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Vol. 34 No. 27

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One of the recently uncovered mosaics at Long Beach Airport

Photo by Sean Belk

See story on page 15

December 7, 2012

SERVING BIXBY KNOLLS, CALIFORNIA HEIGHTS, LOS CERRITOS, WRIGLEY AND THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

LB Airport reveals new passenger concourse, terminals

Signal Hill Council basks in one legal victory

Your Weekly Community Newspaper

CJ Dablo Staff Writer

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Long Beach city officials and business representatives cut a symbolic ribbon on Wednesday, Dec. 5, commemorating the opening of the Long Beach Airport’s new passenger concourse, which is part of a more than $140-million modernization plan. From left, Airport Chief Civil Engineer Jeff Sedlak, 5th District Long Beach City Councilmember Gerrie Schipske, Airport Director Mario Rodriguez, Mayor Bob Foster, JetBlue Executive Vice President/General Counsel Jim Hnat, Long Beach Convention & Visitors Bureau President and CEO Steve Goodling. Sean Belk Staff Writer

A crowd of government officials and civic leaders got a chance to peruse the Long Beach Airport’s (LGB) new passenger concourse on Wednesday during a ribbon-cutting ceremony. The $45million, state-of-the-art concourse, which includes two holding-room termi-

nals with seating, contemporary concessions and a garden walkway, will be officially opened on Dec. 12. As finishing touches to construction were still underway during the unveiling, Airport Director Mario Rodriguez said Airport staff worked around the clock to get the project completed ahead of schedule. He said Airport staff

worked with several different parties, including airlines, local businesses, architects, City officials and the community, to make the design as representative of the city as possible. “It’s going to look a little bit different than what most airports look like… It’s actually designed to mimic Long Beach and to

The labor dispute began on Nov. 27, when the International Longshore & Warehouse Union (ILWU) Local 63 Office Clerical Unit, which represents about 800 workers, came to a stalemate on contract negotiations with the Los Angeles/Long Beach Harbor Employers Association, which represents 14 terminal operators at the local ports. The small clerical union first set up picket lines on Pier 400 in the Port of Los Angeles, affecting two terminals, and then spread to others. ILWU’s 10,000 longshore workers respected and refused to cross the picket lines, eventually shutting down 10 of the 14 marine

terminals at the ports. Leaders of the ILWU Local 63OCU claimed that 51 local jobs had been outsourced to Texas, Taiwan and elsewhere in the past five years since the work could be done via the Internet. The union had also called for wage increases and other benefits. The new contract reached this week after a federal mediator was called in, however, provides new “protections that help prevent jobs from being outsourced,” according to a statement from the union. In the days leading up to the labor deal, a vast array of business

Los Angeles County owes Signal Hill at least $220,000 after the State Court determined that the County had overcharged dozens of cities, according to a report by City Manager Ken Farfsing. Last month, the California Supreme Court ruled in favor of Signal Hill and 46 other cities after they successfully challenged how Los Angeles County calculated a specific administration fee. The city manager summarized how the County had overcharged the cities in Los Angeles County at last Tuesday’s Signal Hill City Council meeting. “It’s pretty much a clerical exercise at the County,” Farfsing

told the Council as he described how the County had overcharged dozens of cities for administrative costs associated with the “Triple Flip,” a state-revenue collection process dealing with the sales tax, motor-vehicle license taxes and property taxes. “And they (the County) essentially were charging over $5 million in one year to the cities in Los Angeles County. Approximately $10 million was collected from the cities to administer essentially what took about $35,000 to do.” Farfsing explained in an interview after the Council meeting that the estimated $220,000 owed back to Signal Hill does not include interest. The Court is chargsee COUNCIL page 14

Port strike ends after labor agreement reached Sean Belk Staff Writer

An eight-day strike that halted goods movement at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach has ended after clerical workers and terminal operators came to a tentative laborcontract agreement late Tuesday night, Dec. 4, allowing the nation’s busiest seaport complex to become “fully operational” again. However, economists say the work stoppage still might cause a delay in products and merchandise arriving at retailers in coming months since the strike disrupted the logistics supply chain locally and across the country for more than a week.

Friday

see AIRPORT page 6

see PORT page 4

Saturday

Sunday

CJ Dablo/Signal Tribune

During Tuesday night’s Signal Hill City Council meeting, Jessie Elwin Nelson Academy won the Fourth Quarter Sustainability Award. Principal Sparkle Peterson (above) accepted the award on behalf of the academy.

December 7 through December 11, 2012

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ST3427 - December 7_Layout 1 12/7/12 4:43 PM Page 2

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ST3427 - December 7_Layout 1 12/7/12 4:44 PM Page 3

COMMUNITY

DECEMBER 7, 2012

Local organizations announce first LB AIDS Ride to be November 2013

Event to benefit HIV/AIDS services at The Center LB, St. Mary’s CARE program

During a candlelight World AIDS Day event in Long Beach on Dec. 1, representatives from The Gay and Lesbian Center of Long Beach (The Center) and The Comprehensive AIDS Resource and Education (CARE) program at St. Mary Medical Center announced the kick-off of Long Beach AIDS Ride, a new major annual fundraising event to help support the work of these two organizations in the areas of education, prevention, testing and treating of the HIV/AIDS pandemic locally. More than a dozen members of Team Long Beach rode in to join the event as the announcement was made. “These riders represented the more than 200 cyclists we will register to participate in our first-ever Long Beach AIDS Ride (LBAR),” said Ron Sylvester, president and chairman of The Center. Long Beach AIDS Ride will take place next year and every year on the Saturday closest to World AIDS Day. The date for the inaugural event will be the morning of Nov. 30, 2013. This one-day bike ride will begin at the Junipero Beach parking lot and wind down local southern California coast. Riders can choose to do a 40-mile or 70-mile route, returning to the Junipero Beach lot. Participants can register as a rider or choose to be a fundraiser.

Courtesy The Center LB

Members of Team Long Beach ride in to join the World AIDS Day candlelight vigil on Dec. 1 at Junipero Beach as the announcement was made that 2013 will be the inaugural year for the Long Beach AIDS Ride.

Either way, cyclists will be raising money that will stay in Long Beach. LBAR is also a platform to increase positive, life-affirming experiences for people affected and infected by HIV and to encourage activism in the greater Long Beach community, according to a press release issued by The Center. “This is the first time that The Center and CARE have come together on this level to address the needs of our

A vigil of ‘vigilance’

community,” said Robert Stohr, manager of Client Services for CARE. “We realize that by combining our expertise and efforts we can make a much bigger impact for Long Beach, and we hope that members of the greater Long Beach community join us on our mission.” To register or for more information, visit the Long Beach AIDS Ride Facebook page, which links to the Active.com registration site, or contact the Center at (562) 434- 4455.

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More than 70 people attended the candlelight vigil on the bluff at Ocean Boulevard and Junipero Avenue on Dec. 1. The event honored World AIDS Day and included personal reflections and information about City health resources.

To culminate its World AIDS Day commemoration, The Gay and Lesbian Center of Long Beach (The Center) held a candlelight vigil from The Center to the bluff area on Ocean Boulevard and Junipero Avenue. More than 70 people participated in the candlelight procession. When they reached the bluff, they were greeted by over 100 oversized red ribbons on display, some bearing the names of lost loved ones. Participants were invited to place their candle near a ribbon and reflect in honor of a loved one who had died from AIDS. After a short time of reflection, the program began with a welcome by Ismael Morales, director of Health Education and Services at The Center. Morales discussed the current state of HIV and AIDS in the Long Beach community and personally reflected on friends that he had lost to the disease. He then offered others in the audience the opportunity to come forward and do the same. The program continued with comments from Dr. Marcia Alcouloumre, MD, from the Infectious Disease & Internal Medicine in the CARE program at St. Mary Medical Center. Alcouloumre spoke both factually and emotionally about the work she and her colleagues at CARE are doing locally and the importance to keep vigilant against the disease. Then the presentation of the launch of Long Beach AIDS Ride was announced as more than a dozen members of Team Long Beach cycled in to support the endeavor. (See story above.) The event wrapped up with remarks from 2nd District Councilmember Suja Lowenthal, who spoke about the impact that HIV/AIDS has had in Long Beach, resources available through the City, and the importance of reaching zero infections.

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ST3427 - December 7_Layout 1 12/7/12 4:44 PM Page 4

COMMUNITY

4 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Port

handles 40 percent of all imported goods to the United States. Mayer Nunn, owner of Two the Root Beauty Supply and Accessories/Salon at 3549 Atlantic Ave. in Bixby Knolls, said she ran out of RastAfri and Black and Gold braided hair extensions, since shipments of the particular product brand were being delayed at warehouses. “I’m waiting for my shipment,” Nunn said on Monday. “That style is in… and [the strike] is stopping me from getting that hair in … I think it’s affecting quite a few salons.” Weston LaBar, a consultant on public policy and economic development for the Long Beach Area Chamber of Commerce, said the local ports are one of the largest “economic engines” in the region supplying one in eight jobs in Long Beach, which can indirectly impact other local businesses. “If the port is not operating at its full capacity then that impacts Long Beach jobs and income,” he said. Also, the fact that cargo ships were diverted to other ports means that Southern California won’t be first on the supply chain, which could mean product shipments may be delayed locally and across the nation, he said. “We’re not going to get it in that same timely manner as you would if it came through the Port of Long Beach,” LaBar said. “I don’t know what the impacts are in the Mid-West, but here in

continued from page 1

groups, chambers of commerce and associations sent a letter to President Barack Obama, urging the federal government to get involved. The outcry mostly came from concerns that the strike would cause a ripple effect of economic disruption across the country. In the weeklongplus strike, more than a dozen ships that traditionally import goods into the United States through Los Angeles-Long Beach were diverted to other ports, including Canada and Mexico. Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa said in a prepared statement that he was pleased that an agreement was reached but added that the strike cost the local economy “billions of dollars.” He said the contract allows the port employees, however, to return to work during the holiday season, adding that the thousands of men and women are “vital to keeping the port running around the clock.” Port of Los Angeles Executive Director Geraldine Knatz said in the same statement that, “The days ahead will be busy, but we look forward to seeing a workforce of thousands back on the job and returning this complex to business as usual.” Still, some local businesses have already been impacted by the strike that caused a slowdown in the flow of products through the local ports, which

Thoughts from the Publisher

by Neena Strichart

Getting a good night’s sleep is a beautiful thing. I find it especially delicious when it is followed by no alarm clock to wake me up. Last Saturday I was looking forward to sleeping in. The dogs and cats were behaving, no buzzing alarm to jolt me awake– ah, BLISS! Bliss indeed, until the phone rang at 8:30am. Steve let out with a disapproving groan, and I quickly announced, “I’ll get it.” Taking the cordless phone in the other room in order to let Steve continue with his beauty sleep, I discovered that the caller was a fellow named Bart who was checking on some recent credit-card activity of mine. He apologized for waking me and started asking me about various transactions I had allegedly

Mea Culpa

Long Beach and Los Angeles County, in general, you’re going to see the biggest impact.” The Los Angeles County Business Federation states that more than $400 billion worth of goods flow through the local ports annually, which supports nearly 3 million jobs in a vast supply chain across the country. It is estimated that nearly 160,000 people are employed in international trade activities in Los Angeles County, and roughly 250,000 people are employed in a five-county area, including Orange, the Inland Empire, Riverside, San Bernardino and Ventura counties. Ferdinando Guerra, associate economist for the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corporation, said overall total employment in the United States will likely be “negatively impacted” by the temporary shutdown, but he added that the good news is it wasn’t a complete shutdown and didn’t occur during the peak season or the busiest time of the year when large retailers get ready for the holiday season. He said the local ports just had their peak season, which may mean there won’t be as much damage to the supply chain. “This would have been much worse if it happened over the past few months, so that’s a big plus,” Guerra said. The recent strike, however, brings back “bad memories” of what happened in 2002, when the local ports experienced a

OPINION

conducted with my Mastercard over the last few days. After he explained that the company he works for is tied to my bank and that his job is to check out fraud, I was happy to cooperate with him. Several of the transactions he questioned were indeed valid purchases, but then a red flag was quickly raised as he asked if I had made any online purchases that morning with a company in Colorado. I quickly told him that I hadn’t. Bart said the amount was for $29. Nope, not me– hey, I was asleep until about 10 minutes ago! He next asked if I had made a purchase in Cypress lately. I thought for a minute and told him that I had been in Los Alamitos a few days ago, and although the establishment I visited that particular day was near Cypress, I hadn’t made a credit-card purchase while I was there. Bart got quiet and then sounded very confused. At that moment, hubby Steve walked in the room sleepyeyed and remarked that the guy on the phone “probably isn’t even in California; he doesn’t know where Los Alamitos is!” I then asked Bart where he was

The new America?

