms, textbooks and training aids. “It does not make sense to cut a program that is being subsidized, regardless of the current budget crisis,” the petition states. “The JROTC Program has proven to be a tool that develops leadership and community service in our students.” However, Chris Eftychiou, LBUSD spokesperson, said, so far, school district officials are not reconsidering their decision to cut the program. “There is no plan to reconsider the elimination of the Millikan ROTC program,” he said. “The Millikan program is being eliminated because federal funding is insufficient to keep it afloat,

NEWS

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

7

Photos by Sean Belk/ Signal Tribune

Hector Esquivel, 14 (far right), of the Millikan High School’s Army JROTC program participates in a ceremony at Rosie the Riveter Park in honor of the men and women who have died while serving in the U.S. military. The ceremony last December was part of the national Wreaths Across America project.

given the federal government’s staffing requirements for this particular program.” Eftychiou said, at this point, if the school district were to reinstate the program, the district would have to cut roughly $160,000 from elsewhere in the district’s operating budget. According to the letter from Steinhauser, students who wish to remain in

Members of Millikan High School’s Army Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps program conduct the color guard ceremony during the Wreaths Across America event last December. The program is to be eliminated by the end of the school year due to lack of funding.

ROTC will have first priority for transfer to Poly, Cabrillo or Lakewood high schools. Poly offers Army ROTC while Lakewood and Cabrillo offer Navy ROTC. Students transferring to these programs would also retain their rank and awards. Millikan High School Principal Jeffrey Cornejo said, however, that there is an effort afoot for JROTC students to continue attending Millikan by allowing them to take a seventh-period JROTC class at Lakewood High School. “We’re hoping we keep our kids,” he said. “Lakewood already has a seventh period, and they would just open it up to Millikan students…That’s what we’ve kicked around a little bit as a possibility.” The program has been a “viable” part of the high school for decades, Cornejo said. “For some people, it’s a viable way to get into a college, whether they use it for scholarships or whether they use it for just building relationships,” he said. “They use those relationships when they go to the big world or the universities. I think it really helps motivate some of the students to do well in school.” According to the petition by parents, the JROTC program prepares high school students for “leadership roles, while making them aware of their rights, responsibilities and privileges as American citizens.” The petition adds, “It is a stimulus for promoting graduation from high school, and it provides instruction and rewarding opportunities

which will benefit the student, community and nation. JROTC teaches young men and women the challenges of adulthood. The JROTC curriculum emphasizes citizenship, character development, leadership development and community service.” Classroom instruction, which includes drills and ceremonies, military customs, uniform inspections, fitness training marksmanship and military history, is augmented throughout the year by community service activities, drill competition and field trips. Cadets are also required to participate in civic service. If the cancellation is implemented, however, Millikan will be the third LBUSD high school to lose its JROTC program, after Wilson High School, which had a Navy contingent, and Jordan High School, which once had an Army program. In addition to eliminating Millikan’s JROTC program, the LBUSD Board of Education has approved rounds of budget reductions in December and January to save nearly $13.3 million in school funds. Those cuts include eliminating 2013 summer school, reducing teacher and certificated and classified support-staff positions through attrition, reducing funding for special education, closing Monroe K-8 school in Lakewood, closing 6th- through 8th-grade classes at David Burcham school and reducing the Advancement Via Individual Determination, or AVID, program by $470,000. ß

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8 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Signal Hill plein-air artist returns to LB Playhouse for fifth exhibit

Nationally recognized plein-air artist Gary Blackwell’s work will return to the Playhouse Gallery at the Long Beach Playhouse, 5021 E. Anaheim St., in an exhibit entitled Mostly Landscapes. The exhibit is a collection of paintings that Blackwell has painted throughout California, mostly on location. Additionally, the exhibit will present an ensemble of collective work that includes some still lifes. In this exhibit, he uses oil as the primary medium to express his love for painting outdoors and the California landscape. Although he has been a resident of Signal Hill for more than 25 years, Blackwell was born in Virginia and traveled the world as a member of a military family. He received his BFA from Ringling School of Art in Sarasota, Florida, then enjoyed a 23-year career in advertising before committing to his passion and becoming a full-time artist in 2001. His work has received numerous local and national accolades. He received an Honorable Mention in

The Pastel Journal in April 2010 Top 100 Special Issue, and he has received several awards from the Pastel Society of the West Coast, to include Distinguished Pastelist Award, their top honor and Signature member status the same year. The Mostly Landscapes exhibit is his fifth show hosted by the Long Beach Playhouse. “It’s really a great venue,” Blackwell said. “First of all, Andrew Vonderschmitt, the producing artistic director, is easy to work with. The gallery is spacious and generous. The Playhouse actually has two large rooms for art work. The walls are painted a neutral gray, and lighting is excellent. Each week the Long Beach Playhouse entertains a new audience, which mean I have a new audience for my artwork. There is plenty of parking, and the building has a great location on Anaheim across from the golf course. I think it’s a perfect match.” Blackwell said the locations he has painted for this exhibition truly cover a lot of California. “Specifically, the places I have painted

CULTURE

JANUARY 18, 2013

“1,000 Palms Evening,” oil on canvas by Gary Blackwell

include Sonoma, the Sierra, Bishop, Morro Bay, San Luis Obispo, Pismo Beach, Santa Monica, San Pedro, Long Beach, Signal Hill and Palm Springs,” he said. “I chose to paint in these locations for two reasons. First, these are the areas where I have participated in plein-air events. The second reason is I teach plein-air painting at Orange County School of the Arts and Kline Academy in Los Angeles. So between these two situations I really get a chance to see a lot of California.” He said that what he enjoys most about plein air is the opportunity to truly be “in the moment.” “You are outdoors enjoying what nature has to offer, to include the location, and still stay focused on painting,” he said. “It’s a little like golfing. You are stimulated by being outside, but you also are trying to accomplish something that gives you pleasure. I guess it’s the challenge that I enjoy.” The public is invited to attend the opening artist reception on Sunday, Jan. 20 from 6pm to 10pm. The exhibition continues through March 16 and will be on display at the Playhouse Gallery during play dates on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. For more information about the artist and his work, visit garyblackwell.com or call (562) 494-4090.

