Issuu on Google+

Signal T

R

I

B

U

N

E

Paper cranes at Hiroshima Memorial Photo by Kaelyn Bruno

To read diary entries from her recent trip to Japan, see page 10.

Vol. 34 No. 14

SERVING BIXBY KNOLLS, CALIFORNIA HEIGHTS, LOS CERRITOS, WRIGLEY AND THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

October dinner to raise funds for two local groups that help disabled people

Your Weekly Community Newspaper

September 7, 2012

Questions remain about future of LB post office after plans made to close mail-processing center Postal service plans ‘measured’ consolidation, but fate of property, employees yet to be determined

Nick Diamantides/Signal Tribune

David Sanfilippo, director of CSULB’s Disabled Student Services (left) and Peter Perbix, coordinator of support services in the DSS office, are two individuals who work together to help disabled students overcome obstacles to their academic success.

Nick Diamantides Staff Writer

Two local organizations have joined forces to raise funds for their respective programs that are aimed at improving the quality of life for people with disabilities. Advocacy for Respect

and Choice (AR&C) and Disabled Student Services (DSS) of California State University, Long Beach (CSULB) are planning to host a fundraising dinner at The Grand in Long Beach on Saturday, Oct. 13. AR&C, which was the subject of

a recent two-part series in the Signal Tribune, provides job training, employment, and adult day care for people with intellectual disabilities and other physiological disorders that hin-

Signal Hill Council approves one-year extension on conditional-use permits for all drilling sites in the city CJ Dablo Staff Writer

The Signal Hill City Council voted 4-0 last Tuesday to approve a resolution that grants a one-year extension of a conditional-use permit to operate seven drill sites owned by the largest oil company in the city. (Mayor Tina Hansen was absent from the Sept. 4 meeting.) The resolution says that the one-year permit extension covers a gas-turbine facility in addition to the operations at the drill sites that deal with oil and gas storage, processing and shipping. There are only seven drill sites in the entire city, and all of them are owned by privately owned

Signal Hill Petroleum. According to a staff report from the City’s Community Development director, Scott Charney, Signal Hill Petroleum began acquiring the seven drilling sites in 1984 and eventually took over all of them. Prior to 1984, the sites were operated by ARCO, Shell and Texaco, and each site had a separate permit, according to Charney. The Community Development director’s report explained that the conditional-use permit that was originally approved in 1998 was the first time the City approved one conditional-use permit that would cover all seven drill sites. Another Community Develop-

see NONPROFITS page 8

ment Department spokesman explained that the one-year permit only covers drill sites, not oil wells. She described the partnership between Signal Hill Petroleum and the City when the original 1998 permit was crafted with an approval term of five years. “The vision was intended to be mutually beneficial for the City and Signal Hill Petroleum,” Colleen Doan told the Council Tuesday night. Doan serves as an associate planner for the City. “They maintained access through directional drilling, and it freed up encumbered land in Signal Hill for other urban uses,” she see COUNCIL page 18

Weekly Weather Forecast Friday

80° Mostly sunny Lo 66°

Saturday

86° Partly cloudy Lo 66°

Sunday

86° Partly sunny Lo 66°

77° Mostly sunny

Long Beach and Signal Hill city officials have been sending letters to federal legislators and attending community meetings in an attempt to postpone the now imminent closure and relocation of the mail-processing plant. The postal service estimates the consolidation alone will save the agency more than $16 million. In some ways, however, residents have already been impacted by the postal service’s financial troubles. On May 17, a new service model was implemented for delivering first-class mail in which deliveries to locations outside of prescribed service areas now take two days instead of 24 hours. The nationwide serv-

Sean Belk Staff Writer

Although the United States Postal Service has decided to consolidate the mail-processing center at 2300 Redondo Ave. in Long Beach with a Los Angeles facility by early next year, questions remain as to the future of the soon-to-be scaleddown facility and its employees. In an era of declining firstclass mail volume (primarily caused by the prevalence of online transactions), increasing retiree benefits and other rising costs, the postal service is now moving ahead with plans to consolidate 140 mail-processing centers across the country, including Long Beach operations, by February 2013. For the past four years,

Sept. 7 through 11, 2012

Monday

Lo 64°

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

A line forms Wednesday morning at the passport-service window at the post office located at 2300 Redondo Ave. The center’s mail processing is expected to be relocated as part of the postal service’s plans to consolidate 140 centers across the country.

Tuesday

75° Partly cloudy Lo 61°

This week’s Weekly Weather Forecast sponsored by: 4147 Long Beach Blvd. @ Carson St., Bixby Knolls (888) 9BUNDTS bundtsonmelrose.com

see POST OFFICE page 14

CELEBRATING 35YEARS OF EXCELLENCE Come join us!

Just one week away!

Friday, September 14 Starting at 4pm

Owners of BK Car Wash for 35 yrs, Sheldon & Shell Grossman

Music & Entertainment Food•Networking Dancing•Gifts•Prizes Fun for the family

Bixby Knolls Car Wash 577 E. Wardlow Rd.

& Detail Center

@ Atlantic Avenue • 562-595-6666

www.bixbyknollscarwash.com


2 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

SEPTEMBER 7, 2012


NEWS

SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Driver dies after collision with Metro Blue Line train

On Thursday, Aug. 30, at approximately 8:22pm, officers from the Long Beach Police Department were called to the area of 19th Street and Long Beach Boulevard in response to a collision between a vehicle and a train that resulted in the death of an adult male. The preliminary investigation revealed that a Metro Blue Line train was traveling northbound on Long Beach Boulevard when a 1995 Honda Accord, which was

also traveling northbound, attempted to make an illegal left turn on 19th Street. The vehicle turned directly into the path of the train, which struck the vehicle. Paramedics from the Long Beach Fire Department responded and rendered aid, but the car’s driver was pronounced deceased at the scene. There were no other occupants of the vehicle. Four passengers on the train were transported to local hospitals with what appeared to be minor injuries.

At this time, the decedent is only being identified as an adult Hispanic male in his twenties, pending confirmation of his identify by the Los Angeles Coroner’s Office. Anyone with information about this incident is asked to contact Long Beach Police Department Accident Investigations Detail Detective Richard Birdsall at (562) 570-7355.

On Tuesday, Sept. 4, at approximately 12:19am, Long Beach Police Department officers responded to the northbound 710 Freeway, between the 7th Street onramp and the 9th Street exit, regarding an injury traffic accident. The accident resulted in the death of a male adult. Officers arrived and located an upside-down, white, 2005 Toyota Scion, in the northbound numbertwo traffic lane. The driver was alone in the vehicle. The male

driver was seat-belted and suffering from significant injuries. The Long Beach Fire Department responded, removed him from the vehicle and transported him to a local hospital, where he died as a result of the injuries sustained in the accident. Investigators believe the driver was traveling at a high rate of speed and lost control of the vehicle. Evidence reveals the driver collided with the center median. Witnesses stated the vehicle rolled

over several times prior to stopping on its roof. The driver has been identified as Arthur Reyes, a 29-year-old resident of Pico Rivera. At this time, it is unknown if alcohol or drugs contributed to the accident. Anyone with information regarding this incident is asked to contact Long Beach Police Accident Investigation Detective Richard Birdsall at (562) 570-7355.

Pico Rivera man dies after his car flips on 710 Freeway Source: LBPD

Source: LBPD

3

TALKING POLITICS What Breakfast meeting Who Hosted by Long Beach Republican Women Federated Where Lakewood Country Club, 3101 Carson St. When Saturday, Sept. 8 More Info The meeting will have three speakers: 38th District Congressional candidate Benjamin Campos; 66th Assembly District candidate Craig Huey; and John Cox, who will speak on Proposition 32. Cost of admission is $15, and RSVPs are required; email nsciorsush@aol.com or call (562) 597-6821 to reserve.

CALLING HISTORY BUFFS What Volunteer opportunities coffee Who Rancho Los Cerritos Historic Site Where 4600 Virginia Rd. When Saturday, Sept. 8 at 10am More Info Rancho Los Cerritos Historic Site is currently recruiting volunteers for its school and living-history programs in mid-September. History enthusiasts are welcome to join a “Q and A” session about programs while enjoying a cup of coffee. RSVP at (562) 570-1755.

SPEAKING OF SUCCESS What American Association of University Women (AAUW) speakers Who Val Parker, executive director of Power 4 Youth, will be the first of AAUW speakers Where Holiday Inn at the Airport, 2640 N. Lakewood Blvd. When Saturday, Sept. 8 at 11am More Info Power 4 Youth provides academic mentoring for struggling students by connecting youth with adult mentors. The social gathering is from 9:30am to 10am; meeting is from 10am to 11am; program is from 11am to noon; luncheon is from noon to 1pm. The luncheon costs $24. For more information, call Margy Arthur at (562) 799-8479.

WRITE ON THE MONEY What Discussion on “Getting Started in Technical Writing” Who Barbara Giammona, global manager of Technical Publications for Invensys Operations Management, will talk about paid writing opportunities available in the technical writing field. Where Long Beach Los Altos Branch Library, 5614 East Britton Dr. When Saturday, Sept. 8 from 2:30pm to 5pm More Info All writers and the public are welcomed. For information, visit calwriterslongbeach.org or email info@calwriterslongbeach.org .

A FAMILY AFFAIR What Family Art-Making Workshop Who Friends of Signal Hill Cultural Arts (FOSHCA) Where Discovery Well Park Community Center, 2200 Temple Ave. When Sunday, Sept. 9 from 2pm to 4pm More Info FOSHCA’S family art-making workshops are designed to give families with children ages 4 to 15 an opportunity to enjoy fun, quality time together while working on a variety of art projects and developing an appreciation for creative arts. No reservations are required, but space is limited to 50 participants. Children must be accompanied by an adult family member. There is no charge to participate, and all materials are provided. For more information, email FOSHCA@verizon.net or call (562) 989-7370.

MEET AND EAT What Bixby Knolls Supper Club Who Hosted by the Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association Where The Factory Gastrobar, 4020 Atlantic Ave. When Monday, Sept. 10. Reservations will be taken for every half hour from 5:30pm to 7pm. More Info There will be complimentary chef’s choice tapas for every table, new lunch menu items and 25 percent off bottles of wine. RSVP to info@bixbyknollsinfo.com .

FESS UP What Book club meeting Who Hosted by the Bixby Knolls Literary Society Where Elise’s Tea Room, 3924 Atlantic Ave. When Wednesday, Sept. 12 at 7pm More Info The Society will discuss William Styron’s novel The Confessions of Nat Turner. Parking will be available along Atlantic Avenue, and refreshments will be provided. Call (562) 595-0081 or email info@bixbyknollsinfo.com .

SAFE WALKIN’ What “Making Our City Walkable: An Action Workshop for Long Beach” Who Hosted by the YMCA of Greater Long Beach Where St. Mary’s Medical Center, 1050 Linden Ave. When Thursday, Sept. 13, from 2pm to 6pm More Info The Walking Action Workshop is a free four-hour program that brings national experts to work one-on-one with citizens and community organizations to learn the fundamental steps toward creating a city that is safer and more accessible for pedestrians. For more information visit lbymca.org/walklongbeach or call (562) 279-1700.

HAVE YOU HEARD? What Discussion titled “The Real Truth: How to Have a Successful Hearing Aid Experience” Who Arineh Khachatoorians, audiologist Where Long Beach/Lakewood Chapter of Hearing Loss Association at the Weingart Senior Center, 5220 Oliva Ave. in Lakewood When Thursday, Sept. 13 at 7pm More Info Khachatoorians is an active member of the American Academy of Audiology and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. No reservations are necessary, and admission is free. For more information, call (562) 438-0597 or visit hlalongbeachlakewood.org .

“DON’T BLOW YOUR TOP! LET US FIX IT FOR YOU!”

BUD’S

Be sure to use an authorized installer for your sunroof & convertible repair & service! Auto Upholstery

Beach Cities Sunroofs Since 1947

Seat Covers - New installations Complete Classic Restoration Annual sunroof servicing - Headliner Beautiful replacement tops Authorized installer

562-595-6370

2637 St. Louis Ave. Signal Hill

www.budsrestyling.com


OPINION

4 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Thoughts from the Publisher

SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

by Neena Strichart

Many of us in business have customers we consider to be in the “friends” category rather than just clients. Having worked with many of our advertisers for more than 10 years, I have several that I think of even more fondly, as I consider them to be like family members. Two of those folks are Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon Grossman, the owners of the Bixby Knolls Car Wash and Detail Center (BKCW). They were customers of mine when I worked selling ads at the original Signal paper 18 years ago, and they continued to be clients when moved on and worked in ad sales at the Press-Telegram. Bless their hearts, they still work with me to this day placing ads in our paper– nearly 13 years after I started it. Fifteen years ago I helped them with their plans for celebrating the 20th anniversary of the BKCW, and now I am honored to be asked to help them with the planning of their 35th anniversary, which is to take place next Friday, Sept. 14 from 4pm to 9pm at 577 E. Wardlow Rd. (at the corner of Atlantic Avenue). The preparation has been fun, and you can bet that there have been many hands behind the scenes setting up this wingding. By the way, this is to be a free event open to the public, so save the date and plan to be there! Some of the festivities will include a deejay, entertain-

ment, food from local vendors (Catalano’s Pizza, Bundts on Melrose, Flame Broiler, Aura Thai, Roxanne’s, Patricia’s, El Torito, Elise’s Tea Room and BIS Italian, among others), give-aways, clowns, games, prizes and free photo-booth style pictures provided by Pics 4 My Party. During the party, Sheldon and Shell Grossman, owners of BKCW since 1977, will also be celebrating their 34th wedding anniversary. Hmmmm. What do you get for the couple who has everything? How about no presents, just our presence??? Have questions about the party? You can reach the Grossmans for more information at (562) 595-6666 or visit bixbyknollscarwash.com .

