Issuu on Google+

Signal T

Vol. 34 No. 19

R

I

B

U

N

E

“Harvey” by Nate Jones; tire shavings, acrylic paint, steel, wire, wood, cardboard

More on this artist on page 8.

october 12, 2012

SERVING BIXBY KNOLLS, CALIFORNIA HEIGHTS, LOS CERRITOS, WRIGLEY AND THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

‘An infusion of energy’

Your Weekly Community Newspaper

Congressional candidate Gary DeLong defends taking Democratic political tracker’s phone despite criticism

As Burnett Elementary’s well-thumbed library closes a chapter in its history, its makeover is the setting for character development and bittersweet endings

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Kelsey Hewlett, a “political tracker” (far right) for the California Democratic Party, records video of Republican Congressional candidate Gary DeLong (far left) after a forum last Friday night just moments before he took her cell phone and allegedly began deleting content. Sean Belk date State Sen. Alan Lowenthal, who are both running for a seat in the US House of Staff Writer Gary DeLong, the Republican candi- Representatives. After the almost twodate in the race for the office of the newly hour debate that drew more than 300 peodrawn 47th Congressional District of Cal- ple to a bottom-floor room of the Pyramid ifornia, maintains that he was in the right at California State University, Long when he took a cell phone from a Califor- Beach (CSULB), the quarrel escalated nia Democratic Party political tracker who into a heated confrontation. DeLong was speaking to members of was assertively video-recording him after the public when a young, blonde woman, a forum last Friday night. The altercation is now being used whose name the Signal Tribune has conagainst him as fodder for the opposing firmed is Kelsey Hewlett, who also works party and campaign that proclaim as an actress, held her cell phone with a DeLong’s reaction shows he is “unfit for spotlight close to the candidate’s face in the office,” however some observers say an attempt to capture off-the-cuff comthe candidate was “provoked” by the ments. DeLong then grabbed the phone aggressive tracker who had reportedly from her hands, allegedly started deleting content and handed it to the event’s modbeen following him for weeks. erators, the League of Women Voters of The incident occurred after most of the crowd had left the debate between Long Beach Area.

Cory Bilicko/Signal Tribune

Burnett Elementary School Principal Lucy Salazar and school librarian Mary McCarthy cut the ribbon to signify the opening of the school’s newly made-over library last Wednesday. The project, made possible by a grant from the Target Corporation and Heart of America Foundation, included all new carpet, paint, bookshelves, tables, chairs, fixtures and artwork. The library also received about 2,000 new books, 10 iPads and an interactive whiteboard. Cory Bilicko

Managing Editor

It was a mid-week school day, with huge, dramatic cloud formations looming ominously over the playground, but, judging from the smiles on everyone’s faces and the exuberant energy in the air, it wasn’t a typical Hump Day at Burnett Elementary School. The staff and students had a special reason to celebrate– and a lot for which to be thankful. Burnett, located at 565 E. Hill St., just west of Signal Hill, is the second-oldest public school in Long Beach, and its library had just become the recipient of a makeover, courtesy of a grant provided by the Target Corporation and The Heart of America Foundation. The library transformation included all new

carpet, paint, bookshelves, tables, chairs, fixtures and artwork in a cohesive design. The library received approximately 2,000 new books, 10 iPads and an interactive whiteboard, as well as books for parents. Furthermore, each student received seven new books, a book bag, and reading-support supplies. The grant also includes a Meals for Minds program through which Burnett families, the vast majority of whom are low-income, will receive 30 pounds of food per pupil, and that distribution will continue throughout the year on a monthly basis. Last Wednesday’s celebration began with a ribbon-cutting in the school’s freshly redone library, after which students were released an hour early so that their parents could meet them

together:

• We can build our golden State • We can rebuild our economy on the principles of free enterprise, hard work and innovation

Vote Nov. 6

562-888-1598 info@marthafloresgibson.com vote4martha@twitter.com facebook.com/marthafloresgibson

Paid for by Martha Flores-Gibson for State Assembly 70th, 2012 ID#1343123

www.marthafloresgibson.com

Nick Diamantides Staff Writer

Leaders of three institutions of public education in Long Beach and one elected official held a press conference on the morning of Oct. 9 to discuss the ramifications of a possible rejection of Proposition 30 by the voters on Nov. 6. California State University, Long Beach (CSULB) President F. King Alexander, Long Beach Unified School District (LBUSD) Superintendent Christopher Steinhauser, Long Beach City College (LBCC) Super-

see LIBRARY page 14

October 12 through October 16, 2012

Vote for Martha Flores-Gibson 70th District - State Assembly

CSULB press conference assesses passage versus failure of Prop 30 DeLong and opposing Democratic candi-

Friday

68°

Saturday

73°

Partial sunshine

Some clouds, then sunshine

Lo 57°

Lo 60°

Sunday

79° Partly sunny Lo 59°

Monday

80° Partly sunny Lo 59°

Tuesday

80° Sunny Lo 59°

This week’s Weekly Weather Forecast sponsored by:

PIANO TUNING (562) & REPAIR Christine Kay 208-1853

see TRACKERS page 18

intendent-President Eloy Ortiz-Oakley, and Long Beach Vice Mayor Robert Garcia took turns warning of the dire local consequences of the voters’ rejection of the ballot measure. The conference took place in front of the Walter Pyramid on the CSULB campus. According to a press release issued days earlier, together the three education leaders serve more than 142,000 students on campuses that employ more than 13,000 individuals making public educasee CSULB page 13

Come for the WALK! Stay for the FUN!

t Contests, Food Trucks, Pe ll, Surf City Flyba s, or Exhibitors,Vend s, ffle Ra l, Ca So Disc Dogs in Ask the Vet, Ask the Trainer, ities & More! tiv Ac n’s re ild Ch

Oct.13 9am to 3pm

Register, Donate, Volunteer, Sponsorship, Vendor, Exhibitor spaces still available!

folba.org/walk

First 300 registrants receive $500 gift card to RedStarWorldWear.com!

Presented by:


2 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

OCTOBER 12, 2012

FREE

ECO GARDENER CLASSES HOMEOWNER SERIES Brought Br ought to you by

&

&

&

&

&

!"#$ !"# $

!"#$%&%$'($)*+,-$)#&.*+#%*/#&01&+02#,$%)&/"(*10%)*" & & & & & !"#$%&'#($)#*+#,-."/#,'$0-.'(-1'$2$3&,&4-,4$567($8(67,9:&'#($;6($!69&<$&,9$'"#$=7'7(# !"#$%&'#($)#*+#,-."/#,'$0-.'(-1'$2$3&,&4-,4$ !"#$% &'#($)#*+#,-."/#,'$0-.'(-1'$2$3&,&4-,4$567($8(67,9:&'#($;6($! 567($8(67,9:&'#($;6($! 67($8(67,9:&'#($;6($!69&<$&,9$'"#$=7'7(# 69&<$&,9$'"#$=7'7(#

Call 562-275-4215

or register egister online at ecogardener.org

October 13th Drip & Sprinkler System Care November 10th Sustainable Garden Care

EC ECO GARDENER

!"#$%&%$'($)*+,-$)#&.*+#%*/# 01&+02#,$%)&/"(*10%)*"

WRD Headquarters - 4040 Paramount Blvd. Lakewood, CA, 90712 !"#$%&'()$&*$#+(,-.&(/$0$Division !"#$%&'()$&*$#+(,-.&(/$0$ !"#$%&'()$&*$#+(,-.&(/ $0$Division 1 - Willar Willard d H. Murray, Murray, Jr. Jr. - Division 2 - Robert Katherman Katherman - Division 3 - Lillian Kawasaki - Division 4 - Sergio Sergio Calderon Calderon - Division 5 - Albert Robles


NEWS

OCTOBER 12, 2012

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Mitchell Kushner named city health officer for Long Beach Dr. Mitchell Kushner has been named as the new city health officer for the City of Long Beach Department of Health and Human Services (Health Department). Kushner, who started his work with the Health Department in mid-August, takes on the position with extensive experience in public health. “I’m pleased to begin work as the health officer for Long Beach, a city where I have lived for many years, and where I hope to build on the excellent reputation of the Health Department,” Kushner said. Previously, Kushner worked for nine years with the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, most recently as the medical director for the Community Health Services Division, where he provided medical oversight to 14 public health centers across the county. Kushner received his medical degree from Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, his bachelor of science

degree from Tulane University in New Orleans, and his master’s degree in public health from UCLA. Kushner is boardcertified in internal medicine and is fluent in Spanish. As city health officer, Kushner has statutory responsibilities for public health in Long Beach, including: • oversight of clinical services • communicable disease control • promotion of public health goals, including improving overall community health for issues such as bioterrorism preparedness response, recreational beach closures, and disease outbreak oversight • promoting public health issues such as healthy eating and active living to reduce disease and disability for Long Beach residents

Gary DeLong, Republican for California’s 47th Congressional District, has been endorsed by the bipartisan group No Labels, which applauded DeLong’s probusiness, bipartisan record in California and his eagerness to work with leaders on both sides of the aisle in Washington. The endorsement was announced at a press conference on Oct. 11 at the Hotel Maya in downtown Long Beach. “I’m a Democrat, but any leader who

puts problem-solving before point-scoring gets the No Labels seal of approval,” said No Labels founder Nancy Jacobson. “DeLong has done just that by agreeing to work with the No Labels ProblemSolvers Bloc to find solutions to our country's problems when elected.”

aboard to assist in meeting the public health mission locally and making Long Beach a healthier place to live, work and play.”

“I welcome Dr. Kushner to the public health family in Long Beach,” said Ron Arias, Health Department Director. “Our team is very happy to have Dr. Kushner

Source: City of LB

The Campaign Trail

have endorsed Alan Lowenthal for Congress. The American Federation of Teachers, California Teachers Association and the National Education Association all threw their support behind Lowenthal’s Congressional campaign. “As an educator and a passionate defender of our schools, colleges, and universities, I am proud to have the support of classroom teachers,” said Senator Lowenthal. “These are the people who work hard every day to create opportunity for our nation’s students. Their confidence and endorsement shows their trust in my plans to protect and improve our schools and higher education.”

Groups representing millions of teachers from across the United States, as well as the 47th Congressional District,

3

IN THE KNOW What North Long Beach Community Assembly Who Hosted by Councilmembers Al Austin and Steven Neal Where North Long Beach Christian Church gymnasium, 1115 E. Market St. When Saturday, Oct. 13 from 9am to noon More Info Attendees will learn about new job opportunities at the Long Beach Airport and north Long Beach public safety, as well as neighborhood issues. Refreshments will be provided, courtesy of Long Beach Airport. Call (562) 570-6685 or email district8@longbeach.gov .

REDUCE, REUSE, RECYCLE What Free e-waste recycling Who Newcomb K-8 Academy Where 7020 East Brittain St. When Saturday, Oct. 13 from 9am to 2pm More Info Residential and business e-waste, including computer monitors, televisions, printers, keyboards, cellphones, VCRs, electrical cords, etc. will be collected. Proceeds will benefit student programs at Newcomb Academy. Call (562) 431-2842.

COME CELEBRATE What Free pancake breakfast Who Hosted by Long Beach City College Where Pacific Coast Campus, 1305 East PCH When Saturday, Oct.13 from 9:30am to noon More Info Long Beach City College invites the public out to a free pancake breakfast to celebrate their 85th year. There will be free drawings, live music, entertainment and the opportunity to connect with community organizations that serve the Long Beach community. For more information, call (562) 938-3088. LET’S BOOK IT! What Book club Who Los Altos Neighborhood Library Book Club Where Los Altos Neighborhood Library, 5614 E. Britton Dr. When Saturday, Oct. 13 at 10am More Info The club will discuss Rebecca Skloot’s The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. The club meets on the second Saturday of each month. For more information, call (562) 570-1045.

CALLING ALL WRITERS What Free writers event Who Hosted by the California Writers Club of Long Beach Where Long Beach Los Altos Branch Library, 614 East Britton Dr. When Saturday, Oct. 13 from 3pm to 5pm More Info Lisa Napoli, a radio host and columnist for the New York Times and MSNBC, will speak at the event. Doors open at 2:30pm for networking prior to the speaker. Visit calwriterslongbeach.org, call (562) 400-1100 or email info@calwriterslongbeach.org .

NEED A JOB? What Long Beach Airport Concessions Job Fair Who Long Beach Airport Where Long Beach Marriott, 4700 Airport Plaza Dr. When Oct. 15–20 from 9am to 6pm More Info As a direct result of the City’s Airport Improvement Program, Long Beach Airport concessions will create more than 110 new permanent jobs. The Airport’s concessionaire, The Paradies Shops, will begin the process of recruiting new employees during a week-long job fair. One-on-one interviews will be conducted. Background check and completed applications are required.

Bixby Knolls Car Wash

We are conveniently located in the center of long Beach, 1 block north of the 405 freeway on Atlantic

577 E. Wardlow Rd. @ Atlantic Avenue • 562-595-6666

& Detail Center

HEAR TO HELP What Hearing-devices exhibit Who Presented by the Hearing Loss Association of Long Beach/Lakewood Where Weingart Senior Center, 5220 Oliva Ave. When Friday Oct.19 from 10am to noon More Info Free hands-on display of devices that help with hearing difficulties; includes information on how they work and where they can be purchased. Call (562) 630- 6141.

SIGNAL TRIBUNE’S FOCUS

Something on your mind?

Visit our website and leave a comment!