“Can You Believe That Sky?” oil on canvas by Gary Blackwell

“My Second Home,” oil on canvas by Gary Blackwell

Shop& Dine Locally A REMINDER FROM THE SIGNAL TRIBUNE


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CULTURE

JANUARY 18, 2013

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

LB Playhouse production about Earnest writer gets Intimate with a seemingly un-Wilde approach Vicki Paris Goodman

a multitude of lesser characters. Thorn never leaves the stage. Playwright Terra Taylor Knudson wrote the role with Thorn in mind, and the part is clearly all his. But the gentlemanly kindness and sensitivity that Thorn overwhelmingly imparts to his character struck me as wholly un-Wilde-like, given the poet’s reputation for biting sarcasm and flamboyant public behavior. If I’m right, then the play, and the role, take a good bit of poetic license and demand as much audience leeway. But Thorn, whose speaking voice is deep and rich, more than makes up for any historic inaccuracies. Torn between family life, with wife Constance (played by Knudson, herself!) and the couple’s two young sons, and his homosexual lover “Bosie” (Ryan Michael Hartman), Wilde’s vulnerability and

guilt are palpable. Yet he never appears to fight his impulses, and he feels genuine affection for his wife I’m a big fan of poet and playand children. His passions, howwright Oscar Wilde, whose literary are with the ill-behaved ever, skewering of the late 19th-century “Bosie,” who is nowhere near British aristocracy is as deliciously Wilde’s equal. Ah, such are matters satirical, and silly, as it gets. For of the heart… example, in his comedic play The Knudson’s Constance, on the Importance of Being Earnest, other hand, seems every bit a worWilde’s every piercing line of diathy mate. Her quick wit, quiet conlogue seems to speak volumes while fidence, and appealing charm render saying absolutely nothing. her an extremely sympathetic So when I found out that the underdog against the romantically Long Beach Playhouse would be and sexually stacked deck that does hosting Intimately Wilde, a producnot favor her. tion of Olio Theatre Works, I was Hartman’s undisciplined “Bosie” anxious to see the play depicting the adds a disquieting color to the play. final 24 hours prior to Wilde’s 1897 And it is his disapproving father who imprisonment for homosexuality. ultimately sets in motion the actions Yes, it was against the law there and that bring about Wilde’s ruin and the then. end of his marriage. Tim Thorn masterfully portrays The prolific lines Knudson has Wilde in what practically amounts written for Thorn’s Wilde are lush, to a one-man show accompanied by lyrical, clever, and insightful. The quality, if not the tone, is befitting of Wilde. As should be the case, dialogue written for other characters is clearly of a more common variety. Courtroom and prison scenes, which might have been heart-wrenching, are instead rather inspiring. Thorn’s determined insistence on his character’s dignity and decency makes them so. A variety of flashbacks that fill in necessary background events are not necessarily in sequence, but somehow the chronology is always clear. Gigi Fusco Meese Lord Alfred “Bosie” Douglas (Ryan Michael Hartman) heads up a tempestuous love triangle with directs this fine proVictorian literary hero Oscar Wilde in Olio Theatre Works' original drama Intimately Wilde, curduction in which other rently showing at Long Beach Playhouse. cast members are Alex DesCombes, Culture Writer

Long Beach Symphony Orchestra appoints new executive director

After a nationwide search, the Long Beach Symphony Association announced this week that Kelly Ruggirello has been selected as the Association’s new executive director, effective March 4, 2013. “On behalf of the Association’s board of directors, I am pleased and excited to welcome Kelly,” said Board President John Di Carlo. “We look forward to the continued growth and success of the Long Beach Symphony Orchestra under her strong leadership.” Prior to relocating to Long Beach Symphony Orchestra (LBSO), Ruggirello was president and CEO of Pacific Chorale in Orange County. During her tenure, the Chorale erased a deficit and enjoyed a balanced budget for seven consecutive years. Prior to her position with Pacific Chorale, Ruggirello served as vice president of Development and Public Relations at the Orange County High School of the Arts. A former teacher and arts mentor for the Downey Unified School District, Ruggirello has also held positions with the Los Angeles Philharmonic and Pacific Symphony in Orange County. Music Director Enrique Arturo Diemecke said he is looking forward to their partnership. “As we begin the new year, we go forward with a new passion, a new energy, to bring our music to more people in our greater community,” he said. “Kelly has a wealth of experience and is a great choice to move the Orchestra forward into this new era.” Ruggirello has been a consultant with local, regional and national cho-

9

Photos courtesy Olio Theatre Works

Oscar Wilde (Tim Thorn) contemplates his demise in Olio Theatre Works’ original drama Intimately Wilde by Terra Taylor Knudson

Derek Long, Pete Stone, and Miguel Solorio. Believe it or not, Thorn also designed the welldetailed set, which cleverly provides for a study in Wilde’s home, the flat where he meets “Bosie,” the courtroom, and Wilde’s prison cell, without the need for any set changes. Intimately Wilde continues at the Long Beach Playhouse Studio Theatre through Jan. 27. General admission tickets are $20, and $15 for students and seniors. Performances are Fridays and Saturdays at 8pm, with Sunday matinees at 2pm. The Long Beach Playhouse is located at 5021 E. Anaheim St. Call (562) 494-1014 for reservations and information. Tickets are also available online at lbplayhouse.org .

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ruses, orchestras, and arts schools, and serves as a presenter at state and national conferences. She currently volunteers as president of the board of directors for the Association of California Symphony Orchestras and is on the fundraising faculty for Chorus America’s Chorus Management Institute. “I feel very fortunate to be joining the Long Beach Symphony Orchestra,” Ruggirello said. “As a Long Beach resident, I have long admired the artistic excellence of the Orchestra, the passionately committed Board of Directors and the very loyal audience. I look forward to helping this outstanding organization explore new ventures and establish an even greater presence in Southern California." Ruggirello has been a Long Beach resident for 25 years. Source: LBSO

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CULTURE

10 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

When Not in Rome

JANUARY 18, 2013

Enjoying the magic of movies...in the places they’re made and celebrated Andrea Ciccolini Staff Writer