LETTERS

Who’s not on First?

I’ve been approached by Signal [Hill Community] First to sign their petition to schedule a local ballot measure to require all city fees, assessments and taxes to be subjected to a two-thirds vote. Never mind that the majority of fees, assessments and taxes are covered under California laws. The ballot measure provides no exemptions, so our police chief recommending increases in the fire-arm sales permit fee would be subject to a voter approval costing the city $30,000 for the election. I wanted to get a sense of how high a “bar” Signal Hill [Community] First would set for our voters to approve future fee increases. There has been much debate that a two-thirds vote gives control to the minority. So let’s examine the facts. There were 87 local revenue measures voted on [in] the June 5, 2012 Presidential Primary statewide throughout California. These included local school bonds, local school parcel taxes, [and] city and county fees increases. There were eight city revenue measures that required a two-thirds vote. Of those, only two were passed (25 percent). There were 10 special district revenue measures that required a two-thirds vote. Of those, only four were passed (40 percent). This confirms what we all know– that it is very difficult to get twothirds of the voters to agree on revenue increases, and costly for a city election. Current state laws require a two-thirds vote for major increases, like sales taxes or utility taxes. The City is prohibited from raising property taxes under Proposition 13. Assessment districts are adequately covered under state law. So, it seems to me that placing all of our city’s fees under a two-thirds vote is excessive and over-reaching. It seems to me that the real motive behind Signal Hill [Community] First and their proposed ballot measure is to cede the management of our city to a minority. I won’t be signing their petition.

Joey Magid Signal Hill

Mea culpa Diana Lejins should have been credited as the photographer for the photo accompanying the story “Councilmember Johnson announces name of LB’s new, four-acre park” [Aug. 10, 2012].

The headline for the story on the postal service processing center [“Postal service moves ahead with plans to close processing center in SH”] in the Aug. 31 issue should have identified Long Beach as the location for the center. Also, the senator mentioned in the story should have been identified as Dianne Feinstein. PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Neena R. Strichart

TO

COLUMNISTS

On another note, do remember that next Tuesday is 9/11– the 11th anniversary of one of our nation’s greatest tragedies. For those who need a place to pause and reflect on the events of September 11, 2001, please feel free to visit the Unity Monument located near the corner of Skyline Drive and Temple Avenue in Signal Hill. The City will commemorate the day by flying several American flags at the site as well as placing flowers at the base of the monument. The public is welcome to bring flowers and light candles in memory of those who lost their lives that day.

ED ITO R

Vivian C. Nelson Long Beach

Balancing act

After much deliberation, the City Council has passed a Fiscal Year ‘13 balanced budget. Although all of the cuts to services have not been restored, the community should be proud of the job it has done to influence the decision makers to fund the services that families depend on. Through your work, we were able to restore many services, programs and investments to our city’s infrastructure. Here are some highlights of the new budget: • $1.3 million will be used to fully fund after-school and youth programs at park centers, parks, and pools • $2.3 million went to restore police overtime, a portion of the gang unit, and neighborhood safety liaisons • the majority of proposed cuts to the El Dorado Nature Center and the Senior Center were restored • a fully funded police academy is included in this budget to put new and highly trained officers on our streets • funding was increased to infrastructure projects such as streets and sidewalks • library funding was restored to reinstate staff With the help of community members voicing their support to keep vital city staff, programs, and services available to our neighborhoods, we were able to balance the budget. There is still much that needs to be done, and I encourage you to continue to stay involved in our community so we can bring positive change to our city. Thank you again for your participation in making this process move forward. I’m looking forward to continue the good work to build a better 9th District!

Steven Neal Long Beach Councilmember 9th District

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

MANAGING EDITOR

Stephen M. Strichart

Cory Bilicko

DESIGN EDITOR

Leighanna Nierle

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/WEBSITE MANAGER

STAFF WRITERS

Nick Diamantides Michelle Lecours

Jennifer E. Beaver Carol Berg Sloan, RD

File photos

Much is being said about the middle class dropping off the charts into the lower class. Are they right? Well, consider this: If you were fortunate enough to have saved some money for your old age so that you wouldn’t burden your children with your possible care in the future, whoosh! Consider it a lost cause. All those things that you did without so that you could draw interest on your savings for your future needs are gone. Four years ago, money in a savings account earned enough to keep your account growing so it would serve the purpose you started it for. Now, you’ll be lucky if the banks don’t start charging you to keep your money in their safe instead of at your home some place– their rationale being they would be better able to protect your money in their bank and the cost will be minor. Harrumph! Ah, yes. Isn’t this a great country? One party keeps telling us the rich must pay more to support the poor people who can’t seem to get a job and earn enough to live the American dream. The middle class just about made it before we were told we will be taken care of, when our savings diminished, so not to worry. And, silly me, I thought the days of “the poor house,” where people who can’t make it on their own are kept, was in the past. It’s our future, folks, unless we turn our country around again. You had better think of all the possibilities and get out and VOTE!

ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS

CJ Dablo

TH E

Class dismissed?

Barbie Ellisen Jane Fallon Stephanie Raygoza Sean Belk

The Unity Monument in Signal Hill

Sheldon and Shell Grossman

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Matt Sun

CULTURE WRITERS

Tanya Paz

Daniel Adams Vicki Paris Goodman Gregory Spooner EDITORIAL INTERN

Ariana Gastelum

DESIGN INTERN

Kaelyn Bruno

The Signal Tribune welcomes letters to the editor, which should be signed, dated and include a phone number to verify authenticity. Letters are due by noon on the Tuesday before desired publication date. The Signal Tribune reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, language and space requirements. The Signal Tribune does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other publications or otherwise presented in a public forum. Letters to the editor and commentaries are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Signal Tribune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, letters to the editor and commentaries are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. Letter-writers will be identified by their professional titles or affiliations when, and only when, the editorial staff deems it relevant and/or to provide context to the letter. The Signal Tribune is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. Yearly subscriptions are available for $45.

939 E. 27th St., Signal Hill, CA 90755 (562) 595-7900

www.signaltribune.com newspaper@signaltribune.com


COMMUNITY

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Patients at Miller Children’s Hospital enjoy a day at the ‘beach’ SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

The Child Life Program of Miller Children’s Hospital Long Beach hosted its annual Beach Day bash for many patients who are too sick to leave the hospital. More than 40 members of the Long Beach Fire Department attended to walk the children through the event crafts and game booths. This year’s event was equipped with stations for patients to dress up in tutus and pirate costumes, face painting for all ages, a sharktooth necklace craft booth, and a visit from Kip and Cruz, the Miller Children’s pet therapy dogs. Held inside the hospital, a giant auditorium is transformed into a seaside escape with beach balls, carnival booths and summer snacks specially created by the chefs of Miller Children’s. Sponsors, including the Aquarium of the Pacific and Home Depot, created interactive games and learning booths for the patients and their firefighting partners. The highlight of the event entertainment was the bubble show, during which a bubble artist created massive bubbles. After making countless shapes and sizes of bubbles, he placed several patients (as well as a fireman) inside the bubbles. The bash has been supported in part by the Michele Rae Crane Foundation for more than 10 years. The Michele Rae Crane Foundation is a family foundation set up to honor Michele Rae Crane, who died as a young woman after being struck by a drunk driver. Through the foundation, her family supports countless

Saturday noon to 9pm, Sunday noon to 8pm Tues.-Fri. Lunch 11am to 3pm, Dinner 4pm to 9pm Closed Monday

MEXICAN GRILL #2

Courtesy Miller Children’s

At Miller Children’s Hospital Long Beach’s Beach Day event, a patient stands still as bubble artist Michael Teoli places her into a massive bubble.

programs within Child Life, such as the hospital grandparent program and literacy programming with patients. “It is always exciting to see the amazement on the kids’ faces when

they walk into the room on Beach Day,” says Rita Goshert, child life manager at Miller Children’s. “They are so happy to spend time at the ‘beach’ and play summer games that they have not been able to play.”

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

outdoor seating for your enjoyment!

Dogs welcome!

Breakfast & Lunch 7am to 3pm

Benedicts, Omelets, Wraps, Salads, Chili, and more!

3405 Orange Ave., LB 562.490.2473 Find us at Facebook.com/BlackbirdCafeLB

ServiNg HoMeSTyLe MexiCAN FooD SiNCe 1975

BREAkFAST luNCh DiNNER CATERiNG

Come watch your Monday Night Football!

Happy Hour 3pm- 6pm Monday- Friday Appetizers, beer, wine and margaritas available!

Taco Mondays & Taco Tuesdays Hard Shell Tacos $1.50

3431 N. Pacific Place (at Wardlow Rd.) 562.490.2100 GuadalupesMexGrill.com

Hours: Tues.-Sat. 8 am-9pm, Sun. & Mon. close @ 8pm

Celebrating over 25 years in business!

5


COMMUNITY

6 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

“Create a harmonious future. Perfection of thought is an expression of beautiful musicality. Learn how to develop your own.”

Sandra M. Barba, BM Private & Small Group Piano Lessons Classical & Popular Music

40 Years Teaching Experience

www.privatepiano.net Home: (562) 627-0421 Cell: (562) 243-6767

tHeHigher WQuality ine Country for Less Money!

A Matter of Life

SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

When should you dispose of a departed loved one’s clothing? kenneth Mckenzie Columnist

We each have a unique scent about us that somehow gets trapped our within clothing: your grandmother’s lilac perfume and fresh-baked persimmon cookies; a carpenter’s freshly carved wood; a florist’s

flowers; and a mortician…well, let’s not go there. After a death, families often ask me, “When is the right time to get rid of ‘his’ or ‘her’ clothing?” There is no right or wrong answer to this question. Some dispose of a loved one’s clothing quickly, while others cannot even deal with the sight of the person’s clothing within a closet. There is no right or wrong time to complete this task. I can only suggest two things to you: First, complete this final step yourself, when you are ready. It hurts, but it

will help with closure for you. You may get advice from family and friends on what you should do, but we are each unique and each deal with loss in different ways and timing. Second, place a favorite shirt or coat in a plastic bag, and tuck it away out of sight. Within a few years, you will come across that special item, and, when you open the bag, the unique scent that was so special to you will put a bright smile on your face. I promise.

Kenneth McKenzie is owner of McKenzie Mortuary in Long Beach.

Latin-American festival expected to draw thousands to downtown LB

Long Beach’s #1 Wine, Spirits, Cra Beer Wine Tasting & Gourmet Gi Destination

“BeSt oF lonG BeaCH!” press telegram reader’s poll 2011 & 2012 Beachcomber reader’s poll: 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012

2301 redondo avenue, Signal Hill

(562) 597-8303 www.thewinecountry.com

Courtesy DLBA

The 4th Annual Latin American Parade & Festival will feature numerous vendors, including authentic Latin-American cuisine, and live performers entertaining crowds from two stages.

Downtown Long Beach Associates and the Office of Long Beach Vice Mayor Robert Garcia will present the 4th Annual LatinAmerican Parade & Festival Saturday, Sept. 8. Expected to draw thousands, the event will take place downtown, with the parade stepping off at 3pm from Pine Avenue and 6th Street. A spectator area and emcee/announcer booth

AZTECA M R EXICAN ESTAURANT

• upS Shipping • Fax Services • upS Freight • Copying, Finishing, printing, & dHl international • Mailboxes • office Supplies • notary Services • packaging & Moving Services and Supplies

For a limited time only!