Share your opinions with us & other readers! www.signaltribune.com

ON

ADVERTISER

Name of business: Urban Cottage | Open since: october 2011 Owner: Melissa Zambrano | Type of business: Unique, eclectic boutique Location: 4121 Long Beach Blvd. | Neighborhood: Bixby Knolls Telephone: (562) 997-4121 | Store hours: tuesday through Saturday, 11am to 5pm About us: hand-picked treasures found by owner Melissa. Some unique, one-of-a-kind items made by local artisans. is boutique’s focus is on repurposed and recycled items for the home, as well as vintage and antique items with soul. Some new home decor and gi items, candles and jewelry. Women’s boutique clothing and vintage clothing will be coming soon. What we want our new customers to know: Come check out the always-evolving merchandise and new hand-picked treasures which arrive sometimes daily. Melissa also offers home-staging and decorating services, as well as personal shopping. She can help you remix what you have, or help you with a whole new look for your home or office! Websites: www.urbancottagelb.com | urbancottagelb.blogspot.com | Facebook fan page


4 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Thoughts from the Publisher

OPINION

OCTOBER 12, 2012

by Neena Strichart

Few celebrations are more fun than a birthday party for a friend or family member. Although gatherings for youngsters have a tendency to be more whimsical and noisy, and may or may not include a petting zoo, pony rides and/or a clown, get-togethers for the older generation can be enjoyable in an entirely different manner. Last Sunday I had the honor of attending a 95th birthday party for Nate Brightman hosted by his children, Lynne and Howard. For those who do not know Nate (only a handful of you, I’m sure), I will tell you a little about him. Nate, a Long Beach resident, is a volunteer extraordinaire. I first met him nearly 20 years ago when he came and gave a presentation about the Red Cross for my Susan B. Anthony, D.A.R. Chapter. His enthusiasm and knowledge of the subject was such that it kept all of us absolutely mesmerized. Little did I know at the time that I would continue to see Nate at event after event, build a relationship with him, and eventually even have a picture of the two of us framed and sitting on a shelf in my office. I wonder if he remembers the day that we met. Anyway, besides Red Cross, Nate is also extremely involved and has ties with the Associated Ratio Amateurs of Long Beach, the Queen Mary, a local computer club, and other interests that are too many to list. As far as the party goes, it was amazing. The event took place at the Petroleum Club with wallto-wall well-wishers, friends and family members kissing or shaking hands with him, posing for photos, and otherwise just fawning over the man of the hour– Nate Brightman. During the evening, Nate’s son and daughter took turns at the podium sharing stories about their father and telling the attendees about his myriad accomplishments and about Nate’s recent decision to learn Hebrew. Linda Temkin-Waltzman, Nate’s Hebrew teacher, spoke of “the sunshine” he has brought into her life and how much she enjoys teaching the written and spoken language to such an eager and apt pupil. During the “we love Nate” speeches portion of the evening, I had a chance to say a few words. I was tickled pink to get up in front of such a loving crowd and make the announcement that we at the Signal Tribune have designated Nate Brightman to be the first person chosen to be part of our new monthly feature called “Living Legends, Our Unsung Heroes.” Well, as I shared this news, you would have thought I announced Nate as the latest Nobel Prize winner! The crowd hooted and hollered, clapped, whistled and stomped their feet. From their reaction, I think we made a good choice in Nate– he truly is a living legend. Keep your eyes peeled for the October 26 issue– featuring dear Nate.

LETTERS

Assessing assessments

TO

In last week’s Letter to the Editor [“The debate continues...,” Oct. 5, 2012], Ms. Lorraine Gilbert asserted that the “Taxpayers Right to Know and Vote applies to all city assessments... and the petition is inconsistent with state law.” As a former member of the [Signal Hill] City Council, I was a party to the negotiations for the California Crown (Kaufman and Broad) Assessment District. This is how it works. City staff gets an annual estimate for landscape services and tells the homeowners what their share of cost will be. The City bases its charges on the “cost” it pays to provide the service. That is the sum total activity of the Assessment District. Just a few months ago, City staff stated that the Homeowners Association in California Crown is far from active in management, notwithstanding the fact that a council member lives in the project. To the point of Ms. Gilbert’s letter: First, the Taxpayer’s Right to Know and Vote citizens’ initiative is consistent with existing State law. This is the language in the current City Charter: “The City is specifically authorized to regulate municipal finance and adopt ordinances, resolutions and orders within the municipal affairs of the City, and to void enactments of the state of California contrary thereto, except as otherwise provided by the State Constitution. The current City Charter voids enactments of the State of California. That means the City is not bound to follow State law. The Taxpayer’s Right to Know and Vote Amendment modifies the language in the Charter to make the City Charter comply with State law. Second, Proposition 218 exempts from taxpayer vote those assessment districts formed prior to 1997 and those formed “at the request of the property owners.” Ms. Gilbert stated in her Letter to the Editor that California Crown was formed in 1992, so her district is exempt from voter approval. Third, Proposition 218 also governs increases to assessments. So long as the City does not charge more than the actual cost of service, under Proposition 218, no voter approval is required. Fourth, The Taxpayer’s Right to Know and Vote applies to new taxes, new property fees, new assessments and new bond issues. The Taxpayer’s Right to Know and Vote is “forward-looking.” It applies to future revenue-raising measures the City may wish to adopt and pass on to taxpayers. When the Council proposes a new tax, fee or assessment, the Charter amendment will require that the ballot going to all Signal Hill voters show: how much the new tax will be, who will pay it, how long they will pay the tax, and what the money will be used for. Voters can decide if the Council’s proposed tax increase is a priority item they wish to fund. The Taxpayer’s Right to Know and Vote lets the taxpayer establish their community priorities....“community first.”

TH E

Neena Strichart/Signal Tribune

Nate Brightman celebrating with his children Lynne and Howard...note the TWO cakes in the foreground!

ED ITO R

Passing of a trailblazer

I am disheartened at the news of the passing of Hon. Mervyn Dymally this weekend in Los Angeles at the age of 86. Merv was a pioneer whose life has been dedicated to excellence in public service, truly ahead of his time. I first met him in 1978 as a high-school senior when he was lieuenant governor and witnessed his impact on the lives of countless individuals. Honorable Mervyn Dymally represented my area as the first foreign-born black California Assemblymember in 1962. He then went on to become the first black state senator and lieutenant governor in California. Later in his illustrious career, he went on and represented Compton and surrounding areas in the US House of Representatives from 1981 to 1993. He was a trailblazer known as the “godfather” of African-American politics in Southern California. Dymally opened the doors for African-Americans in California politics and strongly believed in education and helping those that came along after him. Although no one can replace Mr. Dymally, together we can all strive to continue his model of leadership and dedication to the public. I would like to extend by deepest prayers and thoughts to the Dymally family. Steven Neal Long Beach Councilmember 9th District

Who’s on ‘First?’

The Signal Hill [Community] First folks contend that party politics is not driving their proposed ballot initiative which would require a two-thirds vote for all city fees, assessments and taxes [Letters to the Editor, Sept. 14, 2012]. I only wish this were the case. It seems to me that Signal Hill [Community] First has taken a page from the Tea Party’s tactics in attempting to allow a vocal minority to hold the majority hostage. I’m not willing to participate in their public policy experiment, especially when it impacts the level of services I enjoy as a Signal Hill resident. To me, if it isn’t broke, don’t fix it. I wonder if the Signal Hill [Community] First folks will submit their proposed “Right to Know and Vote” initiative to a two-thirds vote for passage should it qualify for the March ballot. In fairness, I hope they will since it is the two-thirds vote they seek. After all, what’s good for the goose is good for the gander. Jeffrey Adler Signal Hill

Carol Churchill Signal Hill

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

MANAGING EDITOR

Stephen M. Strichart

Neena R. Strichart

Cory Bilicko

ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/WEBSITE MANAGER

Barbie Ellisen Jane Fallon Stephanie Raygoza Sean Belk

COLUMNISTS

STAFF WRITERS

CJ Dablo

Jennifer E. Beaver Carol Berg Sloan, RD

DESIGN EDITOR

Leighanna Nierle

Nick Diamantides

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Matt Sun

CULTURE WRITERS

Tanya Paz

Daniel Adams Vicki Paris Goodman Gregory Spooner EDITORIAL INTERN

Ariana Gastelum

DESIGN INTERN

Kaelyn Bruno

The Signal Tribune welcomes letters to the editor, which should be signed, dated and include a phone number to verify authenticity. Letters are due by noon on the Tuesday before desired publication date. The Signal Tribune reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, language and space requirements. The Signal Tribune does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other publications or otherwise presented in a public forum. Letters to the editor and commentaries are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Signal Tribune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, letters to the editor and commentaries are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. Letter-writers will be identified by their professional titles or affiliations when, and only when, the editorial staff deems it relevant and/or to provide context to the letter. The Signal Tribune is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. Yearly subscriptions are available for $45.

939 E. 27th St., Signal Hill, CA 90755 (562) 595-7900

www.signaltribune.com newspaper@signaltribune.com


COMMUNITY

A sweet visit

OCTOBER 12, 2012

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

5

A LINGERIE BOUTIQUE

Fashion Lingerie - Sports Bras Nursing Bras - Shapewear Swimwear - Bridal - Hosiery

Bra fittings for all sizes Specializing in hard-to-find bra sizes from AAA to N cups

3925 Long Beach Blvd. LB 562.997.8786 Tuesday - Friday 11am-6pm Saturdays 11am-5pm Also open by appointment

www.lucyb.com

Carlon Jeffery, who is best known as Cameron Parks on the Disney Channel show A.N.T. Farm showed his gratitude for the support of his fans with an exclusive fan experience at Miss Priss Cupcake & Such store in Long Beach on on Sept

Photos by Donald Carraway

16. Fans showed up to meet the teen actor and get special-edition Carlon Jeffery cupcakes, commemorative lunch boxes and signed autograph photos. The cupcake store had partnered with the actor as a sponsor by giving away gift cards to

selected attendees of a music festival Jefferey hosted on Sept 1. The 19-year-old actor shared his excitement with Miss Priss owner Karie Foster that it was his first time ever baking cupcakes. Source: Miss Priss

Having recently earned its nonprofit status, Los Cerritos Neighborhood Association preparing for its board elections

The Los Cerritos Neighborhood Association (LCNA) will hold its first annual general meeting at the Expo Arts Center, 4321 Atlantic Ave., on Monday, Oct. 15 at 6:30pm. The Association, formed in 2011 by Los Cerritos neighbors, will present 8th District councilmember Al Austin and 7th District councilmember James Johnson to update the community on local government events, as well as a Long Beach Police Department officer to update the community on Los Cerritos crime statistics and prevention measures. During the past year, the LCNA: became a licensed nonprofit organization with the State of California; established a website and a Face-

book page; organized a city council candidate forum, a Union Station tour, Christmas caroling and concerts in the park; and collected more than 400 neighborhood email addresses of which 250 are accompanied with verified home addresses. There are a total of approximately 1,100 homes in the Los Cerritos neighborhood, including condos and apartments. The first annual meeting will also include introductions to the interim LCNA Board and instructions on how to vote in the first Board of Directors election in which several Los Cerritos neighbors have been nominated. There are four committees: the Security Committee, the Volunteer Commit-

tee, the Nominating Committee and the “Friends of Los Cerritos” Social Committee. The LCNA elections seek to fill three Board of Directors positions for the Security Committee, the Volunteer Committee and the Nominating Committee. The elections will take place in electronic format. In order to ensure a secure voting system, there will be one vote per household. Organizers of the election include: Rick Ivey, who has facilitated much of the LCNA’s growth; Bob Gill, interim vice president, who developed and manages the website; Robert Calhoun, who developed and will oversee the electronic election; and other LCNA members who distributed flyers to each household in Los

Second annual We Can Do It! Awards to honor local women leaders and modern-day ‘Rosie the Riveters’

The Long Beach Rosie the Riveter Foundation will honor 11 local women for their leadership and professional accomplishments at the second annual We Can Do It! Awards luncheon, sponsored by The Long Beach Rosie the Riveter Foundation, on Thursday, Oct. 18. A special tribute to modern Rosie the Riveters, women in blue-collar jobs, is also scheduled. “The 11 women being honored this year embody the spirit of our mothers and grandmothers who worked on assembly lines rolling out airplanes, tanks and military machinery to support our troops overseas,” said 5th District Councilmember Gerrie Schipske, who is president of the nonprofit Long Beach Rosie the Riveter Foundation. “This year’s honorees have blazed new trails in diverse professions, much like the original Rosie the Riveters forever changed the way our nation views the role of women in the workplace.” This year’s honorees are: • The Honorable Eunice Sato, the first woman elected as Long Beach mayor– Public Service Award • Dr. Lynn Shaw, electrical technology professor and president of the Faculty Association at Long Beach City College– Education Award • Carmen Perez, the first Hispanic to serve on the Port of Long Beach

Commission– International Trade Award • Sister Gerard Earls, vice president of Mission Integration at St. Mary Medical Center– Healthcare Award • Maria Elena Durazo, executive secretary-treasurer of the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor, AFL-CIO– Labor Award • Julie Bartolotto, executive director, Historical Society of Long Beach– Historic Preservation Award • Neena Strichart, publisher, the Signal Tribune– Local Business Award • Nien-Ling Wacker, founder, president and chief executive officer, Laserfiche– Corporate Leader Award • Sue Ann Robinson, director of Collections, Long Beach Museum of Art– Arts and Culture Award • Pat McCormick, greatest female diver in U.S. history: only woman to win four Olympic gold medals in diving (1952 Olympic gold medalist in three-meter springboard, 10-meter platform diving, and 1956 Gold medalist in three-meter springboard, 10meter platform diving); founder, Pat McCormick Educational Foundation; inducted in Olympic Hall of Fame and World Sports Humanitarian Hall of Fame– Sports Award

• Jill Rosenberg, Long Beach realtor with 40 years of commitment to the Long Beach community because of her passion for volunteer service– Volunteerism Award • Blue-collar women– Honoring modern-day “Rosie the Riveters” for their outstanding contributions to the City of Long Beach– Special Recognition

The awards will be presented at a special luncheon at 11am on Thursday, Oct. 18, in the law offices of Keesal, Young and Logan, 400 Oceangate. Individual tickets can be purchased for $75, and sponsorship and advertising opportunities are available. An opportunity drawing for a trip for two on JetBlue will be available at the event. Proceeds will go to The Long Beach Rosie the Riveter Foundation, a 501c3 nonprofit organization that works on enhancing the Rosie the Riveter Park and Interpretive Center at Clark Avenue and Conant Street in east Long Beach. The Rosie the Riveter Park and Interpretive Center is the only public setting in the United States to honor the women who worked in the airplane factories in World War II. For more information call (562) 570-6932 or visit lbrosie.com . Source: Rosie the Riveter Foundation

Cerritos in attempts to include the entire neighborhood in the first LCNA Board of Directors election. For questions or comments, call the LCNA at (562) 546-3216 or email elections@loscerritosna.org .

dnt txt n drv A reminder from the Signal Tribune

Source: LCNA

theHigher WQuality ine CoUntry for Less Money!