[Ed. note– The following piece, written by Signal Tribune intern Andrea Cic-

colini, was only lightly edited in an effort to preserve his “voice” and writing style, as he makes his transition into learning English. Ciccolini is a native of Rome, Italy.] I love movies. And mostly I love American movies. Maybe this passion is one of the reasons which pulled me to Los Angeles. It is impossible for me to not dedicate a column to the movies living in the county where there is Hollywood and the Studios. It is impossible for me to not dedicate a column to the movies during the period between Golden Globes and Oscars. A lot of people criticize Hollywood and usually they have good points but, like Quentin Tarantino says, “I'm not a Hollywood basher because enough good movies come out of the Hollywood system every year to justify its existence, without any apologies.” So I went to Hollywood, the cradle of the western movie culture, the place where some of the best and the worst movies of our history have been made. With a lot of expectations I visited the Grauman’s Chinese Theatre with the marks of the men and women which made the first fortune of Hollywood. I walked with the head bended and the eyes focused only on the sidewalk

most famous of the world looking for the stars of my favorite actors, directors and singers. But I didn’t found the names of my favorite directors. I took the tour in the Studios, to see where the wizardry of movies happen. I went to the Kodak Theater, where there is the most famous movie prize ceremony in the world. Amazing, interesting and important places. But I didn't felt the magic of art in those places. I’m not saying this because I didn’t find my stars on the walk of fame. I’m saying this because I had the impression that in Hollywood and in the Studios the largest part of attractions were just sugar for tourists. But this city has something special– I feel it on my skin. The magic of this place about movies is that this area lives with and for the movies. This city is famous all over the world for the movie industry. The cities of Los Angeles County have been and still are the locations of a lot of great movies. In this area there is the largest concentration of people who live for and because of the movie industry. I felt the magic when I went to see Django Unchained, the last movie of Quentin Tarantino, in the historical theater owned by him. In that place I felt the magic atmosphere. In the bookshop which sells screenplays. In that place I felt the magic of movies I was looking for when I arrived in Los Angeles. Driving to go somewhere and stop the car for the surprise, because that place was in the movie I saw the night before. In that place I felt the magic of living here. Watching a movie at home with some friends and jump on the couch saying: “I know that place, it is (for example) Santa Monica Pier. Let’s go!” Movie paused. Everybody in the car just to drink a beer and to live some moment in the place we have seen 30

Courtesy Andrea Ciccolini

The Italian intern outside the theater now owned by his favorite film director– Quentin Tarantino

minutes before in a movie. This is magic. I live in Rome, a city that is the location of a lot of movies. The city where there is Cinecittà, the Italian studios, very important and known during the period of Vittorio De Sica, Roberto Luchino Visconti, Rossellini, Michelangelo Antonioni– the golden age of Italian movies. But it is not the same feeling. In Los Angeles there is something different in the people, in the air. I don’t know what it is, but here I can breathe, feel and smell movies. Movies are the oxygen of this land. In this land the movies are so important no matter the genre or the quality. This is the land of the biggest movie industry in the world. This means also

the biggest porno movie industry in the world. Here the citizens had to vote for a law that wants to oblige the porno actors to wear condoms during the sex scenes. Amazing. Only here something like that can happen. In this land the movies are so important no matter if you are a good actor or not. Just because you are an actor you are important. The best thing is to be an action-movie actor and an ex professional body-builder. If this happens the synchrony with this place is so perfect that you can become the Governor of California. Here the important thing is to have a video-camera, an actor, a director and the clapboard, and the magic can happen. Here is Los Angeles. Here is Hollywood. Everything can happen.

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Getting back to basics Nutrition

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How many calories should we consume per day? The average American adult who does weekly exercise and is at a healthy weight should consume about 2,000 calories daily. Obviously, this number can vary because metabolisms are different, but you need to know how many calories work for you to either maintain or change your weight.

How many calories do you have to eat to gain or lose an actual pound of fat? If you have been maintaining your weight and want to lose or gain a pound in a week without changing your exercise regime, you either need to eat 500 calories less or more per day. A pound of fat (adipose tissue) arrives when 3,500 calories in excess have been consumed and are now being stored. The same goes for losing a pound of fat; 500 calories a day should be cut from the daily intake. I find a disconnect with most understanding the “calories in equal calories out” concept. Remember that water consumption can make the scale numbers change without affecting your actual weight. What is a healthy weight?

Reading labels should be considered mandatory. There is a wealth of information on both the “nutrient facts” panel and the ingredient list. Recently some clients share they are only purchasing foods that do not contain high fructose corn syrup. However, cane sugar, honey, high fructose corn syrup and fruit juice are all metabolically and nutritionally (4 calories per gram) equivalent. As many dietitians recommend, all sweetened products should be enjoyed in moderation. To learn more about sweeteners a great site to visit is sweetsurprise.com/ understanding-natural-sweeteners . My hope is that this simple Q&A will encourage you to become more informed and make healthier changes and choices in the lives of your family. Carol Berg Sloan RD is a registered dietitian in Long Beach. She can be reached at cbsrd@verizon.net .


ST3433 - Jan 18_Layout 1 1/18/13 12:06 PM Page 11

NEWS

JANUARY 18, 2013

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

11

Two residences in the Los Cerritos neighborhood would be directly impacted by the proposed roundabout at Country Club Drive, 36th Street and Pacific Avenue that plans to use up 150 feet of parking spaced.

Roundabout

continued from page 1

Bixby Knolls last Wednesday, Jan. 9. The meeting drew a standing-room-only crowd of more than 100 people, including a throng of bicycling enthusiasts, according to attendees. Some residents said they support plans for bike lanes and circular medians in Bixby Knolls and Los Cerritos neighborhoods as a way to: connect communities, businesses and transit modes; beautify the streets; and create a safer passage for children and adults. Other residents, however, said they fear the infrastructure would only constrict traffic, make streets more dangerous and eliminate parking for residents. Plans so far include: adding bike lanes or signage on San Antonio Drive; putting “sharrows” (similar to the green stripes painted on 2nd Street in Belmont Shore) on Roosevelt Road between San Antonio Drive and California Avenue; and installing a new traffic signal at Wardlow Road and Pacific Avenue with a “gateway median” and what’s called a “porkchop” island. The proposal also includes constructing a 20-foot “roundabout,” a curbed, landscaped round median (similar to those installed along the “bike boulevard” on Vista Street in Belmont Heights), at Pacific Avenue, 36th Street and Country Club Drive that would serve as a “gateway” to the Los Cerritos neighborhood, in addition to placing a “traffic circle” with the same diameter at Pacific Avenue and Bixby Road. According to presentation materials, the project’s goals are to reduce vehicle speeds on residential streets, minimize “cut-through” traffic through neighborhoods, ensure safe crossings for pedestrians and cyclists on busy streets, and provide safe and convenient access to schools, parks and businesses. Long Beach Traffic Engineer Dave Roseman, who led the presentation, said the infrastructure is part of a bike master plan first established in 2001. The project is being funded through a Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority grant that requires that a percentage be matched by local funds.

