Issuu on Google+

,

Signal T

R

I

B

U

N

E

March is Women’s History Month (see p. 8) Serving BixBy KnollS, California HeigHtS, loS CerritoS, Wrigley and tHe City of Signal Hill Vol. 33 No. 39

Your Weekly Community Newspaper

March 2, 2012

Long Beach to possibly lose mail-processing facility as Postal Service announces cost-cutting measures CJ Dablo Staff Writer

The U.S. Postal Service has announced plans to close the Long Beach mail-processing center and other facilities nationwide as part of their cost-cutting measures unless Congress chooses to enact legislation that will address the agency’s financial problems. The Long Beach facility located at 2300 Redondo Ave. is one of three processing centers in Los Angeles County that are targeted for possible closure. Richard Maher, a spokesperson for the U.S. Postal Service, explained that the agency will review each of the three centers individually and announce the dates of closure when the Postal Service feels they can accomplish the consolidation. If the proposal moves forward and all three processing cen-

ters close, only two facilities– one in Los Angeles and the other in Santa Clarita– will handle the processing for the entire county, according to Maher. There is a window, however, for Congress to enact legislation to address the Postal Service’s business woes. “Nothing is set in stone at this time,” Maher said in an interview Monday. He explained that the U.S. Postal Service agreed in December that they would not close post offices or mail-processing facilities until May 15 and that agreement gives Congress an opportunity to propose comprehensive legislation to address what the agency calls a financial crisis. He noted the drop in the demand for first-class mail. The public has increasingly turned to the Internet to handle much of its communication, relying on email and choosing to pay

bills and file taxes online, and the Postal Service’s annual volume for first-class mail has dropped about 25 percent since 2006, according to Maher. He emphasized that the agency’s operations are not funded by tax dollars. In addition to the drop in mail volume, Maher also stressed one major financial obligation that affects the Postal Service’s bottom line. “The Postal Service has asked Congress to provide a more flexible business model for us and to address some of the mandates that were established in past laws,” Maher said. “Most [notable] is the requirement to pre-pay future retiree health benefits to the tune of $5.5 billion every year, which has been driving our losses in the past couple of years. And this is an obligation that no government agency or business

Local carpenters union protesting against Temple Israel over labor wages

CJ Dablo/Signal Tribune

The Postal Service has announced that they may close the processing center at the post office facilities located at 2300 Redondo Ave.

in the United States is burdened with.” The possible closure of Long Beach’s mail-processing facility doesn’t mean the end of service to retail customers at the facility at Redondo

Matt Sun/Signal Tribune

Stephanie Raygoza Staff Writer

Standing behind a white banner that stretches across the sidewalk corner with its bold red print as it greets passersby, carpenter Jay Littlejohn says that sometimes he’ll get people waving back with five fingers and other times he’ll get those that wave back with just one. He smiles either way and stands his ground. “We’re here to stay until this gets settled,” he says.

Littlejohn and two other men have been protesting for the past three weeks as part of a labor dispute between the Temple Israel-Long Beach and the United Brotherhood of Carpenters’ local chapter. The banner located by the entrance of the Alpert Jewish Community Center (AJCC) reads “Temple Israel Long Beach Rips Off the Community” and has come to represent an accusation of the temple’s contribution to the erosion of area wage standards for carpenter craft workers.

As described in detail within each distributed flier, the temple has hired the Hale Corporation as its general contractor for its renovation project. The Hale Corporation has in turn hired CS Drywall to install and finish the drywall on the project. The problem primarily lies with the Hale Corporation’s choice for its subcontractor. CS Drywall has had a history of problems paying workers the area wage standard, according to see PROTEST page 14

see POST OFFICE page 15

WRD suing Signal Hill and two other cities for $5.2 million in water bills Nick Diamantides Staff Writer

From left, union supporter Jacob Saas, carpenter’s apprentice Bert Mondino and carpenter John Littlejohn protesting last Saturday as part of a labor dispute between the Temple-Israel and the United Brotherhood of Carpenters union

Avenue. According to Maher, the movement of the processing center wouldn’t impact any of the other serv-

A recent lawsuit filed by the Water Replenishment District (WRD) against Signal Hill, Downey and Cerritos demonstrates the fact that each party in a legal dispute can be convinced that it is on the side of truth and justice. A Feb. 16 WRD press release contains the following statement: “After accruing month after month of unpaid invoices, 10 consecutive months, WRD today filed suit against [the three cities] to pay their respective outstanding water bill totaling nearly $5.3 million.” The press release also explains that WRD is asking the court to either order the cities to pay their water bills or order them to stop pumping groundwater and obtain their water from other sources. Patty Quilizapa, attorney representing the three cities, insists that they are justified in not paying the bills because WRD has not complied with a previous court order and has violated the provisions of California Proposition 218. She notes that the three cities, as well as Bellflower and Pico Rivera, had taken WRD to court in 2010 over what the cities claimed was WRD’s illegal method of determining how much cities had to pay the agency for the groundwater they pumped. (Quilizapa works for the

Irvine-based Aleshire and Wynder law firm. Dave Aleshire, one of the firm’s senior partners, is Signal Hill’s city attorney.) “Under Proposition 218, (a voterapproved California Constitutional Amendment passed in 1996) you can only charge any taxpayer their proportional costs,” Quilizapa said. “We allege that WRD has never followed 218, and that has resulted in the cities overpaying on their replenishment assessment.” Quilizapa explained that the five cities that sued WRD in 2010 feel that the WRD bills are not justified because they are located in WRD’s Central Basin and it does not cost the agency as much to replenish and maintain the groundwater in its Central Basin as much as it costs to do the same things in the agency’s West Coast Basin. “The uniform replenishment assessment applied to the West Coast Basin and the Central Basin pumpers alike actually resulted in the Central Basin pumpers subsidizing the West Coast Basin pumpers,” she said. “But under Proposition 218, WRD may not do that.” WRD charges a replenishment assessment (RA) to all entities that pump groundwater in the 420-squaremile region that is in the agency’s jurisdiction. The agency uses the see WRD page 14


NEWS 2 SIgNAL TRIBuNE LB police investigating case of 11-year-old girl who died after fight with classmate On Friday, Feb. 24, at approximately 5:50pm, Long Beach Police (LBPD) officers Department responded to a local hospital after being notified that a 10-year-old female who was unconscious and not breathing but showed no visual signs of trauma to her body had been brought into the emergency room (ER) by her family. She was treated by ER staff and taken in for emergency surgery. She was placed in ICU in critical condition, and at approximately 8:50pm, in spite of the hospital staff's efforts, was pronounced deceased. As Long Beach Police began investigating, it was learned that the decedent, a student at Willard Elementary, had been involved in a physical altercation with a female classmate. It was determined that after school, the two girls, and approximately seven onlookers, walked to a nearby alley to engage in a pre-planned fight. “We believe the fight lasted less than one minute, did not involve any weapons, and that no one was knocked to the ground,” according to Lisa Pratt, public information officer for the LBPD. “Once the fight was over, both girls left the location and went their separate ways.” Detectives have identified the involved classmate and interviewed

her, along with the multiple onlookers. Detectives are also attempting to identify anyone who had knowledge of the events leading up to the fight or any additional witnesses to the fight. What the girls may have been fighting over is still under investigation. As of press time, the death has been ruled as an undetermined one, and the Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office will determine the official cause of death. On Monday morning, the LBPD released the name of the girl as being Joanna Ramos, and the Coroner’s Office released preliminary findings regarding the autopsy. The LBPD conducted a news conference regarding the incident on Saturday, Feb. 25 at 9pm at the department’s headquarters. Long Beach Mayor Bob Foster, Deputy Chief Robert Luna, and Long Beach Unified School District Superintendent Chris Steinhauser spoke during the press conference. “There are times when words don’t work to convey our sense of sadness, and this is one of them,” Foster said. “Our hearts go out to the families affected by this tragic event yesterday that resulted in the death of an 11-year old girl from Long Beach. It is hard to understand how this could ever happen. And if you are like me, you are thinking of your

daughter or your grandchildren, and mindful of how precious life really is. All of us are anxious to get answers from the investigation in hopes that they will help us make some sense of this heartbreak.” The LBPD will continue to conduct interviews and gather facts and will present its findings to the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office, along with the coroner’s findings. The District Attorney’s Office will review the case and ultimately determine if any charges will be filed. At this point, no arrests have been made in the case. Detectives have spoken with family members and friends of both girls, and no one has alleged or provided any information that the decedent was being bullied. None of the students interviewed thus far has informed detectives that school officials were made aware of the impending fight. The LBPD’s Homicide Detail will continue investigating the incident to determine if a crime occurred. Anyone who may have information regarding this investigation, who hasn’t already spoken with detectives, should contact the Homicide Detail at (562) 570-7244. Anonymous tips may also be submitted via text or web by visiting tipsoft.com.