Long Beach’s #1 Wine, Spirits, Cra Beer Wine Tasting & Gourmet Gi Destination

“BeSt oF Long BeACh!” Press telegram reader’s Poll 2011 & 2012 Beachcomber reader’s Poll: 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012

2301 redondo Avenue, Signal hill

(562) 597-8303 www.thewinecountr y.com

!ive Ar" Final Weekend! Fri/Sat @ 8pm Mainstage When Tom brings a friend home to meet his shy sister, Laura, carefully constructed dreams shatter like her glass figurines. Tennessee Williams’ most Heralded work.

Opening Weekend! Sat @ 8pm The Studio Homer’s Odyssey Like you’ve never seen before. This absurd and burlesque retelling of the popular myth employs puppets, shadow puppets and enough silliness to last a lifetime.

Oct. 13 - Nov. 10 5021 E. ANAHEIM, LB 562-494-1014 - LBPLAYHOUSE.ORG


NEWS

6 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

OCTOBER 12, 2012

LBPD and various other agencies serve search warrants and shut down seven pot dispensaries On Oct. 10, the Long Beach Police Department (LBPD) conducted an enforcement operation and served search warrants, with the assistance of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), the State of California Franchise Tax Board (FTB), the Long Beach Fire Department, and the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office, that shut down seven marijuana dispensaries located throughout Long Beach. Effective, Aug. 12, 2012, any dispensary that continues conducting business in the City of Long Beach is operating illegally, according to the LBPD. The seven dispensaries that were targeted were those that the police department had received the highest

level of complaints about from the community. During the operation, more than 40 individuals were taken into custody and booked for owning/operating a marijuana dispensary. Marijuana plants, processed marijuana, currency and other evidence were seized. The name of each of the businesses will be forwarded to the Business Licensing Section for review. Additionally, three of the seven locations were also “red-tagged” by the Long Beach Fire Department for posing immediate life-safety hazards. Anyone caught entering these locations will be arrested for trespassing, according to the LBPD. The police department was originally planning to serve a search warrant at an eighth location, located at 301 Atlantic Ave., however, investigators recently received information that the operators

had vacated the building and relocated. The LBPD is urging the remaining dispensaries to voluntarily cease their operations. Any dispensary that continues to operate will be targeted for closure and those operating the business will be arrested, according to the LBPD. Wednesday’s operation addressed the following locations: 2130 Cowles St., 1581 W. Wardlow Rd., 1735 E. 7th St., 745 E. 4th St., 2508 E. 10th St., 3748 Atlantic Ave. and 5115 Atlantic Ave. Anyone wishing to report dispensaries that continue to operate may contact the LBPD Narcotics Section at (562) 570-7221. Anonymous tips may be submitted via text or web by visiting tipsoft.com . Source: LBPD

The marijuana dispensary located at 3748 Atlantic Ave. in Bixby Knolls was among those targeted by the LBPD last Wednesday.

RS! 25% OFF SENIO ly Bird Special 7am – am, M – F

80 years in business...still the best burgers on the Hill!

Ear

*

*For customers age 62 and over

11

MINIMUM $6 ENTRÉE. PLUS TAX. EXCLUDES ALL BEVERAGES. NOT FOR ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES. NO TAKEOUT.

BREAKFAST. LUNCH DINNER. SPORTS. FULL MENU.

1999 E. Willow @ Cherry Ave. Signal Hill (562) 424-0018

Photos courtesy LBPD

Evidence gathered by Long Beach Police Department from the marijuana dispensary located at 1581 W. Wardlow Rd. during Wednesday’s enforcement operation

Councilmember James Johnson


NEWS

7

General Election 2012: California propositions OCTOBER 12, 2012

Sean Belk Staff Writer

It’s election time again. On Nov. 6, a segment of registered voters will head to the polls and fulfill their duties for democracy, while others will have either sent in their mail-inballots or will be doing so that day. Besides electing candidates, state voters are also asked to vote on ballot measures, which propose new laws or changes to existing laws that can be applicable to the entire state (typically referred to as “propositions”) or limited to their local communities, including cities and counties. A proposition or measure may be put on the ballot through either: the State Legislature, if the proposition would change the State Constitution or add a new tax or bond (two-thirds of the Legislature must agree); or through citizens, who must collect enough signatures, thereby using the initiative process. This year’s General Election includes a total of 11 California propositions, with topics ranging from tax increases for education funding to repealing the death penalty. Local registered voters will also decide the fate of two Los Angeles County measures and two Long Beach measures. In this week’s issue, the Signal Tribune provides a synopsis of six state propositions with pros and cons, sourced from the California Secretary of State. (Next week’s issue will cover the other five state propositions and four local measures.) In California, the voter-registration deadline is Oct. 22.

Proposition 30– Temporary tax hikes to fund education To prevent a $6-billion budget cut to K-12 schools, community colleges, universities and other state-funded programs this year, Prop. 30 proposes to increase personal income tax on taxpayers with annual earnings over $250,000 (or couples with annual incomes over $500,000) for seven years and raise sales and use tax by one-fourth of a cent for every dollar of goods for four years. If approved, the rise in the sales-tax rate, which currently averages in the state at 8 percent, would go into effect Jan. 1, 2013. Additional marginal increases on the existing 9.3 personal income-tax rates on upper-income earners would increase as taxable income increases. A majority (about $5.3 billion) of the new revenue derived from the temporary tax increases would go to K-12 schools and community colleges, while about $700 million would be dispersed between the California State University (CSU) system ($250 million), University of California system ($250 million) and other state-funded programs, including public safety. Locally, Long Beach Unified School District (LBUSD), Cal StateLong Beach and Long Beach City College education institutions stand to permanently lose more than $72 million in their combined annual budgets this year if the proposition fails to pass by a majority vote. Although supporters of Prop. 38 have come out opposing Prop. 30, the LBUSD Board of Education has voted to support both propositions. A “no” vote on Prop. 30 would enact “layoffs, elimination of programs, increased class sizes, fewer class sections, shorter school years, increases in tuition and other cuts and changes,” according to a prepared statement from the institutions. The CSU system has stated that it would increase tuition at its 23 universities by 5 percent if the measure fails. Pro: Supporters of the proposition include Gov. Jerry Brown, the League of Women Voters of California and a statewide coalition of leaders from education, law-enforcement and business. Arguments for the measure state that the tax increases are “temporary, balanced and necessary to protect schools and safety.” Con: Those against the proposition, including the Howard Jarvis Taxpay-

ers’ Association and proponents of Prop. 38, state that the tax measure includes no assurances that any more money would be allocated to local schools and it does nothing to reform the state’s education system to “cut waste, eliminate bureaucracy or cut administrative overhead.”

Proposition 31– Shifting to two-year state budget cycle Pushed by California Forward, a bipartisan group led by former lawmakers, business leaders, union heads and civic leaders, Prop. 31 proposes to replace the state’s current budget process with a new two-year budget cycle. The proposition, if passed, would restrict the Legislature’s ability to pass certain bills that increase state costs, decrease revenues or create expenditures of more than $25 million unless new funding sources and/or spending reductions are identified. Almost all bills and amendments would have to be available to the public at least three days before legislative approval. The proposition, however, goes even further than that. The measure gives power to the governor to cut the budget unilaterally during declared fiscal emergences if the Legislature fails to act. The proposition also requires performance reviews of all state programs and calls for performance goals in state and local budgets. Possibly the biggest change to come from the measure, if passed by a majority of voters, is that nearly $200 million in state sales-tax revenues would be shifted to counties and other local governments, such as cities, school districts, community college districts and special districts. The proposition also allows participating local governments to determine how they spend transferred local property taxes. Under the proposition, new plans would be created to sort out how local governments would deliver services, including economic development, education, social services, public safety and public health. Pro: Proponents of Prop. 31 claim a “yes” vote would increase public input and transparency in the budget process and provide for more local control of state funding. Supporters contend that moving to a two-year budget cycle would prevent politicians from passing “short-term budget gimmicks” and instead develop “long-term fiscal solutions.” Con: Arguments against the proposition, however, claim Prop. 31 would “increase costs, increase bureaucratic control and undermine public protections.” Opponents also say the measure would make it tough to cut taxes or increase funding for education, while possibly leading to lawsuits and confusion due to “poorly defined” requirements.

Proposition 32– Payroll deductions for political contributions For decades, politicians have accepted millions of dollars in campaign contributions from large corporations and public- and private-sector labor unions (which often use dues and fees taken from the payrolls of union members to support political campaigns). Political parties have used this scenario as an example of how some politicians, once elected, are often swayed to vote for what’s best for special interests with deep pockets rather than for what’s best for constituents. Prop. 32 proposes to change that. If passed, the proposition would ban unions from using “payroll-deduction” funds for political purposes and also bans corporations and government contractors from using the same type of contribution, if any. The proposition would also prohibit unions and corporations from contributing directly or indirectly to political candidates and candidate-controlled committees. Employees would be allowed to make voluntary contributions to employer-sponsored committees or unions if authorized each year, in writing. The propositions, however, would allow for “other political expenditures,”

including corporate expenditures from available resources not limited by the ban on payroll-deduction contributions. The California legislative analyst estimates the measure would increase costs by $1 million for state and local governments to implement and enforce the requirements. Pro: Supporters of the measure state that Prop. 32 simply bans corporate and union contributions to politicians, stops contractors from giving to politicians who approve their contracts and makes political contributions voluntary rather than automatically being deducted from employees’ paychecks. Con: Opponents, however, state that the proposition itself is backed by special interests and contains loopholes and exemptions. In particular, the measure exempts wealthy investors, corporate executives and Business Super Political Action Committees, or PACs, from the ban on political contributions, according to opponents.

Proposition 33– Auto insurance ‘continuous coverage’ discount Insurance companies currently are allowed to provide discounts to individuals for maintaining coverage with the same company, but they may not offer this discount to new customers who switch over from another insurer, according to existing state law. Prop. 33 proposes to change the law by allowing insurance companies to offer “continuous coverage” discounts on auto insurance policies to new customers who switch from another company. Under the measure, the discount would generally apply to customers with uninterrupted auto insurance coverage. Customers with a lapse in coverage would only be eligible for the discount if the lapse was: not more than 90 days in the last five years for any reason; not more than 18 months in the last five years due to unemployment caused by layoff or furlough; or due to active military service. The California legislative analyst states that the net impact on state premium tax revenues from this measure would “probably not be significant.” Prop. 33 is primarily being funded by Mercury Insurance, which has spent $16 million on a similar initiative that failed in 2010. This year, Mercury Insurance’s billionaire chairman George Joseph has spent $8 million to fund Prop. 33. Pro: Supporters of the proposition state that a “yes” vote would provide a “reward” to all drivers who follow the state’s law by buying auto insurance. Proponents say the state’s current law “punishes” or takes away discounts from drivers who switch to a new company to seek better insurance or try to get a better deal. Con: Arguments against the measure state that Prop. 33 is “a sheep in wolf’s clothing,” calling the measure a “scheme that will result in a surcharge for many California drivers” and would raise insurance rates on college students and people who have dropped coverage because they are recuperating from a serious illness or injury.

Proposition 34– Repealing the death penalty California law currently makes first-degree murder punishable by death or life imprisonment without the possibility of parole when specified “special circumstances” of a crime have been charged and proven in court, according to the state legislative analyst. Under existing state law, death penalty verdicts are automatically appealed to the California Supreme Court in what’s called a “direct appeal.” If confirmed by the court, the defendant can ask the US Supreme Court to review the decision. Inmates on death row may also request that the governor reduce the sentence. In all, death sentence proceedings can take decades to complete in California. Prop. 34 proposes to repeal the state’s current death penalty statute, replacing it with life without parole, and also generally requiring that mur-

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

derers be able to work while in prison and providing new state funding for local law-enforcement on a limitedterm basis. The state legislative analyst estimates that the measure would provide $100 million in annual savings in the first few years for state and counties related to murder trails, death penalty appeals and corrections. The savings would grow to $130 million annually thereafter. The legislative analyst adds that this estimate could be higher or lower depending on how the measure is implemented. The measure also calls for $100 million in one-time state costs for grants to local law-enforcement agencies to be paid over the next four years. Pro: Supporters of the measure state that a “yes” vote would prevent “innocent” people from being executed. Arguments in favor also state that the state’s death penalty system is “too costly and broken beyond repair,” adding that the State “wastes millions of tax dollars on special housing and taxpayer-financed appeals that can last 25 years.” Con: Opponents of Prop. 34, however, say the measure is primarily being pushed by the American Civil Liberties Union, which has a “political agenda” to “weaken public safety laws.” Opponents add that the death penalty is only given to less than 2 percent of murderers, adding that, if passed, the proposition would actually result in increased long-term costs in the tens of millions of dollars, just for housing/healthcare. Proposition 35– Increasing penalties for human trafficking There are currently federal and state laws that prohibit human trafficking, including sex trafficking– such as forcing a person, particularly under the age of 18, into prostitution– and labor trafficking– such as forcing a foreign national to work for free by threatening deportation, according to the state legislative analyst. Prop. 35 proposes to increase human-trafficking criminal penalties to sentences up to 15-years-to-life and fines of up to $1.5 million. Fines collected from penalties would be used for victim services and law enforcement. The proposition also requires that all persons convicted of human trafficking register as sex offenders and that all sex offenders provide information regarding Internet access and identities they use in court activities. The measure would also expand the definition of “human trafficking” and change how evidence can be used against human-trafficking victims.

The state legislative analyst states that the measure, if passed, would increase state and local government costs, not likely to exceed a couple million dollars annually, for prosecution and incarceration of human-trafficking offenders. The measure, however, would also create additional revenue, likely a few million dollars annually, from new criminal fines that would pay for services for human-trafficking victims and law enforcement. Pros: Supporters of Prop. 35 state that a “yes” vote would increase prison terms for human traffickers to hold such criminals “accountable,” and would “protect children from sexual exploitation.” An argument in favor of the measure states that a national study recently gave California an “F” grade on child-sex trafficking laws and Prop. 35 would help strengthen the state’s laws to better protect human-trafficking victims. Cons: Opponents of the measure, however, say Prop. 35 is “shortsighted” and relies on a broad definition of “pimping,” which, under the measure, would apply to parents, children roommates, domestic partners and landlords of prostitutes, who would be labeled as sex offenders. Opposing parties claim the measure’s real intent is to “gain asset forfeiture to benefit endorsing law-enforcement agencies and nonprofits.”

