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ST3422 - November 2_Layout 1 11/2/12 11:45 AM Page 1

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Vol. 34 No. 22

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Dia de los Muertos sugar skulls Photo by Matt Sun

November 2, 2012

SERVING BIXBY KNOLLS, CALIFORNIA HEIGHTS, LOS CERRITOS, WRIGLEY AND THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

2012 State of Education: schools at ‘crossroads’

Your Weekly Community Newspaper

Sean Belk Staff Writer

As next week’s election is set to determine whether grade schools, community colleges and universities may have to make drastic budget cuts, community and business leaders met with education rep-

resentatives during the 2012 State of Education in Long Beach on Tuesday, considered the largest single-day involvement of local businesses in Long Beach public schools. The event, which took place at the Center Theater of the Long

Beach Convention & Entertainment Center, included a panel of education officials who discussed the state of school programs and funding, following the annual Principal for a Day, where nearly 200 business and community leaders shad-

In ‘unusual’ public-private partnership,

City of LB teams with SH Petroleum to open park

Willow Springs Park features 7,850-sq.-ft. map of region

see EDUCATION page 15

Cory Bilicko/Signal Tribune

From left, Signal Hill Petroleum COO/Executive Vice President David Slater, Fourth District Los Angeles County Supervisor Don Knabe, 7th District Long Beach Councilmember James Johnson and Long Beach Mayor Bob Foster at Wednesday’s dedication of the 7,850-square-foot map of the region at the new Willow Springs Park Cory Bilicko

Managing Editor

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

From left, TRICOR co-founder Damon Dunn, Long Beach Area Chamber of Commerce President/CEO Randy Gordon, CSULB Provost Donald Para, LBCC Superintendent-President Eloy Ortiz Oakley, LBUSD Superintendent Chris Steinhauser, US Secretary of Education senior advisor Greg Darnieder, and Long Beach Education Foundation Vice President of Funds, Development and Programs Mike Murray at Tuesday’s State of Education summit

California Heights Neighborhood Association adopts and prepares to clean up portion of 405

Nick Diamantides Staff Writer

Next week, the California Heights Neighborhood Association (CHNA) will add one more item to the list of the ways it benefits the community– helping to beautify a portion of the 405 Freeway. After about six months of filling out forms, conferring with state officials and meeting various requirements, the association has officially “adopted” the .3-mile stretch of the freeway that begins at Atlantic Avenue and ends at Long Beach Boulevard. “This is really just an expansion of the association’s cleanup efforts in the area,” said CHNA President John

see FREEWAY page 9

Nick Diamantides/Signal Tribune

Litter lining the banks of the offramp from the 405 Freeway is one of the problems members of the California Heights Neighborhood Association will start addressing next week.

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Weekly Weather Forecast Friday

Saturday

Clouds then sun

68°

Clouds then sun

Sunny and warm

Lo 56°

Lo 60°

Lo 60°

77°

November 2 through November 6, 2012

Sunday

Monday

85°

85° Sunny Lo 59°

On its way to becoming the largest development of new park space in Long Beach since 1952, Willow Springs Park now boasts a 7,850-square-foot topographical map of the city as the ground-covering for its plaza. The circular map is made of decomposed granite and tumbled glass, and it details the area’s watersheds and terrain, including prominent peaks and points, within 50 miles of the park. On the morning of Oct. 31, the City of Long Beach hosted a dedication of the plaza in the park, which is located at 2745 Orange Ave. Fourth District Los Angeles County Supervisor Don Knabe, Long Beach Mayor Bob Foster, 7th District Councilmember James Johnson and Signal Hill Petroleum COO/Executive Vice President David Slater were all at the unveiling, which took place the day before the park’s official grand opening for the public. “I’m always excited to announce new parks,” Foster said. “We live in a built-up, urban area, so getting this new, green space is really terrific.” The mayor briefly described the map, on which he and the other officials were standing, by saying, “It’s

Tuesday

85° Sunny Lo 56°

This week’s Weekly Weather Forecast sponsored by:

an integrated map of the watersheds of Southern California, and all the prominent locations are marked out with their longitude and latitude.” Johnson thanked Foster for being supportive of the park, which is in the councilmember’s district and has been a pet project of his. “For over a hundred years, the city has had several large parks, all on the east side of town,” Johnson said. “This is the first regional park for the city west of Redondo Avenue.” Johnson acknowledged Supervisor Knabe’s role in getting the park opened, and he also thanked Slater and Craig Barto of Signal Hill Petroleum, echoing an earlier remark of Foster’s that the park is a product of the private sector as well as government planning. “This is unusual, because it is a public-private partnership,” Johnson said. He also thanked the Arts Council of Long Beach, which sponsored the Nov. 1 jazz concert there the next day. “One thing I think this site is going to be [is a] great performance site,” Johnson said. “Right here at the highest point in the city, next to the highest tree in the city, you can come, watch the sun set, listen to great music, and see, on a clear day, the Hollywood

see PARK page 15


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NEwS 2 SIgNAL TrIBuNE Councilmember Johnson schedules west LB hearing on controversial railyard proposal

NovEmBEr 2, 2012

Supporters and opponents of a proposed railyard to be called the Southern California International Gateway converge at a public hearing about the project on Oct. 18. Supporters, mainly consisting of labor union members, wear orange T-shirts while opponents, including neighborhood and environmental groups, wear white T-shirts with the acronym “SCIG” crossed out. Sean Belk Staff Writer

After the Port of Los Angeles declined to hold a public hearing in Long Beach regarding a con-

troversial $500-million railyard being proposed along the city’s western edge, 7th District Long Beach City Councilmember James Johnson has scheduled his own hearing to be held on

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Wednesday, Nov. 7 at 6pm at the Silverado Park Community Room, 1545 W. 31st St. Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) Railway is proposing to build a massive, state-of-the-art railyard complex to be called the Southern California International Gateway (SCIG) on a 153-acre site in Wilmington, near west Long Beach, bounded by Sepulveda Boulevard, Pacific Coast Highway, the Dominguez Channel and State Routes 47 and 103 (Terminal Island Freeway). The project calls for building a near-dock rail facility with 12 railroad tracks that would enable trucks to haul cargo closer to port docks (just four miles) rather than having to lug containers 24 miles

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SIGNAL TRIBUNE’S FOCUS

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

A group of protestors against a $500-million railyard project hold up picket signs outside the Banning’s Landing Community Center in Wilmington during an Oct. 18 public hearing about environmental impacts of the project.

up the I-710 Freeway to a railyard in the City of Commerce. Johnson, who said he’s opposed to the railyard as planned, has organized the upcoming hearing to give Long Beach residents and other community groups an opportunity to comment on the Port’s re-circulated draft environmental impact report (DEIR) on the project. Expected to be in attendance is Chris Cannon, the Port’s director of environmental management, who will provide a brief presentation on the project, as well as Long Beach Unified School District officials, including school district board member Felton Williams. The new DEIR comes after the Port was criticized earlier this year by Long Beach city and school district officials, as well as environmental groups, for using outdated, “flawed” 2005 data to calculate the project’s environmental impacts, among other concerns. The Port issued a new DEIR to reflect 2010 statistics and has added several other updates. The Port’s 45-day comment-period ends Nov. 9.

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The Port held a public hearing on the new DEIR at the Banning’s Landing Community Center in Wilmington on Oct. 18, which drew a divided crowd of more than 100 people. However, Port officials turned down requests by Johnson to hold a separate hearing in west Long Beach, where residents and businesses would be mostly impacted. Johnson sent a letter to the Port, calling the Port’s decision “outrageous and disrespectful,” implying that the Port was trying to “intentionally ignore” Long Beach residents. In response, Cannon wrote a letter to Johnson, stating the Port determined that only holding one hearing in Wilmington was “appropriate” and that the Port facility where the meeting was held was “centrally located.” In a prepared statement, Johnson said the hearing scheduled for next week will allow residents to give their input on the record, “given the significant potential impacts of this proposed project on the health and well-being of Long Beach neighborhoods.” Johnson said all comments received at the meeting will be transcribed and formally sent to the Port for a response as part of the DEIR. John Cross, president of West Long Beach Neighborhood Association, which strongly opposes the project, said the meeting in Wilmington was “stacked against the opponents,” since the first wave of speakers were mostly out-of-town union-sponsored supporters of the project. He said he expects a stronger showing of Long Beach residents at next week’s hearing. “It’s a public hearing, but it’s primarily for residents of Long Beach,” Cross said. At the hearing in Wilmington last month, those in favor of the project included construction see RAILYARD page 14


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NEwS

NovEmBEr 2, 2012

retired LB police commander Josef Levy honored for more than 27 years of service

Emotions flowed as a crowd of more than 400 people, including Long Beach Police Department (LBPD) officers, other publicsafety staff, community members and government officials, gathered on Oct. 25 to honor Long Beach Police Commander Josef Levy for his more than 27 years of dedicated service to the department. A devoted police officer, community activist and volunteer, Levy officially retired from the department in October. Recently assigned to the Long Beach West Division,

he has worked assignments in patrol gangs, narcotics, internal affairs, hostage negotiations and media relations, while once serving as the department’s spokesperson. He also designs and delivers diversity training, is a cultural-awareness instructor and an adjunct staff member at the Simon Wiesenthal Center Museum of Tolerance, where he has conducted workshops for thousands of law-enforcement members and educators throughout California. During his recent “roast,” Levy

Photo by Diana Lejins

During a retirement ceremony on Oct. 25 for Long Beach Police Commander Joseph Levy, Rabbi Moishe Engel, left, hands Levy a cell phone for him to hear a congratulations from a long-time friend. At age 15, Levy was a junior counselor of Rabbi Engel’s day camp. Rabbi Engel has been a teacher at The Hebrew Academy in Huntington Beach for 43 years.

gave a speech, describing his career with the LBPD as a “roller coaster ride.” “Like the roller coaster, my career kind [of] started out slow and steady, then got some height and altitude,” he said. “All my LBPD family, my relatives, extended family, my colleagues, community members and other city employees who have been so supportive and helpful...allowed me the opportunity to building meaningful, lasting relationships while experience the ride of my life.” While he officially retired from the police department in October, Levy has decided to enlist as a LBPD reserve officer. He also plans to continue his nonprofit work. As a cancer survivor diagnosed with thyroid cancer in June 2007, Levy helped start the National Law Enforcement Cancer Support Foundation and will continue to serve as the organization’s vice president. Throughout the years, Levy has helped support others with cancer and speaks out for “living each day to the fullest and not sweating the small stuff,” said a statement from the police department. In addition, Levy sits on the Board of Directors for Goodwill Industries of Southern Los Angeles County and is the president of the Long Beach Police Department Command Officers Association. Levy also plans to continue operating Embassy Consulting Services LLC, which he runs with his wife Lysa Gamboa-Levy.