MARcH 2, 2012

The Campaign Trail During its next monthly meeting on Monday, March 5, the Wrigley Association will host a candidate forum for the Long Beach Unified School District 2 seat at 7pm at Veterans Park, 101 E. 28th St. The candidates are Dr. Felton Willians, the incumbent, and Ricardo Linarez. The moderator for the event will be Gavin McKiernan, a Wrigley Association board member. For more information, email wrigleyvillage@gmail.com or call Chris Graeber, Association secretary, at (562) 424-0790. Long Beach City Auditor Laura Doud announced Tuesday her endorsement of Lillian Kawasaki and her candidacy for the 8th district of the Long Beach City Council. “Now, more than ever, we need elected representatives devoted to being caretakers of the public trust and willing to be financial watchdogs,” said Doud. “In Lillian, the 8th district and Long Beach will truly have a civic-minded councilmember with a long history of public service, integrity, and commitment to those whom she’s sworn to serve.”

The Los Cerritos Neighborhood Association (LCNA) will host a forum for candidates seeking election to the Long Beach City Council’s 8th district seat. Candidates Al Austin, Lillian Kawasaki and Gustavo Rivera have confirmed attendance at the forum, which will take place on Wednesday, March 7 at 6pm in Los Cerritos Elementary School’s Auditorium, 515 W. San Antonio Dr. The forum will begin immediately following a short LCNA presentation and is expected to last one hour and 15 minutes, including a “lightning” round. Jeff Kellogg, former 8th district councilmember and current Long Beach Community College trustee, will serve as sole moderator. Interested parties may submit questions by email to Rick.Ivey@loscerritosna.org. Members of LCNA will review and prepare all questions in advance. Eighth District Long Beach Council candidate Al Austin announced this week that the grand opening of his new campaign office, located at 3811 Long Beach Blvd., will be Saturday, March 3 at 10am. Call (562) 787-3131 for more information.

Alert residents aid police in arrest of burglary suspects On Friday, Feb. 24, at approximately 9:10am, Long Beach Police Department officers were alerted by

a concerned resident to a suspicious vehicle in an alley near Pine Avenue and Roosevelt Street that police believe may have been occupied by four residential burglars who were ultimately arrested. Before the vehicle left the alley, police observed that the trunk contained numerous items and believed a burglary may have been in progress. As police attempted to catch up to the vehicle to conduct a traffic stop, the vehicle crashed into an apartment complex at Marshall Place and Virginia Road. All four subjects in the vehicle, two males and two females, fled from the vehicle on foot. The females were observed boarding a public-transit bus on Long Beach Boulevard. The bus was stopped by police at Long Beach Boulevard and Bixby Road, and both females were detained. Both male subjects fled westbound into the neighborhood. A perimeter was established, and K-9 and the department’s Air Support Unit “Fox” responded to assist. The Reverse 9-1-1 notification system was also utilized, alerting nearby residents that a search for burglary suspects was underway. After an approximately 90-minute search of the area, the suspects were not located, the perimeter was broken down, but units remained in the area. Approximately 45 minutes later, a resident observed two male subjects flee his back yard and contacted police. Officers in the area observed the subjects fleeing and tracked them along the way over police radios. One subject was apprehended in the area of Elm Avenue and Freeland Street, and the other in the 4300 block of Long Beach Boulevard. All four suspects, whose ages ranged from 18 to 20, were booked for burglary. One of the male suspects is from Long Beach, and the others resided outside of the city. Burglary detectives, who also responded to the scene to begin their investigation, believe that these individuals may be responsible for other burglaries in the area, and the investigation remains ongoing. The suspect vehicle was impounded, and loss found in the vehicle from one residential burglary was returned to the victim. Any resident discovering that they have been a burglary victim should contact Long Beach Police Communications at (562) 435-6711 so an officer can be dispatched and a report taken. Anyone who may have any information regarding this investigation should contact Burglary Detective Jose Yarruhs at (562) 570-7351.


NEWS

MARcH 2, 2012

SIgNAL TRIBuNE

3

Driver dies after colliding with traffic-signal pole On Tuesday, Feb. 28, at approxi- is only being identified at this time as wearing his seatbelt at the time of the mately 3:30am, Long Beach Police Department officers responded to 2nd Street and Marina Drive regarding an injury-traffic collision that resulted in the death of a male adult. When officers arrived, they discovered that a 1996 Red Isuzu Rodeo with a lone occupant had collided into a traffic-signal pole. The driver, who

a 54-year-old male resident of Long Beach until family can be notifed, was pronounced deceased at the scene. It is unknown if he had been driving under the influence, and the official cause of death will be determined by the Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office. However, the driver was not

collision, which may have contributed to his death. The cause of the collision is under investigation and anyone who witnessed the collision who hasn’t yet spoken with police is asked to contact Long Beach Police Department Accident Investigation Detective David Lauro at (562) 570-7355.

Youth Services detective to receive NOBLE community-service award The Long Beach Police Department announced Tuesday that Youth Services Detective Yvonne Robinson has been selected as a recipient of the 2012 “Homer L. Garrott Community Service Award” by the Southern California Chapter of the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives (NOBLE). The annual event highlights dedicated professionals who are committed to the community they serve. Robinson began her career with the Long Beach Police Department (LBPD) 13 years ago and has worked the past seven in her current position with the Youth Services detail. According to a press release issued Tuesday by the LBPD, she is very active in the community and dedicates her time to improving the lives of others. Robinson serves on several boards, is involved with volunteer groups, and is a youth mentor for the Police Athletics and Choices for Kids (PACK) program at Washington Middle School, as well as for the Long Beach Polytechnic High School boys and girls basketball and boys football teams. In addition, she holds a degree in public administration from California State University, Dominguez Hills. Robinson will be the third LBPD detective to receive this esteemed award, preceded by Violent Crimes Detective Jackie Bezart in 2011 and

BACK TO THE PAST What Re-enactor workshop: Learn to Portray the Past Who Presented by the Dominguez Rancho Adobe Museum Where 18127 S. Alameda St., Rancho Dominguez When Saturday, March 3 from 10:15am to 3:30pm More Info The free workshop will teach attendees how to do dances from the 1800s and how to act like soldiers and different people from the past. No experience is necessary. A potluck lunch will be part of the event. Guests are encouraged to bring an item to share. Free on-site parking will be provided. Call (310) 603-0088. PINCH POTS PLAY What Crafting opportunity Who Hosted by Rancho Los Cerritos Where 4600 Virginia Rd., LB When Saturday, March 3 from 1pm to 5pm More Info The theme for this month’s creation station is “Play with Clay.” Families with children ages 6 to 11 will be able to introduce their children to adobe and create coil or pinch pots and “muddy wigglers.” Call (562) 570-1755.

Homicide Detective Mark McGuire in 2010. Robinson will be recognized at the 11th annual Achiever’s Dinner on Saturday, March 10 at USC Town and

Gown, 665 Exposition Blvd. in Los Angeles. For additional information regarding the event, contact Stan Hendersen (213) 740-4355 or view the organization’s website at sccnoble.org.