Grandma Darling’s

PARKING LOT SALE A N T I QU E M A L L

Sunday, Oct. 14 8am to 5pm Spaces available



BARGAINS GALORE!



Vintage & Retro • Furniture • Antiques • Jewelry • Collectibles

562-498-2704

1819 Redondo Ave., SH

North of PCH - Next to Panini’s

Also visit:

Grandma Darling’s Annex Mall

3934 4th St.

AboutU



boutique

About "U" Boutique offers great gifts...or treat yourself! ting Celebraew n r ou n! locatio

Exclusive Murano Italian Glass Jewelry, Shabby Chic, Rustic, Collectibles, Home Elements, Fine Art, Sterling Silver Jewelry, Spiritual Iconic Art, and accessories

We now offer layaway!

Bring this ad & receive 20% off a purchase of $25 (one per customer) ••••••

Unique, Handmade, Creative••••••

4340 Atlantic Avenue, Uptown Bixby Knolls

(310) 200-0298 Dealer Spaces Available! www.facebook.com/aboutuboutique


CULTURE From tire shop to gallery spaces

8 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

OCTOBER 12, 2012

Local artist truly makes the most of his day job

Cory Bilicko Culture Writer

It’s not your everyday, run-ofthe-mill automotive technician who looks down at the discarded scraps around him, takes them home and makes art with them. Then again, your local, go-to car guy probably didn’t study at Accademia di Belle Arti in Florence, Italy. Nate Jones Jr., 33, works in his father’s Signal Hill tire shop by day, truing (or shaving) tires, balancing wheels and working on brakes. But, when he leaves that shop and heads to his studio, he doesn’t dismiss his day job as just a way to pay the bills. He incorporates its significance into his art. He collects the tire shavings and reconstructs them into elaborate, detailed sculptures. However, those works aren’t simply homages to the concept of repurposing; they’re oftentimes personal tributes to the very backbone of his dad’s business– the customers. Nate Sr. opened a tire shop in the mid-1960s at 1333 Redondo Ave., which he’d started with a partner, Mel Hamer. “Mel gave my dad a start in his shop, then

MEXICAN GRILL #2 SERVING HOMESTYLE MEXICAN FOOD SINCE ‘75

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER • CATERING

Come watch your Monday Night Football!

Taco Mondays and

Taco Tuesdays Hard Shell Tacos $1.50 each! Happy Hour 3pm–6pm Monday – Friday Try our new appetizers–empanadas (turnovers w/chicken, ground beef, or jalapeño & cheese), buffalo wings, or our fiesta platter!

3431 N. Pacific Place (at Wardlow Rd.) 562.490.2100

GuadalupesMexGrill.com

they went partners, then my dad bought out Mel’s part of the tire shop, and it went from Hamer and Jones to just Nate Jones Tire,” Jones said. “In ‘73 he moved up to 1865 Redondo, where he built a new shop and was there until I think about 2001 or 2002, when he sold the property.” Jones began working there part-time in his junior year of high school. “I learned as I went and eventually ended up knowing my way around pretty well,” he said. “When he sold the property, I had to move about 75 percent of the shop myself. I had to do it one other time, as we were a bit nomadic for a few years. Those were wild, trying experiences. Anyway, we landed at 1837 Reservoir Dr. in 2004 and have kept the ball rolling ever since.” Part of those wild, trying experiences might have been his acceptance into the aforementioned Italian art school, as the only American admitted that school year. “My wife (Kat) and I both studied there, became addicted [to the country] and made friends and so, consequently, go back usually once a year to satisfy our craving,” he said. A year later, he earned a bachelor’s of fine arts in drawing and painting from Cal State Long Beach. Jones’s curriculum vitae lists 14 exhibitions spanning 2004 to last year. What he hasn’t yet added to that résumé is his current

exhibit at Warschaw Gallery in San Pedro, where he is showing what he calls “industrial/abstract” works. They began as experiments with the materials he uses every day at the shop, and he treats the tire shavings like paint. He says that, although the work may recall abstract expressionism, his “painterly gestures” are not spontaneous, but actually intentional and carefully directed. Many of those creations are what Jones refers to as “the meat pieces.” Some of them are indeed reminiscent of animal flesh hanging from meat hooks, but there’s also a beauty in their construction that is at first aesthetically captivating, then compelling in a way that strikes the viewer’s morbid sensibilities. To see that Jones has taken the time to select rubber shavings of particular width and length, then thoughtfully imbue them with color and sculpt their exteriors and interiors into organic-looking forms that appear at once life-like and artful is a, dare I say, satiating experience for the beholder. I met Jones at his current exhibit at Warschaw Gallery during the San Pedro art walk last week, and, after viewing his work up-close, I was full of questions for the self-described “tire man.” How did your works made with shredded tires come to be? They started as experiments with materials other than oil paint. The

www.alsacelorrainepastries.com

open Tue-Fri: 7am-6pm, Saturday: 7am-5:30pm

Stop by and see our assortment of Halloween cookies & cupcakes! Tel: (562) 427-5992 • Fax: (562) 422-1105

4334-36 Atlantic Ave • long Beach

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

outdoor seating for your enjoyment!

Dogs welcome!

Breakfast & Lunch 7am to 3pm

Benedicts, Omelets, Wraps, Salads, Chili, and more!

3405 Orange Ave., LB 562.490.2473 Find us at Facebook.com/BlackbirdCafeLB

“Harvey” by Nate Jones

shavings were a material I had been around for a long time and were something I felt very connected to and consequently were the perfect thing for me to experiment with. They have so many great qualities, especially the quality of very interesting lines, which I am very fascinated with. The shavings themselves are a byproduct of the tire truing process that we do at our shop. I suppose other people could track down shavings to experiment with, but they would not have any relationship to the material. I have poured hours into their making, shed blood during their creation, and feel I have a true relationship with them. In essence, the shavings are my first creation, and the art is my second. From the first piece I made with the shavings until now, it has been a wonderful experiment. I continue to ask myself: How do I get this material to do what I want? What can I learn from it? What can I turn it into?

When people ask you about the meaning of your work, how do you respond? Usually not how most would think. The work for me, first and foremost is a formal artistic exploration. The subject matter is generally a vehicle for me to experiment with: for example, line, shape, color, light and dark, weight, tension, pulling, blobbing and on and on. With the works based on meat, people often think that there is some kind of ideology behind it, but there is not. I’m not, however, opposed to animalrights people pointing out certain truths that may be evident in the work. I guess I enjoy the surprise that I’m able to give people.

Photos by Cory Bilicko/Signal Tribune

What prompted you to create portraits of your customers, particularly Harvey? The portraits of the customers were for my show at Marymount [College] back in 2010. I had a lot of outdoor space to use, and I felt like doing something of the larger scale– at least large for me up to that point. With no boundaries as far as subject matter, I settled on the very people from whom the shavings originate– our customers. Because we have great customers who’ve been with us for a long time and who I know quite well, it was not hard to come up with interesting ways to represent them abstractly, like an homage. Harvey was a very awesome man, one of our country’s great heroes, a World War II fighter pilot. Harvey Davis was his full name. He was always a pleasure to have at the shop and, although I only knew him for a relatively short time, I was easily impressed. I guess with his portrait, as with all the customers’ portraits, there is also the ability to relate them to other people of that same type. There are a few moments within them that are specific to that person’s experience. But even in those cases, I know there are other people out there that share that very experience, however obscure.

What does your dad think of your art made with discarded tires? He loves it. He and my mom have always been great encouragers of my artistic life. My dad was the first person to show me how to make things. Seeing the continuation of my creative production is a joy for him. I think the fact that I’m making work out of the tire shavings he’s been around for so see ARTIST page 9

Saturday noon to 9pm, Sunday noon to 8pm Tues.-Fri. Lunch 11am to 3pm, Dinner 4:30pm to 9pm Closed Monday


CULTURE

OCTOBER 12, 2012

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

9

“Meat 1” by Nate Jones

Artist

continued from page 8

long makes him very happy– except for when I’ve got 10 huge boxes of rubber sitting around the shop taking up space while waiting to be used. He always jokes around and says, “I can’t believe I threw this stuff away for years and now you are making fine art out of it.” I think many people, without knowing him, must think ‘that shop owner must think his son is wasting his life doing art,’ but that is the farthest thing from the truth. Plus, he knows I’m a really hard worker, since I’m at the shop every day, shaving away.

How do you feel about people touching your art pieces? I understand that they are very curious about the material and that it has such a great tactile quality, however sometimes I get a bit concerned. It’s part of the interesting nature of the work, that it

starts as a very durable product, capable of great abuse, and ends up as an extremely delicate, gossamer piece of art. I don't worry too much on the pieces where the material is very well contained, but in the cases where the strands are out by themselves, I don’t like touching. I really get worried with kids, as they don’t just touch; they grab and pull. The touching of my work is something I want to consider for the future, building them to be touched. I guess I have a “little of this, little of that” feeling about it. I suppose if I can be there to sort of supervise, since I know what is too hard or rough, I can be like “Hey, you!...not so rough.” That is, in a comedic voice. What do you hope to achieve with your art? I feel I’ve already met one goal– work that I feel satisfied with and enjoy the process of making. I

Local artisans sought for December’s Uptown Village Market in Bixby Knolls

The Uptown Village Market is currently seeking artisans of all kinds to take part in the upcoming Village Market, a two-day event offering unique, high-quality, handcrafted goods and original artwork. The Uptown Village Market offers a place for artists and creators of well-crafted goods to show and sell their work. The event will be held Friday, Dec. 7, and Saturday, Dec. 8 in the Expo Arts Center in Bixby Knolls. Artists’ entries will be juried from among applications. Vendor booths are already filling up, and the event has been sold out to vendors in the past. The Market is intended to feature a select, eclectic array of emerging designers producing original and handmade goods in a wide variety of media– creating innovative work using traditional craft methods. Among the many products expected to be showcased are original products, handmade items, and a variety of eclectic and sophisticated creations ranging from jewelry, stationery, fashion, steam-punk art and fashion jewelry, ceramic and

glass wares, edibles, and accessories for the home, garden, pets, kids, men and women. Opening night of the Uptown Village Market will be held in conjunction with the popular First Fridays art walk event, a night of art, music and food, which regularly draws a crowd of more than 1,000 participants. For more information about participating or attending the Uptown Village Market, visit uptownvillagemarket.com or email uptownvillagemarket@gmail.com . Deadline for artists’ submission is Thursday, Nov. 1. The Uptown Village Market is sponsored by Bella Cosa Boutique and Gallery Expo.

hope in the future I can carry that on. I hope the ideas keep flowing and that I keep looking forward to going into the studio. Obviously, making money selling art seems great, but honestly, I don’t really expect that nor do I feel it should be of great concern. If it were, I believe it would affect my work in a very negative way. I do hope that art would continue to be a joy, as it always has been for me, and that I’ll continue to find a larger audience.

Nate Jones’s exhibit titled Industrial/Abstract: Recent Works will be on display at Warschaw Gallery, 600 S. Pacific Ave. in San Pedro through Saturday, Nov. 24. Jones’s art may also be viewed at natejonesart.com .

“A Gourmet Gifting & Baking Company”

Red Velvet • Lemon • Orange German Chocolate • Pineapple Vanilla • and more! Tuesday - Friday 11am-7pm Sat. 10am-7pm ~ Sun. 11am-6pm Closed Mondays Call in advance for catering

4147 Long Beach Blvd. at Carson St. in Bixby Knolls

(888) 9BUNDTS www.bundtsonmelrose.com

Patricia’s Mexican Restaurant

Dine In

Buy one dinner plate, get one 1/2 off! TOAUKE

(Excludes seafood. Good through all of Oct. & Nov.)

3626 Atlantic Ave. • Bixby Knolls

Authentic Mexican Food

562-426-7547 • Fax: 562-426-0684

T

HoURS: Mon-Sat 8:30am-10:30pm Sunday 8:30am-9pm

Artist Nate Jones at his current exhibit at Warschaw Gallery during the San Pedro art walk last week


10 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

HEALTH & WELLNESS

American Heart Association and Union Bank to co-host free wellness expo for the public at Bixby Knolls branch The American Heart Association (AHA) and Union Bank, N.A. are teaming up to host a series of Health and Wellness Expos, including one at Union Bank’s Long Beach Branch, 1900 Atlantic Ave., on Saturday, Oct. 27. The event, which will take place from 10am to 1pm, will be free and open to the public. The goal of the Health and Wellness Expo is to bring the “No Wealth Without Your Health” message to the African-American community in Long Beach by providing heart health education, with an emphasis on its connection to one’s financial fitness. The AHA believes that small efforts toward improving heart and brain health can lead to big outcomes. The event will focus on the AHA’s “Life’s Simple 7,” which recommends seven simple steps to add years to your life– don’t smoke, get active, eat better, maintain a healthy weight, manage blood pressure, control cholesterol and reduce blood sugar. Participants will receive complimentary blood pressure and BMI (body mass index) screenings, one-onone consultation with a cardiologist, heart health information and giveaways. “Heart disease and stroke are major health risks for everyone, but African-Americans are especially at high risk,” said Alice Benjamin, RN, clinical nurse specialist and AHA spokesperson. “The American Heart Association believes that race or ethnicity should not put anyone at higher risk for developing cardiovascular disease. Through the Health and Wellness Expo, we hope to help

reduce health disparities in diverse communities and reach AfricanAmerican communities with lifesaving information about their leading health threats and empower them to overcome barriers to reaching ideal cardiovascular health.” Benjamin will be one of the guest speakers at the event, joining local cardiologists and nutritionists, who will provide participants with information on physical activity, nutrition and cardiovascular disease risk factors and prevention. Union Bank executives will share information and tips about financial planning, such as budgeting and saving. “Union Bank is proud to partner with the American Heart Association to host a Health and Wellness Expo for the Long Beach community,” said Union Bank Senior Vice President and Regional Manager Tessia Hassel. “As part of the Long Beach community, we are committed to responsible banking and providing resources that promote heart healthy living for our customers, employees and families.” The Health and Wellness Expo is part of the American Heart Association’s “My Heart. My Life.” campaign designed to promote healthy behaviors and achieve the AHA’s 2020 goal of improving the cardiovascular health of all Americans by 20 percent while reducing deaths from cardiovascular diseases and stroke by 20 percent. For more information about the Health and Wellness Expo, call the AHA– Los Angeles County Division at (213) 291-7000.