DLBA CEo named CA Downtown Assoc. president

Downtown Long Beach Associates (DLBA) President and CEO Kraig Kojian was named president of the California Downtown Association’s (CDA) Board of Directors at its annual conference, which took place this week in Sacramento. Kojian has served on CDA Board since 2010. “It is an honor to serve as the President of CDA Board,” said Kojian. “CDA continues to provide resources and learning opportunities to the downtown industry, allowing organizations to learn from one another’s experiences and established best practices. By working with CDA, member organizations from across the state are able to make connections and improve their services and programs. I’m excited to work to expand the role of CDA and continue the outstanding work it has

instituted.” Established in 1971, CDA represents thousands of diversified businesses throughout California, including downtown associations, cities, chambers of commerce, business districts, supportive vendors and consultants. Its primary purpose is to advocate on behalf of its membership, exchange information pertinent to business districts and to formulate solutions to mutually shared challenges. “We’re excited to have Kraig’s leadership on our Board,” said CDA executive director Gurbax Sahota. “Kraig has extensive experience in the Downtown industry, and his guidance and insight will help CDA expand its leadership role in the downtown industry.” Source: DLBA

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COME RUMMAGE AROUND what Rummage sale who Community Presbyterian Church where 6380 Orange Ave. when Friday, Nov. 2 and Saturday, Nov. 3 from 8am to 3pm more Info Proceeds benefit the church’s general fund. Call (562) 658-7480.

COMEDIC CHOPS what Comedy 101 with Teresa O'Neill who Long Beach City College Foundation’s Senior Studies Associates where LBCC Senior Center, 1305 E. PCH when Sunday, Nov. 4 from 1:30pm to 4pm more Info O’Neill, who has has written for numerous Emmy Award-winning television shows, will share some facts, fallacies, and humorous aspects of her profession. $40 per person for program and dinner, or $15 student price for program only. Call (562) 938-4767 or (562) 938-3048. A WORD ON PUBLIC SAFETY what Public Safety Police Panel who Hosted by North Long Beach Community Action Group where North Police Substation, 4891 Atlantic Ave. when Sunday, Nov. 4 from 2pm to 4pm more Info Panel will feature Police Chief Jim McDonnell, Deputy Chief Robert Luna and Commander Galen Carroll. Discussion will consist of the current police budgeting process, public safety, new creation of the “West Super-Division” and more. Call (562) 428-7710. COME CELEBRATE what 34th Annual Interfaith Benefit Concert who South Coast Interfaith Council where Trinity Lutheran Church, 759 Linden Ave. when Sunday, Nov. 4 from 3pm to 5pm more Info Free community reception with performances by the the International Peace Choir, Sikh Devotionals, MTO Sufis, Native American Dance and more. Call (562) 983-1665.

I CAN HEAR MUSIC what Choral concert who Friends of Music at California Heights United Methodist Church where 3759 Orange Ave. when Sunday, Nov. 4 at 4pm more Info The concert, presented by the 49er Chorus and Collegium Musicum from California State University, Long Beach, will include Mozart’s “Missa Solemnis in C Major, K. 337.” Call (562) 595-1996 or visit calheightsumc.org .

READ MY LIPS what Free lip-reading classes who The Long Beach/Lakewood Chapter of Hearing Loss Association where Weingart Senior Center, 5220 Oliva Ave. when Monday, Nov. 5 from 10am to noon more Info The Hearing Loss Association is offering practice lip-reading classes every Monday. Teaching sessions, led by Linda DeGuire, Ph.D. from California State University, Long Beach, will take place every Wednesday from 9:30am to 11:30am. Call (562) 438-0597 or visit hlalongbeachlakewood.com .

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MEET AND EAT what Supper club who Bixby Knolls Supper Club where BIS Italian-American Sports Cafe, 3819 Atlantic Ave. when Monday, Nov. 5 at 6pm or 7:30pm more Info The Bixby Knolls Supper Club supports local restaurants by dining at them on Monday nights, which are typically slow, and this time will dine at BIS Italian-American Sports Cafe. The dinner includes a $10 corkage fee. RSVPs are necessary; email info@bixbyknollsinfo.com .

HEAR THE DIFFERENCE what Free hearing-loss presentation who The Long Beach/Lakewood Chapter of Hearing Loss Association where Weingart Senior Center, 5220 Oliva Ave. when Thursday, Nov. 8 at 6:30pm more Info Stacy Rogers, a clinical account manager and outreach specialist with MED-EL Corporation, will explain new implant technology. Call 562438-0597 or visit hlalongbeachlakewood.org .

CALLING ALL WRITERS what Free writers event who California Writers Club of Long Beach where Long Beach Los Altos Branch Library, 5614 East Britton Dr. when Saturday, Nov. 10 from 3pm to 5pm more Info Sonia Marsh, author of Freeways to Flip-Flops: A Family's Year of Gutsy Living on a Tropical Island, will speak at the event. Doors open at 2:30pm for networking prior to the speaker. Visit calwriterslongbeach.org or email info@calwriterslongbeach.org .

WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE? what Monthly meeting who Questing Heirs Genealogical Society where Resurrection Lutheran Church Parish Hall, 1900 E. Carson St. when Sunday, Nov. 18 at 1:15pm more Info The meeting will feature a talk by speaker Barbara Renick. A beginning research class commences at 4pm and ends at 5pm. Visit qhgs.info or call (562) 598-3027.


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oPINIoN

4 SIgNAL TrIBuNE

Thoughts from the

delicious salad with chicken skewers and a caramel-apple bar for dessert. (I couldn’t help but have two!) As promised earlier in the day, the most special part of the event was the lunchtime guest speaker, Dr. James Sauceda, whose soulful, poignant speech about art and culture truly moved me and, admittedly, got me teary-eyed. After a morning of presentations about the business and marketing of art (all very important and certainly worthwhile), Dr. Sauceda brought it all home and reminded us of art’s true purposes and potential powers. “Art need not be pretty,” he said. “Art needs to speak to the soul.” That’s a gem I plan to keep in mind as I create pieces for my next exhibit. He also implored us to incorporate unexpected atmospheres and the faces of other cultures into our work, and to speak for the welfare of all. Through our art, he said, we can share our suffering, but we can also share our compassion. His oration changed me. I walked out of that event a different man and certainly a different artist– one who is more in touch

Managing Editor by Cory Bilicko

Usually, when I hear the words “boot” and “camp” used together, I kind of bristle and brace myself with the expectation of a screaming Lou Gossett Jr.type spitting out insults from among his arsenal of assaults, or I imagine a low-fat fitness trainer with uncomfortably high expectations telling me I can do just 20 more push-ups. But, a few weeks ago, when I heard about the nonprofit Cultural Alliance of Long Beach’s (CALB) Artist Boot Camp, I jumped at the opportunity to take advantage of getting whipped into shape artistically. After all, being a somewhat newbie artmaker, I figured I have a lot to learn. I signed up online, paid my $10 (for the entire, five-hour event), and then showed up early last Saturday morning at 727 Pine Ave. in downtown Long Beach. I tell you, it couldn’t have been any more different from a real boot camp. Though I’ve been a lifelong civilian, I’m pretty sure there’s no coffee, bagels and fresh fruit when you show up for basic training. But I’m getting ahead of myself. At Saturday’s event, we artist types were greeted at the front door by several smiling faces who gave us name tags and asked us what type of artist we are: visual, performing or digital/literary. Since I’m visual, they gave me a red ID tag. Then, we were allowed to choose three of the 18 different classes that would be offered between 9am and noon. There would be three sessions, with six different classes offered during each. I selected Getting Others to Pay You to Create Art, Accounting for Artists and How to Promote Yourself as an Artist.

Something on your mind?

with the untapped gold that lurks beneath the surface of my blank canvases and within my tubes of acrylics. I’m now invigorated and amped up to see what comes of my renewed state of mind. I hadn’t planned on writing about the Artist Boot Camp for the Signal, but after all the knowledge, encouragement and inspiration I’d been granted, how could I not? On Tuesday, I emailed Karen Reside, thanked her for the event and asked her to say a few things about it for a piece I’d decided to write. Here’s part of what she had to say:

LETTER

TO  TH E ED ITO R

Long Beach voters have a chance to save the City money and expand democracy this Nov. 6 by voting “yes” on Measure O. I am proud to express my strong support for this measure, which would consolidate our local city elections with the State. Instead of voting three times in an election year, we will only have to vote twice with Measure O. More than 350 California cities have consolidated their elections this way, leaving Long Beach one of a handful of other cities with this outdated voting system. In the long term, Measure O will save us money, as it has for hundreds of cities up and down the state. Measure O also will not go into effect until 2014, which gives our school district and community college district plenty of time to move their elections to the new June and November schedule as well. Our electoral process system in Long Beach is broken. Some councilmembers are elected with as few 1,000 votes. The reason for this is that Long Beach holds separate elections in April, June, and November instead of June and November like the rest of California. Voting three times in an election year is expensive, time-consuming, and can lead to election fatigue. A “yes” vote on Measure O will increase voter turnout, reduce voter fatigue, and save money. Measure O is simple, good government, and that’s why it has been endorsed by California Common Cause, one of the state’s most prestigious non-partisan cleanelection organizations. I invite you to join the 30,000 Long Beach residents that have already pledged support for the common sense and economic savings of Measure O.