The photo caption on page 15 of the Nov. 23 issue of the Signal Tribune should have referred to the bird as a great horned owl.

Something on your mind?

Visit signaltribune.com & leave a comment!

complete 10-day lockout, he said. Guerra said it took 60 days for the supply chain to recover from that strike. “That really impacted the largest importers, such as Wal-Mart, Home Depot and Target,” he said. “This once again brings up that sense of doubt about the Port’s dependability and reliability.” Guerra said, however, that total container traffic at the ports has increased 50 percent since 10 years ago and the value of two-way trade has skyrocketed since then as well. Locally, anywhere from 25 to 50 percent of imports are distributed throughout the Southern California region and the rest is taken to states across the country. Still, he said some merchandise is just now coming in, which could have an impact on some big retailers. Small, local retailers that may have waited until the last minute to order products may now not be able to receive their merchandise or may experience a delay, Guerra said. “That could have a big impact on a small business,” he said. However, Guerra added that the delay might not impact consumer spending patterns in the end. “It’s not necessarily all going to be lost,” he said. “If [products] are delayed a week or two, that doesn’t mean consumers won’t purchase a particular good. They may choose something that’s very similar instead.” ß

LETTER

Stephanie Raygoza

ASSISTANT EDITOR/STAFF WRITER

Sean Belk

STAFF WRITERS

CJ Dablo

COLUMNISTS

Jennifer E. Beaver Carol Berg Sloan, RD

MORE INFORMATION firstfridayslongbeach.com

calling from. He said he was in Idaho. I then revisited his question about Cypress. Explaining that although Los Alamitos is very close to Cypress, since I hadn’t used my Mastercard there anyhow, the purchase was probably bogus. Bart then started laughing. Once he composed himself, he explained that he was talking about the Island of Cyprus in the Mediterranean, not the Orange County, California city of Cypress. I then confessed that indeed I had not recently, or in fact ever, been to the Island of Cyprus; a-ha, another fraudulent transaction. The good news is that Bart cancelled my card immediately. The bad news is Bart cancelled my card immediately! Anyhow, I have been issued a new card, I wasn’t charged for the fraudulent purchases, and I am now free to go about resuming my credit-card spending. Keep in mind, I had the card with the stolen number in my possession at all times, so fraud doesn’t just happen when your card is stolen. Check with your bank. Do they offer the same service?! Happy charging!

TH E

ED I TO R

Nick Diamantides

Shoshanah Siegel

DESIGN EDITOR

Cory Bilicko

ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS

Jane Fallon

The Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association and 8th District Councilmember Al Austin will host the 5th annual Bixby Knolls tree- and menorahlighting ceremony during the First Fridays art walk on Dec. 7. The ceremony will take place by the fountains at Nino’s Italian Restaurant, 3853 Atlantic Ave., beginning at 6pm. The entire community is welcome to celebrate the tradition, listen to holiday music and enjoy hot chocolate. The lights will be turned on at 6:30pm. As this will be a community tree, the Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association is encouraging the public to provide decorations, which may brought to the ceremony on Dec. 7. Austin’s “Council on Your Corner” will be set up at Atlantic Avenue and Burlinghall Drive to meet and greet attendees. Seventh District Councilmember James Johnson’s “First Books at First Fridays” event will begin at 5:30pm at the Dana Branch Library and will feature community leader John Royce as the guest reader. Attendees may dine on “Art-Lantic” Avenue at one of the local restaurants then grab the Big Red Bus to travel from venue to venue via designated stops at the participating businesses. Bella Cosa, 3803 Atlantic Ave., will have information about First Fridays, maps, business info, and restaurant recommendations from 6:30pm to 8pm.

MANAGING EDITOR

Stephen M. Strichart

Neena R. Strichart

Tree, menorah to be lighted during First Fridays art walk

If you have ever wondered why the price of everything is going up, guess no more. I had to pick up a few things, so, because I was in a hurry and the store was close, I went to one of the big variety stores to pick up a few items. While looking for the items I wanted, I noticed opened and half- to completely empty packages of cookies, candy and other items available to purchase. Clothes were on the floor, and other items were treated like garbage. That, my friends, is our new welfare system. If ya ain’t got it, take it. “They have more than you do, so why not?” Ah, yes, the new America. “Why work for 8-9 dollars an hour when you can get it for nothing?” Vivian C. Nelson Long Beach

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

TO

DECEMBER 7, 2012

Leighanna Nierle

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/WEBSITE MANAGER

Tanya Paz

CULTURE WRITERS

Daniel Adams Vicki Paris Goodman Gregory Spooner CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Matt Sun

EDITORIAL INTERNS

Andrea Ciccolini

Ariana Gastelum

CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Rachael Rifkin

DESIGN INTERN

Kaelyn Bruno

The Signal Tribune welcomes letters to the editor, which should be signed, dated and include a phone number to verify authenticity. Letters are due by noon on the Tuesday before desired publication date. The Signal Tribune reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, language and space requirements. The Signal Tribune does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other publications or otherwise presented in a public forum. Letters to the editor and commentaries are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Signal Tribune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, letters to the editor and commentaries are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. Letter-writers will be identified by their professional titles or affiliations when, and only when, the editorial staff deems it relevant and/or to provide context to the letter. The Signal Tribune is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. Yearly subscriptions are available for $45.

939 E. 27th St., Signal Hill, CA 90755 (562) 595-7900

www.signaltribune.com newspaper@signaltribune.com


ST3427 - December 7_Layout 1 12/7/12 4:44 PM Page 5

NEWS

DECEMBER 7, 2012

LBPD seeking public’s help in finding sexual-assault suspect on bicycle The Long Beach Police Department is seeking the public’s help in identifying a male suspect wanted in connection with several incidents of sexually assaulting female victims, and detectives are advising the community to be alert to their surroundings. There have been several reported incidents this year beginning in late September and continuing through November. The victims vary in age from 12 years old to mid-60s, and all

had been walking on the sidewalk when the suspect rode up behind them on a bicycle and grabbed either their buttocks or breast as he passed by. Most incidents have occurred either on or near 4th Street between Chestnut Avenue and Junipero Avenue. Based on the manner, date, time, and location in which the crimes occurred, and the suspect descriptions provided, detectives believe it’s possible that one suspect may be responsible for these incidents.

The reported incidents are as follows:

Date 9/24/12 9/24/12 9/26/12 10/2/12 10/12/12 10/29/12 11/19/12 11/19/12 11/19/12 11/19/12 11/20/12 11/22/12

Courtesy LBPD

The suspect has been described as male, white or Hispanic, 25 to 50 years old, 5’6” to 6’0” tall, 180 to 240 pounds, with gray and black hair. He has been seen wearing an oversize white T-shirt, a hooded sweatshirt (gray or blue), or a black-and-white flannel shirt, with either dark shorts or jeans, and black, skate-style sneakers. The bicycle has been described as a dark or silver-colored mountain bicycle, a BMX-style bicycle, and a low-rider bicycle.

(left and above left) Screen shots from video provided by the Long Beach Police Department that shows a suspect involved in sexual assault on a female pedestrian

Time 8:40pm 9:30pm 9:30pm 8:45pm 6:40pm 7:30pm 3:45pm 4:30pm 5:00pm 7:15pm 6:30pm 9:55pm

Location 4th Street and Alamitos Avenue 4th Street and Nebraska Avenue 4th Street and Cherry Avenue 4th Street and Walnut Avenue Junipero Avenue and 3rd Street 4th Street and Cedar Avenue 4th Street and Elm Avenue Walnut Avenue and Erie Street 4th Street and Chestnut Avenue 4th Street and Lime Avenue 6th Street and Pacific Avenue Broadway and Hermosa Avenue

Video showing the suspect is available at the following link: youtube.com/ watch?v= 7_Wb23YPZGI&feature=plcp . The Long Beach Police Department is reminding the public to pay attention to the people and activity around them and to report any suspicious persons or activity immediately by calling 9-1-1. Anyone who has also been a victim that has not reported

the incident to police or recognizes the suspect description is asked to contact Long Beach Police Sex Crimes Detective Mike Solomita at (562) 570-7368. Anonymous tips may be submitted by calling 1-800-222-TIPS, texting TIPLA plus the tip to 274637 (CRIMES), or visiting lacrimestoppers.org .

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

5

LIGHTS, DECORATIONS, ACTIVITIES What Tree Lighting Ceremony and Home Decorating Contest Who Wrigley Area Neighborhood Alliance Where On the green at West 20th Street and Daisy Avenue When Friday, Dec. 7 from 7pm to 8:30pm More Info Stearns Musical Theatre Company and Santa’s Song Birds will provide entertainment. Attendees are encouraged to bring a donation for WANA’s Food Drive for People ‘n Pets. Call (562) 355-8679 email wrigleyalliance@gmail.com. HONKY TONK CHRISTMAS What 7th Annual Honky Tonk Christmas Who Alex’s Bar Where 2913 E. Anaheim St. When Saturday, Dec. 8 from 7pm More Info The event will include a night of entertainment and festive holiday music provided by Willie Cash & The Cashiers, West of Texas, Sam Outlaw, The Copycats, The Damngivers, Grant Langston, JD Bender, and DJ Hillbilly Jeff. Cost is $10. All proceeds go to the Boys and Girls Club. Call (562) 4348292.

THE GIFT OF LANGUAGE What Enchanted Holiday Who Friends of Languages, associate group of LBCC Foundation Where Private home in Naples When Sunday, Dec. 9 from 8pm to 6pm More Info The fundraiser will feature entertainment, food and beverages. Funds go to scholarships to students studying a foreign language or English as a second language. Call (562) 938-4767.

MIX AND MINGLE What Holiday Mixer Who Long Beach Area Chamber of Commerce Where Forbidden City Restaurant, 6380-A E. Pacific Coast Hwy When Tuesday, Dec. 11 from 5:30pm to 7:30pm More Info Cost is $15 per person for both members and non-members ($5 from each ticket sale and raffle proceeds are donated to the Long Beach Ronald McDonald House). Free appetizers included plus happy-hour drink prices. Call (562) 590-9234 or email jperler@lbchamber.com. OPEN A BOOK What Bixby Knolls Literary Society book club Who Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association Where Elise’s Tea Room, 3924 Atlantic Ave. When Wednesday, Dec. 12 at 7pm More Info This month’s book selection is The Garlic Ballads: A Novel, a 2012 winner of the Nobel Prize for literature by Mo Yan and translated by Howard Goldblatt. Call (562) 595-0081 or email info@bixbyknollsinfo.com.