Increasing ‘connectivity’ The plan aims to create a route that would connect other neighborhoods from the Los Angeles River trail to the Blue Line light rail and other transit modes, while linking to Bixby Knolls businesses and local schools. Original plans were to merely add bike lanes and the new traffic signal, but the community insisted that the City come back with improvements to the project, Roseman said. The most recent pro-

posal is a culmination of nine months of planning and community meetings with residents and various neighborhood groups to come up with “the best mix of project elements,” he said, adding that more than 3,400 notices about last week’s meeting were mailed out to residents. Roseman said he hopes to summarize the comments from residents soon to formulate a “consensus.” Allan Crawford, the City’s bike coordinator, said plans should be finalized in a few weeks and do not need City Council approval, since the overall project has already been approved. However, he said the construction contract has yet to be awarded. Construction is expected to start later this year or early 2014, he said. So far, some cycling enthusiasts, transportation advocates and residents have praised the plans. “It’s really part of a broader picture of connectivity and increasing bicycling and walking,” said Georgia Case, a Los Cerritos resident who founded the first Bikestation in Downtown Long Beach in 1996 with her husband John Case. “It’s really terrific that we have the ability to start connecting north and south.” While Bixby Knolls has various bike events, such as Kidical Mass, an organized bike ride for families, and Bike Saturdays, when local businesses offer discounts to cycling patrons, she said it’s not always easy to connect from other parts of the city. “This bicycle infrastructure will help bicyclists navigate more safely and easier to our community and within our community, potentially making the traffic slower and making it a really nicer entry into our neighborhood,” she said.

Parking and traffic disputes Installing bike lanes on San Antonio Drive, however, would ultimately entail removing parking on the north side of the street, Roseman said. Still, he said the City plans to provide residents with “preferential parking” to address parking impacts as a mitigation. The primary source of contention, however, is that the proposed roundabout at Country Club Drive, 36th Street and Pacific Avenue would chop some residential parking. John Deats, who lives directly across from the proposed roundabout site, is one of two residents who would be directly impacted by the project, which he said would eliminate 150 feet of parking space in front of his house. “I don’t know what’s driving this, but it’s... insane,” Deats said, adding that he plans to post signs on his truck urging residents to “blame” 7th District Councilmember James Johnson for any prob-

Photos by Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Pictured is the site of where the “roundabout” is being proposed at Pacific Avenue, 36th Street and Country Club Drive. The City proposes the infrastructure as a “gateway” to the Los Cerritos neighborhood. However, some residents are opposed to the project.

lems that the new infrastructure will cause residents. “…I question [whether] it is worth the detriment of the quality of people’s lives, having parking stripped away from them,” he said. Bill Kessler, who lives across from Deats, said he and his wife Mary are only opposed to a roundabout that would take away parking from residents. “We’re not objecting to having a roundabout there– we’re just objecting to the design,” he said. Roseman, who admits that parking is a major issue for the community, said that the proposed roundabout comes after the City has learned from the project on Vista Street, which also eliminated parking. That project called for corrective action after the medians couldn’t accommodate emergency vehicles and school buses. “We’ve learned how to do things a little bit better,” he said. “We believe these improvements are going to be an enhancement to the neighborhood or else we wouldn’t be proposing them. I also understand how change can be scary… but we’re not going to push something we don’t have a majority support for.” About the proposed traffic signal, Deats said installing light at Wardlow Road and Pacific Avenue for automobiles would only increase traffic by attracting more vehicles to cut through the neighborhood. However, Mimi Fox, a neighborhood-watch activist who lives on San Antonio Drive said restricting the intersection with no left-turn signal for vehicles is an “unnecessary burden on the residents who use the intersection most.” She added that the proposed sharrows along Roosevelt Road will create a “useless complication” and will “constrict traffic” further, since the street is already narrow. “I have no problem with bikers– we’re all sharing the road together– but don’t make them special,” Fox said. She added that the roundabout isn’t needed since there is already a dip in the road and residents are “already forced to slow down to avoid damage to our cars.”

‘Bike, dine and shop local’ Even with the loss of some parking, some residents and cycling advocates said the benefits still outweigh the impacts. Crawford said encouraging biking and walking only frees up more parking for vehicles. Once the project is completed, cyclists along the new bike route would be able to connect to the historic Los Cerritos Rancho site, the

Dominguez Channel gap, and the LA River trail, while encouraging people to “bike, dine and shop local,” he said. Case said statistics show that creating more bicycle infrastructure increases the number of bicyclists. She added that not only do biking and walking increase quality of life and reduce cars on the road, they improve overall public health since exercise can help stem rising diabetes and obesity rates. “At the end of the day, what we’re really looking at is a community that needs to improve its health,” Case said. Case added that the infrastructure should make the community more “human”-scaled. “When you see people, not just cars, it actually makes the community more friendly and more accessible,” she said. Janet Watt, who has a 13-yearold, a 10-year-old and a 7-year-old, said she too is looking forward to the bike infrastructure to make a safer route to school for her children, who currently are only able to utilize the bike lane along Bixby

Road. “I think it’s better for the whole community,” she said. “I think the big picture is that this will make it safer… you have to look at the big picture and what’s good for the entire neighborhood.” The route will also benefit cycling commuters. Michael Jensen, for instance, who lives in the Los Cerritos neighborhood, said he plans to use the new bike lanes along San Antonio Drive during his five-mile bike ride to and from work every day. “It will make it better and safer for everybody involved,” he said. Crawford said statistics show that traffic circles and roundabouts in the Belmont Heights area reduced traffic accidents by 80 percent, decreased vehicle speeds and tripled the amount of children riding on bikes. He said the City would propose more traffic circles and roundabouts throughout Long Beach, but funding is limited since the structures cost anywhere from $25,000 to $75,000 each. ß MORE INFORMATION bikelongbeach.org

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TST4274 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE File No. 7037.97096 Title Order No. 6933140 MIN No. APN 7216-026-006 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 12/01/86. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in §5102 to the Financial code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. Trustor(s): JOHN MARKALONIS, AN UNMARRIED MAN Recorded: 12/05/86, as Instrument No. 86 1681079, of Official Records of LOS ANGELES County, California. Date of Sale: 01/31/13 at 1:00 PM Place of Sale: At the Pomona Valley Masonic Temple Building, located at 395 South Thomas Street,, Pomona, CA The purported property address is: 1847-1847A, 1849, 1849A JUNIPERO AVENUE, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90806 Assessors Parcel No. 7216-026-006 The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $47,926.64. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid, plus interest. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the beneficiary, the Trustor or the trustee. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 877-484-9942 or visit this Internet Web site www.USA-Foreclosure.com or www.Auction.com using the file number assigned to this case 7037.97096. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: January 3, 2013 NORTHWEST TRUSTEE SERVICES, INC., as Trustee Bonita Salazar , Authorized Signatory 1241 E. Dyer Road, Suite 250, Santa Ana, CA 92705 Sale Info website: www.USA-Foreclosure.com or www.Auction.com Automated Sales Line: 877-484-9942 Reinstatement and Pay-Off Requests: 866-387-NWTS THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE ORDER # 7037.97096: 01/11/2013,01/18/2013,01/25/2013 TST4273 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 11-0149049 Title Order No. 11-0136821 APN No. 7214-003-008 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 08/10/2004. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by AUSTIN V PLONG, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY, dated 08/10/2004 and recorded 8/13/2004, as Instrument No. 20042089829, in Book , Page , of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, will sell on 02/13/2013 at 9:00AM, Doubletree Hotel Los Angeles-Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650, Vineyard Ballroom at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2424 WALNUT AVENUE, SIGNAL HILL, CA, 90755. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein.The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $456,074.22. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state.Said sale will be made, in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. If required by the provisions of section 2923.5 of the California Civil Code, the declaration from the mortgagee, beneficiary or authorized agent is attached to the Notice of Trustee’s Sale duly recorded with the appropriate County Recorder’s Office.

NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on a property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 1-800281-8219 or visit this Internet Web site www.recontrustco.com, using the file number assigned to this case 11-0149049. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone/Sale Information: (800) 281-8219 By: Trustee's Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. FEI # 1006.169315 1/11, 1/18, 1/25/2013 TST4270 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE Trustee Sale No. 731024CA Loan No. 5303811490 Title Order No. 090209533-CA-MAI YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 07-11-2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 01-25-2013 at 11:00 A.M., CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded 07-18-2006, Book N/A, Page N/A, Instrument 06 1574569, of official records in the Office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California, executed by: EDUARDO E MORALES, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY, as Trustor, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.(MERS), (SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR LENDER FIRST MAGNUS FINANCIAL CORPORATION, AN ARIZONA CORPORATION, AND LENDER'S SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS.), as Beneficiary, will sell at public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a cashier's check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a cashier's check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Sale will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to the Deed of Trust. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Place of Sale: BY THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED AT 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, POMONA, CA 91766. Legal Description: PARCEL 1: LOT 99 OF TRACT NO. 51830, IN THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS SHOWN ON THE SUBDIVISION MAP RECORDED ON OCTOBER 31, 2000 IN BOOK 1254, PAGES 1 TO 11, INCLUSIVE, OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE LOS ANGELES COUNTY RECORDER, AS CORRECTED BY CERTIFICATES OF CORRECTION RECORDED JANAURY 25, 2001 AS INSTRUMENT NO. 01-0133596, RECORDED MAY 29, 2001 AS INSTRUMENT NO. 01-925100 AND RECORDED OCTOBER 17, 2001, AS INSTRUMENT NO. 1973026, ALL IN THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF LOS ANGELES COUNTY (''OFFICIAL RECORDS''). EXCEPTING THEREFROM; ALL OIL, OIL RIGHTS, NATURAL GAS RIGHTS, MINERAL RIGHTS, AND OTHER HYDROCARBON SUBSTANCES BY WHATEVER NAME KNOWN, TOGETHER WITH APPURTENANT RIGHTS THERETO, WITHOUT, HOWEVER, ANY RIGHT TO ENTER UPON THE SURFACE OF SAID LAND NOR ANY PORTION OF THE SUBSURFACE LYING ABOVE A DEPTH OF 150 FEET, AS EXCEPTED OR RESERVED IN INSTRUMENTS OF RECORD. PARCEL 2 : NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENTS FOR ACCESS, INGRESS, EGRESS, DRAINAGE, MAINTENANCE, REPAIRS AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES, ALL AS DESCRIBED IN THE AMENDED AND RESTATED DECLARATION OF COVENANTS, CONDITIONS, RESTRICTIONS AND RESERVATION OF EASEMENTS FOR BIXBY RIDGE, RECORDED ON MARCH 1, 2000 AS INSTRUMENT NO. 00-0313402. (THE ''DECLARATION''), AND THE NOTICE OF ADDITION OF TERRITORY AND SUPPLEMENTAL DECLARATION OF COVENANTS, CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS (PHASE 7), RECORDED ON JULY 24, 2002 AS INSTRUMENT NO. 02- 1730181, (THE ''NOTICE''), BOTH OF OFFICIAL RECORDS, AND AS MAY BE AMENDED AND RESTATED, AND THE MAP. Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $1,167,041.51 (estimated) Street address and other common designation of the real property: 2101 RIDGEVIEW TERRACE DRIVE SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 APN Number: 7217-029-010 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". In compliance with California Civil Code 2923.5(c) the mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent declares: that it has contacted the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure; or that it has made efforts to contact the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure by one of the following methods: by telephone; by United States mail; either 1st class or certified; by overnight delivery; by personal delivery; by e-mail; by face to face meeting. DATE: 12-26-2012 CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY, as Trustee DEREK WEAR-RENEE, ASSISTANT SECRETARY CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY IS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. California Reconveyance Company 9200 Oakdale Avenue Mail Stop:

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CA2-4379 Chatsworth, CA 91311 800-892-6902 For Sales Information: www.lpsasap.com or 1-714-730-2727 www.priorityposting.com or 1-714-573-1965 www.auction.com or 1-800-280-2832 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, this information can be obtained from one of the following three companies: LPS Agency Sales and Posting at (714) 730-2727, or visit the Internet Web site www.lpsasap.com (Registration required to search for sale information) or Priority Posting and Publishing at (714) 5731965 or visit the Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com (Click on the link for "Advanced Search" to search for sale information), or auction.com at 1-800-280-2832 or visit the Internet Web site www.auction.com, using the Trustee Sale No. shown above. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. A-4345671 01/04/2013, 01/11/2013, 01/18/2013

TST4267 / 2012 253542 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: VISION 360 LONG BEACH, 3936 Woodruff Ave., Long Beach, CA 90808. Registrant: PARKCREST CHRISTIAN CHURCH INC., 3936 Woodruff Ave., Long Beach, CA 90808. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Michael Goldsworthy, President. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on December 21, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: December 28, 2012 & January 4, 11, 18, 2013.

TST4271 / 2012 247029 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: GET FADED BARBER STUDIO, 2805 E. Pacific Coast Hwy., Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: QUANEIL REECE, 1036 Cherry Ave. #3, Long Beach, CA 90813. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Quaneil Reece. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on December 12, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 4, 11, 18, 25, 2013.

TST4272 / 2013 000248 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: JIGGII.COM, 1018 E. 45th Way, Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: TERRENCE A. JOHNSON, 1018 E. 45th Way, Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Terrence A. Johnson. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 2, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 4, 11, 18, 25, 2013.

TST4269 / 2012 255054 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: BAD NEIGHBOR STUDIOS, 3646 Rose Ave., Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: 1. MATTHEW BEATTY, 2. NICHOLE BEATTY, 3646 Rose Ave., Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: a General Partnership. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Matthew Beatty. The registrants have begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrants began using this fictitious business name on December 26, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on December 26, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: December 28, 2012 & January 4, 11, 18, 2013.