Share your opinions with us & other readers! www.signaltribune.com

vice mayor robert garcia Long Beach

ASSoCIATE PuBLISHEr

PuBLISHEr/EDITor-IN-CHIEF

mANAgINg EDITor

Stephen M. Strichart

Neena R. Strichart

Sean Belk

Stephanie Raygoza STAFF wrITErS

CJ Dablo

CoLumNISTS

Nick Diamantides

Jennifer E. Beaver Carol Berg Sloan, RD

mea culpa

The Oct. 26 article “Signal Hill tank farm spills 42,000 gallons of crude oil and water onto local streets” should have reported that the amount spilled was 4,200 gallons. The Signal Tribune received incorrect information regarding the incident.

DESIgN EDITor

Cory Bilicko

ADvErTISINg CoNSuLTANTS

Jane Fallon

budgets in difficult funding times, cutting off the development of these creative individuals. Creativity can’t be outsourced and is one of the growing industries in Los Angeles County. Artists need to be working with young people to mentor them through the process. There needs to be more resources to support artists so once they graduate from college, they don’t leave Long Beach. CSULB graduates more fine-art and design majors than any university west of the Mississippi and the most of any public university. The Artist Boot Camp is about providing support so artists can successfully set themselves up as a business and gain access to all the tools small-business owners have. Since artists do most of their work in isolation, the Boot Camp also provides an environment to network and develop collaborations, stimulating the flow of creative ideas. Artists are truly visionary leaders and, as a community, we need to release those skills to provide a healthier, more expressive city.

Some of the others offered were Setting Up a Nonprofit Organization, Protecting Your Intellectual Capital, Legal Issues in Art, Curating Exhibits, and Integrating Artistic Vision into CommuThere are few local seminars nity Needs. specifically designed for artists in Inside the vast assembly room Beach. Once they are out of Long were tables lining the walls with school, it is a challenge to stay an unbelievable amount of freeinformed about changes in condibies. I picked up a few painttions that impact them. According brushes, a white marker, some to the Los Angeles Economic acrylic paint samples, some pigthe creative community Council, ment powder and a cup to put it is the fourth-largest industry in all in. I also purchased a book Los Angeles County. These jobs with lots of valuable information are higher-paying on average to help those in the arts industry and need an incoming stream of get their acts together. Then I creatives to develop cutting-edge helped myself to breakfast and ideas and designs. Art is usually enjoyed the people-watching of the first items cut in school one opportunities. Right around 8:30, we were welcomed by the event’s organizers, including Karen Reside, CALB’s secretary and chair of the event’s organizing committee, who explained the process for breaking into classes and where to find them. There were several rooms adjacent to the main one where the classes were conducted. Each class presented so much useful information, I’m glad I had a notebook with me to jot down all the great ideas. I learned about various art opportunities through the City of Long Beach, how to approach business owners about hosting your art show, how to present a portfolio and the importance of having an online presPhoto by Jose Loza ence. Dr. James Sauceda, far right, addresses the group of artists attending last Saturday’s Artist Boot Camp. After the classes, a catered lunch was there waiting for us: a

o...what a relief it is?

Visit our website and leave a comment!

NovEmBEr 2, 2012

Leighanna Nierle

ADmINISTrATIvE ASSISTANT/wEBSITE mANAgEr CuLTurE wrITErS

Daniel Adams Vicki Paris Goodman Gregory Spooner

CoNTrIBuTINg PHoTogrAPHEr

Matt Sun

EDITorIAL INTErN

Ariana Gastelum

Tanya Paz

CoNTrIBuTINg wrITEr

Rachael Rifkin

DESIgN INTErN

Kaelyn Bruno

The Signal Tribune welcomes letters to the editor, which should be signed, dated and include a phone number to verify authenticity. Letters are due by noon on the Tuesday before desired publication date. The Signal Tribune reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, language and space requirements. The Signal Tribune does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other publications or otherwise presented in a public forum. Letters to the editor and commentaries are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Signal Tribune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, letters to the editor and commentaries are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. Letter-writers will be identified by their professional titles or affiliations when, and only when, the editorial staff deems it relevant and/or to provide context to the letter. The Signal Tribune is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. Yearly subscriptions are available for $45.

939 E. 27th St., Signal Hill, CA 90755 (562) 595-7900

www.signaltribune.com newspaper@signaltribune.com


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CommuNITY

NovEmBEr 2, 2012

SH Petroleum donates $15,000 to local rancho

The Signal Hill-based energy company Signal Hill Petroleum recently made a $15,000 donation to Rancho Los Alamitos (RLA) that will support the Rancho’s educational enrichment and school tour program, which allows Long Beach students to learn about California history in an historical setting. “The donation comes at a marvelous time for Rancho Los Alamitos,” said Rancho Los Alamitos Executive Director Pamela Seager. “With our new Rancho Center exhibitions and the restored historic Barns Area open to the public, Rancho Los Alamitos has expanded its capacity for educational programming, and these funds will allow more children to experience the site and take advantage of related enrichment materials.” Approximately 6,000 school children each year participate in the school

tour program as part of their study of California history. At a time when many schools are cutting back on off-site field trips and enrichment programs, Signal Hill Petroleum and Rancho Los Alamitos are partnering to ensure that schools most hard hit by budget cutbacks will be assisted with transportation to and from the site and that their tours of the historic site will include educational materials that enhance the unique learning environment at Rancho Los Alamitos, according to a press release issued by Finn Partners public-relations firm. This unique environment inspired RLA Celebration Committee member Debra Russell to support educational programs at Rancho Los Alamitos through her role as Director of Business Development & Community Relations at Signal Hill Petroleum. Russell joined her children during a field trip with

Residents offered behind-the-scenes look at City of LB’s Health & Human Services Department

For those who have explored the City of Long Beach Health and Human Services Department website and been overwhelmed by the large number of services the department provides, the next Open Up Long Beach meeting on Wednesday, Nov. 14 will provide a behindthe-scenes look at how the Health and Human Services Department operates. “Our City’s Health and Human Services Department covers everything from birth and death records to bio-terrorism preparedness,” said 5th District Councilmember Gerrie Schipske. “It helps provide immunizations and low-cost health services, housing assistance, counseling, [and] wellness

programs, and reaches out to thousands of our city’s residents every year. It may be the most important single entity in the city. Schipske initiated the Open Up Long Beach meetings to make city government more open, transparent, and accountable, and help residents get to know how various departments operate. The meeting will take place at 2525 Grand Ave. from 6pm to 8pm. Seating is limited, and calling to reserve a space is recommended. MORE INFORMATION openuplongbeach.com (562) 570-6932

Source: 5th District Council office

neighboring Prisk Elementary in Long Beach. “I immediately saw the beauty, importance and need to continue these programs for future generations of school children,” she said. David Slater, executive vice president of Signal Hill Petroleum, said, “We are proud to support Rancho Los Alamitos and its educational mission with one of our largest grants to directly benefit the children of our community. Our support of Rancho Los Alamitos reflects our strong commitment to education, but it also reflects the close connection between the history of our company and the involvement of Rancho Los Alamitos in the development of the oil industry in Signal Hill and Long Beach.” Source: Finn Partners

SIgNAL TrIBuNE

5

Courtesy Finn Partners

Rancho Los Alamitos Foundation Trustee Jerry Miller (far left) and Executive Director Pamela Seager (far right) accept a $15,000 check from Debra Russell and Amanda Kilpatrick of Signal Hill Petroleum.


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rancho Los Alamitos hosting tamale and wreath-making workshops

SPRUCE UP YOUR HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS

Rancho Los Alamitos, 6400 Bixby Hill Rd., will celebrate Hispanic holiday traditions with Chef Debbie Dubbs of Deb's Kitchen on Saturday, Nov. 17 from 10am to 1pm. Following a tamale-making demonstration and tasting, adults and children age 8 years and older will make tamales to take home. Attendees will also work with floral designers in the creation of traditional cornhusk and herb holiday wreaths to keep. Parking is available onsite at the Rancho. Reservations for this ticketed event are required by Saturday, Nov. 10. Space is limited. Regular adult admission is $50, Rancho member admission is $45 and tickets for children 8 and older are $25. Tickets may be purchased by calling the Rancho at (562) 431-3541 or online at the Rancho’s website at rancholosalamitos.org .

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The making of wreaths, such as this one made of corn husks, will be demonstrated during a workshop at Rancho Los Alamitos on Nov. 17.

Garden Variety

Quick, easy ways to a welcoming exterior for the holidays Jennifer E. Beaver Columnist

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Though Halloween is dead and gone, I still have some frightening words for you: The holidays are right around the corner. Less than a month till Thanksgiving, less than two for Christmas. (Strike up spine-tingling violin from Psycho.) Company coming? If so, don’t tackle a major garden overhaul; there’s not enough time for plants to fill in and look presentable. You could lavish megabucks on fullsize plants, but why bother when you can spend a little time and a little money and still make your home look welcoming? Borrow a couple of tricks from decorating pros. First, use bright colors to guide the eye toward

areas you want to emphasize. Second, cover bare or unsightly places. Interior decorators use rugs and blankets; gardeners use mulch. Unless they’re particularly nosy or are staying for several days, most people won’t notice landscaping beyond the front entry path. Walk it yourself and see what it needs. Dig out the frayed stuff and replace it with colorful annuals. In sunny areas, go with pansies, dianthus, ornamental kale, calendula, stock, carnations and mums. For shade, use impatiens and cyclamen. Throw in a few wispy grasses for height and movement. Flank the front door with festive pots containing small evergreens or other trees. Dress them for the holidays. Red berry garlands and a string of small white lights can take you from Thanksgiving through Christmas and beyond. Now about those outdoor eating

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areas. Make the area enticing– quickly– with more containers. Try grasses and beautiful trumpetflowered mandevilla and a sweetsmelling vine like jasmine or honeysuckle. For inspiration, check out the site of mandevilla breeder Sunparasol at sunparasol.net . Add charm with hanging baskets near doors and entryways. Save time by picking up a preplanted version at a nursery or a big-box store. Or if, like me, your existing baskets are semi-viable (with, say, half of the flowers still living after the scorching heat wave), take out the charred stuff and tuck in a lime-green sweet potato vine and some sweet alyssum. Then shell out 20 bucks for four bags of mulch and spread it artfully over the bare soil in your front yard. Feeling crafty? Create a longlasting festive succulent centerpiece at Rancho Los Cerritos on Nov. 17 from 2pm to 4pm. For adults only; $28 for the general public, $25 for members. All supplies and materials will be included. Class size is limited; preregistration is required by Nov. 15. Call (562) 570-1755 to reserve your space. Jennifer E. Beaver, a Wrigley resident, is a master gardener and author of Container Gardening for California and Edible Gardening for California.