Mother and grandmother of newborn arrested after abandoning her at gas station On Monday, Feb. 20, at approximately 7:33pm, officers from the Long Beach Police Department (LBPD) were called to a residence on the 800 block of Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue, in response to a call that an abandoned baby had been found at a nearby gas station. The call resulted in a child abuse investigation with two women facing charges. Paramedics from the Long Beach Fire Department responded to the scene and transported the female infant to a local hospital where she was found to be in good condition, and where she will stay until she is released to the custody of the Department of Children and Family Services. Upon responding to the scene, officers and a detective from the Child Abuse Detail immediately began an investigation. They were soon able to identify the mother of the baby and located her driving in the area. She was found to have given birth to the baby just hours before police were notified of the case and was transported to a local hospital and treated. As the investigation progressed, it was determined that the mother of the child had given birth to the baby at her residence in Long Beach, and had given the baby to her mother. She and her mother then told police that they had found the baby abandoned at the gas station. On Friday, Feb. 24, detectives investigating the case presented it to the Long Beach City Prosecutor’s Office, and criminal charges were filed against the two women who have been identified as Long Beach residents Paloma Espinoza, 28, the mother of the infant, and Sonia Ines Hernandez, 52, the mother of Espinoza. Espinoza was charged with child endangerment and child abandonment for abandoning her child, and Hernan-

EXPLORING VICTORIA’S TRUNK What Lecture series Who Presented by the Banning Museum Where 401 E. M St., Wilmington When Saturday, March 3 at 10am More Info The lecture will begin in the Harlyne and Kenneth T. Norris Visitor Center, where guests will be given the opportunity to examine artifacts on display. The lecture and discussion session titled “Queen Victoria and Her Traveling Trunk” will be $5 for general admission. Light refreshments will be served with no RSVP required. Call (310) 548-2005.

dez was charged with filing a false police report and obstructing police officers in their investigation. If found guilty of the charges, each woman faces up to two years in county jail. That afternoon, officers arrested Espinoza for willful cruelty to a child. She was taken into custody without incident and is being held on $50,000 bail. Her arraignment was Tuesday, Feb. 28. Hernandez was served with paperwork to appear in court for arraignment on that date also. The LBPD, in conjunction with the City Prosecutor’s Office and the fire department, issued a press release after the incident to again remind the community of California’s “Safe Surren-

der” law, which was implemented to prevent babies from being abandoned in unsafe locations and give them a chance to be placed in loving homes. The law also provides immunity to a parent who surrenders the infant at a pre-designated location, usually a hospital or fire station, within 72 hours of birth, with no questions asked. For more information on the law and locations that participate, visit babysafe.ca.gov. Anyone who may have additional information on this case is asked to contact Long Beach Police Child Abuse Detective Mark Steenhausen at (562) 570-7321. Anonymous tips may be sent via text or e-mail by visiting tip-

Where every dish is made with passion

2201 East Willow Street Suite G, Signal Hill 562.595.0210 www.kashiwarestaurant.com

Tues-Fri 11am to 9pm, Saturday noon to 9pm, Sunday noon to 8pm, Closed Monday

Breakfast & Lunch • 7am to 3pm

Benedicts, Omelets, Wraps, Salads, Chili, and more!

3405 Orange Ave. Long Beach 562.490.2473 Find us on Facebook! BlackbirdCafeLB

MUSICAL HOUR What Dinner theater fundraiser Who Presented by The Friends of Music at California Heights United Methodist Church Where 3759 Orange Ave., LB When Saturday, March 3 at 6pm More Info The “Musicals…Yes!” fundraiser will include selections from “Princess and the Frog,” “Into the Woods,” “Showboat,” “Legally Blonde: The Musical,” and several others. The show will commence at 7pm. The suggested donation for dinner is $23, and tickets will be available for purchase through pre-sale or at the door. All proceeds will benefit the choir Fire Within Us. Call (562) 595-1996 or visit calheightsumc.org. HAVING A MEATBALL OF A TIME What Monthly supper club Who Presented by the Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association Supper Club Where Nino’s Italian Restaurant, 3853 Atlantic Ave., LB When Monday, March 5 at 6:30pm More Info RSVP to info@bixbyknollsinfo.com. RETELLING THE RANCHOS LEGACY What Exploring the California Ranchos Who Presented by the Rancho Los Cerritos Historic Site Where 4600 Virginia Rd., LB When Wednesday, March 7 at 7pm More Info Attendees will explore the California ranchos under the guidance of University of California Davis Associate Professor of Chicano Studies Miroslava Chavez-Garcia. Cost is $5 for person and $3 for fulltime students. “California’s Ranchos: Building the Hispanic Legacy” is the second in a four-part lecture series celebrating “The Year of the Ranchos.” RSVP at (562) 570-1755. CAN YOU HEAR ME NOW? What “How to Purchase a Cell Phone” Who Presented by the Long Beach/Lakewood Chapter of Hearing Loss Association of America (HLAA) Where Weingart Senior Center, 5220 Oliva Ave., Lakewood When Thursday, March 8 at 6:30pm More Info Member Peg Heglund will present tips she learned at the National HLAA Convention in Washinton, D.C. Light refreshments will be served. No reservations are necessary and admission is free for the general public. Call (562) 438-0597 or visit hlalongbeachlakewood.org. PASS GO AND COLLECT SPAGHETTI What Spaghetti dinner and family game night Who Hosted by the Rising TIDE at Marguerite Kiefer Education Center Where Covenant Presbyterian Church, 607 E. 3rd St., LB When Friday, March 9 at 6pm More Info The family-oriented event will be open to the public and registration donation will be $10 per person. Every registration includes dinner and two 25-minute segments of scored game play of your choice. Prizes will be awarded for the top players in each game category. Registration deadline for team or single players is March 2. Donations will help provide academic support, mentoring, cultural enrichment, arts, sports, recreation and nutrition for over 300 inner city children and youth in downtown Long Beach. Guests will also have the opportunity to take part in a silent auction and prize drawings. Call Jo Sutton at (562) 424-3035. DEBUNKING MISCONCEPTIONS What Discussing gender issues Who Hosted by the American Association of University Women Where The Center at Sycamore Plaza, 5000 N. Clark Ave., Lakewood When Saturday, March 10 at 11am More Info The program will explore skewed attitudes, false ideas and misperceptions about women under the direction of guest speaker Andrea Riggs. The event is open to the public and cost of luncheon is $30. RSVP at (562) 596-8902.


OPINON

4 SIgNAL TRIBuNE Thoughts from the Publisher by Neena Strichart

MARcH 2, 2012

When Steve and I married nearly 22 years ago, I realized that being the wife of a police officer would sometimes be quite stressful. The danger these men and women face every day, and the life-and-death, split-second decisions these folks have to make on every shift can literally be brought home with them. I felt that Steve was a seasoned professional, and with his 21 years on the force at the time of our marriage, I was pretty darned secure that he was not going to take any unnecessary chances with his life. Years earlier, 1980 to be exact, Steve had been shot while on patrol. Part of his routine at the time was to make a drive and check out the back side of the Long Beach Arena as time allowed. On the night of Easter Sunday, Steve was driving around the back of the arena, and his patrol car’s headlights illuminated what appeared to be an individual attempting a break in through a rear door. After shining his spotlight on the man, Steve got out of the car, drew his weapon and yelled “freeze!” The suspect quickly bolted from the area, and Steve took chase on foot. When the “bad guy” turned a corner, he found himself up against a fence and, feeling cornered, immediately took a stance with his gun pointed toward the area Steve would approach– if in fact Steve was in foot pursuit…something of which the suspect was unsure. As Steve rounded the corner, the man shot him in the midsection and fled the scene. Unfortunately, Steve was in a one-man car that night– his partner had taken the day off to enjoy Easter with his family. So, shot, stunned and alone, Steve got on his radio and called for back-up. Other officers and paramedics arrived to check out the situation and take him to the hospital. With the help of his bullet-proof vest, Steve sustained a painful hematoma to his belly area but was otherwise in good shape physically and was later given a Purple Heart for his on-duty injury. The suspect was never apprehended. Fast-forward to this past Wednesday, when, thanks to the generosity of the Long Beach Police Foundation, retirees who had been awarded the Purple Heart in the past were presented with the newly created Purple Heart Medal. The following retirees (see below left) were honored: Anthony Benedetti; the late Ronald P. Burgess, Sr. (award accepted by his wife Regina Burgess); Jim Dowdell; Jim Fortier; Bill Penhollow; Dennis Robbins; Jack Starbird; and Steve Strichart (pictured left with Chief McDonnell). The event took place in the Chief’s Conference Room of the police department, where the recipients gathered to be addressed by Police Chief Jim McDonnell. As the honorees and their guests listened, Chief McDonnell thanked them collectively for their bravery and handed each of the retirees a Purple Heart Medal. At the conclusion of the event, the chief gave his heartfelt remarks to the men being honored. “My hat’s off to all of you,” said the chief. “[There is] no price that can ever repay you.” Although Steve retired in 2000, I know it meant a lot to him to be remembered and honored by his beloved Long Beach Police Department. He absolutely beamed seeing and chatting with his former brothers in blue. I have a feeling this little reunion will stir up more frequent gathering of retirees. They sure have a lot of stories and memories to share.