LBPD receives grant for special trafficenforcement and crash prevention Visit us on First Friday, Dec. 7! The Long Beach Police Department (LBPD) has been awarded a $133,000 grant from the California Office of Traffic Safety (OTS) for a year-long program aimed at preventing deaths and injuries on roadways through special enforcement and public-awareness efforts. “This grant will aid in the city’s ongoing effort to improve traffic safety and the quality of life,” Long Beach Mayor Bob Foster said. “Motorists and residents throughout the city will benefit from the increased enforcement and awareness about traffic safety.” The grant will assist in efforts to deal with traffic-safety problems and to reduce the number of persons killed and injured in traffic collisions. Although traffic deaths from all causes declined by nearly 39 percent between 2006 and 2010 in California, state and federal officials anticipate that figures will show a slight rise in 2011, accord-

ing to the LBPD. DUI deaths remain the largest sector, at nearly 30 percent of traffic fatalities. Recent trends show increases in two new categories: distracted driving and drug-impaired driving. “We are grateful to the Office of Traffic Safety for awarding us this grant,” said Long Beach Police Chief Jim McDonnell. “In these fiscally challenging times, this grant will allow us to maintain our enforcement and education efforts to prevent and reduce injury-traffic collisions and protect lives.” Activities that the grant will fund include: • Specialized DUI and drugged-driving training such as standardized field sobriety testing (SFST), advanced roadside impaired driving enforcement (ARIDE) and drug-recognition evaluator (DRE) • DUI saturation patrols

Source: LBPD

• Motorcycle-safety enforcement • Distracted-driving enforcement • Speed, red-light and stop-sign enforcement • Compilation of DUI “hot sheets,” identifying worst-of-the-worst DUI offenders “Despite the recent increases, California’s roadways are still very much safer than they were before 2006,” said OTS Director Christopher J. Murphy. “The Long Beach Police Department will be keeping the pressure on through enforcement and public awareness so that we can continue saving lives and reach the vision we all share– toward zero deaths, every 1 counts.” Funding for this program is provided by the California Office of Traffic Safety through the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Source: City of LB

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6 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Airport

continued from page 1

be a proper gateway for Long Beach,” he said. The design of the modernization also provides a “resort-like” atmosphere, while accentuating Long Beach’s aviation history, Rodriguez said. Mayor Bob Foster said the new, modern concourse

adds to the Airport’s reputation as the convenient alternative to larger, nearby airports. “People will not only want to come here because it’s efficient, but because it’s beautiful, it’s relaxing and they can have a good time, get a meal and enjoy themselves in addition to flying in and out of the city,” he said. The concourse, which has been under construction for two years and is expected to generate $300,000 in new

NEWS

revenue per month, includes a boarding lounge with north and south holding rooms or passenger terminals, more than 10,000 square feet of new concession space for Long Beach restaurants and retail outlets, a 6,500-square-foot consolidated passenger-screening checkpoint and atrium, garden and palm court with native landscaping. The building is also fitted with fire pits, a greeting hologram, an Internet

bar, lounge areas, solar panels and energy-efficient features. Through concessionaire Paradies Shops, the new concessions include local restaurants and retailers from parts of the city, including 4th Street Vine, George’s Greek Café, Polly’s Coffee and Long Beach Clothing Company. Two concessions are called 562 Experience and McKenna’s on the Fly. “I’ve never been in a terminal that has a sushi bar, a wine bar and two outdoor patios and fire pits,” said Steve Goodling, president and CEO of the Long Beach Convention and Visitors Bureau. “As our visitors come through this facility, they’re going to look at our city and they’re going to say Long Beach is a sophisticated city with a relaxed, Southern California lifestyle … and that’s what we are.”

DECEMBER 7, 2012

The new concourse supports more than 100 new jobs at the concessions, while the entire terminal facility supports 43,000 jobs and has an economic impact about $11 billion in the entire region, according to Foster. Capped at 41 flights per day due to a noise ordinance, LGB provides for more than 3 million airline passengers per year. “This is a gold mine,” said Claude Lagman, a 20-year JetBlue Airways employee and resident of California Heights. “This is just so convenient to fly in and out of … and it beats Orange County and LA for sure … I would say it’s the best airport in the nation.” The public may visit the Long Beach Airport’s new passenger concourse this Sunday, Dec. 9 before the facility is only available to ticketed customers. RSVP is required. ß


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DECEMBER 7, 2012

AIDS forum addresses rising HIV infections among youth, high-risk populations in LB

Sean Belk Staff Writer

Local health officials and community members took part in a forum in Long Beach last Saturday, Dec. 1 to discuss the challenges of combating a continual rise in HIV infections, particularly among youth and other high-risk populations. The two-part forum, attended by about 60 people at the Miller Family Health Education Center at 3762 Cherry Ave., was organized by the Long Beach Health and Human Services Department, as part of the 25th annual World AIDS Day, considered the longest running disease-awareness and prevention initiative in the history of public health. The theme of this year’s global campaign was “Getting to Zero,” promoting the idea of an AIDS-free generation. Although HIV, primarily passed through sex and injecting drugs, is a serious virus that attacks a person’s immune system and if gone untreated can lead to AIDS and early death, major strides in advanced medications over the last few decades have reduced the number of deaths caused by the disease. Still, recent statistics show HIV continues to spread, especially among youth and youth minorities, suggesting a lack of testing and prevention measures, said Dr. Mitchell Kushner, Long Beach’s city health officer. Just last month, the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a report that states that about 50,000 people across the country are diagnosed with HIV each year. In 2010, about one in four (26 percent) of new HIV infections were among 13- to 24year-olds. The report also found that youth made up about 7 percent of the more than 1 million people living with HIV, and about 60 percent of all HIV-positive youth don’t know they are infected and may unknowingly pass the virus on to others. The greatest number of infections occurred among gay and bisexual youth, and nearly half of all new infections among youth occurred in African-American males, according to the report. Local healthcare professionals who participated in a panel discussion during Saturday’s forum said that part of the problem is that the threat of AIDS has dwindled since the early 1980s, when it became clear that the disease is transmitted through sex. As more and more patients died, national campaigns promoted safe sex and prevention measures. Since then, new medications, known as a “triple cocktail” of pills, have greatly advanced treatment and the ability to arrest HIV from developing into AIDS, although a complete cure has yet to be discovered.

“We’re somewhat of a victim of our own success,” said Dr. David Hardy, director of infectious disease at Cedars-Sinai hospital and a professor of UCLA’s School of Medicine. “We’ve made a treatment easy, effective and [with] very few side-effects … We want that to happen, but it’s also made it look like, ‘if you become HIV-positive it’s no big deal … why do I have to worry about becoming HIV-positive? I’ll just take a pill like my buddies do’ … I think that’s something that we have to be very careful about.” Dr. Eric Daar, chief of the division of HIV medicine at HarborUCLA Medical Center who has a 20-year career in providing HIV care, called the new statistics “startling,” adding that younger age groups are continuing to have unprotected sex while not getting tested, which prevents them from getting treatment and counseling. “You certainly see, within our patient population, young people coming in with very advanced stages of HIV, suggesting that not only are they infected, but they’ve been infected for quite a while,” he said. “So, we obviously need to reach out to these very high-risk groups that otherwise don’t see themselves to be at risk and aren’t taking appropriate precautions to stem the tide of HIV.” Larry Forester, a Signal Hill city councilmember who was diagnosed with AIDS in 1985, said that, while he didn’t attend the forum, today’s society has “taken AIDS off of the radar screen,” since the number of deaths has significantly decreased, but having to take so many medications to keep the virus at bay still comes with other side-effects that can cause other health problems. “Young people are ignorant,” Forester said. “They have not paid attention to

NEWS

7

Photos by Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Dr. Mitchell Kushner, city health officer for the Long Beach Health and Human Services Department, gives opening remarks at the World AIDS Day community forum on Dec. 1 at the Miller Family Health Education Center, 3820 Cherry Ave.

what we’ve known since 1981, when it was defined as GRID, gayrelated immune deficiency … their learning curve was driven by deaths, and if there are no more deaths, they think, ‘why do I have to learn?’” In Long Beach, where there are more than 6,000 people living with HIV and about 1,500 people who don’t know they have it, more youth are being diagnosed with HIV on a regular basis, Kushner told the Signal Tribune. “We’re experiencing that also,” he said. Kushner added that, despite being the largest of only three cities in the state to have its own health jurisdiction, Long Beach “is the sixth-highest jurisdiction in the state for cumulative numbers of AIDS cases and the eighth-largest jurisdiction for [HIV] infections.” He also said that the city is lucky to have its own HIV clinic, which sees about 300 patients every year and provides free HIV testing. On Dec. 13, the Long Beach

City Council approved an item to allow the health department to participate in a California HIV/AIDS research program study, assessing linkage, engagement and retention to care to reduce the transmission of HIV. The health department is expected to receive $206,700 from the University of California, San Diego, for the period of April 1, 2012 through March 31, 2013 to provide HIV counseling and testing services to those individuals at risk for HIV and link eligible individuals to disease-prevention services and treatment. The funding is expected to continue through 2016. For most youth, the risk of contracting HIV comes when they start having sex or injecting drugs, subjects that still carry a “stigma” in today’s society. “We’re still dealing with levels of stigma in this country,” said Cathy Elliott, an HIV community liaison for Merck pharmaceuticals. “HIV is connected with sex and … drug use for a lot of individuals, and we

still have difficulty in this country talking openly about those things.” During a community panel, Angel Gomez, who was 18 years old when he tested positive for HIV in April of last year, said, at first, he thought it was a “death sentence.” Now his goal is to pass along the message that, although there are medications that can suppress HIV, it’s important to be “brutally honest” with kids in high school and even middle school about the dangers of drugs and unprotected sex. He said prejudice about HIV and AIDS comes from a lack of education. “If you see [us] walking down the street, you won’t know that we’re HIV-positive … we’re not damaged goods,” he said. “To me, there’s only one race, and that’s the human race.” ß

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A panel of healthcare professionals discusses the state of AIDS and HIV during a community forum with the theme “Getting to Zero” on Dec. 1. The event, attended by about 60 people, also included a panel of community members living with HIV.

Pet clinics to offer affordable vaccinations and licenses

Long Beach Animal Care Services will provide two low-cost vaccination and licensing clinics to residents and pets in Long Beach on Saturday, Dec. 8. The first clinic will be offered from 9am to 10:30pm at Houghton Park, 6301 Myrtle Ave., and the second will be from 12:30pm to 2pm at Admiral Kidd Park, 2125 Santa Fe Ave. No reservation is necessary, but only cash will be accepted for vaccina-

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

tions. A state-licensed veterinarian from the Southern California Veterinary Vaccine Clinic will be onsite to provide the shots, and residents can process their license renewals there as well. Services available will include: Dog rabies $7 Cat rabies $7 (or, if preferred, Purevax Rabies for $20) DHPP (DA2PP) $17 (dogs) Bordetella $14 (dogs)

Lyme $22 (dogs) FVRCP (3-in-1) $17 (cats) FELV $19 (cats) AVID microchips $28 (cats and dogs) Altered dog license $20 (half-price for seniors) Unaltered dog license $95 Altered cat license $10 (half-price for seniors) For more information, call (562) 570-7387 or visit scvvc.webs.com for a full listing of prices.

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CULTURE

8 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

DECEMBER 7, 2012

When not in Rome... Sometimes the roads lead away from ‘The Eternal City’ Andrea Ciccolini Editorial Intern

[Ed. note– The following piece, written by the Signal Tribune’s newest intern, Andrea Ciccolini, was only lightly edited, in an effort to preserve his “voice” and writing style, as he makes the transition into learning English.]

I could start writing this column with a classic: “My name is Andrea Ciccolini. I was born in Italy, in Rome, 26 years ago.” But starting in this way I should stop my narration right now to explain that my name, in Italy, is a male name, so I am not a girl. Actually this is an important detail in the narration of my new American life. Up ahead you will figure why. Anyway, I have already started talking about me and I have a lot of things to tell, therefore I don’t want to start again giving the same information in a different way. I’m sure you can forgive an Italian guy

thrown into California for this. Because I am exactly this: a Roman thrown in California. I’m graduated in Cultural Anthropology at “La Spienza” University of Rome. I love to observe human behavior in different environments; it’s a powerful way to open the mind, to learn about the others and to learn about ourselves. Cultural anthropology: great subject and great chance to never find a job. This is why after graduation I started working like journalist instead of anthropologist. It was a natural decision: I like writing, I like politics and economics, and I like to inform and to inquire. Journalism: great job and great chance to never be paid for your work. Anyway, I had to choose a career and I started writing for an Italian online magazine. It wasn’t my first job experience. When I was 20 years old, for two years, I taught gymnastics to a crazy swarm of kids. But writing news, that was my first experience in the job I

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have chosen for my life. I learned a lot. I started to have more responsibility. I started to contribute to other newspapers and online magazines. I’ve seen my first earned money, and I had my personal desk in an editorial office. “Wow! My life is moving, my life is going exactly where it must go. I’m not earning a lot of money now, but it’s fair. I need more experience, and I’m working hard to get it.” This was the first part of my thought. “Stop. Why I need money? Basically to have my own independent life and maybe a family, to travel and to buy movies and books. In this moment I have money to buy movies and books, I have money to travel sometimes, I have not enough money to get my own independent life, absolutely not enough. Keep saving money and working hard.” This was the second part of my thought. I remember that period, driving faster in the traffic of Rome with my little, damaged scooter to attend a conference, to interview someone or research something for an article. I started also to write a book. In that period my girlfriend helped me to don’t give up. I was tired but happy. I was building my own life. I was driving my scooter singing Bob Marley’s song: “Everything’s gonna be alright” when, in front of Fontana di Trevi, I received a call on my cellphone. I cannot forget that moment. I stopped to take the call from the job I hoped to obtain. I joined the editorial staff of one of the biggest radio networks of my country. Boom! I felt myself so close to have, finally, my independent life that