OCTOBER 12, 2012

City of LB to offer walk-in flu clinics

The City of Long Beach Department of Health, with assistance from the American Red Cross, has announced the dates for its 2012 flu clinics. This year’s walk-in flu clinics will begin on Oct. 23 and continue through Nov. 30. The clinics are for people age 60 and older and adults ages 18–59 who are at highrisk for serious complications from influenza. “Getting an annual flu shot has always been recommended for people over 60, and it is also important for anyone with a health condition that increases their risk of a serious complication from the flu,” said Dr. Mitchell Kushner, city health officer. Adults under the age of 60 who should get annual seasonal flu shots include: anyone with underlying chronic medical conditions, such as heart or lung conditions, or who are immunesuppressed, as in persons with HIV/AIDS, those receiving cancer treatment, or individuals on dialysis; women who will be pregnant during flu season; or caregivers of seniors or infants. Adults with Medicare Part B are urged to bring their Medicare card to the clinic to receive a free flu shot. A $2 donation to offset administrative costs will be requested from people who do not have Medicare. No appointment is needed at the following sites: • Tuesday, Oct. 23, 9am to noon, Long Beach Senior Center, 1150 E. 4th St. • Thursday, Oct. 25, 9am to noon, American Gold Star Manor, Spring at Santa Fe Avenue • Tuesday, Oct. 30, 9am to noon, El Dorado Park (West), 2800 Studebaker Rd. • Thursday, Nov. 1, 2:30pm to 6:30 pm Veterans Park, 101 E. 28th St. (child vaccine also available at this clinic) • Thursday, Nov. 8, 9am to noon, Houghton Park Community Center, 6301 Myrtle Ave. • Friday, Nov. 9, 9am to noon, California Recreation Center, 1550 MLK Ave. • Wednesday, Nov. 14, 9am to noon, Bixby Park, 130 Cherry Ave. • Tuesday, Nov. 27, 9am to noon, Health Department, 2525 Grand Ave. • Wednesday, Nov. 28, 9am to noon, Health Department, 2525 Grand Ave. • Thursday, Nov. 29, 9am to noon, Health Department, 2525 Grand Ave. • Friday, Nov. 30, 9am to noon, Health Department, 2525 Grand Ave.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), influenza is one of the leading causes of death in the nation among people in all age groups. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the CDC recommend annual seasonal flu vaccine for all children age 6 months to 18 years. There is no shortage of flu vaccine this year at commercial outlets, and private provider offices are well stocked, according to a press release issued by the City of Long Beach. The Health Department will also have a limited supply of seasonal flu vaccine available for infants over the age of 6 months and others

longbeach.gov/health

who cannot attend the clinics listed above at its regularly scheduled immunization clinic located at 2525 Grand Ave. Appointments for those visits are required and can be made by calling (562) 570-4315. Annual flu shots are always formulated early in the year with the three strains that scientists predict will be likely to cause flu disease in the fall and winter. Flu disease is most common in the months of January and February. The three strains of flu in the 2012-13 vaccine are A/California (H1N1), A/Victoria and B/Wisconsin. Two of the strains (A/Victoria and B/Wisconsin) are new this year, so most people will have little or no immunity to these vaccine strains. A/California (H1N1) has been available since 2009. The Health Department also recommends that all individuals practice healthy habits to prevent getting or transmitting the flu:

• Avoid close contact with people who are sick • Stay home from work or school if you are sick • Cover mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze • Wash hands with soap and water or a hand sanitizer frequently • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth • Eat healthy food, drink plenty of water, take vitamins, exercise, get plenty of rest, do not smoke, and avoid alcoholic beverages

The Health Department’s vaccination information shot line is updated periodically with flu vaccine information, and may be reached at (562) 570-SHOT (570-7468). For more information about flu disease and prevention, visit longbeach.gov/health . The Health Department will also be conducting a special emergency-preparedness exercise on Thursday, Nov. 1 from 2:30pm to 6:30pm at Veterans Park, 101 E. 28th St., where the flu vaccine will be provided for all individuals over the age of 6 months. For information on that event, visit longbeach.gov/health or call (562) 570-4499.


OCTOBER 12, 2012

COMMUNITY

Various animal-advocacy groups to host pet fair

Friends of Long Beach Animals, Long Beach Animal Care Services and Long Beach Parks, Recreation, and Marine Department will host their Pet Appreciation Fair and 2K/5K Walk, presented by the Petco Foundation, on Saturday, Oct. 13, from 9am to 3pm at the El Dorado Regional Park Archery Range, 7550 Spring St. (at the 605 Freeway). Check-in and registration will begin at 9am, and the walks will begin at 10:15am immediately following opening ceremonies. Entry fee for walkers through Oct. 12, including teams, is $25 for adults 19 and over and includes a com-

memorative T-shirt, a swag bag, a raffle ticket and a parking pass. There are also special discounted rates for families, junior walkers (ages 10 to 18) and virtual walkers. Walkers under 9 are free. Registration the day of the event increases to $30 and does not include parking. Visit folba.org for more details and registration information. The 2K and 5K walk routes will wind through acres of parkland over a dedicated concrete walking path. The route is suitable for humans and dogs of all ages and abilities. Prizes will be awarded to top fundraisers in Adult, Junior and

Conference for Equality and Justice to honor local leaders and volunteers for work in human relations The California Conference for Equality and Justice (CCEJ), formerly known as The National Conference of Christians and Jews (NCCJ), will introduce its officers and new board members at the 49th Annual Dinner meeting and report to the community on Thursday, Oct. 18 at the Old Ranch County Club in Seal Beach. The reception will be at 5:30pm, and the dinner will follow at 6:30pm. The Gene Lentzner Human Relations Award will be given to the following individuals for their contributions to improving human relations in Long Beach: Doris Cooper-Robinson, principal of William Cullen Bryant Elementary School; Francisco Rodriquez, Community Development specialist at Neighborhood Services Bureau; and Justin Rudd, community leader. This award is given in the name of Gene Lentzner because of his life-long commitment to

bringing diverse people together to improve human relations in the greater Long Beach area. Bernice Banares and Erica Gardner will receive the CCEJ Anthony B. Rogers “Volunteer of the Year” award for their volunteer service to CCEJ. The volunteer award is named in honor of the late Tony Rogers, an educator and CCEJ volunteer. Rogers taught at Long Beach Poly High School until his untimely passing in 2002. CCEJ’s community partner, the City of Long Beach Human Dignity Program, will present the 2012 Human Dignity Award to Sandra Horwitz, human relations commissioner for the City of Long Beach, for her work in advocating for social justice in the community. For more information or to purchase tickets for $75 per person, visit cacej.org or call (562) 435-8184.

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

11

Team divisions. All event participants and spectators will be treated to exhibits, vendor samples, So Cal Disc Dogs and Surf City Fly Ball demonstrations, contests for pets and their owners, and entertainment. There will also be food trucks and special activities for kids. Long Beach Animal Care Service will also be on hand with adoptable animals. For general information, visit folba.org/walk and click “Walk” on the menu, or call Friends of Long Beach Animals at (562) 988-SNIP (7647).

FOLBA

Pet of the Week:

Joey

If this handsome guy had been a female, we would have named him Aggie because of those marble-like eyes. But his name’s Joey, and he’s a 3-year-old Basenji mix and a real sweetiepie! Meet him on the shelter side of Companion Animal Village at 7700 East Spring St., (562) 570PETS. Ask for ID#A477155. Sponsored by:

Come for the WALK! Stay for the FUN! October 13, 9am-3pm

Food Trucks, Pet Contests, Exhibitors, Vendors, Surf City Flyball, Disc Dogs in So Cal, Raffles, Ask the Trainer, Ask the Vet, Children’s Activities and More! •••••••••••••••••••••

Register, Donate, Volunteer, Sponsorship, Vendor, Exhibitor spaces still available!

w w w.folba.org/walk

First 300 registrants recei ve $500 gif t card to RedStarWorldWear.com!

Presented by:


NEWS

12 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

OCTOBER 12, 2012

At CSULB forum, 47th congressional district candidates share views on job creation, federal deficit and education

Sean Belk Staff Writer

Republican Long Beach City Councilmember Gary DeLong and Democratic State Sen. Alan Lowenthal, candidates running for a seat in the US House of Representatives, shared their views on a wide range of hard-hitting topics last Friday night during a forum at the Pyramid at California State University, Long Beach (CSULB). The nearly two-hour-long debate between the candidates in the race for the newly formed 47th Congressional District of California, which covers portions of Long Beach, Signal Hill and some cities in western Orange County, was moderated by the League of Women Voters Long Beach Area and was organized by

CSULB and UCLA. The event drew a packed house of more than 300 people. For the most part, the candidates agreed on several subjects, including foreign policy, ridding special-interest money from politics and even legalizing medical marijuana. However, when it came to core issues that the country is facing, such as creating jobs, fixing the federal deficit and funding education, their stances clearly diverged. Lowenthal, a former CSULB psychology professor with a 20-year career in politics as a Long Beach city councilmember, state assembly member and state senator, said the country is “moving in the right direction” and endorsed another four years under Democratic President Barack

Obama. “I was really pleased to see that today the unemployment rate is below 8 percent…It’s at 7.8 percent,” he said. “We are moving in the right direction. It is not time to turn around.” Furthermore, Lowenthal praised the President’s past economic strategies, such as the automobile-industry bailout and financial reform, while supporting his budget policies, including the American Jobs Act and his deficit-reduction plan that calls for ending the Bush-era tax cuts. “We have to do trillions of dollars in cuts, but we also cannot allow the richest Americans to not pay their fair share,” he said. “It’s been a tough four years…we inherited a terrible time, and we need to move forward.” DeLong, who has called himself a

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Republican Long Beach City Councilmember Gary DeLong (far left) and Democratic State Sen. Alan Lowenthal participate in a candidate forum at the CSULB Pyramid on Oct. 5. Bea Antenore, second vice president– Voter Service of the League of Women Voters (far right), moderates the debate.

“fiscal conservative” and a “moderate” Republican, however, painted a more disparaging picture of the country’s economic situation. While he blamed both political parties for the recession, DeLong criticized the current administration for not doing enough to mobilize the private sector while “deficit spending” and continuing to add to the national debt. “We’re in a tailspin,” he said. “We’re on an anemic recovery and that’s happening for a number of reasons… we need to get the private sector going again.” Instead of raising taxes and borrowing money, he said the solution for recovery and fixing the federal deficit is cutting the costs of government and creating a more “hospitable business climate” that will provide more revenue for all. “To me, growing revenue does not include raising taxes,” DeLong said. “Growing revenue is exactly that, it’s motivating the private sector by providing a hospitable business climate so our economy can grow and prosper, and everyone will benefit.” Throughout his campaign, DeLong has coined himself a “maverick” that will bring about political change through crossing party lines and bringing both sides together. During the debate, he further proclaimed that he would not vote in lockstep with Republican House Speaker John Boehner if sent to Washington, D.C. “There are a number of things I disagree with the Republic party on,” he said. “I’m pro-choice; they’re prolife. I support gay marriage; they don’t. I come from a coastal city, and I’m very environmentally oriented. Candidly, the party is not,” he said. “I’m ready to represent everybody.” DeLong, the owner of a small telecommunications company for 25 years, added, however, that in his personal life and on the Long Beach City Council he remains fiscally conservative. “I will tell you, I am very fiscally conservative,” DeLong said. “You can ask my wife. I’m very frugal. And you can certainly see that’s my track record on the Long Beach City Council.” In response, Lowenthal said he has a track record throughout his political career both as a city councilmember and a state legislator of voting against his party’s wishes, citing instances when he pushed for the community to determine redistricting lines and when he voted against paying $6 billion for a high-speed rail line. “I have gone against my party,” he said. “I do have a record of stand-

ing up for the people of California. I have fought for the people of my district … to do the right thing regardless of party affiliation.” Both candidates tried to take partial credit for environmental initiatives and pollution reductions achieved at the Port of Long Beach. They also agreed that more environmental regulations on the federal level are needed but were slightly torn on exactly how much and how to do it. On health care, DeLong said the government must “change” Medicaid and Medicare programs or at some point the healthcare system will become “unsustainable.” However Lowenthal said the government needs to create “efficiencies” and added that the system is “not going broke.” Both agreed that the government shouldn’t repeal Obama’s healthcare law, but should make changes to it. On education, DeLong, who has three daughters, with one about to graduate from college, said he worries that there aren’t enough opportunities for young people to get jobs these days. “I think about what does her economic future look like, and I can tell you it’s not as promising as the one that I had when I graduated from college,” he said. Both candidates supported not increasing interest rates on student loans and also agreed that education standards should be done at the local level. But they clearly disagreed on how to pay for education. DeLong trounced Lowenthal for voting to cut billions in education funding to fix the state budget and blamed the situation on the Legislature increasing pension benefits for public employees. DeLong said voters shouldn’t have to decide whether to raise more taxes to restore those cuts and said governments should focus more on cutting bureaucracy and “wasted” programs. “I don’t believe more taxes are the answer at any level,” he said. Lowenthal shot right back by saying it’s the Republicans who refused to end tax breaks that caused the State to have to cut education funding. “Over 50 percent of our [state] budget is education … and we’re now trying to struggle to keep that. We can only do that by keeping a bipartisan consensus and having everybody step up and pay their fair share. The money doesn’t just appear. We have to support higher education, but we have to do it through additional revenues.”

FoR RENT

Banquet Room available for parties or events at 16426 Bellflower Blvd. Call Steve at (562) 925-5750 for details.

Living with VISION LOSS?