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NovEmBEr 2, 2012

In Living Color

SPRUCE UP YOUR HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS

Budget-friendly ways to make your home cozy and inviting Shoshanah Siegel Columnist

Besides owning a colorconsulting and design firm in Long Beach, I am also a teacher and fine-artist. However, what I love the most is educating and inspiring others to create environments that enhance the enjoyment of their homes and businesses. So when Neena approached me about writing a column for the Signal, I was thrilled. Even after 35 years of living in Southern California, I still hear myself say, “This is why I live here,” referring to our temperate climate. We’re able to enjoy our homes year-round. This allows our indoor-outdoor lifestyle to expand our footage without spending a lot of money to remodel and also provides seamless areas to decorate and design. In Southern California, we have diversity of architectural styles. Our neighborhoods are a checkerboard of different styles, one next to another. Some of these styles include California bungalow and craftsman, Victorian, mid-century and post-modern, singlestory ranch, Mediterranean, and Spanish revival. But even when the style is the same, each home is uniquely different. Whether you choose to enhance the architectural elements, or put your own personal stamp on your space, this column will introduce you to new ideas, tools and information regarding the world of color, design, resources, and decorating throughout the year. I’ll also focus on re-purposing, restoring, and creating style-savvy environments that are eco- and wallet-friendly.

Fall into the seasons Let’s kick things off by talking a little bit about getting ready for the upcoming seasons. I know it’s hard to imagine that fall is actually here, especially with our temperatures being in the 70s and 80s. However, there are ways to get into the season. It’s a fact that most people spend more time at home during the fall and winter months. Whether inside or outside, you want to create a festive and cozy atmosphere. Where to begin? Revisit the decorations you already

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have. Each year I’m able to look at my items with a new perspective. They may only need a new ribbon, or they can be re-purposed into another creation. However, to satiate my desire to decorate, I buy one new item each year. It may be an inexpensive item from the 99 Cent stores, the Dollar Tree, or another local business that have keepsakes I know I’ll have for years to come. Remember– always look for great sales right after a season ends.

windows You should begin with the practical aspects of the season’s décor. Windows are a source of heat leakage, so heavy drapes should be hung up in anticipation of the cold. Add darker, heavier drapes to keep the drafts out.

Furniture Next in line would be the furniture. Be sure to create areas where people can mingle. Start by moving your furniture closer together. To create an area where guests would love to linger, add pillows and throws made of soft fabrics such as flannel, angora, fleece, and velour.

Fireplace If you have a fireplace, this should also be decorated, since you and your guests will most likely want to spend a lot of time in front of it. Bring in items from nature, such as pinecones, leaves and berries. Add candles with mirrors behind them to create a warm glow and sparkle on the hearth. Of course, have a comfy chair close at hand, to curl up in with a cup of tea and a good book.

Dining area A lot of food is prepared and eaten during the holidays, so the dining area might benefit from a change in décor. Go with deep colors for place mats and kitchen linens. You could pull out more attractive linens for any festive celebrations at home. Since this is a time for family and friends, there’s no better opportunity to get out the good china, silver, and stemware. I remember the year we hosted Thanksgiving for all those who needed a place to celebrate the season. For the occasion I

An autumnal wreath that is refreshed each year with repurposed items

pulled out many of the items that were displayed in my curio cabinet. My guests were surprised by the transformation and felt like honored royalty.

Bathrooms The bathrooms could do with a sprucing up too. Mats on the floor so that feet don’t get cold, a decorative heater (to provide that extra bit of warmth) and products that enhance long luxurious baths should be added in during the upcoming months.

Lighting With our daylight getting shorter, lighting is paramount to enliven the spirit. Change out a lampshade or add candlelight with or without batteries. Yes, some of these candles are lit by remote

control. Be sure to purchase candles that give off a hint of food to come: pumpkin pie and cinnamon. All in all, the entire effect should be that of warmth and belonging.

Shoshanah Siegel/Signal Tribune

Shoshanah Siegel provides color consulting as well as space planning, remodeling, upgrading and staging through her firm Your Color Diva. She can be contacted at (562) 427-0440 or at shoshanah.siegel@gmail.com.

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NovEmBEr 2, 2012

richardson, Hahn make re-election pitches at forum in race for Democratic 44th Congressional District seat Sean Belk Staff Writer

Janice Hahn and Laura Richardson, two Democratic candidates vying for the same seat to represent the newly drawn 44th Congressional District, pleaded for votes during a forum at Cal State University Dominguez Hills (CSUDH) on Oct. 25, two weeks before Election Day. Their short, separate presentations before an assembly of about 50 students were part of a twohour-long event that also included moderated debates between local representatives for and against five state propositions, as well as representatives from the campaigns of President Barack Obama and Gov. Mitt Romney. Although a university press release promoting the event stated that there would be “an opportunity for questions from the audience,” both Richardson and Hahn immediately left the University Theatre after giving their speeches and did not take questions. Gamboa, CSUDH David spokesperson, said the university had planned the event as an “educational forum” and not a debate. “We weren’t trying to get into any type of debate format for this forum,” he said. “This was more of an educational format for our students in the greater community. We felt that the issues [were] going to be lost if they decided to debate… we just wanted them to present their views and initiatives.” Richardson and Hahn, who both currently serve in the US House of Representatives (Richardson serving the 37th district and Hahn the 36th), are battling for a chance to represent a new South Bay district that was recently formed out of redistricting. The district now includes Carson, Compton, Lynwood, parts of Long Beach, San Pedro, South Gate, Watts, Walnut Park and Wilmington.

Richardson, who has been a congresswoman for five years, after serving on the California State Assembly and Long Beach City Council, has had a tough run this year. After losing to her opponent by 20 points in the primary election in June, Richardson continues to trail Hahn in recent polls. Much of her declining support may be due to recent controversies over alleged ethics violations. Most recently, Richardson was reprimanded and fined $10,000 after an investigation by the House Ethics Committee determined in August that she had violated House rules by pressuring her official congressional staff to work on her re-election campaign. Richardson has also had a hard time financing her campaign, according to recent campaign finance reports that show she is hundreds of thousands of dollars in debt. Still, Richardson, who briefly attended CSUDH, focused on her past accomplishments during the forum, telling students she helped obtain close to $1 million in federal funds to support programs at the university and classes during her tenure. “This is home for me,” she said. “[It’s] important for me to make sure that you’re successful and have the same chances that I had.” Richardson also mentioned that she voted for federal stimulus funding four years ago that helped restore cuts to CSUs and was one of the sponsors of the DREAM (Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors) Act, pending legislation that, if passed, would give illegal citizens who have lived in the United States and have attended school for more than three years the ability to apply to college and take advantage of financial aid. She said she also voted to reduce interest rates on federal student

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loans. “There’s a lot that I’ve done to bring money to this school and to also bring programs, so it’s going to be better for you being here and that’s important,” Richardson said. Despite recent controversies, Richardson has received a wide spectrum of endorsements from local governmental officials, including a faction of AfricanAmerican representatives. Most recently, she was endorsed by Rep. Emanuel Cleaver II, chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus, who, in a prepared statement, called Richardson “a person who over the years has stood up for those who could not stand up for themselves.” Cleaver added, “It’s critical that I reiterate how important it is for us to hold on to every seat we have, and if possible, to expand the number of AfricanAmericans in Congress… unfortunately, there are still issues that are racial, and I don’t know how you solve a problem if you exclude race.” Hahn, who is white, however, has received the endorsement of the California Democratic Party in addition to the California Labor Federation. Hahn, the daughter of longtime Los Angeles County Supervisor Kenneth Hahn and the sister of former Los Angeles mayor and now Los Angeles Superior Court Judge James Hahn, said the election will ultimately determine the primary concerns for voters in the new district. “This is a critical race,” she said. “And, while it’s not a race between a Democrat and a Republican… it’s a reflection of this new district’s priorities and values and what our future will bring us.” A longtime Los Angeles city councilmember, Janice Hahn aligned her views with re-electing President Obama while promoting investments in education and providing more job opportunities from the ports of Los Angeles and Long

Beach. “If you send me back to Congress, I’ll fight every day to make sure everyone in this district has an opportunity to succeed and has a fair shot at the American Dream,” she said. “My vision for this district is one where everyone graduates from high school and has an opportunity to go to college… I want people in this district to have the skills to pay their bills.” Hahn added that she is “going to be the kind of Congresswoman this 44th district deserves,” with “common sense, brains and also guts.”

One student, however, said it was “unusual” that the candidates didn’t debate any topics or answer questions from students, adding that the candidates appeared to be “pandering” to the audience. “Basically, they gave the audience candy,” said Burton Herwitz, a communications major. “They told [students about] all the goodies they’re giving them, but never touched on the $16 trillion we’re in debt or how we pay for all these social programs and all these amenities we’re giving out.”

The 15-member Medical Board of California unanimously elected Long Beach 5th District Councilmember Gerrie Schipske as its vice president during its Oct. 26 quarterly meeting. Schipske, who is serving in her second term as the

appointee of the Senate Rules Committee, had just completed her term as Secretary of the Board. “This is a hard-working regulatory board that is dedicated to the protection of the consumer,” Schipske said. “I am very honored

to have the support of my colleagues to serve as vice president for the coming year.” Schipske is the first and only registered nurse to serve on a state medical board. The executive officers of the Medical Board of California also include Dr. Sharon Levine as president and Dr. Silvia Diego as secretary.