Cory Bilicko/Signal Tribune

The Signal Tribune’s newest intern, Andrea Ciccolini, in his first week on the “job”

I did more than my best to keep that job. Boom! After the first period of internship in the radio network my editor-in-chief was so satisfied of my job that he gave me more responsibility and an extension of the contract. I started to read some national news live. Next step: the long-period contract and one more zero on my salary amount. Boom! The owner of the radio network, who got every morning to the office with the helicopter, decided to lay off. Me the first victim. Finished. It was very hard to start again and

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almost impossible to find again a good work place. I send résumé everywhere and always the same answer: “You are the perfect candidate, but unfortunately, you know, there is the economic crisis. We can’t take you.” In Italy, companies prefer to use unpaid internship workers instead of more qualified paid workers just because it’s cheaper. Boom! Add to this situation: the love story with my girlfriend– finished. And more résumés and interviews everywhere and always the same answer: “You are the perfect candidate, but unfortunately, you know, there is the economic crisis, we can’t take you.” What to do now? Reaction is better than stagnation. In Italy is impossible to find a job. Political and economic situation is not moving to a solution. English is the language of the millennium and also the language spoken in most of my favorite movies. I need to improve my English and my work experience. I have some money saved. I need to shake up my life. I need to go to California. Los Angeles is calling me. Language school booked. Flight ticket in my hands. Passport and Visa bureaucracy tamed. Luggage ready. Adios to family and friends. The Alitalia fly take off. Expectations, thoughts and the images of movies and books in my mind. 13 hours flight. Landing in LAX. Boom! I’m in the U.S. I’m in California. I’m in Los Angeles. I’m shaking up my life. Why Los Angeles and not London, or Australia, or New York? Honestly I don’t know. When I decided to go in a foreign country to improve my English the map of California with a big red point on Los Angeles County appeared in front of my eyes. The first difference between the U.S. and Italy that affected me is my name. From the English school to the family who hosted me for the first month, everybody was sure that I was a girl. When they have seen me with mustache and goatee the surprise on their faces was eloquent. In the restaurants or cafeterias every servant writes different male versions of my name. I risked some trouble with my Visa. And a lot of time I must explain why I have a female name. The second difference between the U.S. and Italy is that Italy is in Europe. This fact implies a lot of smaller interesting differences. I have already spent two months in California, in this period I have had the chance to verify and analyze with my eyes stereotypes, urban legends and cultural habits about the New World. I can confirm one thing: this land, if it is a trouble moment, gives the feeling that always there is a hope. Maybe there is something in the water or in the air but here hopes don’t give up easily.


ST3427 - December 7_Layout 1 12/7/12 4:44 PM Page 9

Things to

DO…GIVE…EAT 2012 HOLIDAY IDEAS

DECEMBER 7, 2012

Salvation Army and Walmart teaming to collect winter necessities for less fortunate The Salvation Army will partner with Walmart Stores, Inc. on Saturday, Dec. 8 from 9am to 5pm to collect toys and winter coats for children in the Army’s “Fill the Truck” campaign at nearby Walmart stores, located at 7250 Carson Blvd. and 151 E. 5th St. in Long Beach. Capt. Erika Hernandez, the Army’s corps officer, will be coordinating the event. The Salvation Army’s annual holiday relief effort in the Long Beach community aims to assist 1,000 families with food, toys and winter coats for children through the Toy & Joy Center. One of the celebrities attending the event will be Team USA’s

Lashinda Demus, a track star born in Southern California. The 2012 Olympic silver medalist and American record-holder who is an alumna of Long Beach Wilson High School, where she ran and still holds the national high school record for the 300 hurdles– the only girl to break the 40 second barrier. She also competed in the 100meter hurdles, winning the CIF California State Meet in 2011, on the 4x100 relay championship team in 2011, as well as many of the sprint medley teams. In 1999 and again in 2011, Demus was named the national girls’ “High School Athlete of the Year” by Track and Field News. She is the Army’s

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Christmas chairperson/celebrity for 2012 and will be at the Walmart located at 7250 Carson Blvd. Those who will be shopping at either of those Walmart stores are asked to consider purchasing an extra toy or winter coat for a needy child this winter and help the Salvation Army to “Fill the Truck.”

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ST3427 - December 7_Layout 1 12/7/12 4:44 PM Page 10

10 SIGNAL TRIBUNE SATURDAY

DECEMBER 8

10 a.m. (HALL) Movie “A Christmas Wedding Tail” (2011, Comedy) Shawn Ardalan. Two dog owners owners fall in love and it’s up to the pets to perform a Christmas miracle. 10:30 a.m. (FOOD) Pioneer Woman The Drummonds count down to Christmas with meals, treats and munchies. 11 a.m. (GAC) On this Winter’s Night: Lady Antebellum Lady Antebellum performs a special holiday concert. 11:30 a.m. (FOOD) Giada at Home Giada and her family celebrate Christmas California-style with dinner on the beach. (LIFE) Movie “Will You Merry Me?” Noon (2008, Comedy/Drama) Tommy Lioutas. An engaged couple must meet the in-laws, as well as becoming immersed in the holidays. 1:30 p.m. (FAM) Movie “Fred Claus” (2007, Comedy) Paul Giamatti. Santa bails his criminal brother out of jail and brings him to the North Pole. 2 p.m. (HALL) Movie “The Christmas Heart” (2012, Drama) Teri Polo. A boy’s neighborhood bands together when he is hospitalized and in need of a transplant. (LIFE) Movie “An Accidental Christmas” (2007, Drama) Cynthia Gibb. Two children formulate a plan to bring their separated parents together over the holidays. (SOAP) Gilmore Girls Lorelai’s father collapses at the family party; sparks fly between Lorelai and Luke. 3 p.m. (HGTV) Sarah’s Holiday Party Get ready to decorate your tree and invite a gang over to celebrate the season. (TRAVEL) Most Christmasy Places in America The ultimate cross-America Christmas tour. 4 p.m. (FAM) Movie “The Santa Clause” (1994, Comedy) Tim Allen. When a father mistakenly kills Santa Claus, he is magically recruited to take his place. (HALL) Movie “Santa Jr.” (2002, Comedy) Nick Stabile. Santa’s adult son learns the spirit of Christmas when he takes over the family business. (LIFE) Movie “Undercover Christmas” (2003, Comedy/Drama) Jami Gertz. A FBI agent meets a free-spirited cocktail waitress when he is hired to protect her. (TRAVEL) Christmas Crazy We dash from coast-to-coast to find the most decked-out holiday homes and stores. 5 p.m. (TRAVEL) Christmas Crazier The ultimate guide to over-the-top Christmas attractions. 6 p.m. (FAM) Movie “The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause” (2007, Family) Tim Allen. Santa Claus prepares for a busy Christmas with his in-laws and the mischievous Jack Frost. (HALL) Movie “A Holiday Engagement” (2011, Comedy) Haylie Duff. A woman hires a man to come home and pretend to be her fiancé over the holidays. (LIFE) Movie “Holiday High School Reunion”

HolidayTV

(2012, Comedy) Harry Hamlin. A woman returns home for Christmas just in time her high school reunion. 8 p.m. (CBS) Frosty the Snowman Pursued by a greedy magician and rising temperatures, Frosty sets off for the North Pole. (FOOD) Guy’s Disney Holiday Guy Fieri explores the amazing holiday destination that is Disneyland. (HALL) Movie “Come Dance With Me” (2012, Romance) Andrew McCarthy. A financial executive learns to waltz, but falls in love with his dance instructor. (HGTV) White House Christmas Nostalgic look back at what makes 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. favorite place during holidays. (LIFE) Movie “Holly’s Holiday” (2012) Claire Coffee. A woman is knocked unconcious and when she awakens realizes a mannequin comes to life. (NBC) American Giving Awards Five deserving charitable organizations will be given money for their cause. 8:30 p.m. (CBS) Frosty Returns A little girl tries to keep Frosty from melting when a snow-removing spray is invented. 9 p.m. (CBS) The Flight Before Christmas A reindeer yearns to fly just like his dad, whom he believes is a member of Santa’s fleet. (EWTN) Solemn Mass of the Immaculate Conception From EWTN (FOOD) Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives Guy visits some local joints in North Pole, Alaska, which has an all-year Christmas feel. (NICK) How to Rock The members of Gravity 5 are locked in a mall the night before Christmas. (SYFY) Movie “‘12 Disasters of Christmas” (2012, Sci-Fi) Ed Quinn. On Christmas Eve, the star of Bethlehem portends natural disasters. 10 p.m. (HALL) Movie “It’s Christmas, Carol!” (2012, Fantasy) Carrie Fisher. A ruthless tycoon is visited by the ghost of her old boss to help her change her ways. (LIFE) Movie “Dear Santa” (2011, Drama) Amy Acker. A young woman finds a letter from a girl asking for a new wife for her dad. 11 p.m. (TBN) The Christmas Child A man finds himself disconnected from his family over the holidays. Midnight (FAM) Movie “Santa Baby” (2006, Comedy) Jenny McCarthy. Santa’s daughter, Mary Class, tries to makeover Christmas when her father gets sick. (FOOD) Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives Guy visits some local joints in North Pole, Alaska, which has an all-year Christmas feel. (HALL) Movie “The Night Before the Night Before Christmas” (2010, Family) Rick Roberts. Santa Claus loses his memory and his magical bag two days before Christmas.

SUNDAY

DECEMBER 9

10 a.m. (FAM) Movie “Snowglobe” (2007, Family) Lorraine Bracco. A mystical snow globe

transports Angela into an idyllic Christmas winter wonderland. (HALL) Movie “Once Upon a Christmas” (2000, Family) Kathy Ireland. Santa’s daughters must infuse a family with holiday spirit or lose Christmas forever. (NGEO) Evacuate Earth Imagine a future where the Earth’s destruction forces man to another hospitable planet. 11 a.m. (LIFE) Movie “Holiday High School Reunion” (2012, Comedy) Harry Hamlin. A woman returns home for Christmas just in time her high school reunion. (SOAP) Gilmore Girls Lorelai’s father collapses at the family party; sparks fly between Lorelai and Luke. (FAM) Movie “Santa Baby” (2006, ComNoon edy) Jenny McCarthy. Santa’s daughter, Mary Class, tries to makeover Christmas when her father gets sick. (HALL) Movie “Hitched for the Holidays” (Romance) Joey Lawrence. A man and woman agree to pose as each other’s significant other to their families. 12:30 p.m. (FOOD) Pioneer Woman Ree Drummond celebrates the holiday season on the ranch serving up her down-home classics. 1 p.m. (LIFE) Movie “A Nanny for Christmas” (2010, Comedy) Dean Cain. An advertising executive loses her job at a powerful firm just before the holidays. 2 p.m. (FOOD) Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives Guy visits some local joints in North Pole, Alaska, which has an all-year Christmas feel. (HALL) Movie “Come Dance With Me” (2012, Romance) Andrew McCarthy. A financial executive learns to waltz, but falls in love with his dance instructor. 3 p.m. (FOOD) Guy’s Disney Holiday Guy Fieri explores the amazing holiday destination that is Disneyland. (LIFE) Movie “The Road to Christmas” (2006, Comedy) Jennifer Grey. A storm that paralyses the Rocky Mountains leaves a bride’s wedding plans derailed. 4 p.m. (FAM) Movie “12 Dates of Christmas” (2011, Comedy) Amy Smart. A young woman relives the same first date on Christmas Eve over and over again. (HALL) Movie “The Case for Christmas” (2011, Comedy/Drama) Amanda Barker. A lawyer and recent widower takes Santa on as a client and lets love back into his life. 6 p.m. (FAM) Movie “Holiday in Handcuffs” (2007, Comedy) Melissa Joan Hart. A woman kidnaps a handsome guy to take home to her parents during the Christmas holidays. (HALL) Movie “A Princess for Christmas” (2011, Family) Katie McGrath. A young woman falls for a dashing prince when she visits England for Christmas. 7 p.m. (LIFE) Movie “Holly’s Holiday” (2012) Claire Coffee. A woman is knocked unconcious and when she awakens realizes a mannequin comes to life. 7:30 p.m. (NICK) SpongeBob SquarePants Plankton gets all of Bikini Bottom’s residents on Santa’s ‘naughty’ list. 8 p.m. (ABC) Disney’s Prep and Landing Elves