ˆ›‘—ǯ˜‡„‡‡†‹ƒ‰‘•‡†™‹–Šƒ…—Žƒ”†‡‰‡‡”ƒ–‹‘ǡϔ‹†         !"#$%&$'()*%+,$-%*.!'*!(%*$!.$#),)'*!(%*$/,+'')'$*+0$1),($ 2!"$'))$3)##).4$56)0$%&$2!"$1+6)$3))0$#!,7$ 0!#1%0/$*+0$3)$7!0)$2!"$!8)$%#$#!$ 2!".'),&$#!$'))9$+$')*!07$!(%0%!04$ #),)'*!(%*$/,+'')'$'#+.#%0/$+#$:;<==

Richard Shuldiner, OD Toll Free: 888-610-2020

www.LowVisionCare.com


NEWS

OCTOBER 12, 2012

CSULB

continued from page 1

tion Long Beach’s largest source of employment. If passed, Proposition 30– The Schools and Local Public Safety Protection Act– would increase personal state income tax on annual earnings over $250,000 for seven years and increase sales and use tax by onefourth of a cent for four years. In his opening comments, Alexander said, “We wanted to get together in an effort to inform people of what Proposition 30 does and what its failure may do as an impact to our campuses.” He noted that the measure’s passage would result in $6 billion in revenues going to educational institutions annually. “Not only would those resources go to help education, but it would further prevent substantial budget reductions that are in law if this proposition fails on November 6,” he added. Steinhauser spoke next, reminding the audience of about 25 reporters and photographers that LBUSD has cut hundreds of millions of dollars from its budget in the last couple of years. “We have over a thousand fewer employees, and we have raised class sizes from kindergarten to third grade from 20 to 30,” he said. “We’ve had to restrict certain classes that we would like to offer.” Steinhauser warned that the Board of Education will have to reduce or eliminate every LBUSD program if Proposition 30 is not passed. He added that state officials have informed the school district that if the proposition fails, LBUSD will receive an immediate reduction of $435 per student. “That equates to an additional $35-million budget reduction for Long Beach Unified,” he noted. Steinhauser explained that historically Americans have always rallied to overcome threats to the American way of life. “Our citizens have always come together to do what is right,” he said. “And education is the right thing to do.” Steinhauser stressed that he is very worried for the 84,000 students in LBUSD schools who will not have the same educational opportunities that previous generations had if the people of the state of California do not decide to fund schools. Ortiz-Oakley spoke next. He told the media representatives that if Prop 30

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Nick Diamantides/Signal Tribune

At the Tuesday morning press conference, CSULB President F. King Alexander warned that the failure of Proposition 30 would result in higher education being denied to thousands of students. Some LBCC students and faculty members stood behind Alexander as he spoke to show their support for the passage of the ballot measure. Long Beach Community College District Trustee Doug Auto (in suit and tie) also stood to show his support for the measure.

passes, California community colleges will receive $210 million in additional funds in the 2012-2013 school year. “This is a small amount of money considering how many cuts our community colleges have endured, but at the very least this money will be used to pay back all of the deferred costs that we have had in our community college system, and it will allow us to educate an additional 20,000 students,” he said. He noted that because of budget cuts, LBCC has had to deny access to classes to 2,100 qualified students in the past two years. “If this proposition fails, we will have to eliminate access to another 1,300 students,” he said. Ortiz-Oakley also warned that if Prop 30 fails, LBCC would lose an additional $6.4 million of revenue. “We would have to cut a total of $8.4 million from our college come January because we are already facing $2 million in cuts to adjust to the current revenue level,” he noted. After Ortiz-Oakley’s comments, Alexander spoke again in order to outline CSULB budget woes. “In the last 18 months, we have lost 34 percent of our state budget,” he said. “We have gone from being 42 percent relying on the State of California to about 21 percent, so only about one in five dollars that we use for educational purposes

comes from the State.” He stressed that if Proposition 30 fails, CSULB will face an additional $21 million reduction in state funding. “That means we will lose about $800 per student, knocking our per-student state spending to about $3,500 per student. The national average is $7,200 per student. All three of these institutions (represented here) are already well below national averages in student spending.” Alexander also explained that if Prop 30 fails, CSULB will have to cut nearly 2,000 classes and an additional 2,000 students will not get access next fall. Alexander noted that the measure’s rejection would result in per-student state funding levels in California dropping well below per-student state funding in Kentucky, Mississippi, Alabama, West Virginia, New Mexico and North Dakota. In addition, CSULB will have to eliminate 200 teaching positions and expand class sizes. Alexander warned that the continued decrease in investment in education would have dire consequences for California in the not-too-distant future. “California needs to wake up to this reality,” he stressed. “We take great pride in what our school system used to be. Let’s build back

what it was as a national model and international model of educational success.” Garcia then addressed the audience. He explained that if voters reject the proposition, not only would educational opportunities shrink for Long Beach students, but the local economy would lose $75 million. “That is just something that the city of Long Beach cannot bear,” he said. After Garcia’s comments, Alexander took the microphone again. “We’re going to keep fighting this fight in support of access and affordable higher education,” he promised. “We would love the public to join in supporting and investing in students once again.” On the same day as the CSULB press conference, Los Angeles County Supervisor Don Knabe criticized the ballot measure in an email he sent to his constituents. “Proposition 30 is a lazy effort to place the burden of the state’s budget deficit on the taxpayer instead of our elected leaders to find a suitable solution to our state’s fiscal crisis,” he wrote. “Proposition 30 doesn’t guarantee any new funding for schools and includes no reform to prevent a similar situation down the road. I believe there are other ways to fix California’s educational system besides raising taxes.”

LBUSD Superintendent Christopher Steinhauser explained during Tuesday’s press conference that the school district has already cut its budget by millions of dollars, increased class sizes and eliminated some programs. He warned that without the passage of Prop 30, the district will be forced to enact further belt-tightening measures that would impair its ability to provide quality education to its students.

LBCC Superintendent-President Eloy Ortiz-Oakley stressed that the city college has already been forced to reduce its budget, and he warned that without the revenues that Proposition 30 would provide to institutions of higher learning, significantly fewer students will be able to attend LBCC.

9am to 2:30pm Municipal & Sunnyside Cemeteries

For more information, visit hslb.org

13

PArtiALLy SPonSored By deLiUS reStAUrAnt


14 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Library

continued from page 1

and pick up their new books and food. Though the sky was theatrically overcast, the only truly threatening cloud hanging over the school that afternoon was what had been the subject of a media event the day before. Long Beach Unified School District Superintendent Christopher Steinhauser, Cal State University-Long Beach President F. King Alexander and Long Beach

COMMUNITY

City College SuperintendentPresident Eloy Ortiz-Oakley had conducted a press conference Tuesday, during which the three leaders warned of the dire consequences on education if voters in November don’t approve Proposition 30. If it is indeed passed, Prop 30, also known as The Schools and Local Public Safety Protection Act, will increase personal state income tax on annual earnings over $250,000 for seven years and raise sales and use tax by one-fourth of a cent for four years. Steinhauser, who indicated that the school district has

Bamboo Teri House

Try our new Ichiban Dinner Special!

had to cut hundreds of millions of dollars from its budget in the last few years, said the Board of Education will have to minimize or altogether eliminate every LBUSD program if Prop 30 is not approved by voters and that the district will receive an immediate reduction of $435 per student. Amidst those impending and drastic cuts, Burnett’s library makeover and its accompanying benefits clearly provided a gleam of sunshine for the school’s staff. Barbara Alvarez has been teaching at the school since 2000. She taught second grade for the majority of those years, during which time she had 20 students in each year’s class, but she switched to third grade amidst the vast cutbacks and changes made in the state and

“The new, vibrant space will be alive with the love of learning.”

–Burnett Elementary librarian Mary McCarthy the school district in the last few academic years. She now has 30 pupils in her classroom. “This opportunity that Burnett’s been granted gives us a new begin-

OCTOBER 12, 2012

ning, not only to students, but to staff at Burnett,” she said. “With all the cuts to education, this allows Burnett to look at education through a new lens. It’s made me look at things differently. Even though we’re gettting cut, there are still people out there identifying the need and finding funds to do something like this.” Griselda Rodriguez, who teaches a second-grade Excel class and has also been at the school for 12 years, sees a longterm benefit that the grant will have on the students’ character development. “I think this whole program and whole event bring hope to the kids,” Rodriguez said. “It brings a sense of community to the school. They see generosity, and it teaches them to see LIBRARY page 15

Comes with a wonderful assortment of:

• Foster Farms Fresh Chicken Teriyaki • Yakiniku (Japanese-style BBQ beef) • Crunchy California Roll (2pcs) • Shrimp & Vegetable Tempura • Mac-Potato Salad • Fresh Fruit All for just $9.99! Great Japanese taste and great value! Available every day of the week from 5pm. Preparing for the holidays early? Giftcards available for holiday giving!

Warm your body and heart with homemade Ramen Noodle Soup!

Lunch & Dinner starting at just $5.99

3391 Atlantic Avenue (Corner of Atlantic & Wardlow)

(562) 595-6049 www.bambooterihouse.com

The Meals for Minds program will provide families of students at Burnett Elementary, the vast majority of whom are low-income, with 30 pounds of food per pupil, a monthly distribution that will continue throughout the year.

Passport Wine Tasting

“Wines Around the World” Sunday, oct. 14, 2012 4-8pm $50 all-inclusive Reservations required. Attendance limited to 100. Sample wines from different countries and regions representing every corner of the wine world. taste at your own pace and get a stamp in your passport from each place you “visit.” enjoy food from the buffet and the hand-passed selections being offered throughout the night.

Preferred seating w/waiter service available $75 (Request when making reservation)

2951 CHERRY AVENUE, SIGNAL HILL 562.426.0694 • www.deliusrestaurant.com


OCTOBER 12, 2012

COMMUNITY

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

15

Photos by Cory Bilicko/Signal Tribune

(Above) families of students at Burnett Elementary gather after school Wednesday to pick up free books and food, courtesy of the Target Corporation, The Heart of America Foundation and the LA Regional Food Bank.

continued from page 14

be generous to others.” Mary McCarthy has been the school’s librarian since early 1997, and although she was visibly and admittedly delighted by the makeover, she expressed some mixed emotions. “First of all, I have many wonderful memories of the old library. Miss [Heather] Hall (a Burnett teacher) had created an amazing mural that was very hard to say goodbye to,” McCarthy said. “But overall the library had the feel of a bygone era. The colors were drab, and everything was showing signs of age and wear and tear. The collection was in dire straits. Our library is very busy, and the books are used

heavily. I compared our books to the Velveteen Rabbit. They were showing signs of being very well loved. On the one hand, that made those books very precious to me, but I knew that every child deserves a fresh experience with books that are in good shape.” McCarthy explained that the library’s collection had been shrinking from sheer use and that, because of cutbacks, libraries in general have been neglected in recent years. “I am thrilled that our students and teachers will have access to new books, current technology and an inviting, invigorating space to explore their interests,” she said, noting that the majority of Burnett’s students receive free or reduced-price lunches, indicating

the economic concerns of that community. “The new library will build enthusiasm for reading and research. Access to new resources will allow students to be more effective in pursuit of their interests and studies. Availability of recent technology will help our students who have limited access to technology in their homes.” During the ribbon-cutting ceremony, Burnett principal Lucy Salazar thanked all those involved in the project, including the dozens of Target employee volunteers, who were at the event, decked out in red shirts. “This gift to Burnett today is multi-faceted,” she told those in attendance in the library, where there was standingroom only. “It’s not just about the beautiful, inspiring space we’re in

right now. It’s also about the gift of the books that are being donated to the library. So, it’s not just: the furniture; the beautiful shelving; the wonderful, colorful paint. It’s the iPads and the fabulous, state-of-the-art Smart Board that we will have. But it also extends beyond the four walls of the library.” Salazar mentioned that the most special part of the project to her is the Meals for Minds program, which is being co-organized by LA Regional Food Bank. “The boys and girls will have an enhanced home library, but they will also not have to worry about food,” she said. Outside the library that day were numerous tables, draped with red tablecloths and stacked with boxes upon boxes of food, includ-

ing cereal and canned vegetables and fruit. This would be the first day of many that Burnett families could stock up on necessary staples to fill their pantries and protheir children with vide nourishment so that they would be prepared to focus on learning each school day. It was clear that the organizers behind this event understood that hungry stomachs can’t foster hungry minds. And now, equipped with new books and the latest technology, McCarthy is a librarian who’s ready for those eager, young scholars. “The new, vibrant space will be alive with the love of learning,” McCarthy said. “The library has always been the heart of the school, and now it has an infusion of energy.”

110 ExpressLanes Open November 10, 2012. Starting November 10, Metro ExpressLanes will save you time in tra;c on the I-110 freeway. They’re toll-free for carpools, vanpools and motorcycles. Solo drivers have the choice to use ExpressLanes by paying a toll. ®

All you need to use ExpressLanes is a FasTrak account and transponder in your car. Pre-order your FasTrak now at metroexpresslanes.net. Note: All drivers that want to use the ExpressLanes need to sign up and register for FasTrak.

13-0572ps ©2012 lacmta

Library

(Left) New furniture, carpet and shelves (for 2,000 new books) in the newly made-over Burnett Elementary School Library


BUSINESSES & SERVICES

16 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

B O O K K E E P I N G / TA X E S

Bookkeeping & Tax Services

Certified QuickBooks Pro Advisors/Training Business & Personal Bookkeeping Cambodian & Spanish Speaking CTEC Registered Tax Preparers

NEW ADDRESS!