L E T T E R   T O   T H E   E D I T O R

His own private Idaho? The president of the California Fish and Game Commission, Dan Richards, whose mandate it is to protect native species, killed a mountain lion in Idaho and posed grinning with the carcass. It has been against the law in California to hunt mountain lions since 1990, so Richards is reported to have paid about $7,000 to hunt this cat. Today, outraged by this behavior, 40 members of the California State Assembly, led by Assemblymember Ben Hueso, called for Richards’s resignation in a letter. In addition to expressing their outrage in his exercise of judgment and resultant behavior, the lawmakers went on to say: “Your actions have raised serious questions about whether you respect the laws of the people of California and whether you are fit to adequately enforce those laws. Without the proper credibility to hold such an important representative position as the one you hold, you can only succeed at one outcome, eroding the public’s confidence and trust in their government.” To say the least! The people of California have led and continue to lead the nation in animal-protection initiatives. I and many other animal-protection advocates have come before the Fish and Game Commission to plead for the lives of bears offered up to hunters, to stop the imports of frogs and turtles that decimate California’s native species, and to increase

MANAgINg EDITOR

ADVERTISINg cONSuLTANTS

cOLuMNISTS

ADDRESS

__________________ CITY

__________________ STATE, ZIP

No Paper Will Be Mailed. I already receive the Signal Tribune at my home. Please accept this voluntary subscription of:

$45

other:_________

Leighanna Nierle

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/WEBSITE MANAgER

Tanya Paz

STAff WRITERS

Nick Diamantides Stephanie Raygoza

Jennifer E. Beaver Carol Berg Sloan, RD

NAME

__________________

DESIgN EDITOR

Cory Bilicko

Barbie Ellisen Jane Fallon CJ Dablo

__________________

939 E. 27th Street Signal Hill, CA 90755

Stephen M. Strichart

Neena R. Strichart

Sign up for your annual voluntary subscription!

Signal Tribune

ASSOcIATE PuBLISHER

PuBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-cHIEf

SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL NEWSPAPER

humane protections for our captive wildlife. It was us, the people of California who passed Proposition 117, which actually banned the hunting of mountain lions. Commissioner Richards knew that when he signed up for his hunt and essentially gave us the “Bronx Cheer" while flaunting his trophy. This is who is supposed to serve as guardian of our native wildlife. The legislature has the authority and must so exercise it to immediately remove this man from his position. I would also like to see an investigation into whether or not he brought the $7,000 body back with him to California, which is also illegal. It is irrelevant whether his acts were legal in Idaho or not. What is relevant is the act itself. It speaks volumes about Richards’s attitude towards protecting wildlife. It shouts his lack of regard for the opinions of the California public and it has, in the end, killed a lion. “I'm glad it’s legal in Idaho,” said Richards. “Shame on you,” said us. Madeline Bernstein President Society for the Prevention of cruelty to Animals Los Angeles

Rachael Rifkin

cONTRIBuTINg PHOTOgRAPHER

Matt Sun

cuLTuRE WRITERS

Daniel Adams Vicki Paris Goodman INTERN

Elizabeth Gutierrez

The Signal Tribune welcomes letters to the editor, which should be signed, dated and include a phone number to verify authenticity. The Signal Tribune reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, language and space requirements. The Signal Tribune does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other

publications or otherwise presented in a public forum. Letters to the editor and commentaries are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Signal Tribune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, letters to the editor and commentaries are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. Letter-writers will be identified by their professional titles or affiliations when, and only when, the editorial staff deems it relevant and/or to provide context to the letter. The Signal Tribune is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. Yearly subscriptions are available for $45. 939 E. 27th St., Signal Hill, CA 90755

(562) 595-7900

www.signaltribune.com

newspaper@signaltribune.com


MARcH 2, 2012

SIgNAL TRIBuNE

5


6 SIgNAL TRIBuNE

cOMMuNITY

MARcH 2, 2012

Three affordable-housing developments receive $25.8 million in renovations Ninth District Councilmember Steven Neal, The Long Beach Housing Development Company (LBHDC) and developer/property manager Abode Communities have announced $25.8 million in renovations to Evergreen Apartments– three affordable-housing developments with a total of 81 units throughout the city of Long Beach. While the growing disparity between household incomes and housing costs leave a demanding need for housing that working people can afford, both Abode Communities and LBHDC continue their work in advocating and supporting

the new construction and renovation of quality, affordable homes that promote safe and livable neighborhoods. “Thanks to LBHDC and Abode Communities, these properties will not only receive a much needed facelift, but will provide secure housing for families while offering residents valuable services,” Neal said. “Through our public-private partnerships we do make significant efforts to improve living conditions for families and provide affordable housing units for Long Beach residents,” said 4th District Councilmember Patrick O’ Donnell.

The sites – The Palm, The Sage and The Jasmine– are located at 1801 E. 68th St., 1823 E. 68th St. and 1528 N. Freeman Ave., respectively. The properties, originally owned by The Long Beach Housing Development Company, were purchased by Abode Communities in 1999. The major renovation effort will include two new tot lots, new roofs, new landscaping, building façade improvements, new apartment interiors, and high-efficiency mechanical and plumbing. Most notably, two sites will feature expanded and modernized community rooms, and

first-ever ‘People’s State of the city’ address draws full house at local church

Nick Diamantides/Signal Tribune

Former Long Beach 7th District Councilmember Tonia Reyes Uranga spoke to a full house at the first-ever “People’s State of the City” address hosted by Antioch Church at 1535 Gundry Ave. on Wednesday night. The event focused on poverty in Long Beach and what can be done to improve the lives of people who are barely able to pay their rent and put food on the table. “Some people in this city will never have to work two jobs to make ends meet, or worry about filing for bankruptcy, or going for public subsidy just to get health insurance for their children,” Reyes Uranga told the audience. “Yet those of us who do have to worry about such things have never before in the history of this city been under attack. Working families and immigrants have been portrayed as the culprits and blamed for the bad economy, yet we are not responsible for the greed of the corporations.” Next week, the Signal Tribune will publish an article with more information about the event.

Courtesy City of LB

From left, Annette Billingsley, Union Bank; Robin Hughes, president and CEO of Abode Communities; 9th District Councilmember Steven Neal; and Pat Wong, board member representative for The Long Beach Housing Development Company and Abode Communities during a groundbreaking ceremony for The Evergreen Apartments on Tuesday, Feb. 28.

Abode Communities will provide essential basic services to residents at little or no cost. “We’re excited to bring Abode Communities’ value-added services to these residential communities,” said Robin Hughes, president of Abode Communities. “By repositioning these properties, we are able to enhance our physical asset, extend the affordability of the apartments and bring onsite services to the residents.” Resident services will include after-school programs; computer training; resource and referrals to healthcare, job training and adulteducation programs; employment preparation and assistance; financial education; educational workshops; and community outreach events. Extending the long-term affordability of these properties for a term

of 55 years, Evergreen Apartments’ mission is to create safe, healthy and viable neighborhoods. Nearly 180 residents are currently living at the sites, with each household earning between $27,518 and $30,862 or 50 percent to 60 percent of the area median income. The project was financed through a combination of Low Income Housing Tax Credit equity provided by U.S. Bancorp Community Development Corporation, a subsidiary of U.S. Bank; construction and permanent loans from Union Bank; tax-exempt bonds issued by California Municipal Finance Authority; HOME Investment Partnership Program funds obtained through The Long Beach Housing Development Company; and a private developer loan to Abode Communities.

gabelich to host event for public input, information Eighth District Councilmember Rae Gabelich will host a “Coffee and Conversation” event on Saturday, March 10, from 10am to noon at El Avila’s El Ranchito restaurant, 5345 Long Beach Blvd. The public is invited to attend and learn about new projects and events that are taking place in the 8th district and throughout the city. Attendees will also have the opportunity to voice their concerns and suggestions affecting their neighborhoods. For more information, call (562) 570-6685 or email district8@longbeach.gov.