known as Prep & Landing prepare homes around the world for Santa’s arrival. (AMC) Movie “Miracle on 34th Street” (1947, Family) Maureen O’Hara. A Macy’s store Santa Claus causes furor when he claims to be the real Kris Kringle. (FAM) Movie “The Mistle-Tones” (2012, Musical) Tia Mowry-Hardict. A young singer creates her own musical Christmas group after losing a spot in another. (HALL) Movie “Help for the Holidays” (2012, Family) Summer Glau. A woman sets out to teach her employers what it means to be a family at Christmas time. (NICK) See Dad Run David is in charge of making Christmas a success for the family. 8:30 p.m. (ABC) Prep and Landing 2: Naughty vs. Nice Wayne and his estranged brother, Lanny, race to recover classified North Pole technology. 9 p.m. (ABC) Movie “Christmas With Holly” (2012, Drama) Sean Faris. A young girl asks for a mother for Christmas following the death of her mother. (LIFE) Movie “All About Christmas Eve” (2012) Haylie Duff. A party planner needs to choose between a vacation and a huge event. 10 p.m. (FAM) Movie “The Mistle-Tones” (2012, Musical) Tia Mowry-Hardict. A young singer creates her own musical Christmas group after losing a spot in another. (HALL) Movie “Matchmaker Santa” (2012, Romance) Lacey Chabert. A mysterious Santa strands a baker and her boyfriend’s best friend in a small town. (TBN) Movie “Mary and Joseph: A Story of Faith” (1979, Religious) Blanche Baker. Examine the courtship of Mary and Joseph and their early life before Jesus was born. 10:15 p.m. (AMC) Movie “Miracle on 34th Street” (1947, Family) Maureen O’Hara. A Macy’s store Santa Claus causes furor when he claims to be the real Kris Kringle. 10:30 p.m. (TVLAND) Everybody Loves Raymond A Christmas letter written by Marie and Debra causes problems among the Barones. Midnight (HALL) Movie “The Three Gifts” (2009, Drama) Dean Cain. A couple houses three orphan boys over the holidays as their orphanage gets renovated. (TOON) Robot Chicken Santa nearly misses Christmas; GI Joe has a very special Christmas.

MONDAY

DECEMBER 10

(FOOD) Paula’s Best Dishes Amy and Noon Suzette cook up a delicious Christmas meal with Paula. (HALL) Movie “The Santa Suit” (2010, Comedy) Kevin Sorbo. The president of a marketing firm is turned into a Santa lookalike. 2 p.m. (HALL) Movie “Matchmaker Santa” (2012, Romance) Lacey Chabert. A mysterious Santa strands a baker and her boyfriend’s best friend in a small town. 3 p.m. (FOOD) Giada at Home Giada and her

DECEMBER 7, 2012

family celebrate Christmas California-style with dinner on the beach. 4 p.m. (HALL) Movie “The Santa Incident” (2010, Family) James Cosmo. Santa is marooned in a small town when his sleigh is mistaken for a UFO. (LIFE) Movie “Noël” (2004, Drama) Alan Arkin. Five New Yorkers come together on Christmas Eve, waiting for a miracle. 5 p.m. (FAM) A Miser Brothers Christmas It’s up to brothers Heat Miser and Snow Miser to come together and help save Christmas. 6 p.m. (FAM) Jack Frost Jack Frost wants to leave his North Pole existence and become human. (HALL) The Hollywood Christmas Parade Movie and TV stars, bands, floats and Santa Claus make their way down Hollywood Blvd. (LIFE) Movie “The Christmas Hope” (2009, Drama) Madeleine Stowe. A social worker, whose marriage is shaky, takes in a five-yearold over the holidays. 7 p.m. (FAM) Frosty’s Winter Wonderland The children build Frosty a companion out of snow after noticing how sad he has become. 7:30 p.m. (FAM) Mickey’s Christmas Carol The three ghosts of Christmas visit Scrooge McDuck to teach him the spirit of the holiday. 8 p.m. (ABC) Extreme Makeover: Home Edition The Friday family have fostered over 30 children and adopted five. (AMC) Movie “Miracle on 34th Street” (1947, Family) Maureen O’Hara. A Macy’s store Santa Claus causes furor when he claims to be the real Kris Kringle. (CW) 90210 The friends prepare for a Christmas party at The Offshore. (FAM) The Year Without a Santa Claus Santa decides to take time off because he feels people have lost the spirit of Christmas. (HALL) Movie “Moonlight and Mistletoe” (2008, Drama) Tom Arnold. A woman must return to her hometown of Santaville to help her father. 9 p.m. (ABC) Extreme Makeover: Home Edition The Friday family have fostered over 30 children and adopted five. (FAM) Movie “Home Alone” (1990, Comedy) Macaulay Culkin. A young boy must fend off burglars after his family accidentally leaves him home alone. 10 p.m. (HALL) Movie “Twice Upon a Christmas” (2001, Family) John Dye. Santa’s daughter, Kristin Claus, has lost her memory and does not know who her father is. (LIFE) Movie “Christmas Angel” (2009, Comedy) K.C. Clyde. A woman in need of work takes a job helping people in distress. (NBC) Michael Bublé: Home for the Holidays Michael Bublé performs classic holiday music with the help of Carly Rae Jepsen and others. 10:15 p.m. (AMC) Movie “Miracle on 34th Street” (1947, Family) Maureen O’Hara. A Macy’s store Santa Claus causes furor when he claims to be the real Kris Kringle. Midnight (HALL) Movie “Mistletoe Over Manhattan” (2011, Family) Tricia Helfer. When Santa considers retirement, Mrs. Claus tries to prove that his work still brings joy.


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DECEMBER 7, 2012 TUESDAY DECEMBER 11

(HALL) Movie “Love’s Christmas JourNoon ney” (2011, Romance) Ellie Davis. A woman’s brother goes missing while she’s visiting him during the Christmas holiday. 1 p.m. (HGTV) Sarah’s Holiday Party Get ready to decorate your tree and invite a gang over to celebrate the season. 1:30 p.m. (FOOD) Ten Dollar Dinners Melissa helps herself to delicious savings with this wallet-friendly holiday menu. 2 p.m. (HALL) Movie “Love’s Christmas Journey” (2011, Romance) Ellie Davis. A woman’s brother goes missing while she’s visiting him during the Christmas holiday. 2:30 p.m. (FOOD) 30 Minute Meals Learn to make apple-scented fondue and potted pork tenderloin with sweet onions and apple. 4 p.m. (HALL) Movie “Lucky Christmas” (2011, Drama) Elizabeth Berkley. A woman’s car is stolen with a winning lottery ticket inside, and the thief falls for her. 5 p.m. (FAM) Movie “Home Alone” (1990, Comedy) Macaulay Culkin. A young boy must fend off burglars after his family accidentally leaves him home alone. 6 p.m. (HALL) Movie “Hitched for the Holidays” (Romance) Joey Lawrence. A man and woman agree to pose as each other’s significant other to their families. 7 p.m. (FAM) Movie “The Santa Clause” (1994, Comedy) Tim Allen. When a father mistakenly kills Santa Claus, he is magically recruited to take his place. 8 p.m. (ABC) Santa Claus Is Comin’ to Town Kris Kringle overcomes an evil ruler and delivers toys to children all over the world. (AMC) Movie “Miracle on 34th Street” (1947, Family) Maureen O’Hara. A Macy’s store Santa Claus causes furor when he claims to be the real Kris Kringle. (CW) Hart of Dixie Zoe busies herself with a patient, but potentially ruins Christmas Eve for the whole town. (FOX) Raising Hope Virginia is convinced that the world is going to end on December 21, 2012. (HALL) Movie “Come Dance With Me” (2012, Romance) Andrew McCarthy. A financial executive learns to waltz, but falls in love with his dance instructor. 9 p.m. (CW) A Muppets Christmas: Letters to Santa The Muppet gang tries to get lost Christmas letters to Santa in time for the big day. (FAM) Movie “The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause” (2007, Family) Tim Allen. Santa Claus prepares for a busy Christmas with his in-laws and the mischievous Jack Frost. (FOX) New Girl The gang attempts to juggle multiple holiday parties in one night. 9:30 p.m. (FOX) The Mindy Project Mindy’s eager for her coworkers to meet her new boyfriend at her Christmas party.

HolidayTV

10 p.m. (HALL) Movie “All I Want for Christmas” (2007, Drama) Gail O’Grady. A nineyear-old boy enters a contest to find a new husband for his mother. 10:15 p.m. (AMC) Movie “Miracle on 34th Street” (1947, Family) Maureen O’Hara. A Macy’s store Santa Claus causes furor when he claims to be the real Kris Kringle. Midnight (FAM) Movie “Holiday in Handcuffs” (2007, Comedy) Melissa Joan Hart. A woman kidnaps a handsome guy to take home to her parents during the Christmas holidays. (HALL) Movie “Lucky Christmas” (2011, Drama) Elizabeth Berkley. A woman’s car is stolen with a winning lottery ticket inside, and the thief falls for her.

WEDNESDAY

DECEMBER 12

10 a.m. (FOOD) 5 Ingredient Fix Spectacular recipes that are sure to wow guests at this year’s holiday dinner. (GAC) Paula’s Home Cooking After a special charity auction, Mr. & Mrs. Claus makes a guest appearance. (HALL) Movie “Hitched for the HoliNoon days” (Romance) Joey Lawrence. A man and woman agree to pose as each other’s significant other to their families. 1 p.m. (HGTV) White House Christmas Nostalgic look back at what makes 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. favorite place during holidays. 2 p.m. (GAC) On this Winter’s Night: Lady Antebellum Lady Antebellum performs a special holiday concert. (HALL) Movie “Thomas Kinkade’s Home for Christmas” (2008, Drama) Jared Padalecki. A look at the inspiration behind Thomas Kinkade’s painting The Christmas Cottage. 4 p.m. (HALL) Movie “A Christmas Song” (2012, Family) Natasha Henstridge. The fate of two music teachers is to be decided in a city-wide Christmas carol contest. (LIFE) Movie “The Christmas Blessing” (2005, Drama) Neil Patrick Harris. A man meets a young woman and little boy who are in need of miracles for the holidays. 4:30 p.m. (CMT) Roseanne Christmastime brings Darlene a surprise visit from Bev and DJ; Becky gets a demeaning job. 5 p.m. (FAM) Movie “The Santa Clause” (1994, Comedy) Tim Allen. When a father mistakenly kills Santa Claus, he is magically recruited to take his place. 5:30 p.m. (CMT) Roseanne Roseanne gets a job playing Santa Claus at the local department store. 6 p.m. (HALL) Movie “The Wishing Tree” (2012, Family) Jason Gedrick. A professor brings students together through a Christmas tree decorated with wishes. (LIFE) Movie “Christmas on Chestnut Street” (2006, Comedy/Drama) Kristen Dalton. When a store mistakenly orders 60,000 Christmas lights, they promote a decorating contest. 6:45 p.m. (TCM) Movie “Remember the Night” (1940, Romance) Barbara Stanwyck. A

shoplifter’s life is changed when she is placed in a compassionate lawyer’s care. 7 p.m. (FAM) Movie “The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause” (2007, Family) Tim Allen. Santa Claus prepares for a busy Christmas with his in-laws and the mischievous Jack Frost. 8 p.m. (AMC) Movie “Miracle on 34th Street” (1947, Family) Maureen O’Hara. A Macy’s store Santa Claus causes furor when he claims to be the real Kris Kringle. (CW) Arrow Determined to make up for lost time, Oliver decides to throw the family a Christmas party. (HALL) Movie “The Christmas Heart” (2012, Drama) Teri Polo. A boy’s neighborhood bands together when he is hospitalized and in need of a transplant. (LIFE) Movie “The Perfect Holiday” (2007, Comedy) Morris Chestnut. A department store Santa helps a young girl find her mother a new husband. 9 p.m. (FAM) Movie “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” (1989, Comedy) Chevy Chase. A man plays host to numerous dysfunctional relatives during the Christmas holidays. 10 p.m. (HALL) Movie “The Christmas Card” (2006, Drama) Edward Asner. Moved by an anonymous Christmas card, Captain Cody Cullen searches for the card’s sender. (LIFE) Movie “Nothing Like the Holidays” (2008, Comedy/Drama) Alfred Molina. A Puerto Rican family spends a Christmas together, facing the fact it may be their last. 10:15 p.m. (AMC) Movie “Miracle on 34th Street” (1947, Family) Maureen O’Hara. A Macy’s store Santa Claus causes furor when he claims to be the real Kris Kringle. Midnight (FAM) Movie “Christmas Do-Over” (2006, Family) Jay Mohr. A man is forced to relive one terrible Christmas with his ex-wife over and over again.