Monday - Friday 8aM to 7pM Saturday 8:30aM to 5pM CloSed Sunday

50% OFF Computer Time Rental

20¢ per minute or $12 per hour (minimum $1 charge)

3553 atlantic avenue (562) 981-6245 www.theupsstorelocal.com/4466

From the family that brought you Mexico City Restaurant in Long Beach– Azteca Mexican Restaurant has been offering authentic Mexican cooking for over 50 years!

will be located at Pine Avenue and 4th Street. The festival, which will include numerous live performances, will last from 3pm to 9pm at 4th Street and The Promenade. Long Beach City College President Eloy Ortiz Oakley will lead the parade as the grand marshal. Luis Lemus, owner of Prospector Restaurant and Bar, will serve as community marshal. The parade will include decorated floats, classic cars, dance groups, community organizations and musical performers. “This event is a wonderful celebration of Latin-American culture,” said DLBA Board member and event chair Hilda Sanchez. “We are thrilled to be able to honor President Oakley and Mr. Lemus while celebrating with the Latin-American and Long Beach community.” Parade spectators are invited to

become a part of the show, following behind the final entry until it reaches the festival area. The festival will feature numerous vendors, including authentic Latin-American cuisine. Live performers will entertain the crowds from two stages. The festival will be emceed by Latino 96.3FM’s Raq-C. “The Latin-American Parade and Festival has become one of the most anticipated cultural celebrations in Downtown Long Beach,” Garcia said. “We invite all community members to come out and enjoy live music, art and delicious cuisine from more than a dozen Latin-American countries.” MORE INFORMATION (562) 436-4259 downtownlongbeach.org

Home of Aunt Connie’s famous garlic sauce and the original GARLIC TACO!

CROONER’S

Lounge

“Where the King lives”

Open Tuesday through Sunday 11am-10pm for food Crooner’s Lounge open until 2am!

12911 Main Street Historical Downtown Garden Grove

(714) 638-3790

aztecaoc.org

The Latin American Parade will include decorated floats, classic cars, dance groups, community organizations and musical performers.


COMMUNITY

SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Bixby Knolls art walk to go ‘back to cool’ this evening

It will be “back to cool” at First Fridays on Sept. 7 in Bixby Knolls, as the art walk features local jazz, swing, and brass bands. Also, deejays will provide atmosphere for attendees to check out the electic mix of offerings that include graffiti artists, classic cars, haircuts and baby clothes. New York deejay VTrixx will be spinning at The Workshop, and the Knolls Ranger mascot will lead a wedding-vow renewal ceremony at Melinda McCoy’s Flowers. Seventh District Councilmember James Johnson’s “First Books at First Fridays” will celebrate back-to-school month with guest readers: Long Beach Unified Board of Education members

Felton Williams (District 2) and Diana Craighead (District 5). Attendees may dine on “Art-Lantic” Avenue at one of the local restaurants then grab the Big Red Bus to travel from venue to venue via designated stops at the participating businesses. Bella Cosa, 3803 Atlantic Ave., will have all the information about First Fridays, maps, business info, and restaurant recommendations from 6:30pm to 8pm. When the businesses start to close, “First Fridays After Hours” begins with dining and entertainment at: Nino’s Italian Restaurant, 3853 Atlantic Ave.; The Factory, 4020 Atlantic Ave.; and E.J. Malloy’s, 4306 Atlantic Ave.

The 30th annual Greater Long Beach Leadership prayer breakfast will present its Emerging and Community Leader award at its Sept. 13 event. “These awards highlight individuals or groups that might not otherwise receive recognition for their service to the community,” said Jim Lewis, CEO of Long Beach Rescue Mission, which hosts the annual event. Long Beach Police Explorer Post #295 will receive the 2012 Emerging Leadership Award for their commitment to developing young people as leaders by providing insight, leadership experience and mentoring. Each year Post #295 members volunteer nearly 17,000 hours for the Long Beach area. Individual Explorers, ranging from ages 16 to 20, come from all over the city, many from single-parent families and many with an interest in law enforcement as a potential career. The community award will be presented to Ken Sem Kong, who serves as director of Southeast Asian Ministries at The Navigators, director at Southeast Asian Catalyst and project

manager of MESA. He grew up in the difficult circumstances that were inherent in the Cambodian refugee community. Kong was chosen for his work healing families both here and abroad and for bringing awareness to crosscultural community issues. Los Angeles County Supervisor Don Knabe will join Jim Lewis to present the awards. The breakfast and awards ceremony will take place at The Hyatt on Sept. 13. Breakfast will be served at 7:15am, and the program will end at 9am. A community leadership forum will follow at 10am. The Hyatt is located at 200 South Pine Ave. Individual tickets are $40; a table of 10 is $400. Sponsorships are also available. Order online at lbprayer.com or call (562) 591-1292. The Greater Long Beach Leadership Prayer Breakfast is an event which offers prayer for, and inspiration to, elected officials and individuals who serve the community and country. The annual event is patterned after the National Prayer Breakfast and is open to all.

Prayer breakfast to honor Police Explorers for volunteer work leading young people

This ad generously donated by Signal Hill Petroleum and Signal Tribune

Want some snacks to go with that wine? Happy Hour Monday - Friday from 4-7pm

Wine Bar open nightly

HAPPY HOUR MENU • Fish Tacos

(3) Fried fish tacos with cabbage slaw, cilantro aioli and spicy salsa $6

• Build-Your-Own Bruschetta Herbed toast points with goat cheese spread, roasted red bell pepper hummus and diced tomato and basil mix $7

• Asian Chicken Lettuce Wraps $8 • Kobe Beef Sliders (2) Pretzel bread bun, pickled red onion, arugula, feta cheese, sriracha aioli $7

• Homemade Potato Chips $4 • Tabasco Popcorn $4

DRINKS • Draft Beer $2 off • Well Drinks $4 • Well Martinis $6 For more information, visit our website

2951 CHerry avenue, SiGnal Hill For reservations, call 562-426-0694. w w w. d e l i u s r e s t a u r a n t . c o m

7


8 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Nonprofits

continued from page 1

der their ability to work. DSS, founded by students in 1973, provides assistance to CSULB students with a wide variety of disabilities. DSS Director David Sanfilippo explained that DSS lost its state funding several years ago due to budget cuts mandated in Sacramento. He added that the organization, with an annual budget of approximately $900,000, now survives on its share of student fees, grants, and private donations, but even its share of student fees has diminished recently. “Our budget has been cut by a total of 27 percent in the past three years,” he said. Sanfilippo noted that CSULB has about 33,500 students and DSS

Grandma Darling’s A N T I QU E M A L L

LIVE AUCTION

Sat., Sept. 29 From 6pm to 10pm Preview noon to 6pm

BARGAINS GALORE!

Taking consignments (starting Sept. 6)

Call for details.

Vintage & Retro • Furniture • Antiques • Jewelry • Collectibles

562-498-2704

1819 Redondo Ave., SH

North of PCH - Next to Panini’s

Also visit:

Grandma Darling’s Annex Mall

3934 4th St.

provides assistance to approximately 1,200 students. A majority of them have what he called hidden disabilities– physical or intellectual problems that are not easily noticed. “Those kinds of disabilities include learning disorders, diabetes, heart problems, severe allergies and a number of other problems that you would not see just by looking at the person,” he said. Sanfilippo explained that DSS has several components in its program. “One of our major components is support services,” he said. “We provide in-class services like aides who take notes and serve as writers when a disabled student takes a test.” He added that DSS also offers its Workability Program, which focuses on helping disabled students find suitable employment after graduation. “We have services for the hearing-impaired, which include signinterpreters or language stenographers who sit with the hearing-impaired student to enable them to understand what the professor is saying during a lecture,” Sanfilippo said. “The stenographer is basically a court reporter who enables the student to see the lecture on a computer screen as the words are being spoken.” He added that DSS also assists vision-impaired students in a variety of ways, which sometimes include converting an entire book to Braille. “Our High-Tech Center assists vision-impaired students and others with various disabilities,” Sanfilippo noted. He explained that the center offers raised tables and computer technology that converts course materials into alternative formats such as large print or Braille. “In addition, the center has screen reader application,” he said. He explained that, with that tech-

NEWS

nology, reading materials are scanned and then read aloud by a computer. Sanfilippo also noted that DSS offers the Stephen Benson Program, which provides counseling and support services to students with learning disabilities. In addition, DSS provides a wide range of other services including disability management counseling, mobility assistance, tutorial support, and liaison services between students and faculty, administration, and off-campus governmental agencies. DSS also helps students obtain specialized educational and adaptive equipment. “Our program is really individual-based,” Sanfilippo said. “No two disabled students have identical obstacles to overcome. We tailor our services to meet the individual’s needs.” He noted that DSS also assists students with temporary disabilities due to injuries, surgeries, or other conditions that are expected to last for a few weeks or months. “We give them temporary disabled parking permits and provide note-takers if they need them,” Sanfilippo explained. In 1994, Neena Strichart, who is now the publisher of the Signal Tribune, needed DSS’s temporary assistance. “I had broken my foot while I was in my senior year at Cal State Long Beach,” she said. “I was having a rough time getting from lower campus parking to my classes, which were in the upper campus.” Strichart explained that another student saw her struggling to walk with crutches and recommended that she get assistance from DSS. “I told her I am not disabled, but she told me that even though my condition was temporary, I was in fact disabled,” Strichart said. “So I went to DSS, and they gave me preferential parking that enabled me to park much closer to my classes. Without that, I think I would have had to skip that semester.” Strichart added that she is very grateful for the assistance DSS gave her. “I want more CSULB students to know that DSS is available, whether it’s for temporary, permanent, or hidden disabilities,” she said. Sanfilippo says DSS provides a level playing field for students with disabilities. “We want them to have just as much of a chance to excel in their studies and careers as students who do not have disabilities,” he said. “It’s also important to realize that an accident or unexpected illness can happen to any of us, and our lives can be per-

SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

File photo

Rob Schlesinger, a Disabled Student Services (DSS) volunteer who has cerebral palsy, is the lead organizer for the joint DSS-AR&C fundraising dinner. With the help of DSS, Schlesinger received his bachelor’s degree in speech communication in 1991 and his master’s degree in counseling in 2011. He earned both degrees at CSULB and plans on starting his own counseling office in the near future.

manently changed in a heartbeat.” Sanfilippo added that the upcoming fundraiser is important because it will bring much needed resources to both organizations while raising the public’s awareness of the programs both groups offer. Harry Van Loon, AR&C executive director, agreed. He noted that the two organizations were linked in many ways. “We are both essentially serving people with disabilities,” Van Loon said. “We also have CSULB students studying business administration who come here for in-service training at our Work Activity Center. While here, they learn about diversity in the employment setting.” Van Loon explained that the proceeds of the dinner will be split 50-50 by the two groups. “We’re happy to join with DSS to raise funds to help people with disabilities reach their highest potential,” he said. “The fact that state funds

Senior living at its best!

MontH-to-MontH rental

Residential Apartments (Studios, 1- & 2-Bedrooms with Kitchen & Bath)

3737 ATLANTIC AVE.

Assisted Living (Private Studios & One-Bedroom Apartments)

Provide assistance with bathing, dressing and medication monitoring. Nursing staff available 24 hours a day!

3747 ATLANTIC AVE.

Call today for your complimentary lunch & tour! CA LIC# 19160145

Ask for Tony (562) 426-6123 ext. 203

are shrinking for both organizations means that we have to do our best to subsidize our finances.” Rob Schlesinger, a DSS volunteer, is the lead organizer for the fundraising dinner. With the help of DSS, Schlesinger received his bachelor’s degree in speech communication in 1991 and his master’s degree in counseling in 2011. He earned both degrees at CSULB and plans on starting his own counseling office in the near future. Schlesinger, who was diagnosed with cerebral palsy at 18 months old, said he could not have earned his degrees without the assistance of DSS. “I didn’t want to use DSS at first, but eventually I realized I needed their help,” he said. Schlesinger noted that DSS aides read textbooks aloud for him, took notes for him, and filled in the answers for tests as per his instructions. “DSS also arranged for me to have large-print tests and extended time to take tests,” he said. Schlesinger has been volunteering his time to DSS in a variety of ways since graduating in 1991. He noted that he has been working on plans for the fundraising dinner for more than a year. “Our guests will enjoy a fabulous surf-and-turf dinner,” he said. “And we are pleased to have Frank DeCaro of Sirius XM Radio and his partner Jim Colucci, the managing editor for CBS Watch Magazine as our masters of ceremonies.” During the dinner, special awards will be presented to Schlesinger, former State Senator and Assemblymember Betty Karnette, and AR&C President Marion Lieberman for their many years of work on behalf of the disabled. The dinner– entitled “Make a Difference”– will take place Oct. 13 beginning at 6:30pm at The Grand, which is located at 4101 E. Willow St. Tickets for the dinner are $70 and may be obtained by phoning Schlesinger at (562) 981-1933 or DSS at (562) 985-5401, or by emailing makeadifference_theevent@verizon.net .


PET PROJECTS

SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Pet appreciation fair to be a walk in the park

9

Come for the WALK! Stay for the FUN! October 13, 9am-3pm

Food Trucks, Pet Contests, Exhibitors, Vendors, Surf City Flyball, Disc Dogs in So Cal, Raffles, Ask the Trainer, Ask the Vet, Children’s Activities and More! •••••••••••••••••••••

A canine taking its owner for a walk at the 2011 Friends of Long Beach Animals Pet Appreciation Fair

folba.org/walk

Register, Donate, Volunteer, Sponsorship, Vendor, Exhibitor spaces still available!

w w w.folba.org/walk

First 300 registrants receive $500 gif t card to RedStarWorldWear.com!