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Janice Hahn (above), who currently represents the 36th Congressional district in the US House of Representatives, and Laura Richardson (below), who represents the 37th district, during a forum at Cal State Dominguez Hills last week

Schipske elected v.P. of state medical board

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Freeway

continued from page 1

Royce. “Stacey Morrison, who is now one of our board members, and I began getting together to remove litter from our local streets and sidewalks a few years ago.” He explained that just the two of them did that for several months whenever their schedules allowed. “Stacey suggested that we make it an official CHNA activity,” Royce said. “We brought the idea to the board, and they enthusiastically endorsed it.” He added that CHNA members have been cleaning local streets and sidewalks since August 2009. Morrison, who heads up the association’s Clean Streets program, explained that the CHNA volunteers work every Thursday to remove trash from streets and sidewalks that are approximately within one mile of the intersection of Atlantic Avenue and Wardlow Road. “We saw the need to do the same thing alongside the freeway and offramps that are close to our neighborhood,” she said. “So, with approval of the board, we contacted Caltrans (California Department of Transportation) and began the process of adopting a portion of the 405.” According to a brochure found on its website, Caltrans initiated the

A Matter of Life

The worst way to deal with loss is to deny, deny, deny Kenneth McKenzie Columnist

The holidays can be the most difficult time of the year to deal with a loss. It has been years since my family has been separated by deaths and we were all able to sit at one table together for a holiday meal. The worst thing to do in dealing with a loss during the holidays is to not talk about the person or people who have died. My father had been dead for five months, I was 12 years old, and the Thanksgiving dinner table was set the same as the year before, with the exception that my dad’s spot at the end of the table was bare. There were no wise-cracking jokes, no silly faces and no throwing of Grandma’s homemade biscuits across the long table at my grandfather when he asked to have them passed. What emphasized the fact that he was not there anymore was that nobody talked about him nor looked at his empty spot at the table. I felt like I was in a Twilight Zone episode. Maybe about 10 minutes into the meal, I remember going to my mother, hugging her and telling her, "everyone’s pretending it is all okay." When my Grandma Cole asked, "What’s wrong with Kenny?" my mother repeated so the family could hear what I had said to her. My family was afraid to say anything about our father as it may upset us. However, what they did not realize was that it was upsetting to not talk about him. With that, all I remember was one of Grandma’s biscuits bouncing off my head after being hurled at me. The entire family laughed out loud. I was able to taste my tears, that moment is so clear. My recommendation is to embrace the loss. It is okay to talk about a person. It may seem a bit uncomfortable on both sides to bring up a memory, but, believe me, those uncomfortable moments can be created into wonderful life memories.

CommuNITY

Adopt-a-Highway Program in 1989. Since then, more than 120,000 Californians, representing upwards of 6,000 organizations, have volunteered to participate in the beautification of roadsides maintained and administered by Caltrans. Morrison explained that beginning on Nov. 8, a group of about 10 CHNA volunteers will begin the work of picking up roadside litter along their adopted stretch of the 405. “The volunteers will watch a training video shortly before the first day of the actual work,” she said. “We plan on removing litter from the freeway and ramps on the second and third Thursday of each month after that.” According to Morrison, Caltrans is providing CHNA volunteers with white hard hats, vests, gloves, safety glasses, litter-pickers and large, heavyduty trash bags. The association has also been granted a freeway encroachment permit; normally, pedestrians are not allowed on areas adjacent to a freeway. In addition, Caltrans employees will collect and dispose of the filled litter bags. In exchange for CHNA’s litterpickup services, Caltrans will erect special signs alongside the 405 recognizing CHNA’s good deed. “They already installed one sign and it just

has the words: ‘Highway adopted by the California Heights Neighborhood Association,’” Morrison said. Other groups that have adopted portions of highways have also been authorized by Caltrans to: plant and maintain trees, shrubs, and wildflowers; paint over graffiti on freeway structures; and control weeds along the freeway right-of-way. “We will not be doing any of those additional things,” Morrison said. “But Caltrans wants us to inform them about graffiti that we notice and to make suggestions about things we would like to see planted.” According to the Caltrans brochure, in the 23 years of the program’s existence, Adopt-a-Highway volunteers have collected more than 423,000 cubic yards of litter and debris from California roadsides. That’s enough trash to fill a line of dump trucks, parked bumper-to-bumper from San Luis Obispo to San Francisco. Those efforts have saved the State approximately $120 million in labor costs and enabled Caltrans maintenance workers to focus more on the maintenance and repair of the state’s freeway system. “We think that is a valuable contribution, and we are proud to join forces with the thousands of others who are working to improve the quality of life

for all Californians while saving the taxpayers millions of dollars annually,” Morrison said. “Adopt-a-Highway volunteers also help create a cleaner, safer environment by helping to prevent potential pollutants from entering our waterways.” According to the Caltrans brochure, individuals, organizations, businesses, city, county, state and federal agencies can adopt sections of state highway roadsides. Participants may perform the work themselves or hire a licenced contractor to perform the work on their behalf. Subject to Caltrans approval, minors aged 16 and older may participate provided they are adequately supervised. Morrison noted that another motivation behind CHNA’s participation in the program is inspiration. “We want to inspire volunteerism on all levels,” she said. “Just think how much better our freeways would be if another 120,000 people in the state participated in the Adopt-a-Highway program, and just think how much better life would be for us all, if more people volunteered to help out in the many arenas of life.” Royce agreed. “As we continue to deal with the weak economy and reduced funding for all government programs and services, volunteers are

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becoming increasingly important to our society,” he said. “We need to have more people saying, 'If the government cannot afford to do this, I will volunteer my time to make sure it gets done.’” MORE INFORMATION (916) 654-2926

Photo by Stacey Morrison

Caltrans has already installed one of the signs acknowledging the California Heights Neighborhood Association’s commitment to--- pick up trash on a .3mile stretch of the 405 Freeway.


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First Fridays art walk to honor Dia de Los muertos

The First Fridays art walk in Bixby Knolls will celebrate its 6th anniversary with Day of the Dead activties on Friday, Nov. 2. Businesses will participate in an altar contest and will host themed face painting, music, a coloring contest, and treats in honor of the holiday. Attendees can also cruise Atlantic Avenue and check out the jazz, swing, oldies, blues, strolling mariachi, mask-making, Jimi Hendrix sing-along, graffiti artists, classic cars, funky haircuts, photography, gift items, and Saw

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Red, the Sublime tribute band. Eighth District Councilmember Al Austin’s “Council on Your Corner” will be set up at Atlantic Avenue and Burlinghall Drive to “meet and greet” attendees. Seventh District Councilmember James Johnson’s “First Books at First Fridays” will begin at 5:30pm at the Dana Branch Library featuring Long Beach First Lady Nancy Foster as the guest reader. Attendees may dine on “ArtLantic” Avenue at one of the local restaurants then grab the Big Red Bus to travel from venue to venue via designated stops at the participating businesses. Bella Cosa, 3803 Atlantic Ave., will have all the information about First Fridays, maps, business info, and restaurant recommendations from 6:30pm to 8pm. MORE INFORMATION firstfridayslongbeach.com

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Long Beach Playhouse’s Fuddy Meers asks indulgence but ultimately proves worthy Rachel Levy and Stephen Alan Carver in the Long Beach Playhouse’s production of Fuddy Meers

Vicki Paris Goodman Culture Writer

Fuddy Meers is a decidedly quirky drama packed with scumof-society lowlifes. Usually, a play populated with so little human inspiration is more than enough to make me write off that play (literally!). But if everything else works, all it takes to reverse that diagnosis is one splendid character to root for. And playwright David Lindsay-Abaire provides such a character. In Long Beach Playhouse’s current production, Claire, played with a centered optimism and infectious likability by Rachel Levy, is a woman afflicted by a Groundhog Day sort of amnesia, wherein her life’s memories are gone each morning when she awakens. Thus she spends each day struggling to recall her past. Tom Juarez delivers an admirable keep-‘em-guessing complexity as Claire’s husband Richard. Deeply troubled teenage son Kenny is well played by Michael Dougherty,

who capably pulls off the challenging emotional range of his role. Fuddy Meers plays out over the course of a single day in Claire’s life. On that day, a limping, disfigured man (Stephen Alan Carver) enters the house claiming to be Claire’s brother and convinces her to go with him to the home of their mother Gertie (Geraldine D. Fuentes). Gertie, a stroke victim, has trouble with pronunciation. Hence, the play’s title, Fuddy Meers, translates to the “funny mirrors” found at a carnival fun house that distort reflected images. At Gertie’s, yet another disturbing individual emerges in Millet (Bob Fetes). Fetes masterfully alternates between his character’s own obviously unbalanced persona and that of his foul-mouthed puppet Hinky Binky. His performance is remarkable. The limping man and Millet seem to pose a clear danger to Gertie and Claire. Gertie tries in vain to warn Claire of the threat but can’t manage to communicate

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understandably. In the meantime, Richard and Kenny have set out to find Claire, revealing their own apparent emotional instabilities in the process. They also encounter a female police officer (Stephanie Schulz), who isn’t at all what she seems. At this point, the play asks much of its audience, who are probably considering taking an early leave at intermission. But stay, as the second half begins to divulge the answers we seek, and the pay-off is more than worthwhile. At the risk of sounding ridiculously cliché, Fuddy Meers amounts to a theatrical journey, and not a pleasant one. Furthermore, there seems to be a dearth of meaning and depth at the outset. Hence the mid-performance flight risk of the audience. But the play’s flawed souls are struggling to be better people, some more successfully than others. And a slowly revealed sense of conviction and purpose, as well as the ultimate disclosure of the startling truth behind Claire’s amnesia, make the play’s initial superficiality and unsettling evolution well worth enduring. At the end of the day, Richard and Kenny beg an exhausted Claire not to go to sleep just yet. And we are unexpectedly moved by a heartening affirmation of committed and largely unrequited loyalty and love. Robert Craig directs the excellent cast in this no-holds-barred production. Fuddy Meers continues on the Long Beach Playhouse Mainstage through Nov. 24. General admission tickets are $24. Senior tickets are $21. Student tickets are $14 with valid student ID. Performances are Fridays and Saturdays at 8pm, with Sunday matinees at 2pm. The Long Beach Playhouse is located at 5021 E. Anaheim St. Call (562) 494-1014 for reservations and information. Tickets are also available online at lbplayhouse.org .