MARcH 2, 2012

cOMMuNITY

SIgNAL TRIBuNE

7

Kids in the Kitchen fair to teach children about healthy living through fun activities Junior League of Long Beach (JLLB) is inviting local families to join in the fun of learning about healthy eating and exercise at the seventh annual Kids in the Kitchen Fair. Cosponsored by The City of Long Beach Department of Health and Human Services Healthy Active Long Beach Project, the free event will take place Saturday, March 10, from 10am to 2pm at Martin Luther King, Jr. Park, 1950 Lemon Ave. The fun-filled day will provide parents with resources for healthy choices through entertaining food and exercise-related activities such as fitness challenges, veggie bowling, cereal limbo, a bicycle rodeo, kid-friendly

snack recipes, games, music, and raffle prizes. There will be free dental screenings from Mobile Kids Smile, free bike helmets and bike safety tips from Miller Children’s Hospital and Kohl’s, games and activities from Radio Disney, healthy food demonstrations from Renaissance Hotel Executive Chef Michael Poompan, seed-planting lessons from MLK Jr. Park’s onsite Peace Garden, and group fitness exercises led by Long Beach Jr. Runners. Kid Tribe will perform Hoop-A-PaLoo-Za, an interactive hula-hoop concert. Additional activities and services will be provided by Dole, CSULB Dietetic Interns, Walk Long Beach,

Long Beach Fire Safety House, and CalFresh: Food Stamp Enrollment Unit. “In response to the rising childhood obesity epidemic, this free healthy eating and exercise fair offers families an array of resources,” said JLLB President Samantha Fabrigas. “Last year, more than 600 children and their parents came for the fun and increased their options for healthy lifestyles. The Junior League of Long Beach is pleased to offer this to our community.” For more details about the 7th Annual JLLB Kids in the Kitchen: Healthy Eating and Exercise Fair, visit jllb.org.

Photos courtesy JLLB

Local chefs provide healthy-cooking demonstrations during the Junior League of Long Beach’s Kids in the Kitchen event.

Games involving healthy food choices are an important part of the Kids in the Kitchen event.

Local Red cross chapter honors ‘ordinary people’ who bravely helped others in danger

Nick Diamantides/Signal Tribune

The Long Beach Fire Department has issued a press release reminding the public of the 2001 California “Safely Surrendered Baby Law,” which allows parents to safely surrender unwanted newborns without fear of prosecution, as long as the babies are healthy. The purpose of the law is to protect babies from being hurt or killed because they were abandoned. Newborns who are 72 hours old

or younger can be surrendered to any hospital emergency room in Long Beach and throughout Los Angeles County, any Long Beach fire station, any Los Angeles County fire stations, and other fire stations that participate in the program. Since the program began, 90 babies have been safely surrendered in Los Angeles County, including eight in Long Beach. At the time of surrender, a

bracelet is placed on the baby with a matching bracelet provided to the parent (or lawful guardian), which can be used within 14 days to reclaim the baby. All identifying information that pertains to parents is confidential. For more information, including the location of the nearest Safe Surrender site, visit babysafela.org or call the multilingual Safe Surrender hotline at 877-BABY-SAFE (877-222-9723), 24 hours a day.

LB Playhouse looking for funny folks

The Long Beach Playhouse is seeking the funniest people in town for its Comedy Battle Royale Event on April 13 and 14. Those interested may apply by sending the Playhouse a video submission showcasing their act, either as a single, stand-up comedian or an improv ensemble. Submissions should be less than

two minutes in length. The Playhouse will be accepting submissions through March 15. Submit video to facebook.com/ pages/Long-BeachPlayhouse. Those selected to participate in the Comedy Battle Royale will be contacted by April 2. The semi-finalists will engage in “comedy combat,” a face-off on Friday, April 13 in front of a live audi-

ence. The audience will vote for their favorites, who will then move on to the finals on Saturday, April 14. There will be winners in both the stand-up and the improv categories. Stand-up winners will receive $100, and the improv champions will win $200. In addition to the cash prize, winners will be offered future bookings at the Long Beach Playhouse.

AboutU

boutique Where Modern Meets Vintage • Murano Italian Glass Jewelry • Antiques • Collectibles • Home Decor • Fine Art • Vintage Kitchen Ware • Jewelry • Spiritual Art • Hawaiiana • TV Memorabilia • Small Furniture ...and more!

!

LBfD reminding public of ‘Safely Surrendered Baby Law’

!

The Long Beach Red Cross’s annual Hometown Heroes Awards Breakfast at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in downtown Long Beach Thursday morning drew about 300 people to honor “ordinary people who, in a moment of crisis, stepped forward bravely to help someone else” who was in danger of great harm or death. This year’s award recipients, pictured above are (from left): Sascha Bryan-Zwick, Priscilla Hoskinds, Kelly Armstrong, Tyler Marlowe, Brianna Aguet, Tim Evans, Marc Hawkins, Toby Benskin, Sondra Benskin and Adrianna Jaurigui. Next week’s Signal Tribune will include a more detailed article on the event.

Bring this ad & receive $5 off a purchase of $25 or more!

Repurpose • Recycle • Reuse 4342 Atlantic Avenue, Bixby Knolls (310) 200-0298 – Berenice Dena, Owner Dealer Spaces Available!


cuLTuRE

8 SIgNAL TRIBuNE

Women’s education– women’s empowerment is the theme for National Women’s History Month The following is a press release from the National Women’s History Project, which was founded in 1980 in Santa Rosa, California, by Molly Murphy MacGregor, Mary Ruthsdotter, Maria Cuevas, Paula Hammett and Bette Morgan to broadcast women’s historical achievements. Although women now outnumber men in American colleges nationwide, this reversal of the gender gap is a very recent phenomenon. The fight to learn was a valiant struggle waged by many tenacious women– across years and across cultures. After the American Revolution, the notion of education as a safeguard for democracy created opportunities for girls to gain a basic education. However, that education was based largely on the premise that, as mothers, they would nurture the minds and bodies of the (male) citizens and leaders. This idea that educating women meant educating mothers endured in America for many years at all levels of education. The equal opportunity to learn, which today is taken for granted, owes much to Title IX of the Education Codes of the Higher Education Act Amendments. Passed in 1972 and enacted in 1977, this legislation prohibited gender discrimination by federally funded institutions. Its enactment has served as the primary tool for women’s

fuller participation in all aspects of education from scholarships, to facilities, to classes formerly closed to women. It has also transformed the educational landscape of the United States within the span of a generation. Each year National Women’s History Month employs a unifying theme and recognizes national honorees whose work and lives testify to that theme. The stories of women's achievements are integral to the fabric of our history. Learning about women’s tenacity, courage, and creativity throughout the centuries is a tremendous source of strength. Knowing women’s stories provides essential role models for everyone. And role models are genuinely needed to face the extraordinary changes and unrelenting challenges of the 21st century. National Women’s History Month, designated by Joint Resolutions of the House and Senate and Proclamations by six American presidents, is an opportunity to learn about and honor women’s achievements today and throughout history. What is your school, community or organization doing to celebrate National Women’s History Month this March? For more information and resources to commemorate multicultural women’s history and to celebrate Women’s Education–Women’s Empowerment, visit nwhp.org.

first fridays Art Walk to get musical and ‘Seussical’ in honor of author’s birthday The First Fridays Art Walk in Bixby Knolls on March 2 will feature a celebration of Dr. Seuss’s 108th birthday. Little Owl Pre-School, 3426 Linden Ave., will host a student art exhibit at the Expo Arts Center, 4321 Atlantic Ave.; attendees can buy a Dr. Seuss book from A Castle of Books, 4302 Atlantic Ave. in Bixby Knolls for a donation to Miller Children’s Hospital; and anyone who dresses as a Dr. Seuss character will win a prize. Other ingredients of the night will include: live art and interactive art activities, ukuleles, jazz, pop, dance, swing, Long Beach Day Nursery exhibit, a deejay playing classical music, roaming Irish songsters, green drinks, the blessing and activation of an Altar to the Feminine Devine, the Knolls Ranger mascot, classic cars, improv comedy, dramatic scenes, Timstrument, free books, gift items, antiques, spoken word, funky hair, the Big

Red Bus, and plenty of the unexpected. Seventh District Councilmember James Johnson’s “First Books at First Fridays” at the Dana Branch Library will feature 9th District Councilmember Steve Neal and entertainment from “Zorro” beginning at 5:30pm. The Big Red Bus will transport First Fridays attendees to all the participating locations. Bella Cosa, 3803 Atlantic Ave., will provide information about First Fridays, maps, and restaurant recommendations from from 6:30pm to 8pm. When the businesses start to close, First Fridays After Hours begins across the district. Nino’s Italian Restaurant will feature an after-party with a mix of music, dancing, and late-night dining and beverages. The Factory and EJ Malloy’s will also go late into the night with dinner, drinks, music, and community mingling. For more information, visit firstfridayslongbeach.com.