Presented by:

Please help us find Brownie! • Yorkshire Terrier mix • Responds to “Brownie” • About 10 lbs

Dogs taking advantage of the outdoors at last year’s Pet Appreciation Fair and 2K/5K Walk

Friends of Long Beach Animals, Long Beach Animal Care Services and Long Beach Parks, Recreation, and Marine Department will host their Pet Appreciation Fair and 2K/5K Walk Saturday, Oct. 13, from 9am to 3pm at the El Dorado Regional Park Archery Range, 7550 Spring St. (at the 605 Freeway). Check-in and registration will begin at 9am, and the walks will begin at 10:15am immediately following opening ceremonies. Entry fee for walkers through Oct. 12, including teams, is $25 for adults 19 and over and includes a commemorative T-shirt, a swag bag, a raffle ticket and a parking pass. There are also special discounted rates for families, junior walkers (ages 10 to 18) and virtual walkers. Walkers under 9 are free. Registration the day of the event increases to $30 and does not include parking. Visit folba.org for more details and registration information. The 2K and 5K walk routes will wind through acres of parkland over a dedicated concrete walking path. The route is suitable for humans and dogs of all ages and abilities. Prizes will be awarded to top fundraisers in Adult, Junior and Team divisions. All event participants and spectators will be treated to exhibits, vendor samples, So Cal Disc Dogs and Surf City Fly Ball demonstrations, contests for pets and their owners, and

entertainment. There will also be food trucks and special activities for kids. Long Beach Animal Care Service will also be on hand with adoptable animals. For general information, visit folba.org/walk and click “Walk” on the menu, or call Friends of Long Beach Animals at (562) 988-SNIP (7647).

Holly Hobby

What more can we say about Holly Hobby except that she’s a real doll? She’s no toy, though—she’s a 5-year-old spayed Jack Russell (or would that be Jane Russell?) terrier who needs to be loved and cared for and never put away in the toy box, forgotten. That’s why she’s here, in fact. Ask for ID#A472821 on the shelter side of the Companion Animal Village at 7700 East Spring St., (562) 570-PETS.

Sponsored by:

GROOMING • FOOD • SUPPLIES • SELF-SERVICE WASH

Pet Wash 2OFF Self-Service

$

Not valid with any other offer. Expires 9/21/12. one per customer. Bk store only.

4102 Orange Ave.

#113

at Carson St. Open Tues–Sun 562-427-2551

10OFF Full-Service Grooming

$

on first visit or $3 off next visit. $25 min. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 9/21/12. one per customer. Bk store only.

Expert Care • Gentle Grooming • Walk-Ins Welcome*

* AS SPACE PERMITS

• Very friendly • Wearing an orange collar

Please call 562-243-9758 OR 562-507-2595


10 SIGNAL TRIBUNE Signal Tribune staffer takes break from internship to experience Japan’s culture kaelyn Bruno Design Intern

Right after graduating from Millikan High School last June, I began my internship at the Signal Tribune. I had only worked for the newspaper for about two weeks when it was time to pack my bags to experience Japan for the first time. The Lions Club hosts an annual youth exchange program involving various countries from all parts of the world. The goal is to aid students in experiencing a culture that is far different from the one they are used to. Locally, I was sponsored by the Northern California Lions Club, since my grandfather was a member of that charter, and sent off to Japan for four weeks to live with the average Japanese family. I went on various excursions with my host family and experienced the things that make Japan such a unique and historical place. Also, as part of the trip, I participated in a 10-day youth camp that had representatives from 20 different countries all under the age of 23. We learned the importance of world peace and equality amongst all. Overall, this was a rich and rewarding experience from start to finish. From this trip I have gained life-long friends, self-reliance, and most importantly a better understanding of the Japanese culture. I can honestly say this was the best month of my life so far. The following are entries from my journal taken within the first two weeks of my stay in Neyagawa-shi, Osaka, Japan.

Day 1 7-9-12 First off, I am honestly surprised I can even tell what date it is today considering I had just time-traveled 16 hours into the future, but beside that I am doing pretty well. My first feelings when getting off the plane in Tokyo’s Narita Airport and walking down the terminal tunnel, seeing the outside busy street and bustling runway were quite indescribable. I think I was expecting more, perhaps floating cars or for the atmosphere to look like that of Mars...but now I understand that I am thousands of miles away, not light-years away. Now that that’s confirmed, I suppose I should share my few first impressions of the kind strangers who have very nicely welcomed me into their home for the next four weeks. Mr. and Mrs. Yamamoto-san are both people of few words. It could be the fact that they knew little English. I assume they are a middle-class family because of their modest house in a good suburban metro area. I can tell that they do appreciate some of the finer things in life, such as their iPhones, iPads, laptop and big- screen HD TV. They have one daughter named Hikaru (He-car-oo). She is 21 years old and has moved back home for the duration of this month, as she normally has her own apartment in the city of Osaka. Today I spent the day with her and her cousin,Yuichi (still not sure how to pronounce that one). He and his parents were also there waiting for me at the airport. But back to today– you guys’ tomorrow– we went to the super department store... a.k.a. the MALL! It was fabulous, the best one in the

CULTURE

Shopping district in Osaka City, Osaka

sub-area of Osaka. One floor groceries, two floors boutiques, one floor arcade, and two floors restaurants. We got some tapioca boba tea then hit up a few stores. Then we ate at the food court at a place called Pepper Lunch. It was thin, raw beef and rice with corn that was served on a hot stone deep-dish plate that you scramble up and cook yourself. It was quite fun and delicious. Then we went back home and played some Wii Mario Bros. Party and watched America's Next Top Model. Ironic, isn't it? Nothing extraordinary planned for tomorrow just yet... but I’m sure it will be just as wonderful! Goodnight, sayonara, or whatever.

Day 2 7-10-12 Today was a pretty chilled-out

SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

Photos by Kaelyn Bruno

day, and by that I mean in relaxation... not the weather. Hikaru and I went for a walk with their dog to the local convenience store. It’s called Lawson Station, and there are way more of these than 7-Elevens. Then we came back to the house and watched Harry Potter movies. She has ALL of them. Also, later today for dinner I had my first real Japanese sushi experience. For all those hipsters and pescatarians alike, if you say you adore sushi and then only eat California rolls...I will slap you. I really will. I feel that because my parents have fed both me and my brother raw-fish sushi many times before, I can say that I have an acquired taste for this cuisine. This sushi bar exceeded my 17-year-old standards. It was also very close to our house, like seriously less than a block. The bar was one

big, long conveyor belt with fresh orders on plates with the cost on them. As you see an order pass in front of you, you simply grab it off the belt and then pile up your empty plates, and then that’s how you know what the bill is. Each dish averages at about 230 yen. One dessert dish Hikaru had me try was these Jell-O-like cubes that had green tea powder stuck on all sides. It was very scrumptious despite its strange jiggly-ness. She said it was rice-cake based. Not too sure what that means, but I would say this is just number one of the long list of foods I will consume of which I cannot determine its contents. Day 3 7-11-12 Today we went to the city of Osaka. (I wish I could explain the division of territory in Japan, but it is far too complicated.) There they had an amazing outdoor shopping and restaurant row. I splurged on a new champagne-pink Hello Kitty wallet, part of the HK Couture line that is only for sale in Japan. We also made fake food, or rather “replica window wax creations.” As a way for food places to draw in hungry customers, they display totally believable fake food in their store-front windows. They said to not leave my wax creation near a window because it might get soft or melt, but I think I will and then serve it to my brother and watch him bite into a the candlelike wax. Sounds like a plan.

Day 4 7-12-12 I know this isn’t a calorie-counter journal, but I will continue writing my thoughts on the strange food that I have been putting in my mouth. After talking to Yuichi, I have learned that their main diet consists of rice, fish, and eggs. Did I forget to mention the rice? Must not leave that one out. That and fish seem like the stereotypical Asian food staples, however egg seemed a tad bit weird to me. And yes, I have had egg with just about every meal except breakfast. A thin layer of fried egg on a chicken sandwich for lunch. An onion-rice see JAPAN page 11


SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

Japan

continued from page 10

omelette drizzled with curry sauce for dinner. And, of course, sushi style, which is sweetened on sticky white rice with seaweed. So much egg and so little chicken makes me wonder which one came first. Anyways, it’s a nice change to have egg with dinner. Just as thrilling as having cereal or pancakes for dinner. Other than that revelation, today was a pretty dull day due to the fact that it was raining buckets outside. However, that doesn’t mean that it wasn’t still hot and humid, because it totally still was. Maybe I am on a different planet. P.S. I just found out that they have a whole festival dedicated to eggs here. I wonder if I’m the only American that finds this weird.

Day 5 7-13-12 Today we went to the Osaka Castle Museum, which was the historical home of a past emperor. I’m sorry, Mom, but I was not allowed to take any pictures inside the castle due to the fact that the artifacts are prone to deterioration. The place was truly spectacular. Jade tile roofing, gold trim and accents, and even complete with full moat and hand-piled stone boulder wall. The museum inside actually felt rather small in comparison to the view from outside, but I can imagine that not all parts of the castle are accessible. After walking around the castle and surrounding park, we took a water taxi to the train station/underground mall (insane, I know!). Oh, and some of the train cars on the more popular subway lines tend to be segregated on the basis of gender. At first it struck me as some kind of old-world gender bias sort of thing, but turns out it’s because when these lines get so jam-packed the men may feel the urge to get a little frisky. So, basically, all inside the car it says “Women Only”; strange, but a reassuring measure. Also today, we went to the 100yen store, which is the equivalent of the 99-cents store. I bought so much Hello Kitty swag there, my friends won’t know what hit them. It was so damn cheap there and a way better deal than buying that same stuff from the actual Hello Kitty store, I couldn’t control myself. Now let’s hope my friends don’t ever read this. Oh, well– we

CULTURE

are in a recession.

Day 6 7-14-12 Konichiwa! Today we went to a spinning studio and made ceramics. All they kept telling me was “Ghost! Do like Demi Moore!” Good thing I've actually seen that movie before, otherwise they’d be sounding crazy. Aside from that pop-culture reference, I think I did a pretty good job. I made a small tea cup without a handle and a shallow bowl/plate thing. One will have a white glaze, and the other will have a soft green glaze. When it came to using the spinning wheel for the first time, I found that one must be strong yet gentle at the same time. I’m making a note to find a good ceramics studio in Long Beach to take my mom to when I get back. On the way to the studio, I sat in the front seat of Mr. Yamamoto’s Honda. Let me tell you, it was a very surreal feeling to be sitting in the front, on the left-hand side, and not be driving. It’s like I didn’t even know what to be doing with my hands because there was no steering wheel in front of me. Also taking notice of the whole driving on the opposite side of the road thing, it's almost like one of those outer body experiences people talk about. Anyways, it made a whole lot more sense when it came to left turns though.

Day 7 7-15-12 Today I went to the Osaka Aquarium or Kaiyukan. It was a very nice day with Yuichi and his parents. Even though his mom doesn’t know any English, her personality and facial expressions just crack me up. She absolutely adores the Beatles and used to do marathons across Japan. She tells me that the only English she can speak is, “This is a pen,” as she then held up an imaginary pen. Also today we went on the Tempozan Giant Ferris Wheel. It is one of the world’s largest. For a girl who nearly had a nervous breakdown at the Grand Canyon, I can proudly say that, apart from enjoying the breathtaking views, I was just about peeing in my pants. At its highest point of 112.5 meters (you do the conversion), it was making all kinds of scary, creaking noises. I think I saw my life flash before my eyes at least four times. However, on the bright side, each fully enclosed cabin was equipped with air conditioning.

Day 9 7-17-12 I’ve experienced something very extraordinary while at the welcome party that the Lions Club of Osaka Umeda threw in honor of my arrival– live painting. It involved a pianist, and vocalist, and a painter. As the music of the popular John Lennon filled the atmosphere of the dimly lit private café, SiLSiL was furiously and rhythmically painting away. On her huge canvas was a small 8.5-inch by 11-inch piece of paper that at the end of the show they unattached and gave to me. A flurry of blues, teals, and magentas eventually turned into an abstract, splattered profile of a female’s face. Afterwards, there was a stark 8.5-inch by 11-inch rectangle on the painting, and one Japanese Lions Club member bought it on the spot for 50,000 yen– which equals out to several hundred bucks. These old Japanese businessmen gave me their cards, and I shook hands with a music executive who said he has worked with Lady Gaga and Eminem. Overall, the food was good, and the conversation was simple, due to the language barrier of course. Baseball game tomorrow. Buy me some peanuts and…sushi? No, that can’t be right.