ST3422 - November 2_Layout 1 11/2/12 11:46 AM Page 11

CommuNITY recycled-water use celebrated at water replenishment District’s State of the District ceremony

SIgNAL TrIBuNE

NovEmBEr 2, 2012

Nick Diamantides Staff Writer

Last Thursday, the Water Replenishment District of Southern California (WRD) celebrated the 50th anniversary of the first time the agency used recycled water to recharge the region’s underground aquifer. The celebration was part of WRD’s annual State of the District presentation, and the agency invited administrators of water departments of the region to the party held at WRD headquarters, 4040 Paramount Blvd., in Lakewood. California Lt. Governor Gavin Newsom was the keynote speaker at the event, attended by about 300 people, including several elected local and state officials. Albert Robles, president of the WRD Board of Directors, spoke before Newsom took the stage. “When the concept of using recycled water was first floated more than a half-century ago, very few people realized the long-term benefit it would have on securing a safe and reliable groundwater supply for this region that is challenged by limited annual rainfall,” Robles told the audience. “Indeed it was a breakthrough for the future of groundwater sustainability around the world.” Robles explained that WRD was a pioneer in the use of recycled water for groundwater recharge– a practice now emulated by water agencies throughout the world. “WRD, however, is not content with accomplishments of the past and is chartering a course aimed at creating regional water independence that eliminated the need for expensive imported water,” he said. “As California’s water demands increase, WRD is stepping up efforts to do its part to meet the water needs of the 4 million residents in 43 cities within the boundaries of its 420-square-mile jurisdiction– the most densely populated region of the state.” Robles also gave a list of WRD’s accomplishments during the past year. He noted that WRD was created by a vote of the people 53 years ago. “Our charge was to protect the treasure beneath our feet from catastrophic collapse due to the overpumping of groundwater,” he said. “Our mandate is to make up the difference, which historically has been made up by buying water from northern California and the Colorado River.” He noted that WRD accounts for 40 percent of the water demand in the area. “Historically, WRD’s reliance on imported water was among the highest in the state, but 50 years ago in partnership with the Los Angeles County Sanitation District (LACSD) and the Los Angeles County Flood Control District, WRD pioneered the use of recycled water for groundwater recharge,” Robles said. “Over the next five decades, WRD worked hard to increase the use of local water resources, including capturing more storm water and using more recycled water. This has resulted in our reduced reliance on imported water by almost 50 percent compared to 50 years ago.” Robles also noted that in the past 12 months WRD has made much progress in its Water Independence Now (WIN) program, which the agency initiated in 2006. Robles said the goal of the program is to make WRD 100-percent independent of imported water. “On Monday of this week, with our partner, the West Basin Municipal Water District, we

celebrated the expansion of the Ed T. Little Advanced Treatment Plant in El Segundo,” he said. “That expansion will make our largest seawater barrier system the first in the world to be 100-percent dependent on recycled water.” Robles also explained that the WRD Board of Directors recently approved the construction contract expansion of the Leo J. Vander Lans Advanced Treatment Plant in Long Beach. “That expansion will make the Alamitos Barrier the second seawater barrier system in the world to be 100-percent dependent on recycled water,” he said, adding that WRD is currently negotiating with the City of Los Angeles to make the seawater barrier system located near Wilmington Harbor fully dependent on recycled water. Robles then handed the microphone to Newsom, who began by praising WRD for its successful efforts, over more than five decades, to maintain the groundwater supply. “Thank you for your example and your devotion to this extraordinary cause and vision that goes back to a time when California was in the future business,” he said. “In 1962, when you got in the business of the recycling in the replenishment strategy, we were in the future business. That was at a time when our state was the tent pole for the American economy.” He explained that in the ‘50s, ‘60s, and ‘70s, there was no other state that grew jobs at the rate new jobs were created in California, but nowadays California is no longer a leader in job growth compared to

other states. Newsom said the rest of the state would do good to follow the example set by WRD, which has developed innovative ways to improve and expand its services at a time when most organizations in the public as well as the private sector are shrinking. He added that, since the 1960s, the state government has not adequately improved and expanded its water-delivery systems to keep pace with the rapid growth in population. The Lt. Governor stressed that solving problems on a local level, as WRD has done for more than 50 years, seems to be the best way to get things done. “When Albert (Robles) makes the point, ‘We are going to get off importation,’ I get excited,” he said. Newsom told the audience that the notion of local empowerment, regionalism, and the “remarkable capacity of people, regardless of their political parties, working together to bridge regional rivalries,” need to become the way Californians accomplish their goals. He added that WRD models all those things. “You are on the leading and cutting edge of technology and ideas. You’re not dreamers, you’re doers,” he said. You’re an example for the rest of us.” State Assembly Whip Roger Hernandez echoed Newsom’s comments. “You see a lot of communities doing things the old way, as the Lt. Governor pointed out, and then you see some communities and their governance teams trail-blazing,” he said. “WRD is definitely setting the tone for California.” Wade Miller, national executive

Nick Diamantides/Signal Tribune

About 300 people, including representatives of local water agencies and several elected officials, attended WRD’s State of the District celebration last Thursday.

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Nick Diamantides/Signal Tribune

California Lt. Governor Gavin Newsom speaks at the WRD State of the District gathering last Thursday, telling the audience that he is excited by the prospect of the water agency becoming totally free of the need to purchase water from northern California and the Colorado River.

director of the WateReuse Association, based in Alexandria, Virginia, also made brief comments praising WRD and LACSD for their partnership in using recycled water for to replenish groundwater supplies. Miller stressed that he hopes more local agencies would recycle water. “I’ve learned recently that one billion gallons of water per day is discharged into the ocean between Santa Monica and San Diego,” he said. “Think of the possibilities of utilizing that water instead of discharging it into the ocean. Water is just too valuable to be used only once.” During the event, WRD also received the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold Certification for its headquarters building, making WRD one of the very few

water agencies in the state to receive that level of green building recognition. “It is an honor and a privilege to present the Gold LEED Plaque to this wonderful organization,” said Jorge Partida, executive director of the US Green Building Council. “To recognize this organization which is taking care of water is a highlight of my career.”

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TST4215 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 12-0058360 Doc ID #0008720665082005N Title Order No. 12-0105600 Investor/Insurer No. 1701698928 APN No. 7216-002-042 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 06/29/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU

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www.kathyalford.com SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by TEGAN ANN SHANELEC, dated 06/29/2006 and recorded 7/14/2006, as Instrument No. 06 1557143, in Book , Page , of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, will sell on 11/19/2012 at 9:00AM, Doubletree Hotel Los Angeles-Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650, Vineyard Ballroom at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property

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situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2621 EAST 20TH STREET #17, SIGNAL HILL, CA, 90755. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $435,269.68. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. If required by the provisions of section 2923.5 of the California Civil Code, the declaration from the mortgagee, beneficiary or authorized agent is attached to the duly recorded with the appropriate County Recorder's Office. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on a property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale post-

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ponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 1-800281-8219 or visit this Internet Web site www.recontrustco.com, using the file number assigned to this case NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 12-0058360. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 By: Trustee's Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. A-FN4317151 10/26/2012, 11/02/2012, 11/09/2012

TST4216 TSG No.: 4750464 TS No.: CA1000218394 FHA/VA/PMI No.: APN: 7214-015-091 Property Address: 2365 PROMONTORY DRIVE SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 07/21/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 11/15/2012 at 10:00 A.M., First American Trustee Servicing Solutions, LLC, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 07/28/2005, as Instrument No. 05 1787699, in book , page , , of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, State of California. Executed by: CATHERINE A. OLWENY, A MARRIED PERSON, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (Payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States) Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN THE ABOVE MENTIONED DEED OF TRUST APN# 7214-015-091 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2365 PROMONTORY DRIVE, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be

CITY oF SIgNAL HILL TST4222 NoTICE oF ElECTIoN

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a General Municipal Election will be held in the City of Signal Hill on Tuesday, March 5, 2013, for the following Officers:

Three Members of the City Council Full term of four years

The nomination period for these offices begins on Tuesday, November 13, 2012, at 7:30 a.m. and closes on Friday, December 7, 2012, at 4:30 p.m. If nomination papers for an incumbent officer of the city are not filed by Friday, December 7, 2012 (the 88th day before the election), the voters shall have until the 83rd day before the election, December 12, 2012, to nominate candidates other than the person(s) who are the incumbents on the 88th day before the election, for that incumbent’s elective office. This extension is not applicable where there is no incumbent eligible to be elected. If no one or only one person is nominated for an elective office, appointment to the elective office may be made as prescribed by § 10229, Elections Code of the State of California.

The polls will be open between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. ADVANCE \d3 Kathleen L. Pacheco City Clerk

TST4217

Published on: November 2, 2012 Posted at City Hall, Library, Discovery Well Park, Reservoir Park, and on the City’s website on: November 2, 2012

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made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $745,470.57. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust has deposited all documents evidencing the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and has declared all sums secured thereby immediately due and payable, and has caused a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be executed. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (916)939-0772 or visit this Internet Web http://search.nationwideposting.com/propertySearchTerms.aspx, using the file number assigned to this case CA1000218394 Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse. First American Title Insurance Company First American Trustee Servicing Solutions, LLC 3 FIRST AMERICAN WAY SANTA ANA, CA 92707 Date: FOR TRUSTEE'S SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL (916)939-0772 First American Trustee Servicing Solutions, LLC MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.NPP0209668 SIGNAL TRIBUNE 10/26/2012, 11/02/2012, 11/09/2012

TST4211 / 2012 198894 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: LONG BEACH DUCT CLEANING, 2517 Cerritos Ave., Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: LONG BEACH HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING INC., 2517 Cerritos Ave., Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Shari White, Vice-President. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on October 3, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on October 4, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: October 12, 19, 26, & November 2, 2012.