1640 Burnett Avenue Phone: 562-264-5114 www.MadKatInc.com

BUSINESS MACHINES COPIERS • FACSIMILES LASER PRINTERS SALES, SERVICE & SUPPLIES

S uperior C opier S ervice

562-867-7000 Fax: 562-616-1567

robert@superiorcopier.com

HOME SERVICES

ALFORD’S

LAN DSCAPE DES IG N ER

English WE WILL SAVE YOU MONEY! Internet |

Phone |

TV

GARDENS

OVER YOUR CURRENT PROVIDER

...where your garden begins

Frank DuBuy

626.532.3560 frank.dubuy@chartercom.com

• Design • Installation • Maintenance

2935 Redondo Ave. Long Beach, CA 90806

www.kathyalford.com

Business Accounts Executive

PUBLIC NOTICES

TST4194 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.S. No. 12-30811-JP-CA YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 03/02/2004. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, (cashier's check(s) must be made payable to National Default Servicing Corporation), drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state; will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made in an "as is" condition, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: SOPHAN THAI, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN Duly Appointed Trustee: NATIONAL DEFAULT SERVICING CORPORATION Recorded 03/09/2004 as Instrument No. 04 0555572 (or Book, Page) of the Official Records of LOS ANGELES County, California. Date of Sale: 10/19/2012 at 11:00 a.m. Place of Sale: By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 Estimated amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $828,177.27 Street Address or other common designation of real property: 2154 RIDGE VIEW TERRACE DRIVE, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 A.P.N.: 7217-029-014 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The undersigned mortgagee, beneficiary or authorized agent for the mortgagee or beneficiary pursuant to California Civil Code Section 2923.5(b) declares that the mortgagee, beneficiary or the mortgagee's or beneficiary's authorized agent has either contacted the borrower or tried with due diligence to contact the borrower as required by California Civil Code 2923.5. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-730-2727 or visit this Internet Web site www.ndscorp.com/sales, using the file number assigned to this case 12-30811-JP-CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: 09/20/2012 NATIONAL DEFAULT SERVICING CORPORATION 7720 N. 16th Street, Suite 300 Phoenix, AZ 85020 phone 602-264-6101 Sales Line 714-730-2727; Sales Website: www.ndscorp.com/sales Nichole Alford, TRUSTEE SALES REPRESENTATIVE A-4304329 09/28/2012, 10/05/2012, 10/12/2012

TST4208 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.S. No. 12-20304-SP-CAYOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 09/19/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, (cashier's check(s) must be made payable to National Default Servicing Corporation), drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state; will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made in an "as is" condition, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: THOMAS P ONG, AND HANG N TRAN, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS Duly Appointed Trustee: NATIONAL DEFAULT SERVICING CORPORATION Recorded 09/28/2006 as Instrument No. 06 2159906 (or Book, Page) of the Official Records of LOS ANGELES County, California. Date of Sale: 11/02/2012 at 11:00 a.m. Place of Sale: By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 Estimated amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $1,275,004.94 Street Address or other common des-

Landscape & Garden

562.997.4111

ignation of real property: 2501 HILLCREST STREET, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755-3864 A.P.N.: 7214-014-087 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The undersigned mortgagee, beneficiary or authorized agent for the mortgagee or beneficiary pursuant to California Civil Code Section 2923.5(b) declares that the mortgagee, beneficiary or the mortgagee's or beneficiary's authorized agent has either contacted the borrower or tried with due diligence to contact the borrower as required by California Civil Code 2923.5. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-730-2727 or visit this Internet Web site www.ndscorp.com/sales, using the file number assigned to this case 12-20304-SP-CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: 10/08/2012 NATIONAL DEFAULT SERVICING CORPORATION 7720 N. 16th Street, Suite 300 Phoenix, AZ 85020 phone 602-264-6101 Sales Line 714-7302727; Sales Website: www.ndscorp.com/sales Nichole Alford, TRUSTEE SALES REPRESENTATIVE A-4309746 10/12/2012, 10/19/2012, 10/26/2012 TST4209 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE Trustee Sale No. : 20120015001613 Title Order No.: 120114187 FHA/VA/PMI No.: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 03/22/2004. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NDEX WEST, LLC, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 03/30/2004 as Instrument No. 04 0745385 of official records in the office of the County Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, State of CALIFORNIA. EXECUTED BY: TIMOTHY A. LANKFORD, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). DATE OF SALE: 11/01/2012 TIME OF SALE: 11:00 AM PLACE OF SALE: BY THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED AT 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, POMONA, CA 91766. STREET ADDRESS and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2599 WALNUT AVENUE #213, SIGNAL HILL, CALIFORNIA 90755 APN#: 7211-026-104 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $293,306.07. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder 's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-730-2727 for information regarding the trustee's sale or visit this Internet Web site www.lpsasap.com for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case 20120015001613. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFOR-

PREMIUM ROOFING

HUNDREDS OF LOCAL REFERENCES OVER 35 YEARS EXPERIENCE BIXBY KNOLLS RESIDENT FULLY INSURED Workman’s Comp • General Liability

“A-rated” on angieslist.com

Call Dennis Bartlett: Contractor’s License #629882

(562) 427-0688

MATION PLEASE CALL: AGENCY SALES and POSTING 2 3210 EL CAMINO REAL, SUITE 200 IRVINE, CA 92602 714-730-2727 www.lpsasap.com NDEx West, L.L.C. MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NDEx West, L.L.C. as Trustee Dated: 10/03/2012 NDEx West, L.L.C. 15000 Surveyor Boulevard, Suite 500 Addison, Texas 75001-9013 Telephone: (866) 795-1852 Telecopier: (972) 661-7800 A-4310339 10/12/2012, 10/19/2012, 10/26/2012

TST4210 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 10-0119478 Doc ID #0001625896872005N Title Order No. 10-8-439949 Investor/Insurer No. 162589687 APN No. 7216-020-094 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 06/14/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by REBECCA A. MARINE, dated 06/14/2007 and recorded 7/12/2007, as Instrument No. 20071658079, in Book , Page , of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, will sell on 11/08/2012 at 9:00AM, Doubletree Hotel Los Angeles-Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650, Vineyard Ballroom at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2600 EAST 20TH STREET UNIT 202, SIGNAL HILL, CA, 90755. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $482,296.95. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. If required by the provisions of section 2923.5 of the California Civil Code, the declaration from the mortgagee, beneficiary or authorized agent is attached to the Notice of Trustee's Sale duly recorded with the appropriate County Recorder's Office. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on a property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 1-800-281-8219 or visit this Internet Web site www.recontrustco.com, using the file number assigned to this case TS No. 10-0119478. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-91401-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 By: - Trustee's Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. A-4312459 10/12/2012, 10/19/2012, 10/26/2012 TST4205 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 11-0149049 Title Order No. 11-0136821 APN No. 7214-003-008 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 08/10/2004. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by AUSTIN V PLONG, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY, dated 08/10/2004 and recorded 8/13/2004, as Instrument No. 2004-2089829, in Book , Page , of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, will sell on 10/26/2012 at 1:00PM, At the Pomona Valley Masonic Temple Building, located at 395 South Thomas Street, Pomona, California at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2424 WALNUT AVENUE, SIGNAL HILL, CA, 90755. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein.The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $444,535.08. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total

OCTOBER 12, 2012

Genus Computer Services LLC COMPUTER SERVICES

A Full-Service Computer Company - Home or Office

• Computer Sales • Repair & Installation • Website Design & Hosting • Network Setup, Support, Cabling & Wireless • Internet Installation & Configuration • Remote Back-up & Data Recovery • Camera Surveillance Security Systems MEMBER

Better Business Bureau

562.989.4666

4047 long Beach Blvd

PAI NTI NG

“Your Neighborhood Painter”

• Residential • Commercial • Interiors • Exteriors • Woodworking Ward • Faux Finishes Rich CALIC 864357

562.528.6258

indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state.Said sale will be made, in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. If required by the provisions of section 2923.5 of the California Civil Code, the declaration from the mortgagee, beneficiary or authorized agent is attached to the Notice of Trustee’s Sale duly recorded with the appropriate County Recorder’s Office. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on a property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 1-800-281-8219 or visit this Internet Web site www.recontrustco.com, using the file number assigned to this case 11-0149049. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone/Sale Information: (800) 281-8219 By: Trustee's Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. FEI # 1006.169315 10/05, 10/12, 10/19/2012

TST4192 / 2012 183936 F I C T I T I o U S B U S I N E S S N A M E S TAT E M E N T The following person is doing business as: ENTERPRISE ELECTRONICS, 22826 Mariposa A v e . , To r r a n c e , C A 9 0 5 0 2 . R e g i s t r a n t : R O B E R T B U R C H E T T, 2 2 8 2 6 M a r i p o s a A v e . , To r r a n c e , C A 90502. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Robert Lee Burchett. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on September 13, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1 4 4 11 e t s e q . , B u s i n e s s a n d P r o f e s s i o n s C o d e ) . P u b . T h e S i g n a l Tr i b u n e : S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 8 , & October 5, 12, 2012.

TST4193 / 2012 183942 F I C T I T I o U S B U S I N E S S N A M E S TAT E M E N T The following person is doing business as: SB AUTO, 2109 E. Artesia Blv d ., L o n g B e a c h , C A 90805. Registrant: HOWARD MONTES DE O C A , 111 0 S . F r e s n o S t . , L o s A n g e l e s , C A 90023. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Howard Montes De Oca. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on September 13, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name s t a t e m e n t e x p i r e s f i v e years from the date it w a s f i l e d i n t h e o ff i c e o f t h e c o u n t y c l e r k . A n e w fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does n o t o f i tse l f a u th o ri z e th e u se i n th i s s ta te o f a fi ctitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see s e c t i o n 1 4 4 11 e t s e q . , B u s i n e s s a n d P r o f e s s i o n s C o d e ) . P u b . T h e S i g n a l Tr i b u n e : S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 8 , & Octo b e r 5 , 1 2 , 2 0 1 2 . TST4197 / 2012 175226 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. TITAN METALS INCORPORATED, 2. TMI, 3242 E. 59th St., Long Beach, CA 90805. Registrant: TITAN METALS INCORPORATED, 3242 E. 59th St., Long Beach, CA 90805. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Colleen E. Daly, CFO. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on December 1, 1995. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on August 30, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: September 28, & October 5, 12, 19, 2012. TST4198 / 2012 185509 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: MASONRY & TILE TOOL, 7033 McManus St., Lakewood, CA 90713. Registrant: DENISE ANDRE, 7033 McManus St., Lakewood, Ca 90713. This business is conducted

Put on an event they won’t forget! P H OTO B O OT H

MAKES A GREAT WEDDING OR PARTY FAVOR!

Rent a portable photobooth for your next event for 1 hour for only $250! • Includes portable booth, props, and one staff member CALL FOR DETAILS

877-FOTOSTRIP

by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Denise Andre. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on September 14, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on September 17, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: September 28, & October 5, 12, 19, 2012.

TST4199 / 2012 189816 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The fo l l o w i n g p e r s o n i s d o i n g b u s i n e s s a s : P O RT M A C H I N E S H I P, 9 2 3 E . F S t . , W i l m i n g t o n , C A 90744. Registrant: STEPHEN PACE, 1500 Emerald Cove Way, Seal Beach, CA 90740. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Stephen Pace. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on September 21, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see s e c t i o n 1 4 4 11 e t s e q . , B u s i n e s s a n d P r o f e s s i o n s C o d e ) . P u b . T h e S i g n a l Tr i b u n e : S e p t e m b e r 2 8 , & October 5, 12, 19, 2012. TST4200 / 2012 192544 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: 1. THE SIGNAL TRIBUNE, 2. POSH ENTERPRISES, 939 E. 27th St., Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: 1 . S T E P H E N M . S T R I C H A RT, 2 . N E E N A R . S T R I C H A RT, 1 9 1 8 R a y m o n d Av e . , S i g n a l H i l l , C A 90755. This business is conducted by: a Husband and Wife. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Stephen M. Strichart. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on February 9, 2000. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on September 26, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: September 28, & October 5, 12, 19, 2012.

TST4201 / 2012 188833 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: WESTERN FRAME ART, 14110 Gannet St. #103, Santa Fe Springs, CA 90670. Registrant: ARNOLD JAMES, 1 4 11 0 G a n n e t S t . # 1 0 3 , S a n t a F e S p r i n g s , C A 90670. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Arnold James. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on August 14, 1978. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on September 20, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1 4 4 11 e t s e q . , B u s i n e s s and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: September 28, & October 5, 12, 19, 2012. TST4202 / Case No. NP015130 Notice of Petition To Administer Estate of: BEA FAGAN To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of BEA FAGAN. A Petition For Probate has been filed by ANNE MEGLI, in the Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles. The Petition For Probate requests that ANNE MEGLI, be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The Petition requests the decedent’s will codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The Petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act with limited authority. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain and very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A Hearing on the petition will be held on October 25, 2012 at 1:30 PM in Dept. 4 located at 415 W.


OCTOBER 12, 2012

BUSINESSES & SERVICES I N K & TO N E R

F LO O R I N G

The

Tile Zone Ceramic & Porcelain Tiles Custom Design & Installation

3677 Atlantic Avenue

562-988-8429 W W W. T H E T I L E Z O N E . C O M

TUNING & REPAIR

LAN D S CAP I N G

Declares WAR on high ink & toner prices!

50% OFF

on HP reman

toner cartridges With this ad. New clients. Discount based on HP OEM pricing.

562-912-4657 InkPeace.com

P IAN O T U N I N G / R E PAI R

Commercial Residential

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

17

MEDICINE

TRUST lANDSCAPE • Complete Designing and layout • Tree trimming • “All concrete work” • Sprinkler systems • New lawns, trees, shrubs • Maintenance

562-422-3806 LICENSED • BONDED • INSURED State license C27 #642266

PLUMBING

P LU M B I N G

Christine Kay

(562)

208-1853

Call for a free estimate Recommended by many local music teachers Associate Member of the Piano Technicians Guild

Ocean Blvd., Long Beach, CA 90802. If You Object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections, with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If Your Are A Creditor or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: ANNE MEGLI 3826 OLIVE AVE. LONG BEACH, CA 90807 Pub. Signal Tribune, September 28, & October 5, 12, 2012

TST4204 / 2012 194044 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: ALLISON TRAINING PERSPECTIVES AND SERVICE, 4067 Hardwick St. #495, Lakewood, CA 90712. Registrant: ROBBY J. ALLISON, 4067 Hardwick St. #495, Lakewood, CA 90712. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Robby J. Allison. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on September 27, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: October 5, 12, 19, 26, 2012. TST4206 / Case No. TS016001 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, 200 W. Compton Blvd., Compton, CA 90220. PETITION OF Veronica Bacerra For Change of Name. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: 1. Petitioner VERONICA BECERRA, filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: A. Present Name: VERONICA BECERRA to Proposed Name: MIA ABIGAIL MENDOZA. And: B. Present Name: RICARDO SEBASTIAN MENDOZA to Proposed Name: RICARDO DAMIAN MENDOZA. 2. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, shy the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: November 1, 2012; Time: 9:30 A.M.; Dept. A, Room 904. The address of the court is the same as above. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, THE SIGNAL TRIBUNE, 939 E. 27th. Street, Signal Hill, CA 90755: October 5, 12, 19, 26, 2012. ___//ss//___ Lynn D. Olson, Judge of the Superior Court Dated: September 21, 2012

TST4207 / 2012 188839 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: D2M WOOD PRODUCTS, 37925 6th St. East, Unit 210, Palmdale, CA 93550. Registrant: 1. JoANNE DAVIS, 2. RICHARD DAVIS, 1555 Georgetown Ave., Palmdale, CA 93550. This business is conducted by: a Husband and Wife. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: JoAnne Davis. The registrants have not begun to transact business

under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on September 20, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: October 5, 12, 19, 26, 2012.