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Lanterns in a market in Japan

Day 10 7-18-12 Every day, I am continuously mind-blown in this place. The baseball game was so much fun. The stadium was a bit outdated compared to the Anahiem Angels’ and San Diego Padres’ but still better than LA Dodgers’. (When are they going to tear that place down already?) The skill was decent. It was the home team of the Osaka Hanshin Tigers versus the Tokyo Giants. It was a way weird feeling, seeing the sister team of the latest World Series Champs from California. However, I think Tokyo needed some Lincecum “Freak,” “Beard,” or Buster Posey, because they lost. Both teams had a good amount of Americans playing, including both sides’ starting pitcher. One American was from our very own Cal State Long Beach. Aside from the actual playing, the atmosphere was insane. Because it was two traditional teams (equivalent of Dodgers vs. Angels) the place was packed. Each team had a designated cheering section where everybody wasn’t quite dressed exactly alike, but still proudly represented their team. Waving rally towels and giant marching-band flags all while playing trumpets and drums. Lastly, at the end of the eighth inning, everyone pulled out these long balloon noise-makers and began to inflate them. Once the final out was made, everyone let their balloons go, and over thousands of noise-making balloons filled the air and floated away. No other stadium in the world does that, my host family told me. I’m certain I will never experience something so grand ever again.

Temple on Miyajima, which is a small island outside the city of Hiroshima “A Gourmet Gifting & Baking Company”

~Red Velvet ~Lemon ~Orange ~German

Chocolate

~Pineapple ~Vanilla and more!

Stop by for your back-to-school treats! Call in advance for catering 4147 Long Beach Blvd. @ Carson St. Bixby Knolls • (888) 9BUNDTS www.bundtsonmelrose.com

Tuesday - Fri. 11am-7pm Sat. 10am-7pm Sun. 11am-6pm Closed Monday

FREE

FOOTBALL

Bring in this ad for $5 off purchase of $20 or more*

Women’s and Men’s • New & Recycled Fashion

*Cannot be combined with other sales or coupons.

4350 Atlantic Avenue, Long Beach

(562) 426-6999 • Open Noon-6pm, Closed Sunday Like us on Facebook! www.BixbyExchange.com

Community Health Day Saturday, Sept. 29 8am to 11am Discovery Well Park 2200 Temple Ave., SH

Community Walk and Fun Run • 2 mi. Hill Challenge at Hill  St/obispo Avenue •1.5 mi. Scenic route at Temple Avenue, North of park driveway Fitness Booths •  Demonstrations • Snacks opportunity Drawings • kids’ Fun Zone

All ages welcome!

FREE!* *with registration wristband

The City of Signal Hill thanks our sponsors:

For more information, contact City Hall:

2175 Cherry Ave., Signal Hill, CA 90755 (562) 989-7330 cityofsignalhill.org

The Friendliest Place on the Hill!

Banquet Room

11

Full Menu

City of

New O New A wner! t t it u d e !

SPORTS

Happy Hour

Cocktails

Now open Sundays!

cup of chili!* $3.50 value

*With purchase of any entree. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Expires 9/30/12.

1999 E. Willow @ Cherry Ave., SH (562) 424-0018


12 SIGNAL TRIBUNE Ready for your class reunion? Quick and Easy Facial Rejuvenation with Laser and Injectables

• Botox • Juvederm • Radiesse Performed by Board Certified Plastic Surgeons with over 25 years experience

Plasticare Cosmetic Surgery Specialists Connie S. Joy, MD, FACS • Donn M. Hickman, MD, FACS Board Certified by American Board of Plastic Surgery and American Board of Surgery More than Twenty-Five Years of Plastic Surgery Experience in Long Beach

The new you is just a phone call away! 920 E. Wardlow Rd., Long Beach 562.427.8944 • www.plasticare.com

CULTURE

Exhibit provides unprecedented look into the enigma of Cleopatra SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

Gregory Spooner Culture Writer

When one hears the name Cleopatra, images of beauty and power come to mind. Most of us recall she was the last Pharaoh of Egypt, and that she was Julius Caesar’s lover and, later, Mark Antony’s wife. But beyond the celluloid images of Elizabeth Taylor and Vivien Leigh lies a more complex, intelligent and beautiful reality. If you want to dig deeper into the Cleopatra legend and experience her world firsthand, a trip to the California Science Center is in order. Cleopatra: The Exhibition puts together many recently discovered artifacts from the sunken cities of Alexandria, Heracleion and Canopus. No one is certain why these cities sank; earthquakes, tidal waves, and/or the changing path of the Nile are all possible explanations. While the submersion of these cities was no doubt tragic to their inhabitants, it helped preserve many artifacts for over two millennia. The recent discovery and underwater recovery of these artifacts by archaeologists Dr. Zahi Hawass and Franck Goddio have helped us better understand Cleopatra and her world. The exhibit opens with a short film;

Photos courtesy Cal Science Center

Cleopatra: The Exhibition displays artifacts from the recent underwater recovery by archaeologists Dr. Zahi Hawass and Franck Goddio. afterwards, the screen dramatically arises and reveals a large statue bathed in the cool, blue, rippled light of a simulated ocean (most of these artifacts were discovered just offshore of modern Egypt, often in water only 20 feet deep). Visitors are given lanyards with electronic recordings explaining many of the artifacts in Cleopatra’s own “voice.” You

can listen to these vignettes at your own leisure as you view the artifacts. Supplementing the recordings are many explanatory panels; the exhibition uses flat-screen TVs for this, allowing the text to dynamically change, and occasionally to even present short clips or explanatory graphics. Amongst over 150 newly discovered artifacts are a pair of sphinxes (okay... according to the exhibit, the proper plural of sphinx is sphinges, but would you know what I was talking about if I had written that?!), many gold coins and royal jewelry, and two massive statues that tower nearly two stories tall. However, of all I saw, I think I will remember the unassuming piece of tattered papyrus near the exhibit’s end, which was signed by Cleopatra herself. Having been protected in silt for over 2,000 years, nearly all of the artifacts are superbly preserved. After viewing the artifacts and reading about her life and world, I must say I have a newfound respect for this fascinating woman. She assumed the throne while only 18 amidst a three-year period of drought, famine and political turmoil. She was highly educated, speaking both Egyptian and Greek, and was said to more than hold her own in conversations regarding matters of state, science and arts. Instead of failing or falling victim to assassination, she united two of the most powerful Mediterranean forces and won her court and people two decades of relative freedom. She seduced and influenced two of the most powerful men in the world. Even her enemies could not deny her beauty and charisma. Yet her tomb has never been found, and no contemporary images of her survive. She remains an enigma to us. The Science Center’s adjacent IMAX theater is showing Mysteries of Egypt (narrated by the legendary Egyptian actor, Omar Sharif) on its seven-story screen. Other nearby attractions in exhibition park include the Natural History and the African-American museums, so one can easily plan an entertaining and educational day. Cleopatra: The Exhibition runs through Dec. 31. Tickets are $19.75 for adults, $16.75 for senior/youth/students, and $12.75 for children; discounts are available for museum members or for IMAX combo tickets. To help control crowds during this popular exhibit, the center is utilizing timed tickets, valid only for a specified admission date and time. As many school groups tour the museum, those planning a weekday visit are advised to attend a showing after 2pm. Visit californiasciencecenter.org or call (213) 744-2019 for tickets or more information.

Royal jewelry is among the 150 newly discovered artifacts shown in Cleopatra: The Exhibition.


CULTURE

ICT’s Ghost-Writer a spirited English lesson and more SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

Vicki Paris Goodman Culture Writer

Ghost-Writer is a celebration of the English language and so much more. The suspenseful play by Michael Hollinger makes its West Coast premiere to grateful, appreciative audiences at International City Theatre. The single-act dramatic spellbinder couldn’t be more stunningly written. With a dream cast and ICT’s own directorial genius caryn desai [sic] at the helm, this production has everything going its way. Ghost-Writer is set in 1919 in a New York City flat rented by famous novelist Franklin Woolsey (Leland Crooke). Woolsey acquires the space so that he can author his novels in a peaceful setting away from the home he shares with his insecure and apparently far-too-idle wife Vivian (Cheryl David). He hires attractive, strongwilled, and secretarially ultracompetent Myra (Paige Lindsey White) to type his books as he dictates. Myra and Woolsey are literary perfectionists, both demanding control over punctuation, grammar, and phrasing until the two finally establish the optimal working boundaries for a successful collaboration. In other words, Woolsey mostly gives in, Myra having won his trust with respect to at least some of the “disputed domain.” This wrangling between a famous author and his self-confident typist makes us see the two as extraordinarily unlikely equals, but equals nonetheless. Furthermore, Hollinger draws out Woolsey’s ever-softening humanity toward Myra in unexpected ways. For instance, the devoted Myra seems to make her work her entire life, save for Thursday evening dance lessons that she reserves as a condition of her employment with Woolsey. On a Thursday evening in which she stays late, he notes the time and almost affectionately admonishes her to be on her way to dance class. But the main thrust of the story’s power, inspired by the real-life situation of author Henry James and his secretary, lies in what happens after Woolsey’s sudden death. Opposing the strong objections of Woolsey’s jealous widow Vivian, Myra stays on to complete the book she and Woolsey were working on when he died. It is left to the viewer to wonder whether or not Myra receives the words from Woolsey’s spirit. Or perhaps even she is unaware of a connection so deep that she has somehow become every bit the writer he was, and is therefore able to finish the book, unassisted, in his style and image. The truth of the matter remains delightfully unknown at play’s end. Hollinger’s wonderful script should appeal universally to all theater-goers. But a writer, grammarian, or other literary individual, will take special pleasure in the dialogue’s sophistication and quality. The punctuation-intensive dictation that characterizes the first half of the play is more fun than I can say. (Truly, it is.) White, whose role comprises what almost amounts to a onewoman show, is absolutely spectacular. Her every expression,

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

13

AboutU boutique

About "U" Boutique offers great gifts...or treat yourself! ting Celebraew our n n! locatio

Exclusive Murano Italian Glass Jewelry, Shabby Chic, Rustic, Collectibles, Home Elements, Fine Art, Sterling Silver Jewelry, Spiritual Iconic Art, and accessories

We now offer layaway!

Bring this ad & receive 20% off a purchase of $25 (one per customer) ••••••

Unique, Handmade, Creative••••••

4340 Atlantic Avenue, Uptown Bixby Knolls

(310) 200-0298 Dealer Spaces Available! www.facebook.com/aboutuboutique

hoW To AVoiD PRoBATE

Photo by Suzanne Mapes

From left, Paige Lindsey White and Leland Crooke in International City Theatre’s production of Ghost-Writer

from a subtle look askance to a roll of the eyes to a coquettish smile, rings true for its moment in the play. When she is concentrating on receiving the words from Woolsey beyond the grave (or wherever they come from), her head cocked slightly sideways and forward with closed eyes convince us she is drawing the inspiration she so patiently seeks. Even so, White does not completely steal the show. Crooke’s Woolsey is stern yet compassionate. He even defers kindly to his wife of a love-starved marriage. A scene in which Myra teaches Woolsey the foxtrot is splendid in its tenderness. The unhappy Vivian might have been portrayed as just one more vindictive wife among so many written stereotypically into other plays. But David’s Vivian is self-restrained, possessing a depth of understanding and reason that lends a sympathetic complexity, even likability, to the sad character. Ghost-Writer is exquisitely staged in set designer Staci Walters’ well detailed drawing room. Sound man Dave Mickey’s audible typewriter strokes are haunting. When Ghost-Writer ended, White was clearly unable to exit the emotion of her role in time to smile for her curtain call. When have you ever witnessed that in a performance? Ghost-Writer continues at International City Theatre through Sept. 16. Tickets are $44 for Friday and Saturday evening performances and for Sunday matinees, and $37 for Thursday evening performances. Evening performances are at 8pm; Sunday

matinees are at 2pm. ICT is located in the Long Beach Performing Arts Center at 300 East Ocean Blvd. Call (562) 436-4610 for reservations and information. Tickets are also available online at InternationalCityTheatre.org .

Probate is a very costly and long process that can last from 9 to 18 months in most cases. Fortunately, there are several alternatives available that remove the asset from one’s probatable estate while that person is still alive. Naming a beneficiary on life insurance policies, IRA’s, 401(k)’s, and annuities before your death assures the asset is transferred straight to the chosen beneficiary. Joint Tenancy is where the owner of the asset names a co-owner of an account or real property. Caution: Joint tenancies have risks as the co-owner has the same rights to the asset as the original owner and a loss of Stepped-up valuation. Pay-on-death Accounts are similar to naming a beneficiary in that the bank account owner completes banking paperwork which names the person(s) who will receive the bank account upon the bank owner’s death. Lifetime Gifts given during your life avoids probate because probate only applies to those assets owned at time of death. A Living Trust is very beneficial when dealing with titled real property and other assets. A complete estate plan included in the Living Trust includes many ancillary documents that protect you financially, physically and allows for peace of mind.