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TST4268 / 2012 253543 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: JAMES RICHARD PHOTOGRAPHY, 20 Hillcrest Meadows, Rolling Hills Estates, CA 90274. Registrant: JAMES RICHARD KAO, 20 Hillcrest Meadows, Rolling Hills Estates, CA 90274. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: James Kao. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on December 1, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on December 21, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: December 28, 2012 & January 4, 11, 18, 2013.

TST4275 / 2013 005463 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: CADRE MANAGEMENT SOLUTIONS, 2622 E. Catalina Dr., Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: DARCI FERSCH, 2622 E. Catalina Dr., Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Darci Fersch. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 9, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of trights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 11, 18, 25, & February 1, 2013.

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TST4277 / 2013 009008 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: A-1 BEST PLUMBING, 2480 Brayton Ave., Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: COASTLINE ENVIRONMENTAL SOLUTIONS, INC., 2480 Brayton Ave., Signal Hill, CA 90755 This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Vincent Attardo, President/CEO. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on December 1, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 14, 2013. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 18, 25, & February 1, 8, 2013.

TST4276 / 2012 253147 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: M & D HOLDINGS, 4215 Chestnut Ave., Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: KEITH McCARTY, 4215 Chestnut Ave., Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Keith McCarty. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on December 21, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: January 18, 25, & February 1, 8, 2013.

CITY OF SIGNAL HILL TST4278 CITY OF SIGNAL HILL NOTICE OF A PUBLIC HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Signal Hill will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, February 5, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chamber located at City Hall, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, to consider: A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL, CALIFORNIA, DECLARING ITS INTENTION TO VACATE A PORTION OF STREET ADJOINING 2799 E. 21ST STREET

ALL INTERTESTED PERSONS are hereby invited to attend a public hearing to present written information, express their opinions or otherwise present evidence on the above matter. If you wish to legally challenge any action taken by the City on the above matter, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City prior to or at the public hearing. THE PUBLIC IS INVITED to submit written comments to the Public Works Department or during the public hearing.

FURTHER INFORMATION on this item may be obtained at the City of Signal Public Works Department located at 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, or by calling Anthony Caraveo at (562) 989-7352. //ss//___________ Anthony Caraveo Senior Engineering Technician Published in the Signal Tribune on:January 18 and 25, 2013 Posted at City Hall, City Library, Reservoir Park, Discovery Well Park, and on site on: January 18, 2013


ST3433 - Jan 18_Layout 1 1/18/13 12:06 PM Page 13

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14 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Council

continued from page 1

out the U.S. Human Rights Campaign’s so-called Municipal Equality Index ranked cities on various categories that include municipal policies on non-discrimination, city services and employment practices. Signal Hill scored 58 out of a possible 100. The score upset City officials, especially since three out of the five sitting members of the Signal Hill Council are openly gay and have championed LGBT issues for many years. By stark contrast, Long Beach scored a perfect score of 100. Signal Hill, a 2.2-square mile city with a population of more than 11,000 people, is entirely surrounded by Long Beach. That larger city, by contrast, boasts a population of about 465,000 and spans over 50 square miles, according to the latest estimated U. S. Census Bureau figures. “I was very disappointed in our score because I think we are closer to Long Beach,” Vice Mayor Michael Noll said in an interview Tuesday. Noll said that for many years he had

State of the City continued from page 6

place to send your cargo… We will move it faster, greener and in greater volumes than anyone in the country.” Foster also said the City’s Small Business Enterprise program saw a 25percent increase in registrants over last year and Long Beach-based businesses earned $82 million in sales through City purchasing contracts, which accounts for over one-third of the total purchasing dollars– and represents a five-percent increase over last year despite reductions in overall City expenditures. He said Boeing, which has long been one of the City’s main job generators, added more than 150 engineering jobs in Long Beach, even as the aerospace manufacturer may at some point end its C-17 manufacturing plant in the next few years. “Boeing’s investments in other business lines within the company provide a real indication that the last aircraft manufacturer in California has a strong future in Long Beach,” Foster said. Other achievements for the city last year included: being awarded as a top walkable city and an internationally recognized bike-friendly city; having an award-winning cable TV channel; having national award-winning neighborhoods; and being recognized nationally for excellence in financial

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served on the board of directors for The Center in Long Beach, which offers a broad range of programs to the community including health services, HIV testing, legal clinics, and support services. Councilmember Ellen Ward served as the executive director for AIDS Walk Long Beach for several years. “They have been absolute leaders. I have followed their model,” Councilmember Larry Forester said of his peers, Noll and Ward, in an interview Tuesday night. He was quick to recognize his fellow council members for their advocacy on behalf of the LGBT community, but Forester himself has also been an active supporter of causes and programs for people living with HIV and AIDS. Forester shared Noll’s disappointment. “It means all of the hard effort that we have done was not for naught– because our citizens know it– but the [general] public doesn’t. We have created a wonderful, diverse city here where all people are welcome,” Forester said, adding that the low score on Signal Hill was sent to the entire country.

NEWS

The councilmember explained that it was important to address the issue with the Human Rights Campaign because it is a national organization for the LGBT community. The Human Rights Campaign says that it has 1.5 million members and supporters throughout the nation and claims on its website to be the largest civil-rights organization working for equal rights for the LGBT community. The city staff had been directed to respond to the Human Rights Campaign’s assessment. Deputy City Manager Charlie Honeycutt said the Human Rights Campaign did not contact city staff to gather their information before they released their assessment. He said to the Council on Tuesday that the Human Rights Campaign recognized that large cities had an “advantage” over small cities. “The index gave points if a city offered services to vulnerable populations of the LGBT community, but because of our size, you know, we don’t have resources on our own to provide services such as health services, HIV and AIDS testing, and medical care,” Honeycutt said in his Tuesday report to

management. Foster said the City should also be proud of: being acknowledged by the Human Rights Campaign for its inclusion of lesbian and gay individuals in municipal law and policy; being applauded for a progressive development plan in a downtown that continues to grow as a convention destination; and having 32 Olympic athletes who earned 15 medals during the London Summer Games. Foster added, however, that the achievements have also come with challenges, including shrinking funding to pay for public safety and a recent spike in property crimes, that he attributed to California’s “realignment” policy decision that released incarcerated criminals due to a federal mandate aimed at resolving an impacted jail system. He added that he plans to continue efforts to make the city’s building-permit process more “user friendly” while streamlining and combining City departments and continuing environmental improvements. Foster added that there is still “much to rebuild” in Long Beach for generations to come. “The future demands that we do the right thing and create a place that is safe, attractive, well functioning, efficient, and full of opportunity for our young people,” he said.