MARcH 2, 2012

Historical female figures through one artist’s eyes In honor of March as Women’s History Month, the Signal Tribune has asked local artist Alejandra Vernon to share some of her portraits of prominent female figures and to provide her thoughts on the significance of each woman. “Women have influenced history in so many ways,” Vernon said. “These are my impressions of the women I have depicted in art, and the ways they have influenced me.”

“La Gioconda” “Mona Lisa. The essence of the mystery that is Woman. Men have been trying to figure her out for centuries!”

“Good Queen Bess” “Queen Elizabeth I, for better or worse, had a huge impact on the world. History can't ignore her, and she shows the side of womanhood that can be so powerful.”

“Frida” “Frida Kahlo is an inspiration for every artist. When showing my own work, I often feel as if I am standing naked in the town square. Frida did this with every painting, baring her soul to the world. She did it boldly, heroically, and with conviction. Every artist must strive to do the same, and it’s not always easy.”

Don’t let the rain be your only car wash! Let us take care of your car between storms! We offer a wide range of wash options to fit any schedule or budget: • Full service wash • Fast exterior wash • Early bird discounts • “Happy hour” wash specials • VIP Club memberships • Big savings on combo washes • 6 self-serve wash bays with air dryers (3) We are environmentally sensitive and friendly. We reclaim our water. We installed energy-saving and low-noise-drying equipment. We use cleaning and waxing products that are best for the environment.

Sheldon & Shell, making your drive enjoyable for over 30 years

oPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK, WEATHER PERMITTING

Bixby Knolls Car Wash

We are conveniently located in the center of long Beach, 1 block north of the 405 freeway on Atlantic

& Detail Center 577 E. Wardlow Rd. @ Atlantic Avenue • 562-595-6666

“Marilyn” “Marilyn Monroe. Such beauty, fragility, vulnerability, and gentleness. There is a bit of Marilyn in every woman’s heart that must be nourished and fortified.”

“Angela Davis” “Angela Davis is one of the most cultured, eloquent women alive. Her personal history is extraordinary, and she has an aura of self-confidence, humor, and sophistication in the finest sense of the word. That is why I use the word ‘freedom’ in her portrait. She has overcome the constraints of the world and risen above all the negativity that was thrust upon her in the past. I love Angela Davis. She is truly inspiring.” To find out more about the artist and her work, visit avernon.com.


cuLTuRE

MARcH 2, 2012

SIgNAL TRIBuNE

9

carpenter center executive director goes from backstage to onstage with fundraising performance of Pulitzer-nominated play Michele Roberge, the executive director of the Carpenter Performing Arts Center at Cal State Long Beach (CSULB), and award-winning actor and director David Birney will perform in A.R. Gurney’s Pulitzer Prizenominated play Love Letters as a fundraiser for the center’s Classroom Connections program, a three-part program that introduces Long Beach Unified School District (LBUSD) elementary students to the performing arts. The performance will be Sunday, March 4 at 2pm at the Carpenter Center. Each $50 tax-deductible donation to Classroom Connections will receive one ticket. “David Birney is a friend of mine

Michele Roberge, executive director of the Carpenter Performing Arts Center at Cal State Long Beach

and last summer was asked to do a performance for his reunion at Dartmouth College,” said Roberge, now in her ninth year at CSULB and fifth as the executive director of the Carpenter Center. “He and I had done Love Letters a couple of years earlier, and he asked me if I would go to Dartmouth and do it with him as part of the activities of reunion weekend. Frankly, I thought it was a good idea so all the wives would have something to do while the husbands were off playing golf. It was pouring rain the day of the performance, so all the men came to the show too. It went so well that I asked him if he would do it at the Carpenter Center and he graciously agreed.”

Award-winning actor and director David Birney

The play, first performed onstage in 1988, tells the story of two characters, who sit side-by-side and read notes, letters and cards in which they reveal the hopes and ambitions, dreams and disappointments, victories and defeats of their separate lives. “It’s a lovely piece and beautifully written,” Roberge said. “The play spans a lifetime through letters, and I think it’s unavoidable that audience members think of their own lives and the people who come and go out of it. It’s a very sweet, funny play. I think everybody can relate to missed opportunities and bad decisions and the different paths your life can take. That’s what Love Letters is all about.” In the first part of the Classroom Connections program, Carpenter Center teachers go into classrooms to introduce students to an art form and talk about the artist they will soon meet. As many of these students have never been to a live theatre, they are also taught theatre etiquette. In the following week, the professional artists visit each classroom so students can meet and interact, perhaps learning a dance, song, or other creative activities. For the final part of the program, students come to the Carpenter Center and witness a fullyproduced performance. “We fill the theatre with 1,060 kids, and they are completely engaged,” Roberge explained, “because now they get to see a per-

Eileen Holt Helwig, flute player for the ensemble Calico Winds, addresses an audience of more than 1,000 local children for the Carpenter Center’s Classroom Connections program, which exposes young students to the performing arts and teaches them about theatre etiquette.

formance with the person they met who is on stage with costumes, lights, sounds and all the other production values.” Each year more than 3,000 students participate in the Classroom Connections program, which is funded through the support of the Arts Council for Long Beach, Bess Hodges Foundation, Dwight Stuart Youth Foundation, L.A. County Supervisor Don Knabe, Long Beach Rotary Foundation and many generous individual donors. “We offer this program to the Long Beach Unified schools for free,” said Roberge, noting the center does three such events annually. “They do not pay anything to participate. It’s quite a unique program and is consistently full to capacity, with a waiting list of classrooms that want to participate.

Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure more spoof than thriller at LB Playhouse Vicki Paris Goodman Culture Writer

The thought of there being a final adventure for the standard bearer of private eyes is unthinkable. Retirement for Sherlock Holmes? Somehow such a human endeavor as planning the end to one’s career seems too conventional for an immortal like Holmes. Does a legend retire? Yet in 1899 Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, creator of the Sherlock Holmes character and author of the immensely popular mystery novels featuring the brilliant detective, teamed up with coauthor William Gillette to write the stage play that would bring the suspense series to a fitting close. Steven Dietz has adapted the work for the modern stage. James Rice directs the Long Beach Playhouse production.

So with hands figuratively planted over my eyes and ears (yes, I was in denial), I took my seat in the Playhouse’s Mainstage theater and prepared for the end. But what transpired was more spoof than true Holmes. It seemed a parody of what a final episode might look like– sort of a “what if” with a bold sense of humor. Good. I could relax and enjoy this without suffering a loss. In Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, an aging, cocaineaddicted, but sharp-as-ever Holmes (Noah Wagner) summons his famous cohort Dr. Watson (Stephen Alan Carver) to help him seek out and finally destroy Holmes’s age-old nemesis, Professor Moriarty (Don Schlossman). (I suppose Holmes couldn’t justify sitting home working crosswords with Moriarty still on the loose.) But before the two men can put

Courtesy LBPH

Noah Wagner as the aging, cocaine-addicted but sharp-as-ever Sherlock Holmes in Long Beach Playhouse’s Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure

Holmes’s plan in motion, they receive an unwelcome visit from a rather high-strung and supremely agitated King of Bohemia (Skip Blas). His royal highness has his knickers in a twist worrying over his upcoming nuptials to a European princess whom he fears will see a photo depicting him with the famous and beautiful opera singer, Irene Adler (Tiffany Toner). Throwing a bone to Holmes fans who’d held on to the notion of a love interest for the committedly uninvolved detective, the writers have here designated Adler the apple of Holmes’s “private” eye. Where Wagner and Toner don’t exactly ignite, they produce a few sparks of mild admiration. Oh, well. Wagner is an attractive enough Holmes. If only he hadn’t rushed so many of his lines that some were unintelligible. Carver’s Watson does a better job with vocal pace and clarity, and thus produces a more believable character. By the time Holmes and Watson catch up with Moriarty, played with demonic conviction by Schlossman, Adler is married to Moriarty’s accomplice James Larrabee, but is she really? In a spoof, even genius can be exaggerated. And Holmes’s anticipation of every impossibly unpredictable eventuality is showcased here to the point of absurdity. But the absurd can be fun, so why not? Moriarty’s team includes a rather colorful cast of characters, including James’s sister Madge (Judy Gish), whose delicious cackle brings to mind Oz’s wicked witch of the west, and Sid Prince (James Velasquez), ace safecracker and an apparent refugee of the streets of some New Jersey suburb. Blas’s Bohemian king is arguably the hit of the show. Playhouse regular Blas always summons maximal entertainment value out of the characters he por-

trays. In the end, Holmes and Moriarty stage their final showdown unwitnessed at the top of a mighty waterfall. Does either survive? I’d be remiss if I gave that away. Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure continues on the Long Beach Playhouse Mainstage through March 24. General-admission tickets are $24; $21 for seniors. Student tickets are $14 with valid student ID. Performances are Fridays and Saturdays at 8pm, with Sunday matinees at 2pm. The Long Beach Playhouse is located at 5021 E. Anaheim St. Call (562) 4941014 for reservations and information. Tickets are also available online at lbplayhouse.org.

“The Carpenter Center relies on the support of foundations and private donors to provide Classroom Connections to LBUSD schools. This performance of Love Letters will be of great help in ensuring its continuation. I’m so grateful that David is supportive of the arts and of the work we do here,” she continued. “He is so generous in volunteering his time for this performance and he is really good in this part…really good.” For tickets, contact the Carpenter Performing Arts Center at (562) 985-7000.

AZTECA M R EXICAN ESTAURANT

From the family that brought you Mexico City Restaurant in Long Beach– Azteca Mexican Restaurant has been offering authentic Mexican cooking for over 50 years!

Home of Aunt Connie’s famous garlic sauce and the original GARLIC TACO!

CROONER’S Lounge

“Where the King lives”

Open Tuesday through Sunday 11am-10pm for food Crooner’s Lounge open until 2am!

12911 Main Street Historical Downtown Garden Grove

(714) 638-3790

aztecaoc.org

Plan for St. Patrick’s Day Now with smoked corned beef and other meats, poultry, and seafood

Slow-smoked to perfection, each savory selection has to pass Dave Handy’s strict levels for taste, appearance and aroma. When any customers step through the door, their noses let their stomachs know they’re in for a treat.

4149 Long Beach Blvd. (562) 424-8300

Open 10:30am-7pm Saturday, 11am to 6pm Sunday

HandysSmokehouseMeats.com

HoURS: Monday-Saturday 8:30am-10:30pm Sunday 8:30am-9pm

5

$ 00 OFF

when you purchase

2 Dinner Plates 2 Drinks

3626 Atlantic Ave. • Bixby Knolls 562-426-7547 • Fax: 562-426-0684


cOMMuNITY

10 SIgNAL TRIBuNE

Signal Hill resident to compete in Miss Teen L.A./Anaheim pageant

Photo by David Glinton

Marnise Holmes of Signal Hill has been selected to participate in the 2012 Miss Teen Los Angeles/Anaheim pageant competition. Marnise Holmes of Signal Hill was recently selected to participate in the 2012 Miss Teen Los Angeles/Anaheim pageant competition that will take place Saturday, March 17. Holmes learned of her acceptance into this year’s competition when the pageant announced its selections following interviewing in the Los Angeles/Anaheim area. Marnise submitted an application and took part in an interview session that was conducted by this year’s pageant coordinator. Holmes will be competing for her share of thousands of dollars in prizes and specialty gifts that will be distributed to contestants. She will be competing in the Miss Teen division, one of four divisions that will have young ladies between the ages of 7 and 19 competing in modeling routines, which include casual wear and formal wear. Most important, Holmes will display her personality and interviewing skills while interviewing with this year’s Los Angeles/Anaheim judging panel. Personality is the number-one aspect that each contestant is judged on during all phases of competition. If Holmes were to win the title of Miss Teen Los Angeles/Anaheim, she would represent Los Angeles/Anaheim and the surrounding communities at the national competition that will take place in Orlando, Florida. Over $30,000 in prizes and awards will be presented at the national competition while each winner enjoys this expense-paid trip of five nights and six days in Orlando. Community businesses, organizations, and private individuals will assist Holmes in participating in this year’s competition by becoming an official sponsor for her. Through sponsorship, each contestant receives all the necessary training, rehearsals, and financial support which will allow Holmes to become a confident and well-prepared contestant in this year’s Los Angeles/Anaheim Pageant. Any business, organization, or private individual who may be interested in becoming a sponsor to Holmes may contact the Miss Teen Los Angeles/Anaheim pageant coordinator at 1-800-279-0976.

MARcH 2, 2012

Outside the Wire program helps stressed-out vets readjust to civilian life Nick Diamantides Staff Writer

Spending a few years in the military can make a person accustomed to a highly structured lifestyle in which others make decisions, while food, clothing and shelter are provided by the organization. Stepping out of that situation and back into the far less disciplined life of a civilian is a stressful undertaking for many veterans, and it can sometimes cause them to make foolish choices. A program called Outside the Wire is aimed at helping veterans struggling with the transition to civilian life. The program is offered by the U.S Veterans Initiative (U.S. Vets). “It is an outreach and early-intervention program that offers free and confidential mental-health services to veterans, their family members and their significant others in the community,” said Dr. Todd Adamson, coordinator for the Outside the Wire program. “It was initially geared at veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, but we will not turn down any other veterans.” Adamson, who is a clinical psychologist, explained that U.S. Vets has partnered with four local community colleges (Santa Monica Community College, Long Beach City College, Los Angeles City College, and West Los Angeles City College) to provide the counseling at the respective campus veterans resource centers. The organization will soon offer the program to Pasadena City College as well. “The counseling is mostly one-on-one, but group therapy sessions are also available,” Adamson said. He added that Outside the Wire also offers training to college staff and faculty on military life and transitional issues specific to veterans. “One of the reasons we are at the city colleges is that we discovered that many of the Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans are using the post 9-11 G.I. Bill to go to school while they are transitioning back into civilian life,” Adamson said. “The money they receive through the bill helps pay their rent and other expenses while they are working toward their goals, and we are there to help them achieve their goals.”

Adamson said that most of the vets that come to Outside the Wire are seeking emotional health. “Many people have a misconception that all vets are the same and they all have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or similar problems, but that is not the case,” he said. “Every vet is different, and most of them do not have PTSD.” Adamson explained that stress is a common problem among veterans, and it can be related to painful experiences in the military or it can be due to the difficulty of readjusting to civilian life. “But many of the veterans we see had preexisting issues, sometimes with family, or with drugs and alcohol even before enlisting,” Adamson said. “In those cases, the military experience may have exacerbated their problems.” He added that the inability to control anger and problems communicating with the people closest to them are also common among veterans. “Often a family member or significant other will tell them to get counseling, and then they come to us,” Adamson said. After a veteran signs up for the Outside the Wire program, the first thing Adamson or the other counselors try to do is develop rapport and trust. “A vet will not open up and be honest unless he trusts us,” Adamson said. “Once I have established trust with the individual, I try to identify their goals. I ask them, ‘What would you like to get from these sessions?’” He said some vets only need psychological education. “I tell them, this is what PTSD is. This is what traumatic brain injury is,” he explained. “I describe some of the symptoms they may experience, and I tell them what they can do to help themselves.” He noted that some vets only need two or three counseling sessions while others need a year of meeting with a counselor. Adamson also meets with couples having relational issues. Outside the Wire is available to males and females, but because most vets are males, most in the program are also males. The local program has two psychologists: Adamson and Dr. Dan Chenoweth. It also has four psychology doctoral students– practicum students–

Courtesy US Vets

Dr. Todd Adamson oversees the U.S. Vets Outside the Wire program which, among other things, provides help to veterans to avoid future problems such as substance abuse, violence, divorce, and financial crises. from the Chicago School of Professional Psychology. “I probably see four to nine vets a week,” Adamson said. “The practicum students each see about four per week.” Chenoweth does most of the administrative work and compiles data so he is not counseling vets at this time. According to Adamson, the program works very well. “After the counseling, most of the vets are able to function at a level they were not able to function at before,” he said. “ We also coordinate with other organizations to find the best help for the vets. If we can’t help them, we will find the appropriate program for them offered by another organization or agency.” Adamson noted that, as more and more men and women who served in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars are discharged, the number of veterans having problems transitioning back into civilian life is going to increase. “We want to offer these services to the vets early, as soon as possible after their military duty is over,” he said. “We believe that early intervention will help them avoid future problems like substance abuse, violence, divorce and financial crises.”