THURSDAY

DECEMBER 13

10 a.m. (GAC) Dear Food Network All stars from the food network indulge in their favorite holiday desserts. 11:30 a.m. (AMC) Movie “All I Want for Christmas” (1991, Comedy/Drama) Jamey Sheridan. A divorced couple’s two children scheme to get them back together for Christmas. (HALL) Movie “The Wishing Tree” Noon (2012, Family) Jason Gedrick. A professor brings students together through a Christmas tree decorated with wishes. 1 p.m. (FOOD) Semi-Homemade With Sandra Lee Sandra and her sister make a holiday meal starting with macadamia nut-crusted goat cheese. 1:30 p.m. (AMC) Movie “Christmas in Connecticut” (1945, Comedy/Drama) Barbara Stanwyck. A promotional stunt threatens to expose a columnist’s fictitious housekeeping skills. 2 p.m. (HALL) Movie “Cancel Christmas”

(2010, Family) Judd Nelson. Santa must teach two incorrigible children the importance of charity. 4 p.m. (HALL) Movie “A Carol Christmas” (2003, Drama) Tori Spelling. An egomaniacal TV talk show host is given a chance at redemption on Christmas Eve. 5 p.m. (FAM) Movie “The Mistle-Tones” (2012, Musical) Tia Mowry-Hardict. A young singer creates her own musical Christmas group after losing a spot in another. 7 p.m. (FAM) Movie “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” (1989, Comedy) Chevy Chase. A man plays host to numerous dysfunctional relatives during the Christmas holidays. 8 p.m. (AMC) Movie “Miracle on 34th Street” (1947, Family) Maureen O’Hara. A Macy’s store Santa Claus causes furor when he claims to be the real Kris Kringle. (FX) Movie “Deck the Halls” (2005, Family) Gabrielle Carteris. An eight year-old boy begins to think his neighbor may be Santa Claus. (HALL) Movie “Help for the Holidays” (2012, Family) Summer Glau. A woman sets out to teach her employers what it means to be a family at Christmas time. (NBC) Christmas at the White House 9 p.m. (FAM) Movie “The Polar Express” (2004, Animated) Voices of Tom Hanks. A doubting, little boy boards a magical train to visit the North Pole on Christmas Eve. (FOX) Glee Sam and Brittany live their lives to the fullest before the Mayan Apocalypse occurs. (LIFE) Project Runway: All Stars The remaining designers head to the Christmas decor emporium. 10 p.m. (HALL) Movie “The Town Christmas Forgot” (2010, Family) Lauren Holly. An upscale, urban family gets stranded in a remote lumber town two days before Christmas. 10:15 p.m. (AMC) Movie “Miracle on 34th Street” (1947, Family) Maureen O’Hara. A Macy’s store Santa Claus causes furor when he claims to be the real Kris Kringle. Midnight (FAM) Movie “Christmas Every Day” (1996, Drama) Robert Hays. A 13-year-old must relive Christmas Day until he learns the true meaning of Christmas.

FRIDAY

DECEMBER 14

10 a.m. (GAC) Paula’s Party Recipes include: Christmas ham; eggnog custard pie. 2 p.m. (FX) Movie “Deck the Halls” (2005, Family) Gabrielle Carteris. An eight year-old boy begins to think his neighbor may be Santa Claus. (HALL) Movie “When Angels Come to Town” (2004, Family) Peter Falk. An angel comes to Earth at Christmas to help two very different families in need. 4 p.m. (CMT) Roseanne Roseanne gets a job playing Santa Claus at the local department store.

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

11

5 p.m. (CMT) Roseanne Christmastime brings Darlene a surprise visit from Bev and DJ; Becky gets a demeaning job. (FAM) Movie “The Polar Express” (2004, Animated) Voices of Tom Hanks. A doubting, little boy boards a magical train to visit the North Pole on Christmas Eve. 6 p.m. (HALL) Movie “Matchmaker Santa” (2012, Romance) Lacey Chabert. A mysterious Santa strands a baker and her boyfriend’s best friend in a small town. (LIFE) Movie “Under the Mistletoe” (2006, Family) Michael Shanks. A local radio station takes over Susan’s love life after an innocent call from her son. 7 p.m. (AMC) Movie “White Christmas” (1954, Musical) Bing Crosby. Entertainers stage a musical show to save their commanding officer’s inn and find romance. (FAM) The Year Without a Santa Claus Santa decides to take time off because he feels people have lost the spirit of Christmas. 8 p.m. (CBS) Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer A young reindeer and an elf search for a home where they will be accepted as they are. (CW) Movie “Prancer Returns” (2001, Family) John Corbett. A boy’s care and concern for an orphaned reindeer brings his town and family together. (FAM) Santa Claus Is Comin’ to Town Kris Kringle overcomes an evil ruler and delivers toys to children all over the world. (FOOD) Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives Guy visits some local joints in North Pole, Alaska, which has an all-year Christmas feel. (HALL) Movie “Eloise at Christmastime” (2003, Family) Sofia Vassilieva. It’s Christmastime and Eloise gets mixed up with wedding plans at the Plaza Hotel. (LIFE) Movie “Holly’s Holiday” (2012) Claire Coffee. A woman is knocked unconcious and when she awakens realizes a mannequin comes to life. 9 p.m. (CBS) Yes, Virginia The heart-warming tale of a little girl who wants to know if Santa Claus really exists. (NBC) Blake Shelton’s Not-So-Family Christmas Blake Shelton’s first Christmas special includes holiday classics, new music and more. 9:30 p.m. (CBS) The Elf on the Shelf: An Elf’s Story Scout elves help Santa Claus determine who to put on the ‘naughty’ and ‘nice’ lists. 9:45 p.m. (AMC) Movie “White Christmas” (1954, Musical) Bing Crosby. Entertainers stage a musical show to save their commanding officer’s inn and find romance. Midnight (EWTN) The Footprints of God Follow Mary on her extraordinary journey. (FAM) Movie “The Christmas List” (1997, Comedy) Mimi Rogers. A woman’s Christmas wishes come true, but they all have a slight twist to them. (HALL) Movie “The Dog Who Saved Christmas” (2009, Comedy) Mario Lopez. A guard dog reaches his full potential when his house is broken into during the holidays.


ST3427 - December 7_Layout 1 12/7/12 4:44 PM Page 12

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The Long Beach Chorale and Chamber Orchestra will present a Baroque celebration of the season with music that tells the story of three composers in competition for the same job in Leipzig, Germany, in 1722. Their performance of Bach’s Magnificat will be Saturday, Dec. 15 at 7pm and Sunday, Dec. 16 at 3pm at Grace First Presbyterian Church, 3955 Studebaker Rd. The musical groups will also perform music by 18th Century composers Georg Philipp Telemann and Christoph Graupner. The music underscores a critical juncture in music history, when all three

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composers were in competition for the same job. Even in today’s job market, it’s hard to imagine that Bach would have had trouble getting any musical position he wanted– but when he applied to be the music director for the churches of Leipzig, Germany, in 1722, he wasn’t the man the town council had in mind. His hiring in April 1723 was a last resort after several preferred candidates had proven unavailable and caused a council member to utter the now-famous words, “since the best could not be gotten, one must make do with the mediocre.”

Joined by a full orchestra and a quintet of soloists, the Chorale will perform works by the composers the town council considered the “best” and will culminate with the 1723 Magnificat by the “mediocre” applicant now generally known as the greatest musical mind in history. The Chorale’s 70-plus voices will be led by artistic director Eliza Rubenstein. A reception will follow each performance. For tickets, which are $25 for adults and $15 for students, visit longbeachchorale.org or call (562) 427-1931.


ST3427 - December 7_Layout 1 12/7/12 4:44 PM Page 13

DECEMBER 7, 2012

THINGS TO DO...GIVE...EAT

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

13

North Long Beach Community Christmas Wrigley neighborhood preparing for 59th Daisy Avenue parade Seventh District Councilmember neighbors are coming together in will take place. The lighting cereParty a ‘down-home’ holiday tradition James Johnson and The Daisy order to continue its tradition of mony, caroling and live entertainAvenue Parade and Program Committee will present the 59th annual Daisy Avenue Parade on Saturday, Dec. 8 at 5pm. “The Daisy Avenue Parade is special in that it is the only holiday parade that runs down a residential street and not a commercial corridor,” Johnson said. “This year,

bringing outstanding entertainment to the Wrigley area and to Long Beach.” The parade runs along Daisy Avenue between Burnett Street and Pacific Coast Highway. On the day before, the area’s annual community tree-lighting ceremony and home-decorating contest

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Every holiday season for a little more than a decade, Dan Pressburg, a north Long Beach community “advocate,” has opened up his turn-of-thecentury home, known as the Historic Long Beach Dairy and Creamery, to local dignitaries and community leaders. This year, the 11th annual North Long Beach Community Christmas Party took place last Sunday, Dec. 2 and was attended by about 100 people. The event included a “white elephant” game for an ornament swap and an appearance by Santa. Those who attended brought their favorite dishes as well. Pressburg said he started the holiday tradition nearly 15 years ago with just a small group of less than a dozen people as a way to promote the neighborhood that otherwise has carried with it negative connotations. He said north Long Beach has since developed into one of the best places to live in the city. “[The Christmas party] started out, as with all things over here, for recognition of this area and the community, because north Long Beach, traditionally, has gotten kind of a bad rap one way or another,” he said. “For years, we’ve continually been trying to raise property values and promote this area … the nice thing about this area now is property values are going up and houses are turning over, which is really good, and young families are moving in … This is one of the best spots in town.” Pressburg, who has a degree in history, bought the home, located at 167 E. South St., in 1984 for $99,900 and eventually discovered that it was once the house for dairy men that ran the Long Beach Dairy Creamery in 1911 until the outfit was moved downtown. The home, which was first

built in 1903, was officially designated as a Long Beach city landmark in 1994, Pressburg said, adding that he organizes open houses about twice a year. Although political flare-ups have occurred at times, the holiday gatherings have traditionally given the public a chance to meet with candidates during election years, existing elected officials an opportunity to meet with each other and constituents, and neighbors an occasion to meet each other, all in a comfortable setting, Pressburg said. “This is down-home community … that’s all this is,” he said. Jeff Kellogg, current Long Beach City College Trustee and former 8th District Long Beach City Councilmember who has known Pressburg personally since the 1980s, said he tries to make it to the party every year as a way to stay connected with the community. He said his term isn’t over until about two years, so his attendance wasn’t part of a campaign effort. “It’s always nice for me, whether it’s the holidays or not, to come here and see lots of friends,” Kellogg said. “I show up because I want to show up, not because I have to show up.” Ninth District Long Beach City Councilmember Steven Neal, who stopped by after giving a sermon as a pastor on Sunday, said the event is an example of “community building” and getting the public more “engaged,” objectives on which his own council office is focused. “This really is a community event,” he said. “Dan opens up his home to community leaders to give them a chance to come around and get to know each other in a setting where people can let their guards down… when relationships are formed around that, it makes it easier to do the kind of work that needs to take place in transforming the community.”

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North Long Beach community advocate Dan Pressburg and Jeff Kellogg, current Long Beach City College Trustee and former 8th District Long Beach City Councilmember, show some holiday spirit during the 11th Annual North Long Beach Community Christmas Party last Sunday, Dec. 2.

ment will begin at 7pm. Judging for the contest will immediately follow. Attendees are asked to show their appreciation for the entertainment by bringing a contribution for the Long Beach community food drive. Visit longbeach.gov/district7 for up-to-date information or call Johnson’s office at (562) 570-7777.