Commander

continued from page 6

the Council. “However, the City does provide these services to the community through our partnership with the Los Angeles County Department of Health. However…we have received no credit for providing those types of programs.” Honeycutt also talked about how the City offers medical, vision and dental benefits to dependents of LGBT employees because it is a member of CalPERS (California Public Employees’ Retirement System). He clarified in a follow-up interview that these benefits are also extended to spouses and domestic partners of LGBT employees. The deputy city manager said that the City sent a letter signed by all the members of the Council to the Human Rights Campaign. The letter outlined a detailed response to the organization’s rating. Honeycutt said that the organization acknowledged receipt of the letter and is considering the additional information. See how the Human Rights Campaign scored Signal Hill and other cities on its Municipal Equality Index on hrc.org . Other City Council highlights

that the police force has shrunk from about 1,022 officers at full strength to currently about 800 officers due to budget cuts, the department’s number of priority patrol officers has remained steady. He said the department will collaborate with other City departments to carry on the philosophy of “doing more with less,” a directive from Police Chief Jim McDonnell, who Luman said has strategically aligned the department to maintain its “core” workforce, which includes patrol officers and dispatchers. “Even though we have less police officers, I will be looking for ways to leverage technologies, to use our police officers efficiently and to do anything we can do to get a leg up,” he said. “Even though our numbers are shrinking, one of the good things is our numbers for patrol haven’t been affected yet.” Some residents questioned why the North Patrol Division station, located at 4891 Atlantic Ave., remains closed to residents for police-reporting services and information. Luman responded by saying that, with the City’s

CRUISE DIARY

current budget, the department would have to bring a police officer from patrol duty to staff the desks, which isn’t ideal from a public-safety perspective. He said the South Patrol Division station, which takes incarcerated persons, is open 24-hours, while other stations, such as in the north, are considered “a leisure.” Austin added, however, that keeping the North Patrol Division station open for residents to file police reports or obtain permits is essential and vowed to look into coming up with funding. “It’s something that I’m very serious about,” he said. “I want to see the north station open for business… it is the biggest resource for the City, north of the 405 Freeway… and it’s a shame that residents can’t go in there and report crime.” Luman added that gang activity is “decreasing,” however, the department will continue to keep track of problems in north Long Beach that he said typically arise from conflicts between homegrown gangs and gang members coming from outside of the city, such as Compton and Lynwood. In addition, Luman said the North Division has had seven gun-related crimes in the last

JANUARY 18, 2013

Counting the homeless Signal Hill will be participating in the 2013 Greater Los Angeles Homeless Count on Jan. 30. Volunteers for the project, in collaboration with the city’s police department, will count the homeless population. Police department Police Chief Michael Langston offered a presentation on the new cameras for the police cars. Later in the meeting, he discussed the police department’s plans to move into the new headquarters. Successor Agency The due-diligence review for the former redevelopment agency’s cash and property holdings was presented to the Successor Agency. According to City Manager Ken Farfsing, approximately $8,704 is due back to LA County for disbursement to the various tax entities. The due-diligence report that detailed the former redevelopment agency’s housing assets was also discussed. The Successor Agency has already remitted $2.6 million to the County for disbursement.

The next City Council meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, Feb. 5 at 7pm in the Council Chamber. ß

year, four of which were celebratory gunshots, such as when people shoot guns in the air during New Year’s Eve. In response to a report of “riffraff” causing vandalism and suspicious activity on First Fridays in Bixby Knolls, Luman said he would make sure patrol units start “paralleling” the neighborhood during the monthly event. “We don’t step up patrols, but we can move them around,” he said. Some residents reported an increase in “tagging” or graffiti activity in parks, along bridges and near rail lines. Austin said the department is closely monitoring graffiti activity in addition to looking into prevention measures. He said residents are encouraged to report any graffiti, which is often cleaned up within 24 hours. Graffiti can be reported by calling (562) 570-2773 or through the app Go Long Beach. Luman said that neighborhoods have seen more residential burglaries caused primarily by juveniles and people with drugrelated issues. He said it’s important for neighbors to report any suspicious activity by calling 911 or contacting the north division station at (562) 570-9827.

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ST3433 - Jan 18_Layout 1 1/18/13 12:06 PM Page 15

JANUARY 18, 2013

Strollers

continued from page 1

front and then taken the train back up to Bixby Knolls,” Cohn said. “We have: toured Forest Lawn Cemetery and seen the Foucault pendulum; gone to Willow Springs Park and walked to the Municipal and Sunnyside cemeteries; walked through businesses such as Roy Robbins Gifts, Bella Cosa, Elise’s Tea Room, Alsace Lorraine Bakery, Reptiles Unlimited [and] FreeSpirit Yoga; walked through the back yards of houses in the Virginia Country Club neighborhood; toured the gardens and grounds of Rancho Los Cerritos; [and] walked by all of the Boy Scout landscape projects.” And this walking group is a “rain or shine” type of meet-up. Though many will forego a walk in the rain to remain in the warm comforts of home, a hardcore few will indeed battle the elements. “On a rainy Saturday, a group of hearty souls came out, and the minute we stepped off the curb there was a huge thunder and lightning blast,” Cohn said. “Most folks kept going, but by the end only four of

NEWS

started the group five years ago, we decided to walk once to give him moral support,” Gordon said. “We have walked every Saturday morning since, except on those few occasions when we have been out of the country.” Cohn’s parents are some of the walkers who have gained friends as well as health rewards from the strolls. “Apart from the beneficial aspects of walking, we have met people from all over the city, and even neighboring cities, who have chosen to join us,” Gordon said. “Now many people linger after the walk and chat. We have been to dinner parties and weddings of Strollers and their families and have developed some fine friendships.” Cohn sees a number of benefits associated with the Bixby Knolls Strollers– first and foremost, he says, are the connections that have been forged between the BKBIA and residents and between residents and the corridors along Atlantic Avenue and Long Beach Boulevard. “I believe people are now much more familiar with the businesses on the street and the landscape of the whole neighborhood,” he said. “There is a greater appreciation of the beauty of this [area] after walking it so often. Friendships have evolved from this group, and folks of all types walk and talk together each week. It’s a mini melting pot. Friendships have been created beyond just the strolls where people get together socially on their own, go to meals together, etc. On the heath tip, some folks who had a problem making the distance in the beginning can easily do 5K and have moved on to half marathons, marathons, and bike riding. It’s fun to hear about the accomplishments from some folks that weren’t very active at first who are now athletes.”

