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Image from the circus-poster exhibit opening Dec. 8 at Gallery Expo See page 15

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Holiday Gift Guide with special TV listings starting on page 9

Vol. 34 No. 26

November 30, 2012

SERVING BIXBY KNOLLS, CALIFORNIA HEIGHTS, LOS CERRITOS, WRIGLEY AND THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

Your Weekly Community Newspaper

LB Airport to unveil new passenger concourse on Dec. 5

Poly High’s magnet business academy a ‘shining example’ of college and career readiness

Courtesy LB Airport

A conceptual rendering of the Long Beach Airport’s new passenger concourse depicts the structure’s design, which incorporates state-of-the-art, energy-efficient features, such as natural lighting and solar panels.

Sean Belk Staff Writer

Just in time for holiday travel, the Long Beach Airport is slated to unveil its new passenger concourse during a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Dec. 5 to be attended by government officials, community members and business rep-

resentatives. The concourse, which has been under construction for two years, will be fitted with a string of new concessions, a boarding lounge, an atrium and a garden walkway. The ceremony takes place just a few days before the concourse will be briefly opened to the public on Dec. 9,

according to Airport Director Mario Rodriguez, who said at which time area residents will be allowed access to the structure. However, starting Dec. 12, the concourse will be officially “activated” and only available to ticketed passengers, as Transportation Security

Eighth District Councilmember Austin hosts open house at NLB field office

see AIRPORT page 19

Nick Diamantides Staff Writer

Opening up lines of communication and giving residents a chance to talk face-to-face with their elected representative were the two reasons Al Austin gave for holding an open house at his north Long Beach office last Tuesday evening. Austin, who was sworn in as the 8th District’s Long Beach city councilmember on July 17, said he wanted to be sure that his constituents know where his field office is and that his staff is there five days a week, 9am to 5pm to answer questions and deal with issues pertaining to city services. The 8th District north Long Beach field office at 5641 Atlantic Ave. has been in existence for about two years, but many people were used to the 8th District Bixby Knolls field office, which closed last July. Austin’s staff publicized the open house by announcing it in the 8th District online newsletter, sending email invitations, and distributing flyers. In addition, during a recent council meeting, Austin himself invited the public to attend. The open house also kicked off the 8th District’s annual toy and canned-food drive. Austin said that in about three weeks his staff will take all donated toys and food to local charity organizations that will distribute the see AUSTIN page 4

Bixby Knolls in

Winter Wonderland Shop Bixby Knolls on

Saturday

Dec 1st and enjoy holiday specials at participating locations!

participating locations listed Participating locations listedon oninside back ad. page ad.

Nick Diamantides/Signal Tribune

Community activists (from left) Dan Pressburg, Chuck Fowler, and Laurie Angel discuss issues pertaining to north Long Beach with 8th District City Councilmember Al Austin (far right) during the open house in his field office at 5641 Atlantic Ave. on Tuesday evening.

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Saturday

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Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Teacher Libby Huff instructs 11th-grade students enrolled in Polytechnic High School’s Pacific Rim Academy. The four-year program involves students in real-world experiences and includes leadership training, starting up small companies and developing international-business plans.

Sean Belk Staff Writer

International trade may not always be the topic of discussion that teenagers are passionate about these days. At one local high school, however, it’s not only a part of the curriculum, but a subject that has motivated students toward a pathway to a college degree and a future career. Despite the threat of ongoing funding challenges at public schools across the state, Polytechnic High School’s magnet program called the Pacific Rim Academy, which first issued its charter in 1989, remains one of about 500 California partnership academies partially funded by state grants to provide smaller learning communities for high-school students. The four-year program focuses on smaller class sizes, critical lan-

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guages such as Japanese and Chinese, college-prep academics and career courses in international trade. The academy’s activities involve leadership training, starting up small companies and developing international-business plans. For students like Nicole Sun, 16, the academy has assisted in transitioning from English language learning courses, making a résumé and working on an internship. Sun, who plans to go to a four-year college, said she has interests in marine biology and law enforcement, but is also open to going into business. “We have a port in a city, which is really cool,” she said. Other academies in Long Beach include Jordan High School’s Aspirations in Medical Services Academy (AMSA) and its Architecture, Construction and Engineering Academy (ACE). Such academies are part of see POLY page 13

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NEWS

2 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

NOVEMBER 30, 2012

Laid-off LBUSD teachers earn special-ed credential at no cost through CSULB College of Education

Rick Gloady

CSULB Media Relations Director

When Cherrell Harris was laid off after more than seven years of employment with the Long Beach Unified School District (LBUSD), it was both surprising and heartbreaking. “I knew layoffs were coming, but I never considered it really happening to me,� Harris said. “It greatly affected my self-confidence, knowing that I had

dedicated countless hours, including personal time, within the district. Then, to be cut was damaging to my current life and what the future would hold.� But the former 4th/5th-grade combo teacher from Hudson K-8 School isn’t sitting around at home wallowing in self-pity. She is back in school adding to her rÊsumÊ, educational background and marketability as a teacher. The best part– it’s not costing her a penny. Harris is one of 11 laid-off LBUSD

teachers enrolled in a new accelerated special-education credential program at Cal State Long Beach (CSULB). The one-year program was made possible by a $140,000 National Emergency Grant to California, which is being administered by the Pacific Gateway Workforce Investment Network (PGWIN) and covers all tuition, fees and textbook costs (about $12,770 per student) for the students. The purpose of the grant monies is

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in Bixby Knolls Two T wo weekends of !"#$%&'())$*+ !"#$%&'())$*+ treats drinks, trea ts & specials! Cottage! @Urban Cott Co Cot ttage! tt ttage! age! Hygiene Donation Drive Sat.. December D er 1st – Sat. S . December D er 8th Tis the season for giving and $A $ARE ARE TO #ARE &OR THE (OMELESS is having ha a Hygiene Donation tion Drive for the Long Beach Multi-Service Multi-Service Center. Center A wish list of travel-size travel-size hygiene products can be found aat WWW$ WWW$#(ORG #(ORGG Please, help the homeless and drop-off unused products at at Urban Cottage. Cotta

to fund the workforce development of dislocated workers, and the CSULB special-education program is intended to do just that– preparing the laid-off elementary and secondary school teachers for re-employment in teaching positions for which there is a greater demand. “When you think about the highneed areas where there is a shortage of teachers, you think math, science and special education,� said Shireen Pavri, associate dean for graduate studies and research for the CSULB College of Education and a professor of special education. She is also the principal investigator for this grant project. “Even in districts that are not currently hiring, there is usually some hiring in these three areas.� Many of these types of programs for laid-off teachers began with a focus on math and science. In fact, CSULB offers single-subject credentials in foundational-level mathematics and general science for LBUSD teachers laid off last year through its College of Continuing and Professional Education with 30 students in each math and science cohort. Again, PGWIN is administering the funding so that the courses were offered at no cost to the unemployed educators. A collaborative effort between CSULB’s College of Education, the CSULB Research Foundation, LBUSD and PGWIN, the accelerated special education program began classes in late August and will conclude in May with the students having earned the additional credential. Work on the program actually began last spring when program organizers worked with the personnel department at LBUSD and obtained a list of all of the teachers laid off during the 2009-10 or 2010-11 academic years. The district mailed these teachers a flyer and survey to gauge their interest in a special-ed credential program. Everyone who returned the survey was invited to an informational meeting, and about 25 showed up to that initial meeting. “Those who attended the initial meeting obviously were overwhelmed, and I would say there was a sense of concern and urgency for their employment future,� said Kristin Stout, a full-time lecturer for CSULB’s education-specialist credential program and one of the instructors for the accelerated program. “But, I think that the students stood out as an amazing group in that they asked where else they could turn their passion. They looked into another field of teaching.� Stout can relate to the former teachers’ feelings of concern for employment and being overwhelmed in the credential offerings. In the 1990s, she was a general-education teacher in Orange County, and she was laid off from her job. She, too, went back to school, choosing CSULB, and earned her special-education credential. “I have walked in their shoes. I definitely feel like I can relate to their experiences as a teacher and hope they can relate to me,� Stout said. “It is inspiring to see a whole new group of professionals come through this program who have the same passion and desire for teaching all students as I do.�

And it’s a passion and desire they will need for the program, she added. “Special education is a very difficult field, and this isn’t a simple add-on of a few courses. We are not cutting out any of the expectations for students who are coming in through this cohort versus students who are coming in through a traditional program. It’s a pretty intense pace.� In fact, going into the program, Stout said she was wondering if the students were going to feel “entitled� to just get a tack-on to their existing credential. “That is not the experience that I am having with this amazing cohort. What I am seeing is a group of students who take the class discussion to an elevated level, asking for more background, experiences and insights into the field,� she pointed out. “I find this to be a very expressive and talkative group. They are into the content, and they are prepared. So, overall, I am really impressed with the caliber of students that we have in this cohort.� The students meet Mondays and Tuesdays and are taking three courses this semester. Stout is teaching one of the courses and is serving as their advisor. The program originally started out with 16 students, but a handful of them were able to find teaching jobs before the start of the academic year. The one-year program includes seven classes in all– five regular courses and two student teaching opportunities. It is an accelerated program, and students receive credit for having previously taught as elementary- or secondaryschool teachers. Once they complete the program, they will have a California Teaching Commission credential for special education focused on students with mild to moderate disabilities. “This program is a wonderful opportunity for these teachers to build their skills and to teach all students. They will be prepared to teach a wider group of students, and not necessarily just students with special needs,� Pavri said. “I also think this is another outstanding example of the great partnership we have with the Long Beach Unified School District. When the district has a need, we step in and work closely with them on multiple levels to help meet that need. Our hope is that these teachers will get rehired, either in special education or general ed, as positions open up in the district.� For Harris, who was laid off after seven years, special education has always been an interest of hers. In fact, her first position with LBUSD was as an inclusion college aide working with students who had learning disabilities. Later, she was persuaded to teach in the multiple-subject area. “From the program, I’m hoping to gain knowledge that I can use within any classroom. I think this program also will strengthen my teaching techniques and outlook on education as a whole,� Harris said. “I am very grateful that I chose teaching because I feel that I have impacted many lives. I really cannot think of another career I would have gone into. “Yet, there is a sense of urgency regarding future employment,� she continued. “We are all unsure when or if things will turn around for the better.�

Shopping days for Shopping Los Los Cerritos Elementary Friday& Saturday Dec. 7th & 8th Mention shopping for the school sc and bac to the school! 20% of your sale will go back

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Store Located at 4121 Long Beach Blvd. (just south of Carson St.)         s 4UES 3AT 44UESS 3AT  3U  3UN  UN     s W WWW5RBAN#OTTAGE,"COM WW5RBA W N# N #OTTTTAG GE," E,,"CCOM

Photo by David J. Nelson

Kristin Stout (right) is one of three Cal State Long Beach instructors working with laid-off teachers from the Long Beach Unified School District in the accelerated special-education credential program. Cherrell Harris (left), who was laid off after more than seven years of employment with the disrict, is one of the teachers now taking advantage of the program.

ST3426 - November 30_Layout 1 11/30/12 11:50 AM Page 3

NEWS

NOVEMBER 30, 2012

LB City Council denies auto-title loan firm to operate at south Wrigley gateway Sean Belk Staff Writer

The Long Beach City Council unanimously voted 9-0 at its Nov. 20 meeting to deny a conditional-use permit (CUP) for Georgia-based Pennbrooke Financial Services, LLC to operate an auto-title loan business at the southern gateway of the Wrigley neighborhood. The motion, which was made by 6th District City Councilmember Dee Andrews, in whose district the title-loan company would have resided, was based on a set of negative findings presented by city staff. Those findings stated that the establishment “would not

provide vitality or create a commercial center or provide commercial activity” as outlined in the description of an area zoned for a pedestrian-oriented retail strip. At the crux of the issue is whether such high-interest lenders should be allowed to move into Long Beach. The City Council passed a moratorium on such financial institutions as Long Beach Department of Development Services staff conduct a study on their impacts to the community. The final decision comes after the Planning Commssion came to a (3-3) tie vote on Sept. 20 on whether to grant the applicant the CUP that would have

expired after five years. The property owner, Linda Mendoza, had wanted Pennbrooke Financial to occupy her empty commercial building on the northwest corner of Pacific Coast Highway and Pacific Avenue in order to secure financing to redevelop the site and bring in a grocery market. The Planning Commission’s deadlock vote was appealed by both the applicant, Pennbrooke Financial, and project appellants, including Lee Fukui, Mauna Eichner, Lisa Wibroe, Annie Greenfeld, Colleen McDonald, Sam Portillo and Jack Smith, all who have spoken out against the title-loan company.

LBPD issues misdemeanor citations to 10 adults contributing to alcohol sales to minors

The Long Beach Police Department’s (LBPD) Vice Investigations Section, in cooperation with investigators from the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC), conducted two undercover operations in the city of Long Beach on Monday, Nov. 26. The “Minor Decoy” operation focused on employees and the “Shoulder Tap” operation focused on customers of ABClicensed businesses such as liquor and convenience stores. Minors under the age of 21, under the supervision of the LBPD, either approached employees and attempted to purchase alcohol or approached customers outside the venue and requested alcohol be purchased on their behalf. Employees who allowed the minor to purchase alcohol and customers who purchased alcohol for minors were identified and subsequently issued misdemeanor citations for unlawfully furnishing alcohol to a minor. The businesses were unaware that an undercover operation was underway. During the course of the operation, 20 establishments were visited. Eight customers and two employees, a total of 10 individuals, were issued misdemeanor citations in the following areas: 1200 block of East 4th Street 1600 block of Pine Avenue 1900 block of East 4th Street 5200 block of East 2nd Street 700 block of East 4th Street

1300 block of East 7th Street 1800 block of Pacific Avenue 3400 block of East Artesia Blvd 6900 block of Long Beach Blvd 700 block of East Willow Street

In a press release issued this week, the LBPD indicated that these operations are conducted with the community’s safety in mind and that it will continue to enforce ABC laws at all establishments throughout the city. Anyone wishing to report illegal behavior relating to the unlawful sale of alcohol should contact the Vice Investigations Section at (562) 570-7219. Anyone wishing to remain anonymous may call 1-800-222-TIPS (8477), or text TIPLA plus your tip to 274637 (CRIMES), or visit LACrimeStoppers.org .