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ST3427 - December 7_Layout 1 12/7/12 4:44 PM Page 14

NEWS

14 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

DECEMBER 7, 2012

Council

continued from page 1

ing seven-percent interest to the County, Farfsing added, explaining that the final amount due back to the City could be as much as $250,000. The city manager acknowledged that it’s still unclear how the County will pay the monies it owes. He described how the County could pay it all back in a lump sum or over time, but another option would be to adjust the property-tax payments that will be coming up in the next year. Farfsing told the Council that the legal costs associated only totaled about $3,000. “It’s sometimes, you know, difficult to come to you with a recommendation that we join these lawsuits,” Farfsing said, acknowledging that at times people “don’t see the value in them.” He acknowledged the efforts to follow through with the suits. “And this one went all the way to the California Supreme Court,” Farfsing concluded. “So I think it’s basically a victory for the cities.” Councilmember Larry Forester

Mayor Tina Hansen recognized Soroptimist International of Long Beach as Valued Volunteer Organization of the Year. Maggie Shapiro accepts the certificate on behalf of the organization at Tuesday’s Council meeting.

agreed with Farfsing Tuesday night as he thanked the staff. “People, I know, comment and sometimes criticize us for getting involved in lawsuits,” Forester said at Tuesday’s Council. “But I don’t think we ever do one [without] a powerfully good reason to benefit the city. And this really did benefit

Photos by CJ Dablo/Signal Tribune

Christian Dizon-Thomas receives from Mayor Tina Hansen a certificate that recognizes him as Youth Volunteer of the Year at Tuesday’s Council meeting.

CITY OF SIGNAL HILL TST4234 NoTICE oF oRDINANCE ADoPTIoN

Ordinance No. 2012-11-1452 was introduced at the city council meeting of November 20, 2012, and adopted by the City Council at their meeting of Tuesday, December 4, 2012. A summary of the ordinance is as follows:

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AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL, CALIFORNIA, APPROVING ZONING ORDINANCE AMENDMENT 12-03 REVISING THE OFFICIAL ZONING MAP BY CHANGING THE ZONING DESIGNATION FOR 1917 E. 21ST STREET FROM “RLM-1”, RESIDENTIAL LOW/MEDIUM-1 TO “OS”, OPEN SPACE AND LISTING “PUBLICLY MANAGED COMMUNITY GARDENS” AS A PERMITTED USE IN THE “OS”, OPEN SPACE ZONING DISTRICT The ordinance was adopted by the following vote:

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AYES: Mayor Tina L. Hansen, Vice Mayor Michael J. Noll, Council Members Larry Forester, Ellen Ward, Edward H.J. Wilson NOES: None

ABSENT: None

ABSTAIN: None

Pursuant to Signal Hill City Charter Section 315, this ordinance shall become effective 30 days from and after the date of its adoption. A certified copy of the full text of the ordinance is available in the City Clerk’s Office. Kathleen L. Pacheco City Clerk

Published in the Signal-Tribune newspaper on December 7, 2012. Posted at City Hall, Library, Discovery Well Park, and Reservoir Park on December 7, 2012.

the city. And as much as I love the County and I love our Supervisor, it was totally unnecessary, and the courts said illegal, for them to do what they did.” Other City Council highlights

Taxpayers’ Right to Know and Vote Resident Carol Churchill announced to the Council that the local community organization called Signal Hill Community First had gathered enough signatures for the charter amendment petition called “Taxpayers’ Right to Know and Vote” to file with the City Clerk. She urged the councilmembers to sign the petition as individuals.

Community volunteers Mayor Tina Hansen recognized the following people and organizations for their volunteer work this year: Christian Dizon-Thomas (Youth Volunteer of the Year); Soroptimist International of Long Beach (Valued Volunteer Organization of the Year); Chad Brainard and Gil Griego (Community Volunteers of the Year); and Charles Feder of Rossmoor Pastries (Business Sponsor of the Year).

Fourth Quarter Sustainability Award Mayor Tina Hansen announced that Jessie Elwin Nelson Academy won the Fourth Quarter Sustainability Award. Principal Sparkle Peterson accepted the award on behalf of the academy.

Community garden In a secondreading vote, the Council voted unanimously to approve a zoningordinance amendment that essentially approves property located at 1917 E. 21st Street to be open space and allowed to be used for a community garden. The property is located next to Signal Hill Park. Sobriety-checkpoint grant funding The Council unanimously voted to authorize Police Chief Michael Langston to accept a grant in the amount of $35,987 through the University of California-OTS Sobriety Checkpoint Grant Program.

The next Signal Hill City Council meeting will take place on Tuesday, Dec. 18 at 7pm in the Council Chamber.

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DECEMBER 7, 2012

How the Airport’s WPA mosaics were saved

While she was working on her second book on Long Beach history in 2009, 5th District Councilmember Gerrie Schipske discovered that buried underneath the carpet at the Long Beach Airport were a series of floor mosaics that were designed as part of the Southern California Art Project of the Works Project Administration (WPA) under the supervision of Grace Clements (19051969). Clements had been designated official supervisor of decorations of the Administration buildings at Daughterty Field. “Some of the mosaics were visible on the staircase and the restaurant, but the remainder had been covered over by carpet,” Schipske said. “Unfortunately, the wall murals that accompanied the floor designs were painted over in 2005 and could not be recovered.” After Long Beach hired Mario Rodriguez as the new airport director in February 2009, Schipske met with him and shared what she had discovered. She encouraged him to have the carpet removed to see if the mosaics could be recovered. ���Mario Rodriguez was very enthusiastic, and, when improvements were planned for the terminal, he included the removal of the carpet to see if the mosaics could be saved,” Schipske said. “And they have been. Just [last] month the restoration project was completed, and mosaics are available for viewing.” The mosaics cover the 4,300square-foot first floor of the airport. A 1942 article in the California Arts and Architecture magazine describes how Clements focused on the theme of communication, according to Schipske. She said the article describes it as such: “a large map of the western hemisphere showing air routes occupies the central portion of the concourse floor. Large geometric areas of unbroken color form the main body of the floor, highlighted by design units evolved from the idea of communication– ships, oil, aviation and the telephone.” Clements also painted four murals on the first floor level dealing with a “particular means of communications– by land, by water, by air and by sound.” “If you look on the second floor, murals included sky and constellations of the northern hemisphere,” Schipske said. “A zodiac mosaic is outside the entrances of the restaurant. The colors in the murals were specifically designed to mute the strong light

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PUBLIC NOTICES

TST4242 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.S. No. 12-20435-SP-CA YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 12/14/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, (cashier's check(s) must be made payable to National Default Servicing Corporation), drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state; will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made in an "as is" condition, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: GLENN BARR, A SINGLE MAN AND DORIS TURNER, A SINGLE WOMAN AS JOINT TENANTS Duly Appointed Trustee: NATIONAL DEFAULT SERVICING CORPORATION Recorded 12/20/2006 as Instrument No. 06 2833260 (or Book, Page) of the Official Records of LOS ANGELES County, California. Date of Sale: 12/20/2012 at 11:00 a.m. Place of Sale: By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 Estimated amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $526,492.94 Street Address or other common designation of real property: 1940 CHERRY AVENUE, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 A.P.N.: 7216-014-056 The undersigned Trustee disclaims

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www.kathyalford.com any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The undersigned mortgagee, beneficiary or authorized agent for the mortgagee or beneficiary pursuant to California Civil Code Section 2923.5(b) declares that the mortgagee, beneficiary or the mortgagee's or beneficiary's authorized agent has either contacted the borrower or tried with due diligence to contact the borrower as required by California Civil Code 2923.5. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-730-2727 or visit this Internet Web site

CITY OF SIGNAL HILL TST4253 NoTICE oF PUBlIC HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Tuesday, December 18, 2012, the City Council of the City of Signal Hill will conduct a public hearing at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chamber located at City Hall, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California to consider the following: A RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING ABATEMENT

A RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING ABATEMENT OF NUISANCES INCLUDING REMOVAL OF TRASH, DEBRIS AND EXCESSIVE WEEDS ON A RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY AT 1949 ORIZABA IN THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL. A NOTICE OF VIOLATION OF A FINAL NOTICE AND ORDER WAS RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE LOS ANGELES COUNTY REGISTRAR-RECORDER ON NOVEMBER 20, 2012 Applicant: City of Signal Hill THE PROJECT IS CATEGORICALLY EXEMPT from the requirements of the California Environmental Quality Act pursuant to Section 15304, Minor Alterations to Land of the Guidelines for implementation of the California Environmental Quality Act. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS are hereby invited to attend the public hearings to present written information, express their opinions or otherwise present evidence on the above matter, or to submit written comments, prior to the meeting. If you wish to legally challenge any action taken by the City on the above matter, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearings described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City prior to or at the public hearings. FURTHER INFORMATION on this item may be obtained at the City of Signal Hill Community Development Department located at 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, or by emailing Colleen Doan, Associate Planner at cdoan@cityofsignalhill.org or calling at (562) 989-7344. Published in the Signal Tribune newspaper: December 7, 2012 Posted in accordance with S.H.M.C. Section 1.08.010: December 7, 2012 Mailed by certified mail to responsible parties on or before: December 7, 2012 Posted at the subject site on or before: December 7, 2012

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www.ndscorp.com/sales, using the file number assigned to this case 12-20435-SP-CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: 11/29/2012 NATIONAL DEFAULT SERVICING CORPORATION 7720 N. 16th Street, Suite 300 Phoenix, AZ 85020 phone 602-264-6101 Sales Line 714-7302727; Sales Website: www.ndscorp.com/sales Nichole Alford, TRUSTEE SALES REPRESENTATIVE A-4331707 11/30/2012, 12/07/2012, 12/14/2012 TST4240 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 12-0025680 Doc ID #000222633962005N Title Order No. 12-0043327 Investor/Insurer No. 091836478 APN No. 7216-020-107 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 02/22/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by MARK D. BENEDICT, A SINGLE MAN, dated 02/22/2007 and recorded 2/28/2007, as Instrument No. 20070433089, in Book , Page , of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, will sell on 12/27/2012 at 9:00AM, Doubletree Hotel Los Angeles-Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650, Vineyard Ballroom at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2600 EAST 20TH STREET #302A, SIGNAL HILL, CA, 90755. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $317,124.54. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. If required by the provisions of section 2923.5 of the California Civil Code, the declaration from the mortgagee, beneficiary or authorized agent is attached to the duly recorded with the appropriate County Recorder's Office. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on a property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 1-800-281-8219 or visit this Internet Web site www.recontrustco.com, using the file number assigned to this case NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 12-0025680. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 By: Trustee's Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. A-4332273 11/30/2012, 12/07/2012, 12/14/2012

TST4249 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE Trustee Sale No. : 20120159902722 Title Order No.: 120291415 FHA/VA/PMI No.: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 09/19/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NDEX WEST, LLC, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 10/03/2005 as Instrument No. 05 2376831 of official records in the office of the County Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, State of CALIFORNIA. EXECUTED BY: JOHN DEATHERAGE, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). DATE OF SALE: 12/27/2012 TIME OF SALE: 11:00 AM PLACE OF SALE: BY THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED AT 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, POMONA, CA 91766. STREET ADDRESS and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2599 WALNUT AVE #215, SIGNAL HILL, CALIFORNIA 90755 APN#: 7211-026-106 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the

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note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $296,992.17. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder 's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-730-2727 for information regarding the trustee's sale or visit this Internet Web site www.lpsasap.com for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case 20120159902722. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: AGENCY SALES and POSTING 2 3210 EL CAMINO REAL, SUITE 200 IRVINE, CA 92602 714-730-2727 www.lpsasap.com NDEx West, L.L.C. MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NDEx West, L.L.C. as Trustee Dated: 11/29/2012 NDEx West, L.L.C. 15000 Surveyor Boulevard, Suite 500 Addison, Texas 75001-9013 Telephone: (866) 795-1852 Telecopier: (972) 661-7800 A-4331891 12/07/2012, 12/14/2012, 12/21/2012

TST4237 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 11-0104138 Doc ID #0001677052902005N Title Order No. 11-0086389 Investor/Insurer No. 167705290 APN No. 7215-028-032 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 05/16/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by JOSE ANTONIO GUITRON, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE and SEPARATE PROPERTY, dated 05/16/2007 and recorded 5/25/2007, as Instrument No. 20071274638, in Book , Page , of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, will sell on 12/17/2012 at 11:00AM, By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2109 OHIO AVENUE, SIGNAL HILL, CA, 90755. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $1,115,455.20. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. If required by the provisions of section 2923.5 of the California Civil Code, the declaration from the mortgagee, beneficiary or authorized agent is attached to the duly recorded with the appropriate County Recorder's Office. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on a property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been post-

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poned, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 1-800-281-8219 or visit this Internet Web site www.recontrustco.com, using the file number assigned to this case NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 11-0104138. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 By: Trustee's Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. A-4329748 11/23/2012, 11/30/2012, 12/07/2012

TST4238 / 2012 231071 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: JETSPEED INC., 11500 E. 214th St., Lakewood, CA 90715. Registrant: JETSPEED INC., 11500 E. 14th St., Lakewood, CA 90715. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Diana Hasty, Secretary. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on October 18, 2007. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on November 19, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 23, 30, & December 7, 14, 2012.