us made it the whole soaking way without turning around.” When you ask some of the regular “Strollers” if they would be up and exercising that early on Saturday mornings, you get various responses. Bixby Knolls resident Bernie Stearns expressed the unlikeliness that he would be engaging in such physical activity at that hour. “No, I probably wouldn’t be out enjoying the fresh air and having a good walk with my friends,” he said. Marc Rothenberg, who lives near the airport by Bellflower Boulevard and Spring Street, had a similar sentiment. “If not for the Strollers, I would probably sleep in on Saturdays,” he said. However, Cohn’s father, Gordon Cohn, is not fazed by the early start time. “Yes, I would exercise Saturdays in any event,” he said. “I work out four times a week beginning at 6:15, either at the gym or with four-mile walks. I am 80 years old.” Gordon said that he and his wife initially joined their son on the walks to encourage him but the activity became a weekly habit. “When he

Courtesy BKBIA

The Bixby Strollers walking group during a recent visit to Sunnyside Cemetery in Signal Hill

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Routes for the Bixby Strollers are created based on a theme, a holiday, the weather, or a particular destination, such as Rancho Los Cerritos, Dominguez Gap, Forest Lawn Cemetery, or the Metro Line.

Cohn anticipates that the group will continue on for some time, and he said he himself benefits from listening to the conversations during the walks. “It’s a wonderful group of people, and I look forward to seeing them every Saturday,” he said. “I am always very satisfied when I hear ‘Oh, I didn’t know that was here’ or ‘Oh, I need to come to this place for sure.’ You get a different perspective when you walk your own neighborhood and can discover things on each street. I enjoy lis-

tening to conversations between the people, and it’s a good gauge of the morale and spirit of the group. Everyone seems good-natured for the most part and enjoys being a part of this tradition. Let’s shoot for a whole decade of Bixby Knolls Strollers!”

The group is open to the public, is free to join at-will with no obligation, meets every Saturday at 7:15am at The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf at 4105 Atlantic Ave., and steps off promptly at 7:30am. For more information, visit bixbyknollsinfo.com . ß

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EYE ON CRIME Thursday, Jan. 10 Auto burglary 8pm– 3800 block Weston Pl.

Crimes reported by LBPD • Council Districts 6, 7 & 8

Residential burglary 1:23pm– 800 W. 21st St.

Robbery of person 2pm– Atlantic Ave. & E. Bixby Rd.

Commercial burglary 4:12pm– 2100 block Pacific Ave.

Thursday, Jan. 10 Commercial burglary 8:35am– 900 block E. 33rd St. Suspect in custody.

Grand theft 12:10pm– 2700 block Cherry Ave.

Residential burglary 6:51pm– 2300 block Lewis Ave.

Garage/residential burglary 9:50pm– 1000 block E. 32nd St.

DUI 11:25pm– E. Pacific Coast Hwy./Termino Ave.

Commercial burglary 1:30pm– 2700 block Raymond Ave.

Friday, Jan. 11 Commercial burglary 4:44pm– 2700 block Cherry Ave.

Petty theft 9:58pm– 900 block E. 33rd St. Suspect in custody.

Robbery of person 8:30pm– Long Beach Blvd. & E. Pacific Coast Hwy.

Friday, Jan. 11 Grand theft of property 12:05pm– 600 W. Willow St.

Auto burglary 10pm– 4500 block California Ave.

Sunday, Jan. 13 Auto burglary 8pm– 3800 block Lime Ave.

Crimes reported by SHPD • Citywide Saturday, Jan. 12 Stolen vehicle 1:18am– 2300 block Lewis Ave.

Non-injury hit-and-run 11:16am– 900 block E. 33rd St.

Non-injury hit-and-run 12:53pm– 1800 block E. Willow St.

Sunday, Jan. 13 Non-injury hit-and-run 2:04am- 2500 block Palm Dr.

Residential burglary 11:30am– 2300 block Cerritos Ave.

Rape report 11:49am– 1700 block E. Hill St.

Residential burglary 2:30pm– 900 block Nevada St.

Monday, Jan. 14 Forgery 11:46am– 2400 block Cherry Ave.

Non-injury hit-and-run 1:42pm– Cherry Ave./E. Willow St.

Auto burglary 8:30pm– 2200 block Pine Ave.

Monday, Jan. 14 Commercial burglary, shoplifting 8am– 100 block E. Willow St.

Grand theft of person 5:18pm– Atlantic Ave. and E. Pacific Coast Hwy.

Auto burglary 2:04pm– 700 block E. Spring St.

Threatening phone calls 10:09pm- 2500 block E. Willow St.

Tuesday, Jan. 15 DUI 2:12am- 1900 block Dawson Ave. Suspect in custody.

Wednesday, Jan. 16 Residential burglary 9:10am– 3300 block Cerritos Ave.

Assault without firearm 1:23pm– 3000 block California Ave. Suspect in custody.

Non-injury hit-and-run 6:06pm– 1800 block E. Willow St.

Stolen and recovered vehicle 7:48pm– 700 block E. Spring St.

Trespassing, occupying property without consent 11pm– 2200 block Walnut Ave. Two suspects in custody.


ST3433 - Jan 18_Layout 1 1/18/13 12:06 PM Page 16

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

JANUARY 18, 2013

The Signal Hill Chamber of Commerce’s Monthly Membership Luncheon will be held on Thursday, January 24 from noon to 1:30pm in the Signal Hill Park Community Center at 1780 East Hill Street (behind the Library). Doors open at 11:45am for networking and the program starts at noon. Our speaker will be Signal Hill City Manager, Ken Farfsing, with “A Year in Review and What’s On the Horizon for Signal Hill.” Enjoy a delicious lunch catered by Bliss 525 while mingling with other members of our business community, local officials, and legislative representatives. Cost is $25 per person but will be discounted to $15 for 2012-2013 current members with advance non-refundable reservations made before noon on the day before the luncheon. Non-members are welcome at a cost of $25 per person. Please make your reservations by e-mail to shcc@verizon.net (or leave a message at 562/424-6489 and make your payment at the door via cash, check, MasterCard or Visa only.

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STARTERS

sCotCH eggs witH MAngo CHutney Dipping sAuCe

BLACk puDDing on toAst points CArAMeLizeD onions SOUP

spLit peA & Leek 1ST COURSE

BAngers & MAsH onion Curry MAIN COURSE

roAsteD FiLet Mignon yorksHire puDDings vegetABLes HorserADisH CreAM sAuCe

Executive Chef: Louise Solzman

PUDDING engLisH sHerry triFLe

2951 C Herry Avenue , s ignAL H iLL - For reservations: 562-426-0694

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