As it hosts LGBT Leaders Conference, LB receives perfect score for equality Source: LBPD

The city of Long Beach has received a perfect score on the Municipal Equality Index (MEI), the first ever rating system of LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) inclusion for cities. The MEI is a project of the Human Rights Campaign, the nation’s largest LGBT organization, in partnership with the Equality Federation and the Gay & Lesbian Victory Institute. “Long Beach is only 1 of 11 cities to receive a perfect score of 100,” said Vice Mayor Robert Garcia. “That’s something we should all be very proud of, especially since we have such a large gay and lesbian population.” The MEI rated the nation's largest 50 cities, all the state capitols, and top mid-size cities in the

nation. Over 130 cities were included. “Long Beach is noted as a shining example of LGBT inclusivity, with excellent policies ranging from non-discrimination laws, an equalbenefits ordinance, and cutting-edge city services,” Garcia said. “We have worked hard to ensure that Long Beach has the most inclusive municipal laws on equality. Together, we were one of the first cities to pass the landmark equalbenefits ordinance and anti-bullying legislation. We have also supported full civil marriage equality, have an active Human Relations Commission and have numerous laws protecting LGBT people from housing, health, and benefit discrimination.” Garcia said the news could not

It’s Party Time!

come at a better time, since the 2012 LGBT Leaders Conference begins this week in downtown Long Beach. “We will have over 500 LGBT elected and appointed officials in the city to discuss the future of LGBT rights in America and internationally,” he said. “Our guests this week include the first-ever openly gay United States senator, Tammy Baldwin, who was just elected this November, and the entire LGBT Congressional delegation.” The vice mayor said he looks forward to welcoming them and to the expected $500,000 boost to the local economy that is expected from their visit. For more information on the conference, visit victoryinstitute.org/ files/conference2012 .

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BREAKFAST. LUNCH. DINNER. SPORTS. FULL MENU. 1999 E. Willow @ Cherry Ave. Signal Hill (562) 424-0018

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

3

A DIFFERENT KIND OF SCHOOL SHOPPING What 6th Annual Holiday Marketplace Who Newcomb Academy Where 7020 E. Brittain St. When Friday, Nov. 30 from 5pm to 8:30pm More Info This year’s holiday marketplace, which supports the NAPTSA student programs, will feature holiday tunes by the Millikan High School Jazz Band, warm drinks, desserts and caroling by Girl Scouts. Call (562) 544-2043 or visit newcombptsa.org .

DOWN TO ZERO What World AIDS Day Community Forum Who City of Long Beach Department of Health and Human Services Where Miller Family Health Education Center When Saturday, Dec. 1 from 9:30am to 12:50pm More Info Titled “Getting to Zero,” this community forum will feature various presentations from health officials about HIV and AIDS. Call (562) 570-4329 or email marina.ohlson-smorick@longbeach.gov .

GO A-WASSAILING What Holiday celebration Who The American Association of University Women of Long Beach Branch Where The home of Deloris Mayuga When Saturday, Dec. 1 from 10am to noon More Info Carry on the tradition of gathering and camaraderie over the wassail bowl. Refreshments and the hot, spiced wassail drink will be served. Call 562-799-8479, email margyarthur@ymail.com or visit aauw-longbeach.org .

HERE COMES SANTA What Breakfast with Santa Who Miller Children’s Hospital Long Beach Where Parkers’ Lighthouse, 435 Shoreline Village When Saturday, Dec. 1 from 8am to 11am More Info Children of all ages are invited to bring cameras and take pictures of Santa and “Millie” making their way across the Long Beach Harbor. Parkers’ will donate 100 percent of the proceeds to benefit pediatric patients with cancer and serious blood disorders. Call (562) 432-6500 or visit parkerslighthouse.com .

HOLIDAY HOEDOWN What Holiday party celebration Who Signal Hill Chamber of Commerce Where Delius Restaurant, 2951 Cherry Ave. When Monday, Dec. 3 from 6pm to 9pm More Info The event is $35 per person with prepaid reservation and $45 at the door. The party will include a raffle, prizes, live music, hors d’ouevres, dinner, dessert, beverages and a no-host bar. Call (562) 4268939.

POTLUCK PARTY What Holiday celebration Who The Long Beach Central Project Area Council (CPAC) Where Mental Health America, 456 Elm Ave. When Thursday, Dec. 6 from 6pm to 8:30pm More Info The public is invited. Call (562) 225-9462 or email shorti2448@gmail.com .

FELIZ NAVIDAD What Fiesta de Navidad holiday mixer and membership drive Who Centro C.H.A. Inc. Where 1900 Atlantic Ave., second floor When Thursday, Dec. 6 from 5pm to 7pm More Info Festivities include tamales, music, spirits and cultural holiday gifts available for purchase.

BREAKFAST WITH SANTA What Annual Breakfast with Santa Who Signal Hill Community Services Department Where Signal Hill Park Community Center, 2175 Cherry Ave. When Saturday, Dec. 8 from 9am to 11am More Info All guests may enjoy a craft activity, a sing-along, breakfast and a visit by Santa Claus and a royal princess. Tickets are $15 for both children and adults. Non-resident tickets are $20. Call (562) 9897330.

WALKIN’ IN THE WETLANDS What El Dorado Audubon Society and the Los Cerritos Wetlands Land Trust Who Signal Hill Community Services Department Where 1st Street and Pacific Coast Highway, Seal Beach When Saturday, Dec. 8 from 8am More Info Enjoy a nature walk through the wetlands on this earlymorning event and view a variety of plant and animal species. Pre-registration is required. Call (562) 570-1745 or email eldoradoaudobon@yahoo.com .

THE GIFT OF LANGUAGE What “Enchanted Holiday” Who Friends of Languages, associate group of LBCC Foundation Where Private home in Naples When Sunday, Dec. 9 from 8pm to 6pm More Info The fundraiser features entertainment, food and beverages Funds go to scholarships to students studying a foreign language or English as a second language. Call (562) 938-4767.

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4 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Austin

continued from page 1

items to needy families. Speaking to the Signal Tribune, Austin said he has not been surprised by the way things work at City Hall. He explained that moving ideas forward is a slow process in city government, but he knew that even before getting elected. He noted, however, that he is surprised by the level of support he is getting from the community as a whole. “Business people and residents are eager to roll up their sleeves and help solve the problems in the district and throughout the city,” he said. “There is a very strong spirit of cooperation, even from people who did not support me as a candidate.” Austin said working with his colleagues on the city council has been a good experience so far, but there are challenges. “They all have strong opinions, and it’s a little tougher than I thought to build consensus on issues,” he acknowledged. “Believe it or not, we don’t talk to each other much throughout the week. There is not a whole lot of

socialization among us.” He explained that each councilmember, with the help of his or her staff, analyzes staff reports and proposed actions and ordinances in the days prior to a council meeting. “Everybody pretty much has reached their own conclusions before the meeting and most of our conversations are during the meeting,” he said. “That makes for an interesting dynamic when you start deliberating and voting on issues.” He added that even though all councilmembers are interested in doing what is best for their own district, he has not seen any proposed actions or ordinances that would benefit one district to the detriment of other districts. Austin stressed that his number-one priority as councilmember is public safety, and in spite of budget restraints, the council is taking actions designed to make Long Beach a safer city. “We’ve actually budgeted a police academy for fiscal year 2012-2013,” he said. “We should be graduating new recruits in a year or two.” He added that his second priority is infrastructure repairs. “We are looking to replace dilapidated sidewalks and

Thoughts from the Publisher

A recipe of philanthropy

repair streets that have been neglected for many years,” he said. “We are looking to paint out graffiti on railroad trestles and do some public-art projects on those trestles.” Austin added that he is also working to build a better, more unified community by establishing stronger ties with neighborhood associations and neighborhood watch groups in the district. During the open house, Austin spent most of his time talking with people one-on-one or talking to small groups, but about 45 minutes after the event began, he gave a short speech to everyone in the room. “My staff and I are here to serve you,” he said. “We wanted to open this place up and let you know that this is where we are based right now.” He added that he hopes to be able to open another office in Bixby Knolls sometime in the near future. The open house was a friendly gathering with many people expressing support and approval of how Austin has performed during his first four months in office. Gayle Carter credited Austin with giving a group of north Long Beach dog lovers the impetus to start an organiza-

OPINION

LETTERS

Believe it or not, I am a “chef” competing in a “Cooking for Kids” event next week. This is the first time ever that I have participated in anything like this and am asking for your vote. The event is raising awareness and funds for Miller Children’s Hospital of Long Beach. The actual competition is next Thursday, Dec. 6, 6pm, at Hotel Maya in Long Beach. You are invited to attend and have some fun as we try to outwit and outcook everyone else. I am partnered with Long Beach Fire Chief Mike DuRee, and [we] are competing in honor of 5-year-old Berlin Gutenkauf, who had recently had a brain tumor removed. Berlin’s parents are the owners of The Factory Gastrobar in Bixby Knolls and active members of our community. It was a rough year for the Gutenkaufs, and this is a way I can do something for their family. All teams are required to do three things in the competition: get as many votes as possible for being the best team; raise a minimum of $5,000; and cook the best appetizer at the competition where one team is awarded the “Ultimate Chef.” If you are on Facebook, please vote for our team here: facebook.com/ MillerChildrensHospital/app_473933579321180 If you would like to make a donation in Berlin’s honor, here is our donations page: cookingforkids.kintera.org/faf/donorReg/donorPledge.asp?ievent=1031993 &supid=370492556 Thank you for your consideration. Blair Cohn Executive Director Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association

TO

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Tanya Paz

COLUMNISTS

Jennifer E. Beaver Carol Berg Sloan, RD

Signal Hill Mayor Tina Hansen, assisted by her twins Benjamin and Kaitlin Photos by Neena Strichart Kitchens, and Long Beach Mayor Bob View of the tree on the Foster, “light” the tree on top of the hill. hill

Margaret Tyree, a pediatric nurse practitioner at The Children’s Clinic, with the twins from a local family who were the beneficiaries of last week’s Thanksgiving dinner provided by the clinic and Senator Alan Lowenthal.

MANAGING EDITOR

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MORE INFORMATION (562) 570-1326

Penelope Leon Director of Development and Communications The Children’s Clinic

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of his own, and he really wants to see the greater good of the area.” Eighth District resident Kelly Lindberg said she came to the open house to show her support for the new councilmember. “I have had a couple of discussions with him about the streets and sidewalks where I live, and he has been very supportive, so I felt that I needed to be supportive of him,” she explained. Another 8th District resident, Rita Cardenas, said she attended because she wanted to personally meet Austin. “I just wanted him to know who I am, and to ask him to get more involved in my neighborhood,” she added. At the close of the event, Austin said he was happy with the turnout. About 50 people had attended. “We had residents who came from throughout the district and from many neighborhoods,” he noted. “I am very encouraged about our ability to move forward with our plans to activate all of our neighborhoods and get them involved in making the 8th District a better place for all of us to live.”

With the holidays fast approaching, the giving spirit is in full swing in Long Beach. Senator Alan Lowenthal and The Children’s Clinic, “Serving Children and Their Families” (TCC) sponsored Thanksgiving dinner for several families on Nov. 21. The healthy trimmings included fresh green beans, sweet potatoes, whole-wheat bread and more in addition to the vouchers for turkeys purchased by Senator Alan Lowenthal. Every year, we are touched by all the generous donors and particularly TCC staff that give to our families, whether it be for our annual food drive or our holiday toy and book drive. One of the recipients of this year’s food drive was the Jimenez family (pictured at right with nurse practitioner Margaret Tyree). They are patients of The Children’s Clinic Mutli-Service Center for the Homeless. But the family, recently moved to transitional housing a day before Thanksgiving, had not yet been able to purchase groceries. For more information about TCC giving or the programs and services it provides, please contact the Development Department at (562) 246-4646 or visit thechildrensclinic.org .

Stephen M. Strichart

Neena R. Strichart

NOVEMBER 30, 2012

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ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

tion called the Uptown Dog Park Association. “We are taking citizen ownership of the Uptown Dog Park that is located in Scherer Park,” said Carter, who is president of the association. “Al really inspired us and helped us get our group started.” Dan Pressburg, longtime community activist and president of the North Long Beach Community Action Group, lives in the 9th Council District, but he went to Austin’s open-house event because a large section of north Long Beach is in the 8th District. He explained that, regardless of which district they live in, most north Long Beach residents are hoping that, with state approval, the City of Long Beach will be able to use existing bond money to build a new north Long Beach library, and Austin will no doubt participate in the process choosing a building plan for the new facility. Blair Cohn, executive director of the Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association, praised Austin for his support of local businesses. “He and his staff are always eager to help us accomplish our goals in any way they can,” he said. “Al also has lots of ideas and plans

hairdresser, restaurant or coffee house. They are happy to offer cards and certificates in almost any denomination. To simplify the shopping thing even further, there are several shopping events planned this season for the Bixby Knolls business corridor. The first event, Winter Wonderland, takes place all day tomorrow. Including over two dozen local businesses, the merchants have banded together to offer a one-day extravaganza chock-full of special offers, refreshments, a visit with Santa Claus, and lots of holiday spirit! For details, see the back page of our paper today. Next weekend, Dec. 7 and 8, residents can enjoy the Uptown Village Market located at the Expo Arts Center, 4321 Atlantic Ave. in Bixby Knolls. Featuring over 75 vendors along with live music, the event is billed as one that will offer items for sale that are “unique, handmade and creative.” Friday hours are 5pm to 10pm, with Saturday times from 10am to 4pm. For more details, see their ad in today’s issue on page 9 and/or check out uptownvillagemarket.com. Let’s not forget about the Dec. 7 First Fridays event. According to the BKBIA’s Blair Cohn, the Atlantic Avenue event will allow for shopping, mingling, and some good old-fashioned holiday fun. Be sure to check out next week’s issue for more details on December’s First Fridays. Remember: Support your local businesses. You’ll save money, time and gas!

by Neena Strichart

Night before last, the cities of Signal Hill and Long Beach teamed up for what has come to be known as the Annual Tree Lighting Ceremony. Taking place at Discovery Well Park in Signal Hill, Long Beach’s Mayor Bob Foster joined Signal Hill’s Mayor Tina Hansen to turn on the Christmas tree-shaped lighting display atop the hill. In spite of a few rain sprinkles, the event went off without a hitch. Thanks goes out to Rossmoor Pastries for all the cookies and goodies at the after-party! With the tree on top of the hill now lit, I am ready to officially get holiday plans in order. Since Hanukkah, Christmas and Kwanzaa are just weeks away, many of us have started the mad rush to find the perfect gifts for those on our lists. For the easiest way to beat the crowds, do your best to shop locally in your own neighborhoods. Local shop owners are traditionally friendlier and more willing to give the ultimate in customer service, and some even offer complimentary gift-wrapping! For those who prefer giving gift certificates or gift cards, stop by your local

NEWS

CULTURE WRITERS

Jane Fallon

Stephanie Raygoza

Daniel Adams Vicki Paris Goodman Gregory Spooner

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Matt Sun

EDITORIAL INTERN

Ariana Gastelum

CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Rachael Rifkin

DESIGN INTERN

Kaelyn Bruno

The Signal Tribune welcomes letters to the editor, which should be signed, dated and include a phone number to verify authenticity. Letters are due by noon on the Tuesday before desired publication date. The Signal Tribune reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, language and space requirements. The Signal Tribune does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other publications or otherwise presented in a public forum. Letters to the editor and commentaries are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Signal Tribune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, letters to the editor and commentaries are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. Letter-writers will be identified by their professional titles or affiliations when, and only when, the editorial staff deems it relevant and/or to provide context to the letter. The Signal Tribune is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. Yearly subscriptions are available for $45.