TST4212 / 2012 199735 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. BRANSCOMB BY LAUREN LYNN, 2. BRANSCOMB UTILITY, 3. BRANSCOMB DESIGNS, 4. LAUREN LYNN, 375 Atlantic Ave. Suite 104, Long Beach, CA 90802. Registrant: BRANSCOMB, 375 Atlantic Ave. Suite 104, Long Beach, CA 90802. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Lauren Lynn King, President. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on October 1, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on October 5, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: October 12, 19, 26, & November 2, 2012. TST4213 / 2012 199736 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: WE CARE MOBILE AUTO DETAILING SERVICES, 214 E. Adams St., Long Beach, CA 90805. Registrant: LEONARD FREDRICK IRVIN II, 214 E. Adams St., Long Beach, CA 90805. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Leonard Irvin II. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on October 5, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: October 12, 19, 26, & November 2, 2012.

TST4214 / 2012 206012 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. DON & HAROLD'S AUTOMOTIVE & EVALUATION CENTER, 2. DON & HAROLD'S AUTO SERVICE, 500 E. Wardlow Rd., Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: DK AUTOMOTIVE, INC., 500 E. Wardlow


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Call for a free estimate Recommended by many local music teachers Associate Member of the Piano Technicians Guild Rd., Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Kenneth M. Herzog, CFO/Sec. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on October 15, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on October 16, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: October 19, 26, & November 2, 9, 2012.

TST4218 / 2012 212410 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: STAR LINE SERVICES, 1034 E. San Antonio Dr., Apt. B, Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: 1. CLAUDIA DUARTE, 2. JAVIER CRUZ–PINA, 1034 E. San Antonio Dr., Apt. B, Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: a General Partnership. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Claudia Duarte. The registrants have not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on October 24, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: October 26, & November 2, 9, 16, 2012.

TST4220 / 2012 212412 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: 1. THE SPELL SHOW, 2. THE SPELL, 2599 E. Pacific Coast Hwy., Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: 1. ANTHONY WEIDNER, 2826 E. 4th St. #3, Long Beach, CA 90814, 2. ANDY KIDDOO, 3. JOSH BROWN, 4. BRANDEN MURRAY, 2599 E. Pacific Coast Hwy., Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: a General Partnership. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Anthony Weidner. The registrants have not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on October 24, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: October 26, & November 2, 9, 16, 2012.

TST4221 / 2012 206342 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. BEST BUY MOTORS, 2. SIGNAL HILL AUTO CARE, 1865 Redondo Ave., Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: HAMID R. MAMNOON, 1865 Redondo Ave., Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Hamid R. Mamnoon. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on July 6, 1989. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on October 16, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: October 26, & November 2, 9, 16, 2012.

TST4223 / 2012 215753 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: 3D HORIZONS, 2201 E. Willow St. Suite D #320, Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrants: 1. DIANE LEE AAGESEN, 3323 1/2 Walnut Ave., Signal Hill, CA 90755, 2. ARASH ZAHABI, 29 Fox Hollow, Irvine, CA 92614, 3. DALE RICHARD WHITE, 11252 S. Espanita, Orange, CA 92869, 4. BRUCE SCOGGIN SPARKS, 24246 Hayes Ave., Murrieta, CA 92562. This business is conducted by: a General Partnership. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Diane Lee Aagesen. The registrants have not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on October 30, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 2, 9, 16, 23, 2012. TST4225 / 2012 218188 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: AMS LOGIX, 2699 E. 28th St. Unit 412, Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: DEWEY JOHNSON, 3200 E. South St. Apt. 101, Lakewood, CA 90712. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Dewey Johnson. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on November 1, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: November 2, 9, 16, 23, 2012.

EYE ON CRIME Crimes reported by LBPD • Council Districts 6, 7 & 8

Thursday, oct. 25 Commercial burglary 4:22am- 3300 block Long Beach Blvd.

Auto burglary 5:15am- 3200 block Long Beach Blvd.

Grand theft– bike 5pm- 600 block Marshall Pl.

Auto burglary 5pm- 4600 block Long Beach Blvd.

Robbery of person 5:05pm- 1200 block E. Pacific Coast Hwy.

Sunday, oct. 26 Residential burglary 9:20am- 1000 block E. 46th St.

Thursday, oct. 25 Battery (occurred 10/15) 10:30am- 2400 block California Ave. Suspect in custody.

Friday, oct. 26 DUI 12:05am- 2300 block Atlantic Ave. Named suspect.

Forgery 9:30am- 2300 block California Ave. Suspect in custody.

Petty theft 10:40am- 900 block E. 33rd St. Juvenile in custody.

DUI 11:59pm- Lakewood Blvd./Willow St. Suspect in custody.

Residential burglary 2:30pm- 2100 bay View Dr.

Saturday, oct. 27 Commercial burglary 5:25pm- 500 block W. San Antonio Dr.

Residential burglary 9:30am- 200 block W. 37th St.

Attempted auto burglary 11:15am- W. 20th St./Cedar Ave.

Robbery of person 12:57pm- E. Del Amo Blvd./Long Beach Blvd. Grand theft 1:30pm- 100 block E. Willow St.

Auto burglary 7pm- 3500 block Elm Ave.

Attempt auto burglary

Crimes reported by SHPD • Citywide Saturday, oct. 27 DUI 12:59am- 1300 block E. Spring St. Suspect in custody.

DUI 2:46am- 5000 E. Spring St. Suspect in custody.

Injury hit & run 3:30pm- 700 block E. Willow St.

DUI Alcohol/0.08% 6:25pm- Temple Ave./Combellack Dr. Suspect in custody.

Sunday, oct. 28 DUI 12:38am- E. 29th St./Gardena Ave. Suspect in custody.

Non-injury hit-and-run 9:13am- 2400 block Cherry Ave.

False imprisonment 1:10pm- 700 block E. Spring St. Suspect in custody.

7:15pm- 3500 block Elm Ave.

Auto burglary 9pm- 3600 block Country Club Dr.

Commercial burglary 9pm- 4600 block Long Beach Blvd.

Sunday, oct. 28 Commercial burglary 12:57am- 2300 block Long Beach Blvd.

Garage/residential burglary 4pm- 2700 block Eucalyptus Ave.

Residential burglary 6pm- 400 block E. 20th St.

monday, oct. 29 Robbery of person 8:50pm- 2100 block Pacific Ave.

monday, oct. 29 Identity theft 1:35pm- 2400 block Cherry Ave.

Stolen vehicle 7:31pm- 2400 block California Ave.

Tuesday, oct. 30 Mental disorder– danger to others 10:51am- 1300 block E. 23rd St.

wednesday, oct. 31 Commercial burglary 12:33am- 900 block E. 33rd St. DUI 3:34am- Myrtle Ave./33rd St. Suspect in custody.

Forgery 5:03pm- 2500 block Cherry Ave. Attempt residential burglary 9:50pm- 2200 block E. 21st St.

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CITY oF SIgNAL HILL TST4224 NoTICE oF PUBlIC HEARINGS

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Tuesday, November 13, 2012, the Planning Commission of the City of Signal Hill will conduct a public hearing at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chamber located at City Hall, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, to consider the following:

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Tuesday, November 20, 2012, the City Council of the City of Signal Hill will conduct a public hearing at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chamber located at City Hall, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California to consider the following: ZONING ORDINANCE AMENDMENT 12-03

• ADD “PUBLICALLY-OPERATED COMMUNITY GARDEN” AS A PERMITTED USE IN THE “OS, OPEN SPACE” ZONING DISTRICT” OF THE SIGNAL HILL MUNICIPAL CODE CHAPTER 20-18, “OPEN SPACE DISTRICT”

• RECLASSIFY A 6,750 SQUARE-FOOT PARCEL LOCATED AT 1917 21ST STREET FROM THE “RLM-1, RESIDENTIAL LOW/MEDIUM-1” ZONING DESIGNATION TO THE “OS, OPEN-SPACE” ZONING DESIGNATION ON THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL OFFICIAL ZONING MAP TO ALLOW USE OF THE PARCEL AS A “COMMUNITY GARDEN” Applicant: City of Signal Hill

THE PROJECT IS CATEGORICALLY EXEMPT from the requirements of the California Environmental Quality Act pursuant to Section 15304, Minor Alterations to Land of the Guidelines for implementation of the California Environmental Quality Act. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS are hereby invited to attend the public hearings to present written information, express their opinions or otherwise present evidence on the above matter, or to submit written comments, prior to the meeting. If you wish to legally challenge any action taken by the City on the above matter, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearings described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City prior to or at the public hearings. FURTHER INFORMATION on this item may be obtained at the City of Signal Hill Community Development Department located at 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, or by emailing Colleen Doan, Associate Planner at cdoan@cityofsignalhill.org or calling at (562) 989-7344. Published in the Signal Tribune newspaper: November 2 2012 Posted in accordance with S.H.M.C. Section 1.08.010: November 2, 2012 Mailed out to affected property owners within 300’ on or before: November 2, 2012

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labor unions who wore hard hats and orange T-shirts that read “Good Jobs, Less Traffic and Cleaner Air.” Those against the proposal included local neighborhood and environmental groups who assembled outside the meeting, holding up signs and wearing white T-shirts with the acronym “SCIG” crossed out. Labor unions, local chambers of commerce and international trade groups have put their support behind the project that, if approved, would generate 1,500 construction jobs over the next three years, boost trade capacity and add to the Port’s competitiveness for years to come, according to speakers at the meeting. Los Angeles Councilmember Joe Buscaino has also expressed support for the SCIG project. BNSF officials said in a statement that the SCIG will eliminate more than 1.5 million truck trips from I-710 each year, providing local and regional air-quality improvements and congestion relief. BNSF officials also said the facility would be equipped with all-electric cranes, ultra-low emission switching locomotives and low-emission railyard equipment, while trucks would be required to avoid residential areas by traveling on designated, GPStracked industrial routes.