ELIZABETH ARNETT VOZZELLA

Attorney at Law • (562) 426-9876 www.Vozzella4Law.com


14 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Post office

continued from page 1

ice standard change maintains 80 percent of first-class overnight mail delivery, which is on top of mail-processing consolidations. “I think residents should expect that mail delivery won’t be as prompt as we’ve become accustomed to,” said Charlie Honeycutt, Signal Hill deputy city manager. For now, the postal service plans to continue operating all services other than mail processing out of the Long Beach facility, including bulk-business-mail entry, public retail, P.O. box delivery and letter-carrier delivery operations, said Richard Maher, spokesperson for USPS in Los Angeles and Orange counties. “Relocation of mail-processing operations will be transparent to the community, with no change in customers’ addresses or ZIP codes,” he said. “Changes will be implemented with measured and methodical planning to ensure seamless and excellent service performance through the process.” As for the long-term future of the property, however, city officials are still waiting for the postal service’s plans. “That’s a large property, and we’re interested in what’s going to happen to that,” Honeycutt said. “The property is actually located in the city of Long Beach, but, since it’s right on our border, we clearly want to stay involved in whatever decision the postal service makes … Whatever happens there could have an impact on Signal Hill.” Maher said the public will be notified of any changes as the consolidation moves forward, adding that plans may involve either relocating the facility, subdividing the property or moving in other operations. Tiffany Andrews, chief of staff for Long Beach City Councilmember Gerrie Schipske,

whose 5th district encompasses the mail facility, said, since the matter is federal, there’s really nothing that cities can do to stop the closure at this point other than continue to work with congressional representatives. She said the closure would be a “significant” loss to the community. Also in question is the fate of 580 employees who currently work at the Long Beach mailprocessing plant. Maher, however, said, at the moment, there are no plans for layoffs and all of the employees would either have to retire or be put into other positions, such as mail delivery. While an arbitrator in 1978 gave complete “layoff protection” to employees once they achieve six years of continuous service, the postal service has reduced its workforce by more than 140,000 employees over the last four years through attrition, Maher said, adding that 54 percent of all mail-processing employees nationwide are eligible to retire. Representatives from the American Postal Workers Union Local 115 could not be reached for comment. Maher added that the new business model should actually make operations more efficient since an independent analysis indicates that first-class mail volume is expected to drop by more than half from 2010 to 2020 and has already decreased by about 25 percent over the past five years. Despite some former postal employees claiming that consolidation of the Pasadena mailprocessing center in July has already resulted in delayed mail service, Maher said the postal service has “independently documented that overnight firstclass mail delivery is currently at 96.6 percent on-time in Los Angeles/Pasadena.” Still, some businesses that have become accustomed to the mail-processing center for years continue to ask questions and

NEWS

SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

Photos by Seak Belk/Signal Tribune

Trays of bulk business mail are prepared for delivery at Charters Mailing Group, a local company that pre-sorts mail so businesses and nonprofits can receive a discount on postage. The small business delivers the mail daily to the Long Beach facility at 2300 Redondo Ave.

fear changes may still be in the works. “We have been told [the postal service] will keep a bulkmail facility in Long Beach … if that happens, it would have no impact on us,” said Margy Slavin, co-owner of Charters Mailing Group in Signal Hill. “The question is: will they take it out of Long Beach completely? Nobody knows.” For 17 years, Charters Mailing Group has dropped off bundles of pre-printed advertisements, newsletters and pamphlets to the mail-processing center promptly at 4pm. But, if the bulk-mail entry were to move to another city, the small company that pre-sorts mail so businesses and nonprofits can receive a discount on postage would be forced to

How to pay for college without going broke

spend time and money to drive to another location, creating costs that would be passed on to customers, Slavin said. In addition, she said her business has declined, since printers have been significantly impacted by the economy. Maher reassured, however, that “USPS has taken no steps toward relocating any services from Long Beach other than mail processing.” However, if indeed bulk-business-mail entry were to be relocated, the postal service would be required to at least give permit-holders a 120day notice of the move, he said. Further, Maher said, if retail lobby service and P.O. box delivery were to be relocated, it would have to be within the same ZIP

code and would require a 30-day public comment period, in addition to a public meeting. Local stakeholders would also be able to appeal the decision. If the final decision were made to relocate, there would be an additional 60day waiting period, he said. Maher added that if the public retail service were to be relocated, so too would the plaque dedicated to Congressman Steve Horn, who fought to get the City of Signal Hill its own ZIP code, 90755, in early 2002. “If, in the future, we decided to relocate and we bought or leased another location, then that name will move with the public retail service, and that plaque will be placed in the lobby of the new location,” Maher said.

Long Beach man teaches free workshops to help parents save thousands in the process

LONG BEACH --- Parents of Senior, Junior, Sophomore, and Freshman high school students next year that are planning on sending a child to college in the next few years, but aren’t quite sure how to pay for it can now rest a little easier. Skip Dawson of College Planning of Greater Long Beach educates parents in the community about what to do if they haven’t saved enough for college. “Most parents that we talk to have done real well financially, but never found the time to save for college, and now they’re facing a bill of $20,000-$60,000 a year and they don’t know who to turn to,” he says. “Further, most of the time, all they hear is to not even bother applying for any aid because they make too much money. Most of the time, however, that is simply not true…even if they make a six-figure income.” Skip works with family units ranging from single moms to corporate CEO's, and he swears he can help anyone get through the process and save a bundle….no matter how good of a student they have or how much money they make. “Simply put, we show parents the truth that they aren’t hearing anywhere else about how the college process really works, and how they can get their child into a top school easily, help that student pick a career that will suit them and pay them well, and save thousands of dollars in the process.” Long Beach parents will have a couple of opportunities to hear Skip speak. He is teaching his class “How

to Give Your Kid a 4-Year College Education…Without Going Broke!” at the following dates and times at these Long Beach locations: Saturday, 9/15 from 11:15am to 12:45pm at the Ruth Bach Library (4055 Bellflower Blvd., Long Beach), Saturday, 9/22 from 11:15am to 12:45pm at the El Dorado Library (2900 Studebaker Rd., Long Beach). “We’ll discuss everything from the greatest myths about the college process, to how to send your student to a fancy private school for less than the cost of a state college…it’ll be like learning how to get a brand new Lexus for the price of a used pick up truck,” he grins. Topics will also include why private scholarships and 529 plans are a waste of time, how to double or even triple the amount of free money you receive from each school, and how to avoid the one mistake that will kill your chances of getting any money at all that almost every other parent will make next January, and much, much more. “They will learn a bunch, and I do my best to make the class fun,” he says. “It’s like I’m giving them a super bright flash light to navigate a pitch black cave, while all the other parents continue to stumble around blindly! “Don’t forget: the class is totally free, but seats are limited, and we turned away a ton of people in previous months, so come on out and see me.” You can reserve a seat by calling (888) 236-0625 or online at www.CollegePlanningofLB.com

- This is a paid advertisement -

A plaque currently located at the Redondo Avenue facility dedicated to Congressman Steve Horn, who fought to get the City of Signal Hill its own ZIP code in 2002, would be transferred to a new facility if public retail operations are relocated.

Go Painlessly™ with THERA-GESIC.

Support your local businesses A REMINDER FROM THE SIGNAL TRIBUNE


NEWS

SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

EYE ON CRIME Crimes reported by LBPD Council Districts 6, 7 & 8

Thursday, Aug. 30 Assault (not a firearm) 11:20am– 1800 block of Magnolia Avenue Friday, Aug. 31 Battery 10am– 400 E. Pacific Coast Hwy.

Residential burglary 10:20am– 2300 block of Oregon Avenue

Auto burglary 11pm– 600 block of W. 20th Street

Monday, Sept. 3 Auto burglary 9pm– 2000 block of Myrtle Avenue

Crimes reported by SHPD Citywide

Thursday, Aug. 30 False imprisonment 1:30am– 3200 block of Orange Avenue Suspect in custody.

Danger to others (mental disorder) 8:55am– 2700 block of E. Willow Street

Commercial burglary 4:30pm– 900 block of E. 33rd Street Suspect in custody.

Friday, Aug. 31 Non-injury hit-and-run 4:31pm– 2200 block of E. Willow Street

Saturday, Sept. 1 Threaten with intent to terrorize 8:15am– 700 block of E. Spring Street

Residential burglary 6pm– 2300 block of Promontory Drive

Sunday, Sept. 2 Auto burglary 6:30am– E. Hill Street/Obispo Avenue

Recovered stolen vehicle 2:50pm– 1900 block of Cherry Avenue

Possession of marijuana (less than an ounce) 3:43pm– Obispo Avenue/Grant Street Suspect in custody.

DUI (alcohol– 0.08 percent) 11:36pm– 3300 block of Brayton Avenue Suspect in custody.

Monday, Sept. 3 Commercial burglary attempt 6pm– 2600 block of E. 28th Street

Danger to others (mental disorder) 6:12pm– 3500 block of E. Pacific Coast Hwy. Tuesday, Sept. 4 Stolen vehicle 11:23am– 1500 block of E. Burnett Street

Stolen vehicle recovered 4:59pm– 1100 block of E. 25th Street

Danger to others (mental disorder) 7:36pm– 2400 block of Rose Avenue

Minor purchasing tobacco 11:50pm– E. Willow Street/Orange Avenue Juvenile taken into custody.

Wednesday, Sept. 5 Stolen vehicle 1:30pm– 2400 block of Brayton Avenue

September is National Preparedness Month A natural disaster can strike at any moment and could cause a power outage. At Southern California Edison, an Edison International company, company, our number one priority is keeping your electricity on 24 hours a day – in a way that keeps you and our crews safe. We W proudly support the American Red Cross PrepareSoCal initiative and want to remind you to be prepared and stay safe if your power goes out. „ If you see a downed wire, stay away and call 9-1-1. „ Get a kit. Make a plan. Be informed. Check out PrepareSoCal.org for more emergency preparedness tips. „ If someone in your home is dependent on electric-powered, life-sustaining medical equipment, have an emergency plan that includes a back-up power source, or make arrangements to relocate. o learn more about safety around electricity, electricity visit sce.com/StaySafe. To

'PVOEJOH1BSUOFFS

-*'&108&3&%#:&%*40/

to read or download full issues of the Signal Tribune, visit

w w w. s i g n a l tr i b u n e . c o m

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

15

TST4179 NoTiCE oF iNViTiNG BiDS

A-1 Sealed bids will be received at the office of the City Clerk, City of Signal Hill, California, until 10:00 a.m. on September 20, 2012, and on the same day shortly thereafter, they will be publicly opened and read for the “2013 Pavement Management Project, No. 688�, in accordance with the Specifications therefore. Bids must be made on the forms provided for this purpose, addressed to the City Clerk, City of Signal Hill, marked "Bid for," followed by the title of the project and the date and hour for submitting bids. Bids are required for the entire work as described in the Bid Schedule and the Specifications.

The work to be accomplished under this contract includes the rehabilitation of various streets in the southeastern portion of the City per the vicinity Map, exhibit ‘B’ with the application of Type ii slurry seal, cold planing and construction of asphalt concrete pavement, removal and reconstruction of failed pavement sections, replacement of an alley intersection, and installation of street traffic striping, pavement legends, and pavement markings. Specific construction activities are described in the quantity sheets for each street segment following the project.

A-2 All work must be completed within thirty (30) working days after receipt by the Contractor of the notice to proceed from the City. The contract documents, which include the Specifications, may be obtained at the City of Signal Hill Department of Finance for $25, or $35 if requested by mail. The documents are entitled “2013 Pavement Management Project, No. 688�

A-3 Bids will not be received unless they are made on a proposal form furnished in the Contract Documents by the City of Signal Hill. each bid must be accompanied by cash, certified check, cashier's check, or bidder's bond, made payable to the City of Signal Hill for an amount equal to at least ten percent (10%) of the amount bid, such guarantee to be forfeited should the bidder to whom the contract is awarded fail to enter into the Contract.

A-4 All bids are to be compared on the basis of the lump sum or itemized bid items shown in the Bid Schedule(s). Bids will not be accepted from the contractors who are not licensed in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 9, Division iii of the Business and Professions Code of the State of California. The Contractor shall be required to possess a Class A or Class C-12 license at the time the contract is awarded.

A-5 Attention is directed to the provision in Section 1777.5 of the labor Code concerning the employment of apprentices by the Contractor of any subcontractor under the Contractor. A-6 Before a Contract is entered into with the successful bidder, the bidder shall present evidence in writing to the City Clerk, City of Signal Hill, that he has a current combined single limit liability policy with aggregate limits for Bodily injury and Property Damage in the amount of two million dollars ($2,000,000).