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ST3426 - November 30_Layout 1 11/30/12 11:50 AM Page 5

COMMUNITY Local fallen hero to be honored at Wreaths Across America ceremony

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

NOVEMBER 30, 2012

Sergeant Thomas R. MacPherson, 26, was killed in action Oct. 12 during combat operations in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

MemorialCare announces agreement to purchase certain Universal Care assets

role in population health management, accountable care, medical homes, information technology, best-practice medicine and other elements of health reform,” said Barry Arbuckle, PhD, president & CEO, MemorialCare Health System. “They expand our ability to further partner with health plans, employers, hospitals, physicians and providers to better serve patients and local communities.”

The nonprofit MemorialCare Health System announced this week an agreement to purchase specific assets of Signal Hill-based Universal Care and the filing of an application for its newly formed Seaside Health Plan to become a California licensed health plan. Seaside is organized to support managed Medi-Cal members and prepare for the California Children’s Services (CCS) demonstration project that addresses the needs of children with certain diseases and ongoing med-

ical conditions. According to a press release issued by MemorialCare, these developments enhance its mission of ensuring Southland communities have convenient access to highquality, evidence-based medicine, superior value, exceptional service and a network of integrated providers, including top hospitals, physicians, outpatient services, ambulatory centers and preventive care for all ages. “The new capabilities further our

He sat alone with the chaplain in the back of a CH-53 Super Stallion loaded down with artillery ammunition as it flew through the dark skies of Afghanistan with the twinkle of smallarms fire glimmering from far below. Chief Petty Officer Andrew P. Stanley, the group religious program specialist for 2nd Marine Logistics Group, said he felt completely at home as the helicopter sped through the night on his last deployment in 2011. The 48-year-old Long Beach native served 11 years in the Marine Corps before he left to pursue a life of ministry. His passion for service never dissipated. “It was the only job I ever had where I woke up in the morning, jumped out of bed and couldn’t wait to get to work,” Stanley said. “I’ve gotten to work with a variety of people, and really, when it comes down to it, they have enriched my life and made me who I am.” Stanley eventually re-enlisted in the Navy and became a religious program specialist so he could bring his passion for spiritual service back to the Marines and sailors who helped shape him. He still serves them nine years later. “For me, the mission was always the priority,” he said. “With my job now, the mission is still the priority, but my mission is to take care of the people who are performing the mission.” Religious program specialists, such as Stanley, support the clergy of all faiths in the performance of their religious activities. They also serve as a valuable link between servicemembers and their spiritual providers in the Navy Chaplain Corps. They are also responsible for guarding the chaplains in combat, where the

noncombatants remain unarmed under the Geneva Convention. Stanley’s particular duties at 2nd MLG place him in a position to mentor his fellow religious programmers and work directly with the group chaplain. He also takes on many of the administrative tasks needed to ensure the unit’s religious programs continue to flourish. He strives first and foremost to remain open to the unit’s personnel and to help care for their needs. “I have a list of things I want to do every day when I start,” he said. “Typically by 8:00, that is shot, and I’m shifting things. It is really hard to tell because when you work with people, you can’t always tell dvidshub.net when somebody is going Andrew P. Stanley, a 48-year-old Long Beach to have a problem and native, served 11 years in the Marine Corps before he left to pursue a life in the ministry. need something.” Stanley sets aside much more than his daily schedule. He spent the last three years years. You work with them. You get to living apart from his wife and children, know them, and going out together as a whom he visits primarily on weekends team … there is no greater experience.” The sacrifices made over two and major holidays. He admits time away from his fam- decades of service are taxing, Stanley ily is one of his greatest challenges, but says, but the people he serves continue he also considers it a unique blessing to define him. when he gets the chance to work with The above article was provided by the Marines and sailors in the field. DVIDS– Defense Video & Imagery “It is probably the best thing in the world for me in terms of a sense of Distribution System, a media and pubaccomplishment and belonging to a lic-relations operation run by the US Third Army on behalf of the Departfamily,” Stanley said. ment of the Army. Visit dvidshub.net . “You train with these people for

Metro Briefs

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Get metro.net Rider Info In 9 Languages Basic rider information and important contact numbers are available in nine languages other than English on metro.net. Online links are provided for rider guides in Spanish, Korean, Chinese, Armenian, Cambodian, Vietnamese, Japanese, Russian and Thai on Metro’s homepage.

Protect Your Phone Cell phones, smart phones and other electronic devices are great ways to use your time while riding Metro. But they can also be attractive targets for thieves. Don’t invite trouble – keep your personal items close to you at all times. Be alert and keep your phone!

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Source: MemorialCare

Long Beach Marine finds identity through life of ministry

If you’d like to know more, visit metro.net.

13-0923ps_gat-ne-13-006 ©2012 lacmta

sgt-jim.blogspot.com

The annual Wreaths Across America ceremony at Rosie the Riveter Park and Interpretive Center at 9am on Saturday, Dec. 15 will include a tribute to Sergeant Thomas R. MacPherson, who was recently killed in Afghanistan, with the commemoration of a Hometown Hero banner in his honor. MacPherson, a US Army Ranger, 26, was killed in action Oct. 12 during combat operations in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. He was assigned to Company D, 2nd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington. MacPherson was killed by direct fire from enemy forces during a heavy firefight while conducting combat operations in Ghazni Province, Afghanistan. A native of Long Beach, Calif., he enlisted in the U.S. Army in May 2007. For more than four years, MacPherson served as a mortarman and a Ranger Team Leader with 2nd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment. Fifth District Councilmember Gerrie Schipske and the Long Beach Rosie the Riveter Foundation are participating in the nationwide Wreaths Across America ceremony by laying wreaths in memory of our fallen heroes and to honor those who serve. This will be the third year the ceremony has taken place at the park. Thousands of Christmas wreaths will be placed simultaneously on the graves of the women and men who gave their lives in service of our country at Arlington and nationwide. The wreath-laying ceremony is a project of Wreaths Across America. Pastor Chris Lankford, the MacPhersons’ family pastor of the Long Beach Alliance Church, will offer the invocation. For more information, call (562) 570-6932 or email district5@longbeach.gov .

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ST3426 - November 30_Layout 1 11/30/12 11:50 AM Page 6

COMMUNITY

6 SIGNAL TRIBUNE In Living Color

NOVEMBER 30, 2012

Color schemes for holiday decorating Shoshanah Siegel Columnist

If you love a traditional tried and true holiday season, you probably won’t think much about a color scheme for your decorations. You’ll gather together everything with sentimental value in any color and find just the right place for it. But if you’re just starting out or want your decorations to complement your home’s décor, you’ll find that all your decorating decisions will be easier if you begin with a specific theme and color scheme. Here are some ideas:

Colors and items from your childhood If you have particularly happy memories from holidays past, try selecting a color theme to enhance that memory. For example, if you loved candy canes, choose a red-and-white color scheme. Did your tree have

shiny silver tinsel strewn on the branches? Or was your tree all tinsel, with a turning color wheel illuminating it? Did you have bubble lights? You can either search to find originals of these items from the past or purchase reproductions.

Bring in the bling I was always envious around the holidays because we did very little decorating for Hanukkah, and I loved the beauty of the season, especially the bling. Now, I bring bling into my home and love helping friends and clients decorate theirs for the season. For more sparkle, string garlands of faux crystals from chandeliers and lampshades. Or use strands of gold or silver pearls, mirrors or iridescent beads that will reflect the light. For more of a glow, set items on shiny metal trays or chargers or on a mirror.

Items of inspiration If you’ve seen a beautiful fabric that would be spectacular on the

center of your dining-room table, draw your colors from the fabric’s design. Check out color schemes used in gift-wrapping paper. See which ones you like and think about the style, the motifs represented, and the colors. Choose a paper that would look good in your home and find more decorations to place around the house that coincide with the theme and color. Go global Go beyond borders and celebrate a region of the world that’s new to you. Mix it up with a Latin or Mediterranean holiday theme. Or go with an Asian influence and celebrate the Chinese New Year. Pick a theme, and browse the stores or shops that have unique products from around the world. The possibilities are endless.

Too many colors? Yes, I am all for the color, but going with a monochromatic theme can create a sophisticated and elegant feel. Monochromat-

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For added sparkle, place lit candles and baubles in front of a mirror.

ice means using different value of the same color, darker or lighter. However, it’s all about the texture like velvet, leather, silk, or faux feathers and furs.

Let there be light Hanukkah isn’t the only festival of lights. The African tradition of Kwanzaa and Sweden’s Santa Lucia Day shine brightly too. Whether inside or outside, lighting can change the mood instantly. For outside highlights, Pamela Patsavas of Distinctive Event Productions in Chicago suggests the latest trend– bulbs attached to stakes in the ground or secured and draped from the bows of trees. Greet your guests with illuminations leading to the front door. Inside, change bulbs to amber to give off a warm glow rather than a stark whitewash.

Give depth to any room by placing lights in plants.

Let your imagination flow There’s no end to the themes you can embrace. Try snowflakes, country rustic, Hollywood glamour, penguins, black and white with a splash of color, the ocean, birds, cats, dogs, pine trees. For continuity, carry your theme and color scheme throughout the house. Have fun, and enjoy! May your season glow.

Shoshanah Siegel provides color consulting as well as space planning, remodeling, upgrading and staging through her firm Your Color Diva. She can be contacted at (562) 427-0440 or at Shoshanah.siegel@gmail.com or yourcolordiva.com .

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ST3426 - November 30_Layout 1 11/30/12 11:50 AM Page 7

COMMUNITY

NOVEMBER 30, 2012

Horticulture expert to discuss benefits of trees in urban areas

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Nutrition

Carol Berg Sloan, RD Columnist

If your Halloween pumpkin is still sitting on the porch, bring it in and eat it! Pumpkin continues to be an excellent source of vitamin A, which is necessary for eye, bone and cell health. Cooked pumpkin has about 30 calories per cup and is naturally fat-, cholesterol- and sodium-free. It is filling and adds color and flavor to soups, casseroles, breads, desserts and even appetizers. And don’t forget the seeds. Roasted pumpkin seeds provide

Vitamin E and micronutrients including magnesium, phosphorus, potassium and zinc. They are easy to make: Roasted pumpkin seeds Ingredients 1½ cups pumpkin seeds 2 teaspoons melted butter or olive oil salt garlic powder (optional) cayenne pepper (optional) seasoning salt (optional) cajun seasoning (optional)

Directions Preheat oven to 300 degrees F. While it’s okay to leave some strings and pulp on the seeds (they add flavor), clean off any major chunks. Toss pumpkin seeds in a bowl with the melted butter or oil and seasonings of your choice. Spread pumpkin seeds in a single layer on baking sheet. Bake for about 45 minutes, stirring occasionally, until golden brown.

(Recipe from food.com)

Courtesy Sierra Club

Jorge Ochoa is the director of the horticulture program at Long Beach City College.

What trees are the oldest in Long Beach? Which is the most historic? The rarest? Where are the most magnificent specimen trees in the city? Jorge Ochoa knows. As the director of the horticulture program at Long Beach City College, Ochoa knows more about the area’s urban forest than almost anyone else. He’ll share that knowledge at the Dec. 5 meeting of the Long Beach Sierra Club. Ochoa will explain the benefits of trees in an urban area such as Long Beach. Using slides and drawing on his study of the area’s little-known tree treasures, Ochoa will tour the street, park, backyard

trees that make up the local urban forest. His tour will show some of the historic, oldest and most dramatic trees that otherwise go unnoticed by most of us. His program, which is free and open to the public, will begin at 7:30pm at the Environmental Services Bureau, 2929 E Willow St. The Long Beach Group is part of the Angeles Chapter of the Sierra Club. The group has more than 2,500 members and serves Cerritos, Hawaiian Gardens, Lakewood, Long Beach, Los Alamitos, Signal Hill and Seal Beach. MORE INFORMATION (562) 252-0686

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NEWS

8 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

EDCO partners with LB and LA County to provide household-hazardous waste collection facility in SH

Sean Belk Staff Writer

A new permanent facility to dispose household-hazardous waste (HHW), such as batteries, paint, pesticides, oils, pills, sharps (such as needles and syringes) and other materials, is expected to open early next year in Signal Hill as part of a partnership between EDCO (known locally as Signal Hill Disposal), Los Angeles County and the Long Beach Environmental Services Bureau. The new facility will be located at EDCO’s recently opened municipal solid-waste material-recovery facility and transfer station on Patterson Street and California Avenue. The new HHW center will be opened in mid-January after the project goes before the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors in December for final approval. Originally, the City of Long Beach had planned to build its own HHW center across the street from EDCO’s 68,000-square-foot transfer center. However, EDCO, the County and Long Beach decided to combine their efforts. On Nov. 20, the Long Beach City Council officially approved entering into an agreement with the County of Los Angeles Department of Public Works, the Los Angeles County Sanitation District and EDCO to move forward with the project. The environmental services bureau began designing plans to build an HHW facility after being awarded a one-time $400,000 grant from the state’s CalRecycle department to build a facility and purchase equipment for an HHW collection and transfer site convenient for Long Beach residents. In March last year, the City Council agreed to use the grant funding to reimburse EDCO for redesign expenses and extending a fixed canopy for the HHW facility. Jim Kuhl, manager of the Long Beach Environmental Services

Bureau, said the partnership ended up saving the City of Long Beach more than $3 million that would have otherwise gone to build a new facility. “Through EDCO agreeing to host that facility, it was a great deal for everyone,” he said. “For Long Beach residents, our numberone request for services is a permanent household-hazardous waste facility.” Kuhl said EDCO originally had planned to build a smaller HHW facility, but the grant funds were able to pay for a larger facility and additional equipment such as storage containers and forklifts. The annual operating costs of the facility are being funded by the County through a surcharge on disposal fees at landfills and other disposal sites, which is typically how such programs are funded throughout the county, Kuhl said. Seventh District Long Beach City Councilmember James Johnson said during the council meeting this month that having a convenient facility will ultimately encourage more residents to dispose of such waste properly. “When you have a place to do this locally, not only is it convenient for residents, but it’s more likely resi-

dents will do the right thing and dispose of them properly as opposed to dumping them in the trash or disposing of them improperly in ways we contaminate our waterways, soil and environment,” he said. Efrain Ramirez, vice president and general manager of EDCO, said the HHW collection facility should be a “tremendous benefit” for environment and area residents. He said the center, however, is to be open on a limited basis at first, depending on funds available. “To dispose of household-hazardous waste is a bit expensive,” he said. “It’s better to start slow and incremental.” According to a city staff report, the County will be contracting with a vendor to manage the collection of the HHW, and the facility will be open on the second Saturday of each month, available for all County residents. Efrain said EDCO’s transfer center is currently authorized to handle 1,500 tons of material, including recyclables and trash, per day. Just around the corner, on 28th Street and California Avenue, EDCO opened its 19,000square-foot administration building and truck terminal in mid-October.