TST4236 / 2012 230011 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: PIER MEDICAL AESTHETICS, 415 Pier Ave., Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. Registrant: DOUGLAS R. MEST, MD INC, 2810 Sunset View, Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Douglas R. Mest, MD, President. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on October 1, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on November 16, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 23, 30, & December 7, 14, 2012.

TST4239 / 2012 230012 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: G&G HEALTHCARE SERVICES, 1100 E. Mauretania St., Wilmington, CA 90744. Registrants: 1. STEPHANIE MARIE GARCIA, 1100 E. Mauretania St., Wilmington, CA 90744, 2. GLORIANA GONZALEZ, 150 W. Zane St., Long Beach, CA 90805. This business is conducted by: a General Partnership. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Stephanie M. Garcia. The registrants have not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on . This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on November 16, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 23, 30, & December 7, 14, 2012.

TST4248 / 2012 231850 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: AFFORDABLE TAX SERVICES, 2727 E. Anaheim St. #4097, Long Beach, CA 90804. Registrant: PATRICIA HARRIS, 2727 E. Anaheim St. #4097, Long Beach, CA 90804. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Patricia Harris. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on November 20, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on November 21, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 30, & December 7, 14, 21, 2012. TST4243 / 2012 227837 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: RIKA86, 2997 E. Pacific Coast Hwy., Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: 1. DOMINICK EAV, 2. GAURIKA EAV, 2997 E. Pacific Coast Hwy., Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: a Husband and Wife. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Dominick Eav. The registrants have begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrants began using this fictitious business name on November 14, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on November 14, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 30, & December 7, 14, 21, 2012

TST4244 / 2012 217298 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: LIFE ON THRIVE, 2997 E. Pacific Coast Hwy., Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrants: 1. GAURAV BAJAJ, 2. BRENDA SINGH BAJAJ, 2997 E. Pacific Coast Hwy., Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: a Husband and Wife. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Gaurav Bajaj. The registrants have begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on October 1, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on October 31, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 30, & December 7, 14, 21, 2012.

TST4245 / 2012 226867 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: SOLOZPLEASURE, 3900 Lewis Ave., Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrants: 1. SOLOMON MUTH, 2. VI THUY VO, 3900 Lewis Ave., Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: a Husband and Wife. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Solomon Muth. The registrants have not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on November 13, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 30, & December 7, 14, 21, 2012.


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Call for a free estimate Recommended by many local music teachers Associate Member of the Piano Technicians Guild TST4246 / 2012 231006 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following pers o n i s d o i n g b u s i n e s s a s : D I R E C T STORE DELIVERY, INC., 7400 E. Slauson Ave. Unit ES3, Commerce, CA 90040. Registrant: DIRECT STORE DELIVERY, INC., 7400 E. Slauson Ave. Unit ES3, Commerce, CA 90040. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Wenceslao Zavala. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on September 12, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on November 19, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 30, & December 7, 14, 21, 2012.

TST4247 / 2012 234355 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: ADVOCATES IN ACTION, 2510 E. Willow St. Unit 101, Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: ALOHI ENTERPRISES, INC., 2510 E. Willow St. Unit 101, Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Robert M. Schlesinger. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on November 1, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on November 26, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 30, & December 7, 14, 21, 2012. TST4251 / 2012 240165 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: DEVLOSTI, 53 Outrigger Ct., Long Beach, CA 90803. Registrant: MICHAEL DAILEY, 53 Outrigger Ct., Long Beach, CA 90803. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Michael Dailey. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on December 4, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: December 7, 14, 21, 28, 2012.

TST4250 / 2012 238637 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. EVE INSURANCE BROKERAGE INC., 2. EVA INSURANCE-VEHICLE REGISTRATION SERVICES, 4000 E. Anaheim St. #C, Long Beach, CA 90804. Registrant: EVA INSURANCE BROKERAGE INC., 4000 E. Anaheim St. #C, Long Beach, CA 90804. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Eva X. Juarez, President. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on November 30, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: December 7, 14, 21, 28, 2012.

TST4252 / 2012 240821 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: ALFRAY PRODUCTS CO., 13624 Stanbridge Ave., Bellflower, CA 90706. Registrant: PATRICK RILEY, 13624 Stanbridge Ave., Bellflower, CA 90706. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Pat Riley. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on December 4, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: December 7, 14, 21, 28, 2012

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EYE ON CRIME Crimes reported by LBPD • Council Districts 6, 7 & 8

Thursday, Nov. 29 Residential burglary 9:30am– 2300 block San Francisco Ave.

Robbery of person 10:09am– Atlantic Ave./E. 20th St.

Robbery of person 11:58am– 300 block E. Pacific Coast Hwy.

Auto burglary 1pm– 600 block E. Carson St.

Auto burglary 5:30pm– 1900 block Henderson Ave.

Friday, Nov. 30 Residential burglary 6:40am– 4400 block Cerritos Ave.

Battery of person with serious injury 9:13pm– W. Pacific Coast Hwy./Chestnut Ave.

Auto burglary 12pm– 3500 block Olive Ave.

Vandalism– over $400 10:30pm– 2300 block Chestnut Ave.

Auto burglary 11:50pm– 2000 block Magnolia Ave.

Saturday, Dec. 1 Attempted auto burglary 2:25am– 2700 block Daisy Ave.

Auto burglary 9am– 4000 block Atlantic Ave.

Residential burglary 10am– 4400 block Olive Ave.

Residential burglary 12:30pm– 3800 block Brayton Ave.

Robbery of person 2:19pm– 100 block E. Willow St.

Commercial burglary– shoplifting 3:55pm– 4500 block Atlantic Ave.

Auto burglary 6:45pm– E. Wardlow Rd./Long Beach Blvd.

Sunday, Dec. 2 Garage/residential burglary 3:30pm– 4500 Long Beach Blvd./2 E. Carson St.

Commercial burglary– shoplifting 7:18pm– 3300 block Atlantic Ave.

Grand theft property 8:30pm– 100 block E. Willow St.

Auto burglary 9:15pm– 3300 Block Daisy Ave.

Residential burglary 10pm– 1900 block Atlantic Ave.

Crimes reported by SHPD • Citywide Thursday, Nov. 29 Stolen vehicle 3:32pm– 2600 block Cherry Ave.

Vandalism, damage property 11:55am– 2700 block St. Louis Ave. Suspect in custody.

Friday, Nov. 30 Battery 3:36pm– 2700 block Cherry Ave.

Saturday, Dec. 1 Disorderly conduct– under the influence of alcohol/drugs 2:08am– E. Pacific Coast Hwy./Gladys Ave. Non-injury hit-and-run 5:22pm– Dawson Ave./Skyline Dr.

Auto burglary 7:30pm– 2800 block E. 19th St.

Tuesday, Dec. 4 Forgery 12:40pm– 2700 block Cherry Ave.

Child molestation 6:42pm– E. Hill St./Gaviota Ave.


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18 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Living Legends, Unsung Heroes

COMMUNITY

Notable businessman re-emerges as community leader Rachael Rifkin

Contributing Writer

At the age of 42, Mel Pinkham, successful businessman and former child entertainer, had a massive coronary. Under doctor’s orders, he had to slow down and rest. He re-evaluated his life and, over the next several decades, dedicated the majority of his time toward helping the community, and in particular at-risk youth, through the Knights of Pythias. The gregarious Pinkham, now 78, has always embraced new adventures. As a child, he loved singing and dancing (For a clip of his singing, see the online version of this story at signaltribune.com). “My parents took me to an audition, and a talent scout there booked me on The Children’s Hour. I was 6 years old,” said Pinkham. “It was a lot of fun. I remember singing “Sunny Side of the Street,” “Less Work for Mother” and “If I Could Love You.” They paid us in war bonds– never cash.” He sang on the show until he was 14 and performed around the city and in the Catskills off and on until he was 19.

By that point, he was ready to move on. “Once I realized it was a business, I didn’t like it as much,” he said. “I wasn’t interested in that.” He went to Brooklyn College to study business. When he got out, he couldn’t find a job. “I was around the draft age, and no one wanted to invest in someone who was going to be drafted. But I didn’t get drafted until I was 24. So I went into the beauty business. Some friends of mine had a company that filled bottles for different labeling companies,” Pinkham said. “I ended up in sales. They gave me a car and assigned me to an area in the South. I went from little town to little town like a medicine man selling beauty preparations. That first year I built the territory up from $30,000 in sales to a million dollars. It was exciting.” He also pitched their products at conventions. He met his future wife, Betty, at a beauty show in Chicago. “I traveled extensively, so for three years I mainly dated her by mail. I used to send her rose petals in the mail. I couldn’t afford to send a dozen roses, so I’d put one petal in an envelope. I had

File photo

Mel Pinkham with empty bags used for the Pythian literacy program “Is This Book for Me?” and bike helmets that were distributed to local kids

to do something to compete with those Chicago guys. I guess it worked. We’ve been married for 55 years and have two children, Lauren Ashley Fox and Bradford Adam,” he said. He was eventually drafted and served two years in the Army, entering just two months after the Korean War ended. When he got out, an opportunity in Long Beach came his way. He remembered visiting his uncle in California when he was a kid and had always wanted to come back. “I wound up buying into a small beauty-supply company here in town. Then we started to build the company. We owned a couple companies after a while, but the first one was Abbey Warren,” Pinkham said. “We opened up wholesale warehouses, which later turned into some of the first retail beauty-supply stores. It was the first time hairdressers could go to a warehouse and have access to a catalog with 23,000 products in it. We had a store on Wardlow [Road], and then we opened stores in Fullerton, Garden Grove and Los Alamitos.” He began acquiring real estate in Signal Hill after buying a supermarket nearby and turning it into a central warehouse. Then, he suffered a massive coronary and had to sell his companies. He was in the hospital for four months and spent the next five years recuperating. “At first, life got lonely. I sat in my yard with nothing to do, nobody to play in my sandbox. Then I went out and educated myself. I took courses in finance. I became more involved with the Knights of Pythias,” Pinkham said. “If I had to say anything about my heart attack, it’s that it taught me how to live life. You have to be pretty deliberate in this world we live in.” He had joined the charitable organization years before based on its motto: friendship, charity and benevolence. “I also liked that it had nothing to do with business,” he said. “So I decided to become more active in the organization.

DECEMBER 7, 2012

Courtesy Mel Pinkham

Mel Pinkham at 18 years of age, entertaining at a club in the Catskill Mountains

I began coming up with ideas that would enhance children’s potentials.” Pinkham helped develop the “Is This Book for Me?” program. The literacy program, named for the question kids would often ask when receiving free books, collects thousands of books each year, often partnering with other organizations to distribute them. Pinkham also started a helmet-safety program. “I gathered funding from different companies, and passed out safety facts in both English and Spanish to parents,” he said. “We’ve probably given out over 70,000 helmets in Southern California.” One of Long Beach-Lakewood Knights of Pythias’s other big programs is their annual eight-day camping trip at a youth camp at Kings Canyon Park in the Sequoia National Forest. The US government deeded the land to them in 1946 and has been sending kids to camp ever since. The camp has about 10 sessions and serves approximately 50 local

children between the ages of 9 and 11. Donations cover the $450 cost per child for camp. Pinkham believes camp can change a child’s perspective. “In eight days, it is absolutely incredible to see the difference in their attitudes,” he said. “They’re seeing way beyond the corner of their block, and they bring that home. They learn how to dance. They learn how to share. There’s no hitting, no punching, no fighting. You do any of that, you just lose rights. There’s a learning process that takes place.” For his 30 years of service, which includes program development and fundraising as well as stints in a variety of board positions, he was honored with the Golden Spur Award (and the title “Sir”), the highest honor a Knight can receive. “I think he’s a fantastic man,” said Pinkham’s daughter, Lauren Fox. “He’s charitable almost to a fault because he has such a huge heart.”


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