A-7 Pursuant to the provisions of Section 1773.2 of the Labor Code of the State of California, the minimum prevailing rate of per diem wages for each craft, classification or type of workman needed to execute the contract shall be those determined by the Director of industrial relations of the State of California which are on file with the City Clerk of Signal Hill and copies will be made available to any interested party on request. A copy of the Contractor's certified payroll, as well as those of all subcontractors shall be submitted with each invoice. A-8 Attention is directed to Public Contract Code Section 22300 permitting the substitution of specified and approved securities for contract retention of funds. All such securities shall be subject to the review and approval of the City Attorney of the City of Signal Hill.

A-9 The successful bidder will be required to furnish a payment bond in an amount equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the contract price and a faithful performance bond in an amount equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the contract price, and said bonds shall be secured from a surety company satisfactory to the City Attorney of the City of Signal Hill. A-10 The City of Signal Hill reserves the right to reject any and all bids, or delete portions of any and all bids or waive any informality or irregularity in the bid or the bid procedures and shall be the sole judge of the bids received. By order of the City of Signal Hill.

Posted at Signal Hill City Hall on: August 30, 2012 Published in the Signal Tribune on: August 31 and September 7, 2012


BUSINESSES & SERVICES

16 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

BUSINESS MACHINES

B O O K K E E P I N G / TA X E S

Bookkeeping & Tax Services

Certified QuickBooks Pro Advisors/Training Business & Personal Bookkeeping

COPIERS • FACSIMILES LASER PRINTERS SALES, SERVICE & SUPPLIES

S uperior C opier S ervice

Cambodian & Spanish Speaking CTEC Registered Tax Preparers

NEW ADDRESS!

1640 Burnett Avenue Phone: 562-264-5114 www.MadKatInc.com

562-867-7000 Fax: 562-616-1567

robert@superiorcopier.com

ALFORD’S

LAN D S CAP E D E S I G N E R

MEDICINE

English

GARDENS

Landscape & Garden

562.997.4111

www.kathyalford.com

TST4166 Trustee Sale No.: 20120159900742 Title order No.: 1165799 FHA/vA/PMi No.: 98000721 NoTiCe oF TrUSTee'S SALe yoU Are iN DeFAULT UNDer A DeeD oF TrUST, DATeD 5/17/2007. UNLeSS yoU TAKe ACTioN To ProTeCT yoUr ProPerTy, iT MAy Be SoLD AT A PUBLiC SALe. iF yoU NeeD AN exPLANATioN oF THe  NATUre oF THe ProCeeDiNg AgAiNST yoU, yoU SHoULD CoNTACT A LAWyer. NDex WeST, LLC, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded on 05/25/2007 as instrument No. 20071273184 of official records in the office of the County recorder of Los Angeles County, State of CALiForNiA. exeCUTeD By: DoNALD J KoZiL, WiLL SeLL AT PUBLiC AUCTioN To HigHeST BiDDer For CASH, CASHier'S CHeCK/CASH eQUivALeNT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States).  DATe oF SALe: 9/13/2012 TiMe oF SALe: 09:00 AM PLACe oF SALe: Doubletree Hotel Los Angeles - Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650 STreeT ADDreSS and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2001 eAST 21ST STreeT 235, SigNAL HiLL, CA 90755 APN#: 7215-019-116 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or  encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $448,343.68. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NoTiCe To PoTeNTiAL BiDDerS: if you are considering bidding on this property lien, you

A Full-Service Computer Company - Home or Office

• Computer Sales • Repair & Installation • Website Design & Hosting • Network Setup, Support, Cabling & Wireless • Internet Installation & Configuration • Remote Back-up & Data Recovery • Camera Surveillance Security Systems MEMBER

Better Business Bureau

should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. you will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. you should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. if you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. you are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. if you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NoTiCe To ProPerTy oWNer: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. if you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 800-280-2832 for information regarding the trustee's sale or visit this internet Web site www.auction.com for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case 20120159900742. information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. For TrUSTee SALe iNForMATioN PLeASe CALL: AUCTioN.CoM, LLC  oNe MAUCHLy  irviNe, CA 92618  800-2802832 www.auction.com NDex West, L.L.C. MAy Be ACTiNg AS A DeBT  CoLLeCTor ATTeMPTiNg To CoLLeCT A  DeBT. ANy iNForMATioN oBTAiNeD WiLL Be USeD For THAT PUrPoSe. NDex West, L.L.C. as Trustee Dated: 8/16/2012 P977416 8/24, 8/31, 09/07/2012     TST4165 Trustee Sale No. 736965CA Loan No. 1024243702 Title order No. 3206-243385 NoTiCe oF TrUSTee’S SALe yoU Are iN DeFAULT UNDer A DeeD oF TrUST DATeD 7/12/2006. UNLeSS yoU TAKe

ACTioN To ProTeCT yoUr ProPerTy, iT MAy Be SoLD AT A PUBLiC SALe. iF yoU NeeD AN exPLANATioN oF THe NATUre oF THe ProCeeDiNgS AgAiNST yoU, yoU SHoULD CoNTACT A LAWyer. on 9/14/2012 at 09:00 AM, CALiForNiA reCoNveyANCe CoMPANy as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 07/20/2006, Book N/A, Page N/A, instrument 06 1599635, of official records in the office of the recorder of Los Angeles County, California, executed by: LiLiA LoPeZ, AN UNMArrieD WoMAN, as Trustor, MorTgAge eLeCTroNiC regiSTrATioN SySTeMS, iNC., (MerS), SoLeLy AS NoMiNee For LeNDer, ALLiANCe BANCorP, iT'S SUCCeSSorS AND ASSigNS, as Beneficiary, will sell at public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Sale will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to the Deed of Trust. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Place of Sale: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA Legal Description: As more fully described in said Deed of Trust Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $402,012.99 (estimated) Street address and other common designation of the real property: 2388 CerriToS AveNUe , SigNAL HiLL, CA 90755 APN Number: 7211-019-010 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". in compliance with California Civil Code 2923.5(c) the mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent declares: that it has contacted the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure; or that it has made efforts to contact the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure by one of the following methods:

562.989.4666

4047 long Beach Blvd

PAI N T I N G

• Residential • Commercial • Interiors • Exteriors • Woodworking Ward • Faux Finishes Rich CALIC 864357

• Design • Installation • Maintenance

PUBLIC NOTICES

Genus Computer Services LLC COMPUTER SERVICES

“Your Neighborhood Painter”

...where your garden begins

SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

562.528.6258

by telephone; by United States mail; either 1st class or certified; by overnight delivery; by personal delivery; by e-mail; by face to face meeting. DATe: 8/21/2012 CALiForNiA reCoNveyANCe CoMPANy, as Trustee DereK WeAr-reNee, ASSiSTANT SeCreTAry CALiForNiA reCoNveyANCe CoMPANy iS A DeBT CoLLeCTor ATTeMPTiNg To CoLLeCT A DeBT. ANy iNForMATioN oBTAiNeD WiLL Be USeD For THAT PUrPoSe. California reconveyance Company 9200 oakdale Avenue Mail Stop: CA2-4379 Chatsworth, CA 91311 800-892-6902 For Sales information: (714) 7302727 or www.lpsasap.com (714) 573-1965 or www.priorityposting.com NoTiCe To PoTeNTiAL BiDDerS: if you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. you will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. you should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. if you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. you are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. if you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NoTiCe To ProPerTy oWNer: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. if you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, this information can be obtained from one of the following two companies: LPS Agency Sales & Posting at (714) 730-2727, or visit the internet Web site www.lpsasap.com (registration required to search for sale information) or Priority Posting & Publishing at (714) 573-1965 or visit the internet Web site www.priorityposting.com (Click on the link for “Advanced Search” to search for sale information), using the Trustee Sale No. shown above. information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not imme-

Put on an event they won’t forget! P H OTO B O OT H

MAKES A GREAT WEDDING OR PARTY FAVOR!

Rent a portable photobooth for your next event for 1 hour for only $250! • Includes portable booth, props, and one staff member CALL FOR DETAILS

877-FOTOSTRIP

diately be reflected in the telephone information or on the internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. P974131 8/24, 8/31, 09/07/2012

TST4173 NoTiCe oF TrUSTee'S SALe TS No. 10-0141714 Doc iD #0001001886442005N Title order No. 10-8-508633 investor/insurer No. N/A APN No. 7215-020-021 yoU Are iN DeFAULT UNDer A DeeD oF TrUST, DATeD 04/22/2005. UNLeSS yoU TAKe ACTioN To ProTeCT yoUr ProPerTy, iT MAy Be SoLD AT A PUBLiC SALe. iF yoU NeeD AN exPLANATioN oF THe NATUre oF THe ProCeeDiNg AgAiNST yoU, yoU SHoULD CoNTACT A LAWyer. Notice is hereby given that reCoNTrUST CoMPANy, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by LATeeF T FrANKS, A SiNgLe MAN, dated 04/22/2005 and recorded 5/2/2005, as instrument No. 05 1017867, in Book , Page , of official records in the office of the County recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, will sell on 09/24/2012 at 11:00AM, By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2244 SeA riDge Drive, SigNAL HiLL, CA, 90755. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $1,303,080.30. it is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. in addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ''AS iS'' condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. if required by the provisions of section 2923.5 of the California Civil Code, the declaration from the mortgagee, beneficiary or authorized agent is attached to the Notice of Trustee's Sale duly recorded with the appropriate County recorder's office. NoTiCe To PoTeNTiAL BiDDerS if you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. you will be bidding on a lien, not on a property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. you should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. if you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. you are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. if you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NoTiCe To ProPerTy oWNer The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. if you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 1-800281-8219 or visit this internet Web site www.recontrustco.com, using the file number assigned to this case TS No. 10-0141714. information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. reCoNTrUST CoMPANy, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon rd., CA6-914-01-94 SiMi vALLey, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale information (626) 927-4399 By: Trustee's Sale officer reCoNTrUST CoMPANy, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose.A-4290942 08/31/2012, 09/07/2012, 09/14/2012 TST4162 / 2012 162796 FiCTiTiouS BuSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: SAr CoNSULTiNg, 2520 gundry Ave., Signal Hill, CA 90755. registrant: SyLviA ALLey roBiNSoN, 2520 gundry Ave., Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Sylvia Alley robinson. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on August 13, 2012. NoTiCe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: August 17, 24, 31, September 7, 2012.

TST4163 / 2012 162797 FiCTiTiouS BuSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: roBerT SCoTT CoMPANy, 1554 Seabright Ave., Long Beach, CA 90813. registrants: 1. MALCoLM SCoTT KeNNeDy, 2921 Senasac Ave., Long Beach, CA 90815, 2. roBerT T. BroWN, 1961 e. Lemon Heights Drive, Santa Ana, CA 92705. This business is conducted by: a general Partnership. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Malcolm Scott Kennedy. The registrants have begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrants began using this fictitious business name in September, 1997. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on August 13, 2012. NoTiCe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: August 17, 24, 31, September 7, 2012.


SEPTEMBER 7, 2012 F LO O R I N G

The

Tile Zone Ceramic & Porcelain Tiles Custom Design & Installation

3677 Atlantic Avenue

562-988-8429 W W W. T H E T I L E Z O N E . C O M

FoR RENT

Banquet room available for parties or events at 16426 Bellflower Blvd. Call Steve at (562) 925-5750 for details.

BUSINESS & SERVICES

I N K & TO N E R

Declares WAR on high ink & toner prices!

50% OFF

on HP reman

toner cartridges With this ad. New clients. Discount based on HP oeM pricing.

562-912-4657 inkPeace.com

TUNING & REPAIR

P I A N O T U N I N G / R E PA I R

LAN D S CAP I N G

Commercial Residential

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

17

P LU M B I N G

TRuST lANDSCAPE • Complete Designing and layout • Tree trimming • “All concrete work” • Sprinkler systems • New lawns, trees, shrubs • Maintenance

562-422-3806 LICENSED • BONDED • INSURED State license C27 #642266

PLUMBING

PREMIUM ROOFING

Christine Kay

HUNDREDS OF LOCAL REFERENCES OVER 35 YEARS EXPERIENCE BIXBY KNOLLS RESIDENT FULLY INSURED

(562)

208-1853

Workman’s Comp • General Liability

“A-rated” on angieslist.com

Call for a free estimate Recommended by many local music teachers Associate Member of the Piano Technicians Guild

Call Dennis Bartlett: Contractor’s License #629882

(562) 427-0688

PAC KAG I N G & S H I P P I N G

Moving Box Bundle Discount Book Box -16x12x12 Bundle of 20 - $25 (+tax) Medium Box – 18x18x16 Bundle of 20 - $40 (+tax) 20” Wardrobe Box – 20x20x45 $10 each (+tax)

(562) 424-9403

TST4159 / 2012 154251 FiCTiTiouS BuSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: SAiNT MiCHAeL HoMe CAre ServiCeS, 11423 216th St. Unit A, Lakewood, CA 90715. registrants: 1. DANieL P. PAgUiA, 2. MyrA JoSePHiNe B. PAgUiA, 11423 216th St. Unit A, Lakewood, CA 90715. This business is conducted by: a Husband and Wife. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Myra Josephine B. Paguia. The registrants have not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on August 1, 2012. NoTiCe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: August 17, 24, 31, & September 7, 2012. TST4160 / 2012 159180 FiCTiTiouS BuSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. reFiNer'S Fire FeLLoWSHiP, 2. rFF, 3. WCrC, 4. WeST CoAST regioNAL CoNFereNCe, 10711 Felson Circle, Cerritos, CA 90703. registrant: reFiNer'S Fire FeLLoWSHiP, iNC., 10711 Felson Circle, Cerritos, CA 90703. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Bonnie radden, President. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on May 9, 1997. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on August 7, 2012. NoTiCe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: August 17, 24, 31, & September 7, 2012.