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Efrain Ramirez, vice president and general manager of EDCO, known locally as Signal Hill Disposal, stands in front of a heap of waste at the company’s recently opened transfer center, which is slated to include a household-hazardous waste-collection facility.

NOVEMBER 30, 2012

Two local theaters victims of burglaries on consecutive days

Cory Bilicko

Managing Editor

In what appear to be related incidents, two local theater headquarters were victims of burglaries earlier this month. The Long Beach Playhouse reported that it had been burglarized on Monday, Nov. 5, and, the following day, the offices of Musical Theatre West (MTW) also reported a burglary there. According to Nancy Pratt, public information officer for the Long Beach Police Department (LBPD), officers responded around 11:40am on Nov. 5 to the Long Beach Playhouse, located at 5021 East Anaheim St., regarding a theft. “Officers learned that currency, a wallet, and a computer were taken from the business while an employee stepped outside the business for a short time,” states the emailed information provided by Pratt. “It was also learned that the back doors to the building had been open while maintenance was being conducted.” The report also indicates that Playhouse staff said a black male, approximately 24 to 30 years old, with short hair and glasses, was supposedly there to conduct business prior to the theft. Staff indicated that the same suspect had been in the building on a previous occasion. According to a press release issued by Andrew Vonderschmitt, producing artistic director of the Playhouse, the thief got away with about $1,000 in cash, a laptop and an employee’s wallet. “What’s disturbing is we are the second arts organization in a week to have this happen,” Vonderschmitt said. “And based on the description, it appears to be the same individual in both cases. As much as we have enjoyed having an open door to the community at all times, we are now keeping all entrances locked and secured. We are hoping to install a security camera as well.” Madison Mooney, business and operations manager for the Playhouse, said that the suspect had been inquiring about helping out at the theater. “A man was in the [Long Beach Playhouse] lobby asking about volunteering or working on an upcoming production,” Mooney said. “He seemed to know members of the staff by name and said he had an appointment to

meet with one of them.” However, the man had acquired the names from a volunteer who was working on outdoor lighting at the theater, according to Vonderschmitt. When the business manager left her desk for less than a minute to retrieve the mail, the individual took the cash and her wallet, and he apparently took the laptop either as he entered or exited through the back door, according to Vonderschmitt. He also said that, after calling the LBPD, Playhouse staff immediately notified other local theaters, as well as the Long Beach Arts Council, which serves as support to most of the city’s arts organizations. On the day after the Playhouse incident, MTW staff notified the LBPD that there had been a theft at its offices, located at 4350 E. 7th St. According to Pratt, officers responded to MTW at approximately 2:40pm on Nov. 6 regarding a theft. “The reporting party indicated that a male, black subject had entered the business and appeared to be looking around,” states the information provided by Pratt. “After the subject left the business, the caller discovered that a computer and an electronic tablet were missing. The suspect description provided by the caller was similar to the description provided in the Nov. 5, 2012 incident [at the Playhouse]. It is unknown if the same individual is responsible for both incidents, and the investigation remains ongoing.” Vonderschmitt said that, before the burglary, the Playhouse had already begun its annual community campaign, seeking contributions to support its production and education programs, but now that campaign is even more important. “Our goal was to raise $50,000 from our community campaign. Now we have to raise $52,000 to replace the stolen money and laptop,” he said. “I hope the public will help us. We have been a city institution since 1929. That’s 83 years, and we have every intention of being here for another 83 years. We hope the public will help us achieve that goal.” To contribute to the campaign, visit lbplayhouse.org . To donate to MTW, visit musical.org/MusicalTheatreWest/donate.html .

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ST3426 - November 30_Layout 1 11/30/12 11:50 AM Page 9

Things to

DO‌GIVE‌EAT 2012 HOLIDAY IDEAS

Christmas classics restore the magic of the holidays NOVEMBER 30, 2012

Many of these stories do more than entertain – they restore our faith in ourselves and each other. Take a moment to relax in front of the TV this season with friends at home and on screen.

No matter how you celebrate, the holidays are a busy time of year, and they can seem more hectic than joyful. But for many, a key part of their Yuletide traditions is taking time out to relax while watching beloved Christmas movies. There are all kinds of Christmas films, but the true classics are often stories about restoring faith, redemption and coming together. Such movies harken back to days when the holidays were about celebrating peace on Earth and good will toward each other, not the latest gadget or the trendiest toys. Few songs conjure up these feelings while capturing that sense of nostalgia like White Christmas. In fact, the movie that first introduced it to the world, Holiday Inn (1942), celebrates its 70th anniversary this year. Bing Crosby stars as singer Jim Hardy opposite Fred Astaire as Ted Hanover. Laden with Irving Berlin holiday tunes, the movie follows a heartbroken Hardy as he opens a rustic inn and learns to love again. It was loosely remade with White Christmas (1954), in which Crosby teamed up with Danny Kaye, Rosemary Clooney and Vera-Ellen to save a struggling inn by putting on an elaborate Christmas show. With these two classics and the biggest-selling single of all time to his credit, Crosby has become virtually synonymous with the season – but so, too, has legendary actor Jimmy Stewart. His portrayal of a desperate George Bailey in Frank Capra’s It’s a Wonderful Life (1946) has made the film a perennial favorite. After Bailey wishes he’d never been born, a guardian angel shows him what the town of Bedford Falls would be like without him, making him realize just how much he means to his loved ones. The life-affirming story strikes a chord with viewers year after year as we remember to focus on the positive and come together in tough times– an important theme in the wake of the recent financial crisis. On a lighter note, this year also marks the 65th anniversary of Miracle on 34th Street (1947). Edmund Gwenn stars in his Oscar-winning role as Kris Kringle, an elderly gentleman who takes a job as a Macy’s department store Santa in the weeks leading up to Christmas. Insisting that he is, in fact, the real Santa, Kringle is forced to stand before a judge to prove it. The sweet tale epitomizes what it takes to truly have faith as no one has concrete proof of Kringle’s claims. The outcome is as uplifting as any holiday movie, as little Susan (played by a young Natalie Wood) and thousands of other children write letters to Santa, which are delivered to Kringle in the courtroom. Holiday viewing wouldn’t be the same without A Christmas Carol. However, the problem might be choosing a favorite cinematic version of the story, which has been remade time and time again, from a 1908 silent film to a beloved Muppets version and a 2009 animated 3D Disney movie– not to mention countless TV adaptations. Charles Dickens’s story of a miserly Scrooge who learns the error of his selfish ways on Christmas Eve reminds us that giving is, indeed, better than receiving. For all the nostalgia of classic Christmas movies, many contemporary films have made their way into see CHRISTMAS page 12

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DECEMBER 1

10 a.m. (HALL) Movie “Moonlight and Mistletoe” (2008, Drama) Tom Arnold. A woman must return to her hometown of Santaville to help her father. 10:30 a.m. (FAM) Movie “A Dennis the Menace Christmas” (2007, Family) Maxwell Perry Cotton. Dennis the Menace tries to make amends with his neighbor, Mr. Wilson. (FOOD) Pioneer Woman Ree Drummond celebrates the holiday season on the ranch serving up her down-home classics. 11 a.m. (GAC) Christmas Crazy We dash from coast-to-coast to find the most decked-out holiday homes and stores. (LIFE) Movie “Christmas in Paradise” (2007, Family) Colin Ferguson. Two families take a vacation to an exotic Caribbean island over Christmas. 11:30 a.m. (OXY) Movie “The Family Stone” (2005, Drama) Sarah Jessica Parker. A woman meets her boyfriend’s family during the holidays and experiences their judgment. (GAC) Christmas Crazier The ultimate Noon guide to over-the-top Christmas attractions. (HALL) Movie “Naughty or Nice” (2012, Drama) A young woman receives a book that reveals the good and bad about everyone in her life. 12:30 p.m. (FAM) Movie “Miracle on 34th Street” (1994, Drama) Lord Richard Attenborough. A young girl’s mother hires a department store Santa who proves that he’s genuine. 1 p.m. (LIFE) Movie “Recipe for a Perfect Christmas” (2005, Comedy) Christine Baranski. A food critic has her holiday season turned upside down when her mother shows up. 2 p.m. (HALL) Movie “Hitched for the Holidays” (Romance) Joey Lawrence. A man and woman agree to pose as each other’s significant other to their families. 3 p.m. (LIFE) Movie “A Very Merry Daughter of the Bride” (2008, Comedy/Drama) Luke Perry. A daughter who disapproves of her mother’s romance learns that letting go works both ways. 4 p.m. (HALL) Movie “Debbie Macomber’s Mrs. Miracle” (2009, Family) James Van Der Beek. Mrs. Merkle, a nanny, changes the lives of a father and his six-year-old twins. 6 p.m. (FAM) Movie “Jack Frost” (1998, Family) Michael Keaton. After his death, a father comes back as a snowman to make things right with his son. (HALL) Movie “Debbie Macomber’s Call Me Mrs. Miracle” (2010, Drama) Doris Roberts. Mrs. Miracle, a magical lady turns the lives of a group of New Yorkers upside down. 7 p.m. (TLC) Crazy Christmas Lights Go inside the

HolidayTV

homes of America’s most unique, entertaining and wacky decorators. 8 p.m. (FAM) Movie “Elf” (2003, Comedy) Will Ferrell. A man raised as an elf at the North Pole travels to New York to find his true father. (GAC) Christmas with Scotty McCreery & Friends Hot young country stars join forces in this one-hour Christmas special. (NBC) Movie “It’s a Wonderful Life” (1946, Drama) James Stewart. An angel shows a suicidal banker how important he has been in the lives of others. (TLC) Extreme Christmas Trees Captures the anticipation, excitement and joy embodied by the ultimate Christmas icon. 10 p.m. (HALL) Movie “All I Want for Christmas” (2007, Drama) Gail O’Grady. A nine-year-old boy enters a contest to find a new husband for his mother. (LIFE) Movie “Love at the Christmas Table” (2012) Danica McKeller. Two friends who spend Christmas together realize they are meant to be together. (TLC) Holiday ER An elf is in distress and a boy has a blue leg that defies diagnosis. (FAM) Movie “Elf” (2003, Comedy) Will Ferrell. A man raised as an elf at the North Pole travels to New York to find his true father. 11 p.m. (TBN) Christmas with a Capital “C” A man tries to rid his town of a 50 year old Christmas tradition. (TLC) Extreme Christmas Trees Captures the anticipation, excitement and joy embodied by the ultimate Christmas icon. Midnight (HALL) Movie “A Dog Named Christmas” (2009, Family) Bruce Greenwood. A developmentally challenged man convinces his family to adopt a dog for Christmas.

SUNDAY DECEMBER 2

10 a.m. (HALL) Jingle and Bell’s Christmas Star Jingle the husky pup helps make Christmas special for his new friends. 10:30 a.m. (HALL) Hoops and Yoyo Ruin Christmas A comical, pink kitty and a green bunny become accidental stowaways on Santa’s sleigh. 11 a.m. (FAM) Movie “I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus” (2001, Comedy) Cole Sprouse. The comical and touching story of a young boy struggling to keep his family together. (FOOD) Sandwich King Jeff is thinking about ways to work some holiday cheer into his sandwiches. (HALL) Jingle All the Way A Husky puppy looking for a home at a Christmas tree farm bonds with a young boy. (LIFE) Movie “The Christmas Blessing” (2005, Drama) Neil Patrick Harris. A man meets a young woman and little boy who are in need of miracles

for the holidays. 11:30 a.m. (HALL) Jingle and Bell’s Christmas Star Jingle the husky pup helps make Christmas special for his new friends. (HALL) Movie “It’s Christmas, Carol!” (2012, Noon Fantasy) Carrie Fisher. A ruthless tycoon is visited by the ghost of her old boss to help her change her ways. (NICK) Movie “Fairly Odd Christmas” (2012, Children) Timmy Turner travels around the world granting kids’ wishes, and stealing Santa’s thunder. 1 p.m. (FAM) Movie “The Search for Santa Paws” (2010, Children) Reese Alexander. Magic dogs and an elf work together to help Santa regain his memory. (LIFE) Movie “A Christmas Proposal” (2008, Comedy) Nicole Eggert. A lawyer rethinks his proposals to his job and fiancée while rekindling an old romance. 2 p.m. (TLC) Holiday ER An elf is in distress and a boy has a blue leg that defies diagnosis. 3 p.m. (FAM) Movie “Jack Frost” (1998, Family) Michael Keaton. After his death, a father comes back as a snowman to make things right with his son. (LIFE) Movie “Christmas on Chestnut Street” (2006, Comedy/Drama) Kristen Dalton. When a store mistakenly orders 60,000 Christmas lights, they promote a decorating contest. 4 p.m. (HALL) Movie “A Dog Named Christmas” (2009, Family) Bruce Greenwood. A developmentally challenged man convinces his family to adopt a dog for Christmas. 5 p.m. (FAM) Movie “Elf” (2003, Comedy) Will Ferrell. A man raised as an elf at the North Pole travels to New York to find his true father. (LIFE) Movie “Holiday Spin” (2012, Drama) Ralph Macchio. A father and son work together to prepare for a dance competition. 5:15 p.m. (TBS) Movie “The Holiday” (2006, Romance) Cameron Diaz. Two women with romance issues swap homes and fall for men in their new neighbourhoods. 6 p.m. (HALL) Movie “A Christmas Wish” (2010, Family) Kristy Swanson. A woman, left destitute by her husband, faces a bleak Christmas with her children. 7 p.m. (FAM) Movie “Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas” (2000, Fantasy) Jim Carrey. The Grinch disguises himself as Santa to steal Christmas from the people of Whoville. 7:30 p.m. (DISN) Good Luck Charlie 8 p.m. (HALL) Movie “The Christmas Heart” (2012, Drama) Teri Polo. A boy’s neighborhood bands together when he is hospitalized and in need of a transplant. (NICK) Movie “Fairly Odd Christmas” (2012, Children) Timmy Turner travels around the world grant-