TST4211 / 2012 198894 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: LONG BEACH DUCT CLEANING, 2517 Cerritos Ave., Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: LONG BEACH HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING INC., 2517 Cerritos Ave., Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Shari White, Vice-President. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on October 3, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on October 4, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: October 12, 19, 26, & November 2, 2012. TST4212 / 2012 199735 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. BRANSCOMB BY LAUREN LYNN, 2. BRANSCOMB UTILITY, 3. BRANSCOMB DESIGNS, 4. LAUREN LYNN, 375 Atlantic Ave. Suite 104, Long Beach, CA 90802. Registrant: BRANSCOMB, 375 Atlantic Ave. Suite 104, Long Beach, CA 90802. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Lauren Lynn King, President. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on October 1, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on October 5, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: October 12, 19, 26, & November 2, 2012. TST4213 / 2012 199736 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: WE CARE MOBILE AUTO DETAILING SERVICES, 214 E. Adams St., Long Beach, CA 90805. Registrant: LEONARD FREDRICK IRVIN II, 214 E. Adams St., Long Beach, CA 90805. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Leonard Irvin II. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on October 5, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: October 12, 19, 26, & November 2, 2012.

FoUND CAT

This young male cat showed up this weekend at 36th Street and Olive Avenue. He is very sweet and a great low-key companion. Please help him find his way home or a new home.

Call 562-761-1955

EYE ON CRIME Crimes reported by LBPD • Council Districts 6, 7 & 8

Friday, Oct. 5 Battery 11:55am– 2000 block of Magnolia Avenue

Auto burglary 7pm– 800 block of W. 20th Street

Commercial burglary 11pm– 4300 block of Atlantic Avenue

Saturday, Oct. 6 Commercial burglary 3pm– 3700 block of Long Beach Blvd.

Garage/residential burglary 3600 block of Falcon Avenue

Sunday, Oct. 7 Auto burglary 4pm– 3700 block of Country Club Drive

Monday, Oct. 8 Auto burglary 8am– Pacific Avenue/Wardlow Road

Auto burglary 1pm– 3300 block of Elm Avenue

Commercial burglary 3:30pm– 3700 block of Long Beach Blvd.

Residential burglary 10pm– 3500 block of Pacific Avenue

Tuesday, Oct. 9 Commercial burglary 4am– 2200 block of Long Beach Blvd.

Crimes reported by SHPD • Citywide

Thursday, Oct. 4 Identity theft 4:33pm– 1800 block of E. Hill Street

Friday, Oct. 5 Disorderly conduct (under the influence) 3:12am– 2300 block of Dawson Avenue Auto burglary 10:44am– 2600 block of Cherry Avenue

Stolen vehicle 3:52pm– 3000 block of California Avenue

Saturday, Oct. 6 Non-injury hit & run 11:48am– Cherry Avenue/Town Center West Sunday, Oct. 7 Embezzlement 12:01am– 2500 block of Cerritos Avneue Two named suspects. Auto burglary 11:30am– 2000 block of Orizaba Avenue Petty theft 1:40pm– 2200 block of E. Willow Street Three suspects in custody.

DUI 8:31pm– 1600 block of E. Willow Street Suspect in custody.

Monday, Oct. 8 Stolen vehicle 10:07am– 3300 block of Orange Avenue

Grand theft 2:44pm– 2800 block of Gundry Avenue

Recovered stolen vehicle 7:54pm– 1800 block of E. Hill Street

Battery 8:42pm– 1900 block of Junipero Avenue Suspect in custody.

Tuesday, Oct. 9 Stolen vehicle 9:36am– 3000 block of California Avenue

Non-injury hit & run 12:17pm– 1800 block of Stanley Avenue

Stolen vehicle 1:01pm– 2200 block of E. Willow Street

Auto burglary 3pm– 900 block of E. 33rd Street

Residential burglary 7:44pm– 1900 block of Junipero Avneue

Wednesday, Oct. 10 Disorderly conduct (under the influence) 8:59pm- E. 19th Street/St. Louis Avenue


18 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Trackers

continued from page 1

On Monday, DeLong released a statement defending his actions, saying the political tracker that he called a “stalker” was violating rules of the event. He continued to theorize that Lowenthal’s campaign had hired the tracker to follow him. “I asked her nicely several times to get the camera out of my face,” DeLong said in the statement. “When she refused to remove the camera from my face, I removed the camera and delivered it to a representative of the League of Women Voters so they could take appropriate action.” Phone calls made by the Signal Tribune to Hewlett had not been returned by press time. However, representatives of the opposing campaign, who said the woman was not employed by Lowenthal, said the six-year Long Beach city councilmember went too far, adding that the incident is an example of why DeLong is unfit to run for Congress. Mike Shimpock, Lowenthal’s consultant, said political trackers are typical in high-profile political races, and the skirmish shows that DeLong has a fear of being held accountable on issues that he has repeatedly “dodged” by taking moderate or bipartisan positions. “If he can’t handle the pressure of a five-foot-tall person with a video camera recording him in a debate, how is he possibly going to stand up to the radical Republican leadership in Congress or stand up to Iran?” Shimpock replied. “This level of scrutiny is nothing compared to what he would be subject to if elected to Congress, and, frankly, I think his behavior, in the face of it, makes him unqualified for the office.” That same Monday, an edited YouTube video of the footage was released by the California Democratic Party, with added audio of the congres-

sional candidate taking the phone from Hewlett, who the Democratic Party confirmed is a political tracker working for the party and not for Lowenthal’s campaign. However, Diana Lejins, a local freelance photographer who sometimes contributes to the Signal Tribune, said she recently saw Hewlett at Lowenthal’s campaign headquarters. The job of the political tracker is to record candidates of the opposing party during public appearances. The Democratic Party alleges that DeLong erased parts of the video. After the woman grabbed her phone back and started recording again, the altercation resumed as DeLong’s staff members began blocking her access to the candidate, calling her “rude” and “offensive.” At one point, DeLong’s staff members threatened to call the police. Bill Christiansen, DeLong’s campaign manager, is seen in the video obstructing the tracker’s view of the candidate while saying, “You are the strangest person I’ve ever seen … Are you proud of yourself? Are you enjoying this?” Though the forum was organized by CSULB, it was moderated by the League of Women Voters, which had a protocol of “no filming of the forum without advanced approval.” Both candidates signed agreements that all recording would be approved before the forum and footage would be published in its entirety to prevent either candidate from misrepresenting or taking parts of the forum out of context. However, Hewlett continued to proclaim that it was a “public event” and that she had a right to record once the forum was over. DeLong asked the League of Women Voters to intervene, after which a moderator said the woman’s actions were against the rules, but the political tracker continued to record anyway. DeLong then asked Lowenthal to step in, but the Dem-

NEWS

ocratic candidate said he had not employed the woman. Noel Fritsch, a spokesperson for DeLong’s campaign, said the political tracker clearly violated guidelines of the event regardless of what organization the woman is affiliated with. He further called the incident a “strategy of bullying and intimidation.” Fritsch said the situation comes down to a matter of “security” after the same woman had most recently closely recorded video of DeLong and his family, including his 6-year-old daughter, during a Greek festival just weeks prior. “In this day and age, when there are unhinged people who have access to Congressional candidates that result in shootings like we saw with Gabby Giffords (a former Democratic member of Congress, who was shot in January 2011 during a public meeting with constituents in Tucson, Arizona), security is a paramount concern,” Fritsch said. “The behavior of this woman is beyond reprehensible, and whether she’s aligned with the Lowenthal camp or the Democrat party, both should publicly apologize and announce that they will not use such tactics going forward.” Tenoch Flores, spokesperson for the California Democratic Party, said political trackers are “commonplace” in political circles as a way to keep candidates accountable, especially in campaigns for federal offices. Flores pointed to a part of the video in which DeLong is asked about Proposition 30, a state proposition that, if passed, would temporarily raise taxes to prevent billions of dollars in cuts to public education. DeLong has refused to publicly state his position on the matter, but in the video the candidate is heard saying, “Well, you know, I think there’s a better way to get more funding to the schools, education …” DeLong’s staff, however, stopped the rest of the interview from being recorded. “The purpose of tracking candidates in public settings is to have a public record

of what it is they’re saying to make sure they aren’t misleading voters,” Flores said. “The reality is that candidates like DeLong have been known to take a position one way and, the next day, claim they didn’t take that position.” Flores added that it was “unbelievable” that DeLong took the cell phone, an action that he believes set a poor example for DeLong’s staff members. Jan Gallup, president of the League of Women Voters of Long Beach Area, said she was “disappointed” about how the event ended but admitted that the guidelines could have been made clearer. She said it wasn’t expected that there would be a political tracker at the event. “We did not anticipate that there would be an issue like that,” Gallup said. “We thought we had the concurrence of the Party as well. Apparently, we did not.” Shimpock said it was DeLong and his staff who “crossed the line” and “bullied” the political tracker, adding that the situation is ironic since Lowenthal’s campaign fully obliged when DeLong sent two staff members to track a press conference. “I thought that Gary would be a more mature politician,” Shimpock said. “Having a level of outrage about being held accountable isn’t productive in the campaign … We’re not afraid of being held accountable.” Although she didn’t see DeLong take the woman’s phone, Gallup said she observed the woman recording the candidate in an “aggressive” manner with what looked like a goal of inciting a confrontation. “She was repeatedly maybe no more than eight inches away from Gary’s face for an extended period of time,” Gallup said. “She was invading people’s personal space for sure … My sense from her is that she wanted to provoke DeLong into something, and she got exactly what she wanted.”

OCTOBER 12, 2012

Political trackers considered

‘standard procedure’ Sean Belk Staff Writer

They appear out of nowhere, ready to capture that one offensive comment, inaccuracy, gaffe or slip-up that, in some cases, may change the outcome of an election. They’re called political trackers, and they have become commonplace in high-profile political races over the past decade, according to experts. However, some reports show that such trackers are also increasingly becoming more aggressive and have been the subject of controversies that have sometimes swayed public perceptions and election results. Typically, a political tracker’s job is to shadow an opposing candidate during public-speaking events in order to video- or audio-record off-the-cuff comments that may be later used against a particular candidate in political ads or Internet videos. Either political parties or the candidates themselves can use political trackers, and sometimes candidates send trackers to follow the trackers. “It’s been a standard procedure for definitely over six years and probably longer than that,” said Ian Patton, a political consultant for the past 15 years and a former staff member of the late Congresswoman Juanita MillenderMcDonald, who represented California’s 37th congressional district. An incident most commonly associated with political trackers is when George Allen, a former United States Senator for Virginia, was speaking during his re-election campaign in 2006 and called an Indian-American tracker for the opposing campaign a “macaca,” considered a racist epithet used in the South, meaning “monkey.” Although the candidate apologized and said he meant to say something else, Allen ended up losing the campaign, which reports speculated was due to the incident. Another incident occurred most recently, when Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney was secretly recorded during a fundraiser saying that 47 percent of Americans don’t pay income tax, a statement he later retracted. In the case of Gary DeLong taking a cell phone from political tracker Kelsey Hewlett on Oct. 5, some have speculated that his reaction might have been due to the fact that she had been following him for weeks. Patton said, however, that the tracker was in complete compliance with the law and was conducting a standard operating procedure for her job. “If somebody is actually being a problem, you can go get a restraining order, but I understand, as far as I know, [DeLong] didn’t do that,” Patton said. “So there hasn’t really been any suggestion that she wasn’t doing anything other than the standard tracking procedure.” Patton further said DeLong’s reaction was odd since trackers are the norm today. “It was bizarre that he freaked out because it’s such a common thing these days,” he said. “It happens all the time, especially for higher-profile races. At every public event, they’re going to have someone recording the words so that in case you say something stupid they can use it against you … you can’t stop people from doing that.” Although phone calls to Hewlett were not returned, Tenoch Flores, spokesperson for the California Democratic Party said the paid job is not difficult. “It’s pretty straightforward,” he said. “You go to events where the opposing candidate is speaking, and you get a camera and record what they’re saying. Most campaigns are used to that and accept trackers as a part of campaigning … the DeLong campaign is apparently not ready for prime time.” However, DeLong is not alone in his feeling of being harassed by a political tracker. The Star Tribune in Minneapolis reports that Mark Dayton, a Minnesota Democratic Farmer Labor Party candidate for governor, accused GOP trackers of “harassment” for following him so closely during a race in 2010. Republicans scoffed at the accusation. Still, Patton said video recording in public is legal and doesn’t require permission, adding that, in today’s technologically advanced society, it should be expected, especially in such a high-profile political race. “Every year the saturation of people with cell-phone cameras gets to 100 percent,” he said. “In this day and age, how can you expect to not be recorded?”


OCTOBER 12, 2012

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Forum

continued from page 1

Home Seating Promotion: This Weekend

VISIT oUR ClEARANCE CENTER

SAVE 50% - 90%

FlooR SAMPlES, CloSEoUTS, DISCoNTINUED AND SCRATCH & DENT MATTRESSES, lIVING RooM, DINING RooM, HoME oFFICE & ENTERTAINMENT 1703 E 17 TH ST, SANTA ANA, CA 92705

19


SIGNAL TRIBUNE

OCTOBER 12, 2012

The Port awards thousands of dollars in scholarships each year. Now, that’s economics I like to teach.

— Libby Huff, Polytechnic High School Teacher

At the Port, we’re always planning for the future. That’s why educational outreach—including scholarships for local students planning to enter trade-related fields—is one of our top priorities. As teachers like Libby Huff know, investing in the next generation always pays off. www.POLB.com/community

Thinking outside the docks

© 2012 Port of Long Beach

20


ST3419