TST4161 FiCTiTiouS BuSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. P&v ProDUCTioNS, 2. P&v TeCH SoLUTioNS, 2239 virginia Ave., Pomona, CA 91766. registrant: CeLiDoN, PATriCiA, 2239 virginia Ave., Pomona, CA 91766. This business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Celidon, Patricia. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on July 30, 2008. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on August 10, 2012. NoTiCe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: August 17, 24, 31, & September 7, 2012.

TST4168 / 2012 159909 FiCTiTiouS BuSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. WHoLeSoMe WHoLeSALe CLUB, 2. SooZie Q WorKS For yoU, 315 W. 3rd St. Unit 206, Long Beach, CA 90802. registrant: LoUie Do iT ALL iNDUSTrieS, iNC., 315 W. 3rd St. Unit 206, Long Beach, CA 90802. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Susan M. Arete, vice President. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on August 8, 2012. NoTiCe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: August 24, 31, September 7, 14, 2012.

TST4169 / 2012 166621 FiCTiTiouS BuSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: ALLiNgToN CoMPANy, 36323 el Camino Dr., Palmdale, CA 93551. registrants: 1. riCHArD ALLiNgToN, 2. MArgAriTA ALLiNgToN, 36323 el Camino Dr., Palmdale, CA 93551. This

business is conducted by: a Husband and Wife. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: richard Allington. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on August 3, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on August 17, 2012. NoTiCe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: August 24, 31, September 7, 14, 2012.

TST4176 / 2012 169457 FiCTiTiouS BuSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: Mr. B'S Box, 2059 W. Jefferson Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90018. registrant: MArK e. gALLoWAy, 2933 eucalyptus Ave., Long Beach, CA 90806. This business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Mark e. galloway. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on August 22, 2012. NoTiCe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: August 31, & September 7, 14, 21, 2012.

TST4177 / 2012 171758 FiCTiTiouS BuSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: SoMeTHiNgTUrQUoiSe.CoM, 5293 e. Anaheim rd., Long Beach, CA 90815. registrant: JeNNiFer rACHeL CArreiro, 5293 e. Anaheim rd., Long Beach, CA 90815. This business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Jennifer rachel Carreiro. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on August 27, 2012. NoTiCe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: August 31, & September 7, 14, 21, 2012. TST4178 / 2012 171848 FiCTiTiouS BuSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. SUNBeLT reALTy, 2. SUNBeLT ASSoCiATeS, 4429 village rd., Long Beach, CA 90808. registrant: iNTerNATioNAL SUNBeLT ProPerTieS, iNC., 4429 village rd., Long Beach, CA 90808. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Joan McCormick, vice-President. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on August 27, 2012. NoTiCe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: August 31, & September 7, 14, 21, 2012.

TST4175 / Case No. NS025773 oRDER To ShoW CAuSE FoR ChANGE oF NAME SUPerior CoUrT oF CALiForNiA, CoUNTy oF LoS ANgeLeS, 415 W. ocean Blvd., Long Beach, CA 90802. PeTiTioN oF Svapnaben Trivedi For Change of Name. To ALL iNTereSTeD PerSoNS: 1. Petitioner SvAPNABeN TriveDi, filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name: SvAPNABeN TriveDi to Proposed Name: SvAPNA ALAN TriveDi. 2. THe CoUrT orDerS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, shy the petition for change of name should not be granted. NoTiCe oF HeAriNg:

Date: october 5, 2012; Time: 8:30 A.M.; Dept. 11, room 31. The address of the court is the same as above. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, THe SigNAL TriBUNe, 939 e. 27th. Street, Signal Hill, CA 90755: August 31, & September 7, 14, 21, 2012. ___//ss//___ ross M. Klein, Judge of the Superior Court Dated: August 28, 2012

TST4181 / 2012 167273 FiCTiTiouS BuSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: BoArD & BArKFeST, 8116 Byron road, Unit D, Whittier, CA 90606. registrant: DANieL L. gUeSS, 5418 Premiere Ave., Lakewood, CA 90712. This business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Daniel L. guess. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on August 1, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on August 20, 2012. NoTiCe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: September 7, 14, 21, 28, 2012.

TST4182 / 2012 175413 FiCTiTiouS BuSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: 1. PoWerFLex LiCeNSiNg, 2. PoWerFLex SoFTWAre SySTeMS, 2420 e. 28th St. #11, Signal Hill, CA 90755. registrant: 1. roBerT e. SCHAUer, 2. PATriCiA A. SCHAUer, 3508 Maple Ave., Manhattan Beach, CA 90266. This business is conducted by: a Husband and Wife. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: robert e. Schauer. The registrants have not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on August 30, 2012. NoTiCe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: September 7, 14, 21, 28, 2012.

TST4183 / 2012 177197 FiCTiTiouS BuSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: "iN gooD HANDS" QUALiTy HoMe HeALTH CAre, 17439 virginia Ave. Unit U, Bellflower, CA 90706. registrant: DANieLLe SNeeD, 17439 virginia Ave. Unit U, Bellflower, CA 90706. This business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Danielle Sneed. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on September 4, 2012. NoTiCe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: September 7, 14, 21, 28, 2012. TST4184 / 2012 174105

TST4184 FiCTiTiouS BuSiNESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: CirCLe oASiS ASSiSTeD LiviNg, 119 Termino Ave., Long Beach, CA 90803. registrant: SHore LiviNg LLoC, 119 Termino Ave., Long Beach, CA 90803. This business is conducted by: a Limited Liability Company. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: eric Schriver, Manager. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on August 29, 2012. NoTiCe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: September 7, 14, 21, 28, 2012.

www.box-pros.com

Lost cat

“Winky” is missing, and he needs medication. He was last seen Aug. 19 around 3727 Gundry Ave. wearing a red collar. He gets tired very easily and might be in a quiet spot in a yard. Please call any of the following numbers if you think you’ve seen him: (562) 426-9112 (562) 810-0489 (562) 212-5513

CITY OF SIGNAL HILL TST4180 NoTiCE oF oRDiNANCE ADoPTioN

ordinance No. 2012-08-1450 was introduced by the City Council on Tuesday, August 21, 2012, and adopted on Tuesday, September 4, 2012. A summary of the ordinance is as follows:

AN orDiNANCe oF THe CiTy CoUNCiL oF THe CiTy oF SigNAL HiLL, CALiForNiA, AMeNDiNg CHAPTerS 21.44 eNTiTLeD WATer SySTeM iMPACT Fee, AND 13.04 eNTiTLeD WATer ServiCe AND rATeS, oF THe SigNAL HiLL MUNiCiPAL CoDe, To ADD AN exeMPTioN For reSiDeNTiAL Fire SPriNKLerS AND iNSTALLATioN oF SUBMeTerS The ordinance was adopted by the following vote:

AyeS: vice Mayor Michael J. Noll, Council Members Larry Forester, ellen Ward, edward H.J. Wilson NoeS: None

ABSeNT: Mayor Tina L. Hansen ABSTAiN: None

Pursuant to Signal Hill City Charter Section 315, this ordinance shall become effective 30 days from and after the date of its adoption. A certified copy of the full text of the ordinance is available in the City Clerk’s office. Kathleen L. Pacheco City Clerk

Published in the Signal-Tribune newspaper on September 7, 2012. Posted at City Hall, Library, Discovery Well Park, and reservoir Park on September 7, 2012.


18 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Council

continued from page 1

added. Since that time, the permit has undergone significant changes. One of the major changes involved the term of the permit itself. Doan explained that in 2002, the approval term of the permit had been extended to 10 years. That permit was set to expire this October. The private oil and gas company has told City officials that it eventually wants another 10-year permit, but before it gets approved, City officials acknowledge that there are some issues that they want addressed. According to a staff report from the community development director, Signal Hill Petroleum needed a one-year extension of the permit “in order to allow sufficient time to complete updated environmental studies.” The City’s associate planner also explained that the one-year extension would allow enough time to

complete the studies and technical reports so that the City could examine operational and environmental issues. “And we think some of the areas of focus would be on water quality [and] on technical reports on oil operations,” Doan told the Council, adding that they would also get input from “unbiased, qualified consultants.” Doan said that Signal Hill Petroleum is not proposing new construction or any changes to the ongoing operations that have been in place during the last 10 years. A spokesman for Signal Hill Petroleum acknowledged that, primarily, administrative concerns were behind his company’s request to eventually obtain another 10-year conditional-use permit. Exploration manager Brady Barto said in an interview Tuesday night that an approval for a 10-year permit would reduce City staff time and would allow his company to focus on its mission of obtaining oil.

NEWS

“It’s extremely important to operations,” Barto said. “We’re committed to American energy, and the key to that is getting wells in the ground and getting oil out of it. So having the ability to use these drill sites to drill for oil is fundamental.” There was one issue, however, that Signal Hill Petroleum representatives have already addressed after a few residents from the community in July questioned the company’s methods of oil recovery. The City and Signal Hill Petroleum have collaborated on recent public workshops and facility tours to talk about the oil company’s operations and specifically explain the company’s current oil-recovery methods. The report from the community development director described one public workshop during a Planning Commission meeting two months ago where several members of the community expressed concerns Signal Hill Petroleum may be practicing a controversial oil-recovery method known as “fracking.” Signal Hill

Petroleum representatives addressed these concerns during the July workshop, explaining that the company has never practiced fracking and instead uses another oil recovery method that is called “water injection.”

“We’re committed to American energy, and the key to that is getting wells in the ground and getting oil out of it. So having the ability to use these drill sites to drill for oil is fundamental.” –Brady Barto, Signal Hill Petroleum exploration manager

In an emailed statement Thursday, Barto summarized the difference between the water-injection and fracking methods for oil recovery. Fracking is also known as hydraulic fracturing. “Water injection is a technique used in depleted sand reservoirs to move oil from one well to another,” Barto wrote. “In the Long BeachSignal Hill oil field, water injection is done at lower pressures, under 1,800 psi (pounds per square inch). Hydraulic fracturing is a technique generally used in hard shale rock, done in one well, and uses pressures from 3,000 to 15,000 psi.” After the Council voted to approve the one-year extension, Councilmember Larry Forester expressed his support of Signal Hill Petroleum. “We look forward to many more years of working with them on the conditional-use permit as we approve it over the next year to get them the 10-year status,” he said.

SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

Forester’s appreciation of Signal Hill Petroleum was echoed by the others on the Council, including fellow Councilmember Ellen Ward. Ward and other members of the Council thanked the private, California-based oil company that has enjoyed close ties to the community. “I also want to express my appreciation because Signal Hill Petroleum is a wonderful partner not only to the City, but to every nonprofit we have in the community,” Ward said. “We really appreciate your support.” Signal Hill Petroleum’s business represents a significant revenue stream to the City’s general fund. According to the report from the community development director, the City collects from the local oil and gas company about $619,000 every year in the form of business franchise taxes, oil well permits and oil-barrel taxes. Signal Hill’s ties to the oil and gas industry go back decades since a 1921 discovery of the oil fields of Long Beach, according to a staff report from Doan. Other City Council highlights Water impact fees In a secondreading vote, the Council voted 4-0 to pass an ordinance that would change City codes. The change adds an exemption for installing submeters and fire sprinklers for residential developments when determining water service connection charges and monthly water service charges.

Cherry Avenue traffic signals The Council voted 4-0 to authorize the city manager to award a contract worth more than $222,000 to California Professional Engineering for proposed traffic-signal improvements for the 20th Street and Cherry Avenue project.

The next Signal Hill Council meeting will take place on Tuesday, Sept. 18 in the City’s Council Chamber.

Your Dealer Alternative


SALE HELD OVER! ENDS SUNDAY, LABOR DAY

SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

19

2 DAYS oNlY! SATuRDAY, SEPT. 8 & SuNDAY, SEPT. 9

MSrP

SAlE houRS Saturday: 10am-6pm Sunday: 11am-6pm

September 9,

Please see sales associate for complete details.


SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

20


ST3414