ing kids’ wishes, and stealing Santa’s thunder. (TBS) Movie “Four Christmases” (2009, Comedy) Vince Vaughn. A couple struggles to spend Christmas with all four of their divorced parents. 9 p.m. (LIFE) Movie “Finding Mrs. Clause” (2012, Drama) Mira Sorvino. Mrs. Clause heads to Las Vegas to help a little girl with her Christmas wish. (NGEO) Evacuate Earth Imagine a future where the Earth’s destruction forces man to another hospitable planet. 9:30 p.m. (FAM) Movie “Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas” (2000, Fantasy) Jim Carrey. The Grinch disguises himself as Santa to steal Christmas from the people of Whoville. 10 p.m. (HALL) Movie “The Christmas Card” (2006, Drama) Edward Asner. Moved by an anonymous Christmas card, Captain Cody Cullen searches for the card’s sender. (TBN) Movie “Love’s Christmas Journey” (2011, Romance) Ellie Davis. A woman’s brother goes missing while she’s visiting him during the Christmas holiday. (TBS) Movie “Four Christmases” (2009, Comedy) Vince Vaughn. A couple struggles to spend Christmas with all four of their divorced parents. 11:30 p.m. (TOON) Family Guy When Peter gives the family’s presents away, they have to go shopping on Christmas Eve. Midnight (HALL) Movie “A Christmas Visitor” (2002, Drama) Meredith Baxter. A visitor enters the lives of grieving parents to help them remember the joy of Christmas. (NGEO) Evacuate Earth Imagine a future where the Earth’s destruction forces man to another hospitable planet.

MONDAY

DECEMBER 3

(HALL) Movie “A Christmas Visitor” (2002, Noon Drama) Meredith Baxter. A visitor enters the lives of grieving parents to help them remember the joy of Christmas. 1 p.m. (HGTV) Holiday Inc. Time Warner Center, Lord & Taylor, and Macy’s 34th street flagship store are transformed. 2 p.m. (HALL) Movie “When Angels Come to Town” (2004, Family) Peter Falk. An angel comes to Earth at Christmas to help two very different families in need. 2:30 p.m. (FOOD) 30 Minute Meals A couple of easy but tasty appetizers become a can’t miss weeknight supper. 4 p.m. (HALL) Movie “Finding John Christmas” (2003, Drama) Valerie Bertinelli. A woman searches for her brother, a former fireman hero, who disappeared many years ago. 5 p.m. (FAM) ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas

NOVEMBER 30, 2012

The citizens of a small town learn that Santa has struck their town off his delivery list. (FOOD) Paula’s Best Dishes Amy and Suzette cook up a delicious Christmas meal with Paula. 5:30 p.m. (FAM) Rudolph’s Shiny New Year Rudolph must find Happy, the missing baby new year, before midnight on New Year’s Eve. 6 p.m. (HALL) Movie “A Town Without Christmas” (2001, Drama) Patricia Heaton. A reporter and a novelist try to locate a child who wrote a disturbing letter to Santa. 6:30 p.m. (FAM) Movie “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer and the Island of Misfit Toys” (2001, Animated) Voices of Jamie Lee Curtis. Rudolph and his friends must stop the evil Toy Taker who has taken all of Santa’s toys. 8 p.m. (FAM) Movie “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” (1989, Comedy) Chevy Chase. A man plays host to numerous dysfunctional relatives during the Christmas holidays. (HALL) Movie “Silver Bells” (2005, Drama) Anne Heche. A widower and a young woman help each other to put their painful pasts behind them. (TOON) Regular Show Mordecai and Rigby have to destroy a gift for Santa, to save Christmas. 8:30 p.m. (TOON) Annoying Orange Orange is spoiling the holiday cheer until a visit from three ghosts. 10 p.m. (FAM) Movie “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” (1989, Comedy) Chevy Chase. A man plays host to numerous dysfunctional relatives during the Christmas holidays. (HALL) Movie “Mistletoe Over Manhattan” (2011, Family) Tricia Helfer. When Santa considers retirement, Mrs. Claus tries to prove that his work still brings joy. (NBC) Blake Shelton’s Not-So-Family Christmas Blake Shelton’s first Christmas special includes holiday classics, new music and more. Midnight (FAM) Movie “Chasing Christmas” (2005, Comedy) Tom Arnold. The Ghost of Christmas Past escapes and leaves his subject trapped in his past. (HALL) Movie “The Santa Suit” (2010, Comedy) Kevin Sorbo. The president of a marketing firm is turned into a Santa lookalike.

TUESDAY

DECEMBER 4

(HALL) Movie “A Town Without Christmas” Noon (2001, Drama) Patricia Heaton. A reporter and a novelist try to locate a child who wrote a disturbing letter to Santa. 1 p.m. (FOOD) Sandra’s Money Saving Meals Sandra makes a holiday feast that will leave money left over for holiday shopping. 2:30 p.m. (FOOD) 30 Minute Meals A holiday seafood spread features tuna and vegetable salad and shrimp scampi.

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NOVEMBER 30, 2012

4 p.m. (HALL) Movie “The Santa Suit” (2010, Comedy) Kevin Sorbo. The president of a marketing firm is turned into a Santa lookalike. 4:30 p.m. (FAM) Rudolph’s Shiny New Year Rudolph must find Happy, the missing baby new year, before midnight on New Year’s Eve. 5:30 p.m. (FAM) Mickey’s Christmas Carol The three ghosts of Christmas visit Scrooge McDuck to teach him the spirit of the holiday. (TOON) Abominable Christmas Two abominable snowkids are forced to spend Christmas with humans. 6 p.m. (FAM) Winnie the Pooh and Christmas Too! Pooh and Piglet play Santa when their Christmas letter doesn’t make it to the North Pole. (GAC) Christmas with Scotty McCreery & Friends Hot young country stars join forces in this one-hour Christmas special. (HALL) Movie “Eloise at Christmastime” (2003, Family) Sofia Vassilieva. It’s Christmastime and Eloise gets mixed up with wedding plans at the Plaza Hotel. 6:30 p.m. (FAM) Jack Frost Jack Frost wants to leave his North Pole existence and become human. (TOON) Scooby Doo: Haunted Holidays Scooby Doo and the gang participate in a holiday parade; a snowman haunts the streets. 7 p.m. (TOON) Amazing World of Gumball Santa Clause gets run over by the Wattersons who must then save Christmas. 7:30 p.m. (FAM) Frosty’s Winter Wonderland The children build Frosty a companion out of snow after noticing how sad he has become. (TOON) The Looney Tunes Show Lola stages her own version of ‘A Christmas Carol’ to renew the town’s holiday spirit. 8 p.m. (CBS) Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer A young reindeer and an elf search for a home where they will be accepted as they are. (FAM) Movie “Elf” (2003, Comedy) Will Ferrell. A man raised as an elf at the North Pole travels to New York to find his true father. (GAC) The Making of Cheers, its Christmas with Blake Shelton and Friends Blake Shelton gives viewers a behind the scenes look at the recording of his new album. (HALL) Movie “The Dog Who Saved Christmas” (2009, Comedy) Mario Lopez. A guard dog reaches his full potential when his house is broken into during the holidays. 10 p.m. (FAM) Movie “Fred Claus” (2007, Comedy) Paul Giamatti. Santa bails his criminal brother out of jail and brings him to the North Pole. (FOOD) Chopped The holiday-themed battle features spiral ham, Italian cookies and eggnog. (GAC) Christmas with Scotty McCreery & Friends

HolidayTV

Hot young country stars join forces in this one-hour Christmas special. (HALL) Movie “Farewell Mr. Kringle” (2010, Comedy) Christine Taylor. A journalist writes about a Santa Claus impersonator who lives in a Christmas-themed town. Midnight (GAC) The Making of Cheers, its Christmas with Blake Shelton and Friends Blake Shelton gives viewers a behind the scenes look at the recording of his new album. (HALL) Movie “The Christmas Secret” (2000, Family) Richard Thomas. A zoology professor sets out to prove that reindeers can fly and discovers Christmas.

WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 5

10:30 a.m. (FOOD) Hungry Girl Lisa has to convince Santa that guilt-free goodies do exist. 11 a.m. (STYLE) Katy Perry Katy Perry is an American singer-songwriter, musician and a bundle of contradictions. (HALL) Movie “The Dog Who Saved ChristNoon mas” (2009, Comedy) Mario Lopez. A guard dog reaches his full potential when his house is broken into during the holidays. 2 p.m. (GAC) Christmas with Scotty McCreery & Friends Hot young country stars join forces in this one-hour Christmas special. (HALL) Movie “The Christmas Secret” (2000, Family) Richard Thomas. A zoology professor sets out to prove that reindeers can fly and discovers Christmas. 2:30 p.m. (FAM) Movie “Fred Claus” (2007, Comedy) Paul Giamatti. Santa bails his criminal brother out of jail and brings him to the North Pole. 4 p.m. (HALL) Movie “Farewell Mr. Kringle” (2010, Comedy) Christine Taylor. A journalist writes about a Santa Claus impersonator who lives in a Christmas-themed town. 5 p.m. (FAM) Movie “Elf” (2003, Comedy) Will Ferrell. A man raised as an elf at the North Pole travels to New York to find his true father. (GAC) On this Winter’s Night: Lady Antebellum Lady Antebellum performs a special holiday concert. 6 p.m. (GAC) George Strait ACM Artist of the Decade An all-star performance line-up in tribute of George Strait and his 25-year career. (HALL) Movie “Debbie Macomber’s Trading Christmas” (2011, Romance) Gil Bellows. A man and woman find love at the most unexpected time and have the best Christmas ever. 7 p.m. (FAM) Movie “Home Alone” (1990, Comedy) Macaulay Culkin. A young boy must fend off

burglars after his family accidentally leaves him home alone. (TNT) The Mentalist The CBI pursues two lines of investigation when a Santa is murdered. 7:30 p.m. (FX) Two and a Half Men Alan dates a Martha Stewart-like woman who takes over the house at Christmas. (TOON) Smurfs: A Christmas Carol The ghosts of Christmas past, present and future teach Grouchy Smurf to appreciate C’mas. 8 p.m. (ABC) The Middle (HALL) Movie “Naughty or Nice” (2012, Drama) A young woman receives a book that reveals the good and bad about everyone in her life. 9 p.m. (FAM) Movie “The Polar Express” (2004, Animated) Voices of Tom Hanks. A doubting, little boy boards a magical train to visit the North Pole on Christmas Eve. (GAC) On this Winter’s Night: Lady Antebellum Lady Antebellum performs a special holiday concert. 10 p.m. (A&E) Duck Dynasty The family gears up for Miss Kay’s big Christmas party, featuring the Pirducken. (GAC) George Strait ACM Artist of the Decade An all-star performance line-up in tribute of George Strait and his 25-year career. (HALL) Movie “Hitched for the Holidays” (Romance) Joey Lawrence. A man and woman agree to pose as each other’s significant other to their families. Midnight (FAM) Movie “Home Alone” (1990, Comedy) Macaulay Culkin. A young boy must fend off burglars after his family accidentally leaves him home alone.

THURSDAY

DECEMBER 6

10 a.m. (FOOD) Challenge Four cake designers take on classic Christmas tales and carols. 1 p.m. (TRAVEL) Christmas to the Extreme Join us as we celebrate Christmas with those who truly take Christmas to the extreme. 2 p.m. (GAC) On this Winter’s Night: Lady Antebellum Lady Antebellum performs a special holiday concert. (HALL) Movie “Eve’s Christmas” (2004, Drama) Cheryl Ladd. An executive about to become a partner in her firm re-evaluates her life on Christmas Eve. 3 p.m. (GAC) George Strait ACM Artist of the Decade An all-star performance line-up in tribute of George Strait and his 25-year career. 4 p.m. (FAM) Rudolph and Frosty’s Christmas in July During a July vacation, Rudolph and Frosty

find themselves in danger.

(HALL) Movie “A Christmas Wish” (2010, Family)

Kristy Swanson. A woman, left destitute by her husband, faces a bleak Christmas with her children. 6 p.m. (FAM) Movie “The Polar Express” (2004, Animated) Voices of Tom Hanks. A doubting, little boy boards a magical train to visit the North Pole on Christmas Eve. (FOOD) Cupcake Wars Four bakers battle for a place among the stars at the Hollywood Christmas Parade. (HALL) Movie “It’s Christmas, Carol!” (2012, Fantasy) Carrie Fisher. A ruthless tycoon is visited by the ghost of her old boss to help her change her ways. 8 p.m. (FAM) Movie “A Christmas Carol” (2009, Animated) Jim Carrey. Spirits visit Ebenezer Scrooge and show him the errors of his ways by revisiting his life. (TOON) MAD The kids of Fantastic Four deal with yuletide villains; Santa teams up with the FBI. 10 p.m. (FAM) Movie “Elf” (2003, Comedy) Will Ferrell. A man raised as an elf at the North Pole travels to New York to find his true father. (FOOD) Sweet Genius In the first test, competitors face a fabled pudding and a classic yuletide candy. (HALL) Movie “Eve’s Christmas” (2004, Drama) Cheryl Ladd. An executive about to become a partner in her firm re-evaluates her life on Christmas Eve. Midnight (FAM) Movie “Elf” (2003, Comedy) Will Ferrell. A man raised as an elf at the North Pole travels to New York to find his true father. (HALL) Movie “A Christmas Wish” (2010, Family) Kristy Swanson. A woman, left destitute by her husband, faces a bleak Christmas with her children.