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“This report validates that building SCIG is the right choice for green growth in Los Angeles,” said Matthew K. Rose, chairman and CEO of BNSF, in a prepared statement. “I’m proud of the hard work we’ve done over the past seven years to design the greenest intermodal rail facility in the country.” But opposing groups say the rail facility would cause more pollution than BNSF is leading the public to believe, adding that the Port’s own DEIR anticipates that the railyard would add 5,000 more trucks per day to local highways by 2035. Opponents proclaim that the DEIR inaccurately tries to take credit for airquality improvements that the Port would be implementing even if the project wasn’t built. The railyard, opponents say, would subject schools, daycare centers, parks, senior facilities and lower-income veterans’ homes to increased health risks and noise pollution. Andrea Hricko, professor of preventative medicine at USC’s Keck School of Medicine, said via email that, if the railyard is approved, children and staff at four local schools would have a higher risk of developing asthma due to higher volumes of truck and locomotive pollution. “A serious concern is that a large number of schools in west Long Beach are located within 1,000 feet of the proposed BNSF SCIG railyard … some even closer,” she said. “Their playgrounds and ball fields are likely just 250 feet away, [and that’s a] concern because, when children play hard, they breathe hard.” Johnson said the new DEIR now states that the Port will have a “goal” that 100 percent of trucks run on zero-emissions technology by 2020, but he said there are many questions that the Port has left unanswered as to how the technology would be developed. “It appears that the EIR still does not adequately address the real concerns of Long Beach residents,” he said. Opponents also expressed concerns about the displacement of several longtime Port-related businesses, including California

NovEmBEr 2, 2012

Cartage Company, a 50-year warehousing and trucking company that operates a transloading operation on a large portion of the site. The company employs its own permanent workers as well as contract employees and independent truckers. Although the project is expected to create 250 permanent jobs once completed in 2016 and 450 jobs in the next 30 years, opponents said the project would still lead to a “net loss” of about 800 jobs, since the local businesses already provide for about 1,200 jobs. Patrick Wilson, president and founder of Fast Lane Transportation, which is the only affected business that owns property at the site, said he supports the project, but the new DEIR has provided “no solution” for relocating the company. “This project, while it’s good in its intent, still will have some collateral damage … that is, it will take property that I own and have owned for decades,” he said. “That is property that supports over 100 local workers… so, we’re looking for some assurance that we will be able to continue.” Although Port officials have stated that there is no room for any more “on-dock” rail facilities, opponents said the facility should be built inside the Port complex instead of near neighborhoods. “Good air, less traffic and good jobs … all those things can be achieved by putting this project on dock, and that’s what we support,” said David Pettit, Natural the for director Resources Defense Council’s (NRDC) Southern California Air Program and an environmental lawyer. The NRDC has stated that it would file a lawsuit against the City of Los Angeles if the project goes forward. Phillip Sanfield, the Port’s spokesperson, said the Port will provide responses in a final EIR, after which the Los Angeles Harbor Commission will vote on whether to approve the project sometime in early 2013. If the harbor commission’s decision is appealed, the project will be taken up by the Los Angeles City Council sometime later next year.

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Crowd hears drug-law reform efforts at Art Theater’s Legalize It doc screening

A screening of the new documentary Legalize It drew people from different quarters to hear the tale of a social movement and drug-law reform efforts. The screening was hosted by Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP), a group of law-enforcement officials opposed to the war on drugs. Several LEAP speakers appear in the documentary, which covered the 2010 campaign to legalize marijuana in California that failed to pass. Members of LEAP were also on hand after the screening to discuss issues that were raised in the film. “It boggles my mind that marijuana is still illegal,” said former police officer Kyle Kazan. “Few policy changes would do more to end budget deficits, increase public safety, restore community trust in the police and improve racial relations in this country than ending the prohibition of marijuana.” He added that, while the Prop. 19 campaign may not have succeeded in changing the law, it changed a lot of minds. “It set the stage for reform in places like Washington, Oregon and Colorado, where voters are now poised to make history by ending these ridiculous laws once and for all,” Kazan said.

Education

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owed local school principals during the morning hours. Randy Gordon, president and CEO of the Long Beach Area Chamber of Commerce, commended the Principal for a Day program but added that he didn’t see enough business members in the audience. He also said he “doesn’t hear enough” from local business leaders on what skills students need to enter the workforce but added that students should have a strong work ethic and a background in technology. Other Long Beach programs commended were the Seamless Education partnership and a new program called Promise Pathways, which guarantees Long Beach high school students certain math and English classes during their first semester at Long Beach City College (LBCC), which is also working to base enrollment on high-school transcripts rather than placement tests. Greg Darnieder, senior advisor on college access to US Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, said national efforts to increase post-secondary college-degree completion rates will have to involve a “systems change” at school districts across the country. He said President Barack Obama’s challenge, which is in its third year, involves a goal to have 8.2 million additional students across the country graduate with post-secondary degrees by 2020, which translates to a goal of having 920,000 more students in California graduating with post-sec-

Photo by Diana Lejins

The Art Theater recently screened the documentary Legalize It, about the campaign of Prop 19, an initiative seeking to legalize marijuana, but failed to pass..

A panel discussion featuring lawenforcement, clergy and others followed the film. There was also an awards ceremony honoring medicalcannabis educators from Oaksterdam University. Many in the room remarked on the parallels with initiative campaigns to legalize marijuana currently on the ballot in three states and several localities. “The fact that we sold out this theater is indicative of a growing belief in the failure of current marijuana policy,”

said LEAP speaker and retired Redondo Beach Lieutenant Commander Diane Goldstein. “Public support has never been higher. Cities and states all across the nation are instituting reforms, and, at this point, change is inevitable. When that change comes, we will all be indebted to those on the Prop. 19 campaign, who first forged the path toward ending prohibition.”

ondary degrees by that time. Still, Darnieder said there’s a lot that needs to be done in school systems before those goals can be achieved. “Only 24 percent of high-school graduates are ready academically to be successful in college in all subject areas,” he said, adding that only 60 percent of students fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and a majority of students who do fill it out forget to sign the forms. In Long Beach, Darnieder said he sees “institutional leadership that’s genuine and trusted and fully committed to the futures of … young people.” Chris Steinhauser, superintendent of Long Beach Unified School District (LBUSD), said a program to improve readiness in algebra completion across schools has proved successful, with 8th-grade participation in algebra at 60-percent proficiency, which is 20 percent higher than the state average. He added that 70 percent of Long Beach high-school students who go on to college attend the same college the next year, meaning they don’t drop out. Despite the acknowlegement of those positive achievements, the mood switched to a more somber tone as Steinhauser discussed financial struggles that schools across the state have been facing for the past few years. He said LBUSD alone has had to cut over $300 million in the last four to five years, and, despite still being the largest employer in the city, the school district’s workforce has been slashed

dramatically. During this year’s General Election on Nov. 6, registered voters will decide whether to pass Proposition 30, an initiative put forth by Gov. Jerry Brown that would temporarily raise sales and income taxes on California residents to pay for education and other state necessities. The tax increases are expected to prevent a $6-billion budget cut to schools across the state. Steinhauser said if the measure doesn’t pass, he would be forced cut $35 million from Long Beach schools, which could mean less advanced-placement classes, music classes and sports programs available for some 84,000 students. “For the very first time, I’m scared to death of what’s going to happen,” he said. “We are at a crossroads in this nation, because it’s an economic

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

At Tuesday’s State of Education event, LBUSD Superintendent Chris Steinhauser (center) discusses the potential for $35 million in budget cuts to Long Beach schools if Proposition 30 doesn’t pass next Tuesday. Also pictured are LBCC Superintendent-President Eloy Ortiz Oakley and US Secretary of Education senior advisor Greg Darnieder.

Source: LEAP

Park

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sign, Catalina Island, the Pacific Ocean– it’s a tremendous opportunity, to see from downtown LA to downtown Long Beach.” He then reflected on the long journey it has been to open the public space. “You know, we bought this land over 130 years ago, in 1882, and, after decades of talking about what to do with it, and over a century of ownership, tomorrow we’ll finally open it up for public access,” Johnson said. “Tomorrow will be the first phase of what will eventually be Willow Springs Park, a 47-acre, regional, open-space opportunity– not just for one part of Long Beach, but for Long Beach, Signal Hill, Cerritos, Lakewood, and all our surrounding cities, and southern Los Angeles County and

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northern Orange County. Tomorrow, after 130 years, we’ll finally dedicate this beginning, this four acres, as a park of perpetuity. Tomorrow, we celebrate not just the opening of this highest point in the city of Long Beach, but the beginning of wetlands restoration, the beginning of access to open space for all communities in Long Beach and beyond, and the beginning of waterquality improvement, not just of this area, but the Los Angeles River, and our beaches and beyond.” Johnson explained that Willow Springs Park is home to two of the historic Southern California wetlands that have diminished over the years. “This entire property drains to the LA River and then to the beaches,” he said. “When we improve this property, and improve some water retention, we will clean up the LA River and our beach front.”

Cory Bilicko/Signal Tribune

The circular, topographical map is made of decomposed granite and tumbled glass, and it shows the region’s watersheds and terrain within 50 miles.

development issue.” Steinhauser added that lower-quality education services may cause more students to drop out, which may lead them into even worse trouble. Cal State University Long Beach Provost Don Para said, if the statewide measure isn’t approved, the university may have to close in spring, turning away some 2,000 students, due to having to make a $30million budget cut. Eloy Ortiz Oakley, superintendent and president of LBCC, said he would have to cut an additional $4 million from the community college budget next year, on top of a $2-million to $4-million budget cut, even if Proposition 30 passes. “It’s unfortunate, discouraging and hugely problematic that we’re sitting here having this conversation and putting so much on one elec-

tion,” Oakley said. “If the worst happens next Tuesday it will really look very different … Let me be clear, we will not be able to serve [students] with the same amount of resources, the same amount of choices or the same amount of opportunities to learn all the things that they want to. We’re going to be very focused in our mission of providing education.” Still, even with the tax increases, Oakley said schools, colleges and universities still face funding challenges to meet the needs of a growing student population. He said LBCC is enrolling fewer students now than in 1995, but has waiting lists of some 15,000 students and classes that are 94-percent full. “At a time when high schools have had the largest graduating classes, we are turning away more students,” he said.

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November 2 issue