FRIDAY

DECEMBER 7

(HALL) Movie “Fallen Angel” (2003, Noon Drama) Gary Sinise. A big-city lawyer returns to his small hometown and reconnects with a childhood friend. 2 p.m. (FOOD) Secrets of a Restaurant Chef How to prepare a special meal for a group, using a few restaurant tips and tricks. (HALL) Movie “Our First Christmas” (2008, Drama) John Ratzenberger. Two widows try to please their children so the two families can spend Christmas together. 3 p.m. (FAM) Movie “Elf” (2003, Comedy) Will Ferrell. A man raised as an elf at the North Pole trav-

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els to New York to find his true father. 4 p.m. (HALL) Movie “November Christmas” (2010, Drama) John Corbett. Neighbors band together to create Halloween and Christmas moments for a young girl. (LIFE) Movie “A Very Cool Christmas” (2004, Drama) George Hamilton. A teenager helps Santa Claus recapture his spark by giving him a makeover. 5 p.m. (FAM) Movie “A Christmas Carol” (2009, Animated) Jim Carrey. Spirits visit Ebenezer Scrooge and show him the errors of his ways by revisiting his life. 5:30 p.m. (FX) How I Met Your Mother Marshall and Lily’s shocking news affects the rest of the gang profoundly. 6 p.m. (HALL) Movie “A Season for Miracles” (1999, Drama) Patty Duke. A woman leaves with her sister’s children in an attempt to keep them from foster care. 7 p.m. (FAM) Movie “The Santa Clause” (1994, Comedy) Tim Allen. When a father mistakenly kills Santa Claus, he is magically recruited to take his place. 8 p.m. (HALL) Movie “The Christmas Heart” (2012, Drama) Teri Polo. A boy’s neighborhood bands together when he is hospitalized and in need of a transplant. (LIFE) Movie “Finding Mrs. Clause” (2012, Drama) Mira Sorvino. Mrs. Clause heads to Las Vegas to help a little girl with her Christmas wish. 9 p.m. (FAM) Movie “The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause” (2007, Family) Tim Allen. Santa Claus prepares for a busy Christmas with his inlaws and the mischievous Jack Frost. (NBC) Blake Shelton’s Not-So-Family Christmas Blake Shelton’s first Christmas special includes holiday classics, new music and more. (TCM) Movie “The Shop Around the Corner” (1940, Romance) James Stewart. A pair of co-workers do not realize that they are each other’s lonelyheart pen-pals. 10 p.m. (HALL) Movie “Santa Jr.” (2002, Comedy) Nick Stabile. Santa’s adult son learns the spirit of Christmas when he takes over the family business. (LIFE) Movie “Holiday Spin” (2012, Drama) Ralph Macchio.A father and son work together to prepare for a dance competition. Midnight (EWTN) The Footprints of God Follow Mary on her extraordinary journey. (FAM) Movie “12 Dates of Christmas” (2011, Comedy) Amy Smart. A young woman relives the same first date on Christmas Eve over and over again. (HALL) Movie “A Christmas Wedding Tail” (2011, Comedy) Shawn Ardalan. Two dog owners owners fall in love and it’s up to the pets to perform a Christmas miracle.

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THINGS TO DO...GIVE...EAT Christmas

NOVEMBER 30, 2012

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viewers’ hearts as well. The Polar Express (2004) is one of the most visually stunning examples of a modern-day holiday classic. On Christmas Eve, a young boy doubts the existence of Santa Claus, only to be whisked away by train to the North Pole in this computer-animated fantasy. Many other releases have become classics thanks to their lighthearted approach. In 1983, A Christmas Story became an instant favorite with the story of young Ralphie who, like so many kids at Christmastime, sets his sights on one coveted Christmasmorning prize– a Red Ryder BB gun. Clark Griswold’s (Chevy Chase) dreams for a perfect family holiday go awry in National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation (1989), as he comes to learn that what he has means so much more than any picture-perfect Norman Rockwell Christmas. Funnymen Tim Allen and Will Ferrell also made the jump from TV to movies thanks to some modern-day holiday classics. Allen’s 1994 hit The Santa Clause found him taking up the mantle of Santa after an unfortunate Christmas Eve accident, whereas Ferrell’s Elf (2003) sends him to New York to find his biological father after

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A scene from “A Christmas Story” growing up in the North Pole. Bill Murray and Billy Bob Thornton have even conveyed jaded takes on the holiday season with their badboy Christmas comedies Scrooged (1988) and Bad Santa (2003), respectively. With an abundance of Christmas movies to choose from, it’s difficult to believe there’s room for more, but each year new movies pop up, hoping to capture the hearts and imaginations of young and old. Hallmark Hall of Fame is the force behind the holiday romance Christmas With Holly, premiering Sunday, Dec. 9, on ABC. Toy store owner Maggie (Eliose Mumford) falls for a man who’s been raising his six-year-old niece since his sister passed away. That same day, ABC Family premieres The Mistle-Tones, starring Tia Mowry and Tori Spelling. Singer Holly (Mowry) loses out on a spot in a legendary vocal group when the part goes to the best

GIFT

CERTIFICATES

friend of the group’s leader, Marci (Spelling). Undeterred, she starts her own group and prepares to face off against Marci in a sing-off on Christmas Eve. Over on the Hallmark Channel, it boasts 12 new holiday programs in the weeks leading up to the holiday. A Bride for Christmas stars Arielle Kebbel as Jessie Patterson, whose latest crush (Andrew Walker) has secretly made a bet with his friends that he can convince a woman to marry him by Christmas. Later in the month, Summer Glau and Eva La Rue star in Help for the Holidays, the tale of an elf (Glau) who travels to L.A. to help a family rediscover their Christmas spirit. Check the local listings section on pages 10 and 11 for airtimes for all your favorite Christmas movies– old and new– that feature stories about restoring faith, coming together and turning skeptics into believers.

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ST3426 - November 30_Layout 1 11/30/12 11:50 AM Page 13

NOVEMBER 30, 2012

THINGS TO DO...GIVE...EAT

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Television fans may recognize the name Jeraldine Saunders as that of the author of the book Love Boats, which inspired the hit television series The Love Boat. What most fans don’t know is that the book was autobiographical in nature and that Saunders had been one of the first female cruise directors in the world. To share her expertise with novice and seasoned “cruisers,” Saunders later penned another book, Cruise Diary. Her readers have found it to be the perfect cruise accessory. Within the pages of the elegant hardbound Cruise Diary, readers will find information that can help guarantee a carefree and joyful vacation at sea. Having lived at sea seven days a week, 11 months each year for more than eight years as a cruise director, Saunders has written a book that offers tips that only someone who has worked and lived on ships as a cruise director could share. Chapters in Cruise Diary include: packing, dressing for ship and shore, dining and shipboard tipping, embarkation, disembarkation, immigration and customs. Also included are sections for the cruiser to record diary notes, purchases, port lecture notes and names and contact information of new shipboard friends. There are also pages designed for mounting photos taken by the ship’s photographer. In the months and years following a voyage, Cruise Diary will allow cruisers to relive the excitement of the trip, as everything was documented in his or her own handwriting, including memories of the many beautiful sights and all the shipboard adventures. “Cruises were created for fun and relaxation, and they are

Poly

continued from page 1

the rapidly growing field of Linked Learning, a new approach to education that “provides students with strong academics connected to realworld experience.” School districts locally and across California are now closely watching such programs as recently passed state legislation aims to “evolve” the Academic Performance Index (API) to include more indicators of college and career readiness as a complement to standardized-test scores for measuring school-success rates. Take for instance a recent debate among 11th-grade students. In front of a room full of peers, 16-year-old Alexus Asher defends why global powers, such as the World Trade Organization (WTO) and the United Nations, should be able to “rule the world” some day. “It’s not always going to be fair,” she declares. “Somebody is going to get less and somebody is going to get more … it just depends on who you’re trading with.” On the other side, 16-year-old Mari Molen-Radcliffe shoots back that the WTO fails to help undeveloped countries and only focuses on eliminating tariffs without taking into account human rights. “The WTO is the international organization whose primary purpose is to open up trade for the benefit of all,

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filled with days and nights of enjoyment. I believe Cruise Diary is a wonderful gift for a friend during the holiday season, or a memorable way for Signal Tribune travelers to relive their own cruise experiences for years to come– I wish them all happy sailing,” said Saunders during a recent interview. Cruise Diary is now available exclusively at Urban Cottage this holiday season at $10 per copy. Located in Bixby Knolls at 4121 Long Beach Blvd., Urban Cottage is open Tuesday – Saturday 11am to 5pm and Sundays Noon – 4pm. Visit www.urbancottagelb.com for more holiday ideas or call owner Melissa at (562) 997-4121 for details.

but they don’t benefit all,” she says. The discussion was a practice run for the students who participated in a world trade conference and summit at the school’s library on Dec. 3, gearing up for debates in the spring semester that will involve cash prizes. “This is a good format for you to be able to answer questions on your feet [and] to be able to come up with a good argument,” explains Libby Huff, who teaches the class. Although Poly High School receives more than 600 applications each year, Huff said the school is only able to accept about 70 students into the program. “There is definitely an interest … to be in an academy that prepares students for business and a global environment,” she said. The program is particularly fitting in Long Beach, considered the “International City” and home to the second busiest seaport in the country. In fact, Huff said the academy was instrumental in developing the Port of Long Beach’s internship program about five years ago. She said, just last year, the Port hired more than 30 high-school students as interns and many students have continued on into careers. “Once they graduate, it’s a little harder to keep track of them, but we have had many students who have come back and said, ‘Yes, I work in some capacity at the Port or international business or in some other industry,’” Huff said. The internships not only keep students actively involved in their edu-

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cation, but also directly connect them with what employers are looking for in today’s labor market, she added. “What employers are looking for isn’t necessarily a skill set … what they’re really looking for is somebody who is ready to work, shows up on time, knows how to get along in a team environment and can hit the ground running,” Huff said. “And that’s really the skill sets we are focused on here.” Hilary McLean, deputy director of Linked Learning Alliance, a statewide association that promotes combining rigorous academics with challenging career-focused education, said the Long Beach Unified School District has committed to take the Linked Learning approach district-wide. “Long Beach is a real shining example,” she said. “Their implementation of Linked Learning is really highly regarded, and their student-success rate is really impressive.” A report released last year by the Career Academy Support Network at the University of California, Berkeley that reviewed test scores, attendance and graduation rates of academies from 2009-2010 found that 95 percent of seniors attending such academies go on to graduate, compared with 85 percent of students statewide. The study also found that 57 percent of graduates from such academies fulfilled the courses required for admission to University of California or Califor-

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Eleventh-grade students of Polytechnic High School’s Pacific Rim Academy take part in a practice debate before participating in a world trade conference and summit at the school’s library on Dec. 3.

nia State University systems, compared to 36 percent of graduates statewide. In addition, even though 50 percent of students enrolled in the academies enter the program as “at-risk students,” they perform better than students at other California high schools, according to the report. McLean said such academies are becoming more of the norm at high schools across California, particularly after recently enacted legislation known as SB 1458, which aims to change the state’s API to better measure a school’s ability to prepare students for college and career pathways. She said the California State

Department of Education and public school advisory committees are currently coming up with recommendations about how the API should evolve. “There’s been a whole evolution of our educational system, and 15 years ago, we didn’t even have standardized tests,” McLean said. “We’ve built in accountability with statewide tests … and had a vision that it would expand and evolve to include other factors that were reliable and valid … Unfortunately, we stalled out there for a variety of reasons … We’re at a place now where there’s really exciting work happening to look at this anew.”

ST3426 - November 30_Layout 1 11/30/12 11:50 AM Page 14

14 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

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CITY OF SIGNAL HILL TST4241 NoTICE oF A PUBlIC HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Signal Hill, California, will hold the following public hearings: December 11, 2012: Planning Commission at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chamber located at City Hall, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California

December 18, 2012: City Council at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chamber located at City Hall, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California (Conditional Use Permit ONLY)

Subject: SITE PLAN AND DESIGN REVIEW 12-05 & CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 12-03

PROJECT A REQUEST TO CONSTRUCT A 5,432 SQUARE FOOT APPLEBEE’S RESTAURANT DESCRIPTION: AT THE SIGNAL HILL GATEWAY SHOPPING CENTER AT 899 SPRING STREET IN THE SP-6, COMMERCIAL CORRIDOR SPECIFIC PLAN, ZONING DISTRICT. PROPOSAL INCLUDES CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT ALLOWING THE SALE AND ON-SITE CONSUMPTION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES APPLICANT: Perkowitz + Ruth Architects for Applebee’s and Signal Hill Petroleum AN ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT (EIR) for the subject retail shopping center project (State Clearinghouse No. 2000061137) was certified by the City Council on August 7, 2001. The EIR, as well as material relevant to the proposed project, may be inspected by the public between the hours of 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and on Fridays from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in the Community Development Department located on the lower floor of City Hall.

ALL INTERESTED PERSONS are hereby invited to attend this public hearing to present written information, express their opinions, or otherwise present evidence on the above matter. If you wish to legally challenge any action taken by the City on the above matter, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing as described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the City prior to or at the public hearing. Written comments may be submitted to the Community Development Department prior to or at the public hearing. You may also email us with your comments and/or concerns at HYPERLINK "mailto:scharney@cityofsignalhill.org" scharney@cityofsignalhill.org.

FURTHER INFORMATION on this item may be obtained at the City of Signal Hill Community Development Department located at 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, or by calling Scott Charney, Planning Manager at (562) 989-7343. Published in the Signal Tribune newspaper: November 30, 2012 Posted in accordance with S.H.M.C. Section 1.08.010: November 30, 2012 Mailed to affected property owners within 300’ on or before: November 30, 2012

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CULTURE

NOVEMBER 30, 2012

Lemon Boots takes huge strides at CSULB Daniel Adams Culture Writer

Forget all you know, or think you know, about live theatre. You know those performances as always being the routine of just you and maybe a friend or companion showing up to the theatre as an audience member, ticket in hand, ushered to your seat? You prepare as the lights dim to sit back just as comfortably as you would in your own home, for a presentation before you brought on by actors, a plot line, and maybe some special effects thrown in just to keep things interesting. Let me inform you, my fellow theatre goers, that now those routine times have changed. It’s time to wake up and attend a new kind of production and be entertained by the resounding, thoughtful, picturesque, music-filled enlightenment of Lemon Boots, directed by Ezra LeBank. Mr. LeBank is currently an assistant professor of theatre arts and head of movement at California State University, Long Beach, and the artistic director of the Curbside Company. He has a résumé within the theatre arts that is so long and impressive, including teaching at The Juilliard School, to name just one of his many accomplishments, that my only hope could be that my mother never meets him for fear of trading me in for a more impressive model! The storyline for Lemon Boots as it was presented to me by the University Players was that a girl named Lemon finds herself thrown off course in her life. With her identity suddenly removed, she now must make the journey to rediscover that which makes her who she is in a world that already is trying to make its way without water, a world of post-apocalyptic desolation. The audience itself is brought into the action as the young performers from the CSULB University Players take on the roles of every creature, every emotion, every part of Lemon’s journey. The music that is played to enhance the wonder and performances in Lemon Boots makes up a character all its own and sets much of the tone, the feeling, and the emotion that is only enhanced by the performers onstage.

Photos courtesy CSULB

In Lemon Boots, a girl named Lemon finds herself thrown off course in her life.

I have to make mention of the great cast for this show by name because this very talented group of young actors and dancers deserve praise for the wonderful fluidity of movement that they presented in Lemon Boots. It was their energy, their dedication to the story and their complete interest in what the show has to say to us as the audience that kept me riveted to their every movement and the emotions they presented before me. You should make plans now to see these wonderful actors in action: Jamiel Abdelrazzaq, Sebastian Arboleda, Christopher Bearden, Chelsea Brynd, Jose

Corea, Penny De Vera, Andrew Douglas, Liliana Frandsen, Lottie Frick, Marissa Ibarra, Benji Kaufman, Jeff McCarthy, Diego Parada, Israel Powe, Jocelyn Sanchez and Rachel Zink. Lemon Boots is performed in the Studio Theatre on the CSULB, South Campus (accessible via West Campus Drive). There will be three more performances: Friday, Nov. 30 at 8pm; and Saturday, Dec. 1 at 2pm and 8pm. Tickets are $15 for general admission and $12 for seniors and students (with a valid student ID). For more information, call (562) 985-5526 or visit csulb.edu/depts/theatre .

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ST3426 - November 30_Layout 1 11/30/12 11:50 AM Page 15

CULTURE

The circus is coming!

NOVEMBER 30, 2012

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

(Well, the posters anyway)

15

This Lewis Brothers three-ring circus poster will be among those on display in Big Zinky Gallery, located in the Expo Arts Center

!ive Ar" Mainstage

Poster publicizing the Coles Brothers cir- Sally Key co-curated the circus-poster exhibit that will be on display at Gallery cus, which began in 1884 Expo beginning Saturday, Dec. 8.

Big Zinky Gallery, located in the Expo Arts Center, 4321 Atlantic Ave., will host the largest circus poster show the west coast has ever seen. Curated by Mac Productions and Sally Key (who is weeks away from earning a bachelor’s degree in art from Cal State Long Beach), and covering a period from 1895 through the early 1970s, the show features posters from Barnum & Bailey, Cole Brothers, Ringling Bros., A.G. Kelly, Clyde Beatty, Hanneford, Pollack Bros. and Lewis Bros. as well as many featured

individual artists from the Golden & Silver Ages of circus history. Filled with vivid colors and iconic images, many of the posters still have the city and date tags attached. Lithographic and silk-screening mediums are included with many from publishing companies across the United States, including Erie Litho, Enquirer Printing, Globe Poster and Neal Walters to name a few. Advance circus posters large and small were put up days ahead of actual arrival dates to create interest and excitement

and are truly a piece of Americana. “There really is something for everyone in this very unusual, unique circus poster show... young and old, a varied price range, this is one of the more interesting shows that I have curated,” Key said. Opening night will be Saturday, Dec. 8 from 7pm to 11pm and is open to the general public. The exhibit will be available for viewing until Saturday, Dec. 22. For more information, visit bigzinky.com or call (310) 8959945.

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PUBLIC NOTICES TST4235 RoBERT AND J.C. MIllS 1949 oRIZABA AVENUE SIGNAl HIll, CA 90755

SIGNAL HILL CODE VIOLATION FINAL NOTICE AND ORDER FOR ABATEMENT OF NUISANCE (Signal Hill Municipal Code § 8.12.080) Subject Property: 1949 Orizaba Avenue Legal Description: LA County Map Book 11, Page 175 (further description below) Assessor’s Number: 7217-006-038 TO THE OWNER, AGENT OF THE OWNER, LESSEE, OCCUPANT, INTEREST HOLDER, OR PERSON IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY LISTED ABOVE: The City continues to receive reports of excessive weeds and trash on the Subject Property. Photographic evidence submitted reveals a damaged mailbox in front left unrepaired, and overgrown plants and weeds throughout the property. Our files indicate this is an ongoing issue. As a responsible party pursuant to Signal Hill Municipal Code (“SHMC”) section 8.12.030, you are formally advised that these items constitute public nuisances under the following section(s) of the SHMC: SHMC Sections 8.12.010 A, K and R: A “public nuisance” is defined as: (Section A) Anything which is injurious to health, indecent or offensive to the senses, or an obstruction to the free use of property so as to interfere with the comfortable enjoyment of life or property by a neighborhood or by any considerable number of persons. (Section K) Refuse deposited upon private property, or upon any public street or alley, or upon any City owned property. For proposes of this section, “refuse” shall include any discarded of cast-off object or material which may include, by way of example, but shall not be limited to, paper, cardboard, plant materials, scrap metals, obsolete household appliances and furniture, paving and building material, and human and household waste. (Section R) All landscaped front and street side yards deemed by the city abatement officer to be unattractive and constitute a public nuisance by reason of one or more of the following: • Failure to regularly remove trash, debris, accumulated leaves or plant clippings; • Failure to regularly mow, weed, fertilize or prune landscaping; • Failure to restore or replant missing or dead plant materials • Failure to mow grass, weeds, undergrowth in excess of twelve (12) inches in height. SHMC Section 8.20.010 Nuisance declared--Property owner's duty to abate. All weeds in the city are declared to be a public nuisance. All owners of property in the city are required to keep their respective property and the sidewalk (that portion of the street between the curbline and the property line) in front of their respective property free from all weeds. The overgrown vegetation has been deemed unattractive pursuant to SHMC § 8.12.010(R) because there exist weeds of over twelve (12) inches in height, and because such vegetation is not properly trimmed and not otherwise maintained in a manner comparable to the photographs labeled “attractive” in the exhibit of photographs entitled, "Attractive and Unattractive Landscaped Yards," dated April 13, 1999, on file in the City of Signal Hill Community Development Department at 2175 Cherry Ave., Signal Hill, CA, 90755. The overgrown vegetation also constitutes a nuisance because it creates a risk of harborage for vermin (skunks/feral cats, etc.). YOU MUST TAKE THE FOLLOWING ACTIONS TO ABATE THE ABOVE NUISANCES WITHIN FIFTEEN (15) DAYS OF THE DATE OF THIS NOTICE AND ORDER. Required Corrections: • Clear property of overgrown weeds/plants (front and rear) • Clear property of all junk, trash, and debris • Repair or remove damaged mailbox To correct the overgrown vegetation, it must be cut back and kept properly trimmed and maintained, so that it is comparable to the photographs labeled “attractive” in the exhibit of photographs entitled, "Attractive and Unattractive Landscaped Yards," dated April 13, 1999, on file in the City of Signal Hill Community Development Department at 2175 Cherry Ave., Signal Hill, CA, 90755. If the nuisance is not completely abated within fifteen days as specified in this notice and order, the city may initiate abatement procedures and abate the nuisance by City personnel or private contractors, with responsible parties being liable for all cost incurred to initiate abatement procedures and to abate the nuisance, including but not limited to all cost of inspection, investigation, assessment, repair, mitigation, remediation, removal, rehabilitation, security, storage, traffic control, law enforcement protection and other consequential direct and indirect cost relating to such abatement, including all administrative and legal fees and cost, as well as any and all cost incurred pursuant Section 8.12.050 and Section 8.12.080. These cost and fees shall be recoverable by the City notwithstanding any subsequent corrective action or abatement of the nuisance by any responsible party taken after the City has initiated abatement procedures, commencing with the serving of this notice and order. You may appeal the determinations set forth in this notice and order to the City Council by serving a written request for such an appeal to the City Clerk within fifteen days from the date of the service of this notice and order. Failure to file an appeal with the City Council within this fifteen-day time period shall constitute a waiver of the party’s rights to contest the determinations set forth in this notice and order (SHMC 8.12.080 E). Legal Description of Property: The subject property is situated in the City of Signal Hill, Los Angeles County, California, on premises described as: LOT NUMBER: 1; SUBDIVISION: PARK LANE TRACT #2; CITY/MUNI/TWNSP: SIGNAL HILL; MAP: MB11 PG 175. Should you have any questions, or require additional information, please contact this office immediately at (562) 9897340. Thank you. Sincerely, Colleen Doan, Associate Planner Community Development Department, City of Signal Hill Published in the Signal Tribune 11/30/12.

www.kathyalford.com TST4232 Title No. 6490235 ALS No. 2012-4522 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT OF A LIEN, DATED APRIL 2, 2012. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT: On 12/12/2012, at 9:00 AM, ASSOCIATION LIEN SERVICES, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to a certain lien, recorded on April 5, 2012, as instrument number 20120513842, of the official records of Los Angeles County, California. WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR LAWFUL MONEY OF THE UNITED STATES, OR A CASHIERS CHECK at: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA 91766. The street address and other common designations, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1999 Stanley Ave No 13, Signal Hill, California 90755 aka 1999 Stanley Ave. #13, Signal Hill, California 91307 Assessor's Parcel No. 7216-018-048 The owner(s) of the real property is purported to be: Lori B. Herbison, as joint tenant The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designations, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of a note, homeowner's assessment or other obligation secured by this lien, with interest and other sum as provided therein: plus advances, if any, under the terms thereof and interest on such advances, plus fees, charges, expenses of the Trustee and trust created by said lien. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $36,916.64. Payment must be in cash, a cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state bank or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings & loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. The real property described above is being sold subject to the right of redemption. The redemption period within which real property may be redeemed ends 90 days after the sale. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may contact Priority Posting & Publishing for information regarding the trustee’s sale or visit its website www.priorityposting.com for information regarding the sale of this property. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the website. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. The beneficiary of said Lien hereto executed and delivered to the undersigned, a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located. Date: November 6, 2012 Association Lien Services, as Trustee P.O. Box 64750, Los Angeles, CA 90064 (310) 207-2027 By: Brian Gladous, Trustee Officer P1002209 11/16, 11/23, 11/30/2012

TST4242 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.S. No. 12-20435-SP-CA YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 12/14/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, (cashier's check(s) must be made payable to National Default Servicing Corporation), drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state; will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made in an "as is" condition, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: GLENN BARR, A SINGLE MAN AND DORIS TURNER, A SINGLE WOMAN AS JOINT TENANTS Duly Appointed Trustee: NATIONAL DEFAULT SERVICING CORPORATION Recorded 12/20/2006 as Instrument No. 06 2833260 (or Book, Page) of the Official Records of LOS ANGELES County, California. Date of Sale: 12/20/2012 at 11:00 a.m. Place of Sale: By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 Estimated amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $526,492.94 Street Address or other common designation of real property: 1940 CHERRY AVENUE, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 A.P.N.: 7216-014-056 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid

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to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The undersigned mortgagee, beneficiary or authorized agent for the mortgagee or beneficiary pursuant to California Civil Code Section 2923.5(b) declares that the mortgagee, beneficiary or the mortgagee's or beneficiary's authorized agent has either contacted the borrower or tried with due diligence to contact the borrower as required by California Civil Code 2923.5. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-730-2727 or visit this Internet Web site www.ndscorp.com/sales, using the file number assigned to this case 12-20435-SP-CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: 11/29/2012 NATIONAL DEFAULT SERVICING CORPORATION 7720 N. 16th Street, Suite 300 Phoenix, AZ 85020 phone 602264-6101 Sales Line 714-730-2727; Sales Website: www.ndscorp.com/sales Nichole Alford, TRUSTEE SALES REPRESENTATIVE A-4331707 11/30/2012, 12/07/2012, 12/14/2012

TST4240 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 12-0025680 Doc ID #000222633962005N Title Order No. 12-0043327 Investor/Insurer No. 091836478 APN No. 7216-020-107 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 02/22/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by MARK D. BENEDICT, A SINGLE MAN, dated 02/22/2007 and recorded 2/28/2007, as Instrument No. 20070433089, in Book , Page , of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, will sell on 12/27/2012 at 9:00AM, Doubletree Hotel Los Angeles-Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650, Vineyard Ballroom at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2600 EAST 20TH STREET #302A, SIGNAL HILL, CA, 90755. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $317,124.54. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. If required by the provisions of section 2923.5 of the California Civil Code, the declaration from the mortgagee, beneficiary or authorized agent is attached to the duly recorded with the appropriate County Recorder's Office. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on a property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 1-800-281-8219 or visit this Internet Web site www.recontrustco.com, using the file number assigned to this case NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 12-0025680. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 By: Trustee's Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any infor-

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TST4237 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 11-0104138 Doc ID #0001677052902005N Title Order No. 11-0086389 Investor/Insurer No. 167705290 APN No. 7215-028-032 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 05/16/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by JOSE ANTONIO GUITRON, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE and SEPARATE PROPERTY, dated 05/16/2007 and recorded 5/25/2007, as Instrument No. 20071274638, in Book , Page , of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, will sell on 12/17/2012 at 11:00AM, By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2109 OHIO AVENUE, SIGNAL HILL, CA, 90755. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $1,115,455.20. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. If required by the provisions of section 2923.5 of the California Civil Code, the declaration from the mortgagee, beneficiary or authorized agent is attached to the duly recorded with the appropriate County Recorder's Office. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on a property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 1-800-281-8219 or visit this Internet Web site www.recontrustco.com, using the file number assigned to this case NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 11-0104138. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 By: Trustee's Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. A-4329748 11/23/2012, 11/30/2012, 12/07/2012 TST4226 T.S. No.: 2012-21082 Loan No.: 706526662 NoTICE oF TRUSTEE'S SAlE

YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 12/22/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.

A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: LESLIE A MARTINEZ, A MARRIED WOMAN AS HER SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY Duly Appointed Trustee: Western Progressive, LLC Recorded 12/30/2005 as Instrument No. 05 3227195 in book ---, page --- and rerecorded on --- as --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, Date of Sale: 12/7/2012 at 9:30 AM Place of Sale:

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By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $432,648.78 Street Address or other common designation of real property: 12310 BRINK AVENUE, NORWALK, CALIFORNIA 90650 A.P.N.: 8024-022-022 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. Pursuant to California Civil Code §2923.54 the undersigned, on behalf of the beneficiary, loan servicer or authorized agent, declares as follows: The beneficiary or servicing agent declares that it has obtained from the Commissioner of Corporation a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to California Civil Code Section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date the Notice of Sale is filed and/or the timeframe for giving Notice of Sale Specified in subdivision (s) of California Civil Code Section 2923.52 applies and has been provided or the loan is exempt from the requirements. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender my hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on this property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (866)-960-8299 or visit this Internet Web site HYPERLINK "http://www.altisource.com/MortgageServices/DefaultManagement/TrusteeServices.aspx" http://www.altisource.com/MortgageServices/DefaultManagement/TrusteeServices.aspx, using the file number assigned to this case 2012-21082. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale Date: 10/24/2012 Western Progressive, LLC, as Trustee c/o 18377 Beach Blvd., Suite 210 Huntington Beach, California 92648 Automated Sale Information Line: (866) 960-8299 http://www.altisource.com/MortgageServices/DefaultManagement/TrusteeServices.aspx For Non-Automated Sale Information, call: (866) 240-3530 __________________________________ Laterrika Thompkins , Trustee Sale Assistant

TST4238 / 2012 231071 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: JETSPEED INC., 11500 E. 214th St., Lakewood, CA 90715. Registrant: JETSPEED INC., 11500 E. 14th St., Lakewood, CA 90715. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Diana Hasty, Secretary. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on October 18, 2007. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on November 19, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 23, 30, & December 7, 14, 2012.

TST4236 / 2012 230011 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: PIER MEDICAL AESTHETICS, 415 Pier Ave., Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. Registrant: DOUGLAS R. MEST, MD INC, 2810 Sunset View, Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Douglas R. Mest, MD, President. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on October 1, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on November 16, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 23, 30, & December 7, 14, 2012. TST4239 / 2012 230012 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: G&G HEALTHCARE SERVICES, 1100 E. Mauretania St., Wilmington, CA 90744. Registrants: 1. STEPHANIE MARIE GARCIA, 1100 E. Mauretania St., Wilmington, CA 90744, 2. GLORIANA GONZALEZ, 150 W. Zane St., Long Beach, CA 90805. This business is conducted by: a General Partnership. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Stephanie M. Garcia. The registrants have not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on . This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on November 16, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this

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statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions

Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 23, 30, & December 7, 14, 2012.

TST4230 / 2012 221896 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: ON-SITE COMPUTER CONSULTING, 2667 E. 28th St. Suite 518, Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: ANGELINA STAHL, 4234 Maybank Ave., Lakewood, CA 90712. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Angelina Stahl. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on November 1, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on November 6, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 9, 16, 23, 30, 2012. TST4231 / 2012 222379 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: SIGHTLESS MUSIC, 5211 El Roble St., Long Beach, CA 90815. Registrant: SEAN LANDGRAF, 5211 El Roble St., Long Beach, CA 90815. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Sean Landgraf. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on November 7, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 9, 16, 23, 30, 2012.

TST4248 / 2012 231850 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: AFFORDABLE TAX SERVICES, 2727 E. Anaheim St. #4097, Long Beach, CA 90804. Registrant: PATRICIA HARRIS, 2727 E. Anaheim St. #4097, Long Beach, CA 90804. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Patricia Harris. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on November 20, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on November 21, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 30, & December 7, 14, 21, 2012.

TST4229 / 2012 221893 STATEMENT oF ABANDoNMENT oF USE oF FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: ON-SITE COMPUTER CONSULTING, located at 1975 Raymond Ave., Signal Hill, CA 90755. The fictitious business name referred to above was filed on January 19, 2012, original File No. 2012 010525, in the County of Los Angeles. Registrant: CHARLES STAHL, 1975 Raymond Ave., Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: an Individual. Signed: Charles Stahl. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on November 6, 2012. Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 9, 16, 23, 30, 2012. TST4233 NoTICE oF APPlICATIoN To SEll AlCoHolIC BEVERAGES lICENSE Date of Filing Application: October 24, 2012 To Whom It May Concern: The Name(s) of the Applicant(s) is/are: Blackbird Cafe Inc The Applicant(s) listed above are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 3403 & 3405 Orange Ave., Long Beach, CA 90807-4826. Type of license(s) applied for: 41 - On-Sale Beer and Wine – Eating Place. Published in the Signal Tribune Newspaper: November 16, 23, 30, 2012

TST4243 / 2012 227837 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: RIKA86, 2997 E. Pacific Coast Hwy., Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: 1. DOMINICK EAV, 2. GAURIKA EAV, 2997 E. Pacific Coast Hwy., Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: a Husband and Wife. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Dominick Eav. The registrants have begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrants began using this fictitious business name on November 14, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on November 14, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 30, & December 7, 14, 21, 2012

TST4244 / 2012 217298 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: LIFE ON THRIVE, 2997 E. Pacific Coast Hwy., Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrants: 1. GAURAV BAJAJ, 2. BRENDA SINGH BAJAJ, 2997 E. Pacific Coast Hwy., Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: a Husband and Wife. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Gaurav Bajaj. The registrants have begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on October 1, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on October 31, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 30, & December 7, 14, 21, 2012. TST4245 / 2012 226867 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: SOLOZPLEASURE, 3900 Lewis Ave., Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrants: 1. SOLOMON MUTH, 2. VI THUY VO, 3900 Lewis Ave., Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: a Husband and Wife. I

declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Solomon Muth. The registrants have not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on November 13, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 30, & December 7, 14, 21, 2012.

TST4246 / 2012 231006 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: DIRECT STORE DELIVERY, INC., 7400 E. Slauson Ave. Unit ES3, Commerce, CA 90040. Registrant: DIRECT STORE DELIVERY, INC., 7400 E. Slauson Ave. Unit ES3, Commerce, CA 90040. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Wenceslao Zavala. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on September 12, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on November 19, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 30, & December 7, 14, 21, 2012.

TST4247 / 2012 234355 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: ADVOCATES IN ACTION, 2510 E. Willow St. Unit 101, Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: ALOHI ENTERPRISES, INC., 2510 E. Willow St. Unit 101, Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Robert M. Schlesinger. The registrant has begun to transact

business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on November 1, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on November 26, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 30, & December 7, 14, 21, 2012.

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Wednesday, Nov. 21 Robbery– person 7:30am– 2500 block Chestnut Ave. Auto burglary 4pm– 4600 block Banner Dr.

Robbery – person 5:55pm– E. Hill St./Lemon Ave.

Auto burglary 9pm– 1 block W. Arbor St.

Commercial burglary 9:40pm– 600 block W. Willow St.

Wednesday, Nov. 21 Recovered stolen vehicle 12:40am– Myrtle Ave./E. 33rd St.

Identity theft 3:30pm– 2400 block Cherry Ave.

Threatening crime with intent to terrorize 8pm– 1600 block E. Willow St.

Thursday, Nov. 22 Grand theft from auto 1am– 2800 block Walnut Ave.

Auto burglary 8:14pm– 1100 block E. Willow St.

Friday, Nov. 23 Petty theft with prior 1:34am– E. 29th St./Cherry Ave. Suspect in custody. DUI alcohol/drugs 3:02am– 800 block E. 33rd St. Suspect in custody.

Crimes reported by LBPD • Council Districts 6, 7 & 8 Robbery – person 10:20pm– 1100 block E. Spring St.

Thursday, Nov. 22 Assault– not a firearm 7:58pm– 100 block W. Pacific Coast Hwy.

Friday, Nov. 23 Battery 12:30am– 2000 block Magnolia Ave.

Auto burglary 12:48am– E. 27th St./Long Beach Blvd.

Battery 3:50am– 2000 block Chestnut Ave.

Crimes reported by SHPD • Citywide

Mental disorder– danger to others 1:32pm– 2400 block Cherry Ave. Suspect identified.

Non-injury hit-and-run 1:36pm– E. 23rd St./Orange Ave.

Stolen vehicle 3:50pm– E. 28th St./Atlantic Ave.

Saturday, Nov. 24 Mental disorder– danger to others 12:09am– Orange Ave./Burnett St.

Juvenile within jurisdiction of juvenile court 12:30am– Cherry Ave./17th St. Juvenile in custody

DUI alcohol/drugs 1:37am- Walnut Ave./E. Willow St. Suspect in custody Mental disorder– danger to others 11:12am– 2500 block Cherry Ave.

Saturday, Nov. 24 Assault 11:51am– 700 block Vernon St.

Sunday, Nov. 25 Kidnapping 9:45am– 4400 block Atlantic Ave.

Monday, Nov. 26 Commercial burglary 6:36pm– 4500 block Atlantic Ave.

Robbery– person 1056pm- 3500 block Long Beach Blvd.

Wednesday, Nov. 28 Auto burglary 1:40am– 1100 block E. 20th St.

Theft– misrepresentation as cardholder 2:45pm– 900 block E. 33rd St.

Monday, Nov. 26 Auto burglary 5pm– 2500 block Walnut Ave.

Carrying concealed dirk or dagger 11:35pm– 2100 block E. Spring St. Suspect in custody.

Identity theft 5:49pm– 2600 block E. 19th St.

Commercial burglary 3pm– 2400 block Palm Dr.

Sunday, Nov. 25 Possession of bad checks 7:26am– 2800 block E. Pacific Coast Hwy. Two suspects in custody Auto burglary 8am– 2200 block Temple Ave.

Auto burglary 8:20am– 2200 block Temple Ave.

Grand theft 3:14pm– 2200 block Cerritos Ave.

Tuesday, Nov. 27 Burglary 4:23pm– 1900 block E. 21st St.

Carrying concealed dirk or dagger 10:45pm– E. PCH/Molino Ave. Suspect in custody

Wednesday, Nov. 28 Vandalism– defacing property 12:549pm– Cherry Ave./E. Willow St. Juvenile in custody Grand theft 3:56pm– 1800 block E. Hill St.

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18 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

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ST3426 - November 30_Layout 1 11/30/12 11:50 AM Page 19

NOVEMBER 30, 2012

Airport

continued from page 1

Administration check-point equipment will be officially moved from existing trailers, he said. “At that point, it becomes a secured area, and passengers will be shifted from the trailers to the new concourse,” Rodriguez said. Although the long-awaited concourse is to be completed nearly five months ahead of schedule, the project, which officially broke ground in December 2010 and generated as many as 300 construction jobs, didn’t come without a few challenges along the way. Temecula-based Edge Development Inc., the original prime contractor, declared default and pulled out of the project earlier this year, as the company faced financial hardships and eventually went bankrupt. In August, however, the City entered into a “takeover agreement” with Safeco Insurance Company of America and Liberty Mutual Insurance Company as part of a surety bond that protected the completion of the construction contract. The remaining work is being conducted by San Diego-based Soltek

Pacific Construction, and parts are being managed by the Airport’s own staff. Pulling together such a critical project took a widespread effort on the part of Airport staff, Rodriguez said. “In most other places, that sort of problem would ground a project to a complete halt,” he said. “It would have ended at that point and we would have still been in court, but we basically kept pushing and kept moving everything forward because our staff pushed it forward … we’ve had people working out there like crazy.” Rodriguez added that, by the time the ribbon is cut, the concrete may “still be wet,” but it is important to get it done early. “It’s not financially prudent or intelligent to wait around for a concourse, because this generates about $300,000 a month in revenue,” he said. “So, the faster we open it, the faster the revenue comes in and the better everyone else is. At the end, we’ll open the concourse and there will be little, tiny items we’ll fix as we go along.” Though the Airport has budgeted the concourse at a cost of about $45 million, Airport staff said it’s still unclear whether the project will be completed under budget. Anticipated as an “innovative,

NEWS

intimate and world-class” facility, the new concourse is slated to provide a “modern, comfortable and inviting” atmosphere to evoke a relaxed, resortlike atmosphere, similar to a luxury hotel, according to Airport staff. Built to accommodate the slot-regulated airport’s more than 3 million annual commercial-airline passengers, the concourse, composed of 35,000 square feet of new construction, will include a stateof-the-art consolidated screening checkpoint, solar panels on the roof, north and south holdrooms with improved seating, natural lighting, new bathrooms, Internet bars and Wi-Fi capabilities. A garden and palm court through the middle of the concourse will include a variety of native plant life as well as exhibits highlighting the history of the airport, known historically as Daugherty Field, and its impact on aviation industry. “The definition of ‘world-class’ to us is that it shouldn’t look like an airport,” Rodriguez said. “Airports are places that are uncomfortable and usually very highpriced, and there’s a lot of stress involved in going to an airport. So, we redefined what an airport should look like.” The newly enhanced concessions, which include local retail outlets and

eateries, such as George’s Greek Café, McKenna’s On the Bay and Sweet Jill’s, will be offering fare at regular “street prices,” unlike other airports where concessions raise prices to profit from a captive audience, he said. “Good customer service is providing [customers] with street pricing, not charging them more because they’re a captive audience,” Rodriguez said. “We should treat our customers with respect and the way we want to be treated ourselves … we don’t want to up-gauge the price just because we can.” The Airport’s new concourse is one of the final legs of an ongoing, more than $140-million modernization plan that has also included building a new 1,989-space parking garage and a 247-

Courtesy LB Airport

19

space surface parking lot, enhancing runway ramps with electrical plug-ins for commercial aircraft and restoring the Airport’s World War II-era terminal built in 1941. Down the road, the Airport plans to build a new rent-a-car facility and redo the front terminal to put in a new transportation center with buses, cabs, shuttles and valet parking. In addition, the City plans to install electric-vehicle charging stations inside of each parking structure. Some of the Airport’s nostalgic features, such as being able to walk out on the tarmac to board a plane as opposed to nearby LAX, will remain the same, he said. “There are a lot of plans,” Rodriguez said. “We’re going to make this airport as convenient as possible.”

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Construction of the Long Beach Airport’s new passenger concourse is rapidly coming to a close and is expected to be completely finished by Dec. 12, when the new concourse is “activated” and security, check-point equipment is transferred from existing trailers.

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NOVEMBER 30, 2012

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

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