!"#$%&'("#)*+#(*#,*-"#.%/#0+11*2(## !

0(3#4.2%.5.6ǯ6#7%%+.8#9"%("%#:'%%"2# # #

!

!"#$"#%&'##"(%)('*+,%-'./$0%1231%% !"#$%&&'()$*+,"$*-+#,$(-#$.(/0$,1(-1+&2$*-+3(45$*#.-'(-4$67 $ $ $ $ $ $ 1"8$$$$$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 9:;#$(&3$#&<:4$2-#(1$=::38$!"#$>-+/#$=:-$(3')1,$+,$?@8AA5$,#&+:-,$?B8AA5$/"+)3-#&$'&3#-$C6$ 4-,8$:=$(2#$?D8AA$(&3$=:-$($=(;+)4$:=$=:'-$?678AA8$$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ E#&'$1:$.#F$G##>$*-+#3$H/#)(&3+/$9:35$*-+#3$I"-+;>5$*+,"$!(/:$J(-$(&3$E(/$(&3$9"##,#8$ ŚĞĨ͛Ɛ^ƉĞĐŝĂůǁŝůůďĞŝŶƚƌŽĚƵĐĞĚŽŶǀĂƌŝŽƵƐǁĞĞŬƐ͘WƌŝĐĞŝŶĐůƵĚĞƐŐƌĞĞŶďĞĂŶƐ͕&ƌĞŶĐŚ          $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ =-+#,5$:&+:&$-+&2,5$/:)#,)(K$(&3$-:)),8$H/#$/-#(;5$L(-+:',$3#,,#-1,5$,:=1$3-+&0,$(&3$/:==##$K+))$ .#$(L(+)(.)#$=:-$?C8AA$>#-$,#-L+&28$ $ $ $ $ $ !

!"#$%%& &'()*%%+ +*",% 3033 Long Beach Blvd. Long Beach, CA 90807 -./01/.0.2//%

345(#46)%%+ +*",% 3619 Atlantic Ave. Long Beach, CA 90807 -./01/701/-.%

MORE INFORMATION (323) 246-0413


cOMMuNITY

MARcH 2, 2012

Smoothies– healthy drink or just extra calories? The following nutrition article was submitted by Kelly Sloan, a food and nutrition undergraduate student at the of University Hawaii at Manoa and daughter of Signal Tribune nutrition columnist Carol Berg Sloan. According to the Juice and Smoothie Association, smoothies are the most popular drink on the market. Many smoothie bars such as Jamba Juice® or Juice it Up!® are aware of consumers’ needs and wants for healthy meal alternatives, so what better than a real-fruit smoothie? Smoothies were created to be healthy and beneficial for diets at any demand: at home, at work or on the go. All you need is fruit, ice and water; however, smoothies can be made with just about any ingredient you desire. What makes a smoothie good for you? As mentioned, if smoothies are made from real fresh fruit, ice and water, consumers are getting the nutrition benefits of whole fruits. Unfortunately many smoothies have added ingredients that can boost calories but not nutritional value. For example, a popular smoothie at Jamba Juice called Peanut Butter Mooed contains frozen yogurt, chocolate base, peanut butter and banana. And, while delicious, this drink contains 480 calories for a 16ounce drink and 770 calories for a 20-ounce original! Smoothies can be a healthy treat that ups your fruit and vegetable intake, or a calorie-laden beverage that contributes extra sugar to your diet. I suggest that you ask for the nutrition information and the ingredient list so you can make an informed decision at the smoothie bar. I also share that smoothies should not be a drink for a meal; this is just too many calories. Better yet, make your own smoothie at home. Smoothies can be a great snack or even a meal replacement. Try these recipes to get you in the mood for the islands, mon (Tropical Walnut Smoothie) or for St. Patty’s Day (Green Smoothie). Tropical Walnut Smoothie Walnuts.org This creamy non-dairy smoothie is a super-foods smoothie. It contains three top super foods: oranges (as juice), soybeans (as tofu) and walnuts. Using frozen mango gives it a thicker, ice cream-like consistency.

Servings: 4 Ingredients: 1 cup orange juice 1 cup frozen chunks of mango 1/2 cup chopped California walnuts 1/3 cup tofu (about 2-inch cube) Directions: Place orange juice, mango, walnuts, and tofu in a blender. Blend on low speed until ingredients start to mix together. Then increase to high speed and blend until smooth. Pour into glasses and sprinkle with walnuts. Can make up to 1 hour ahead. Serve with straw or spoon. Nutrition per serving: Calories 158 Total Fat 10 g Saturated Fat 1 g Monounsaturated Fat 1 g Polyunsaturated Fat 7 g Trans Fat 0 g Cholesterol 0 mg Sodium 14 mg Total Carbohydrate 16 g Dietary Fiber 2 g Protein 4 g green Smoothie eatingwell.com/recipes/green_smoot hie.html Get your daily dose of dark leafy greens any time of day with this delicious green smoothie. Ground flaxseed adds omega-3s. Pour any extra into a freezer-pop mold and have it later as a frozen green smoothie pop. Servings: 2 Ingredients 2 ripe medium bananas 1 ripe pear or apple, peeled if desired, chopped 2 cups chopped kale leaves, tough stems removed 1/2 cup cold orange juice 1/2 cup cold water 12 ice cubes 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed Preparation Place bananas, pear (or apple), kale, orange juice, water, ice cubes and flaxseed in a blender. Pulse a few times, then purée until smooth, scraping down the sides as necessary. Nutrition per serving: Calories 240 Fat 3 g Saturated Fat 0 g Monounsaturated Fat 0 g Cholesterol 0 mg Carbohydrates 55 g Protein 5 g Fiber 8 g Sodium 38 mg Potassium 987 mg

SIgNAL TRIBuNE

11

IRS warns filers of ‘Dirty Dozen’ tax-season scams, part two The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has issued its annual “Dirty Dozen” ranking of tax scams, reminding taxpayers to use caution during tax season to protect themselves against a wide range of schemes, from identity theft to return-preparer fraud. The Dirty Dozen listing, compiled by the IRS each year, lists a variety of common scams taxpayers can encounter at any point during the year. But many of these schemes peak during filing season as people prepare their tax returns. Last week, the Signal Tribune published the first six scams in the Dirty Dozen. The following comprise the second set of six: false form 1099 refund claims In this ongoing scam, the perpetrator files a fake information return, such as a Form 1099 Original Issue Discount (OID), to justify a false refund claim on a corresponding tax return. In some cases, individuals have made refund claims based on the bogus theory that the federal government maintains secret accounts for U.S. citizens and that taxpayers can gain access to the accounts by issuing 1099-OID forms to the IRS. Don’t fall prey to people who encourage you to claim deductions or credits to which you are not entitled or willingly allow others to use your information to file false returns. If you are a party to such schemes, you could be liable for financial penalties or even face criminal prosecution. frivolous arguments Promoters of frivolous schemes encourage taxpayers to make unreasonable and outlandish claims to avoid paying the taxes they owe. The

IRS has a list of frivolous tax arguments that taxpayers should avoid. These arguments are false and have been thrown out of court. While taxpayers have the right to contest their tax liabilities in court, no one has the right to disobey the law. falsely claiming zero wages Filing a phony information return is an illegal way to lower the amount of taxes an individual owes. Typically, a Form 4852 (Substitute Form W-2) or a “corrected” Form 1099 is used as a way to improperly reduce taxable income to zero. The taxpayer may also submit a statement rebutting wages and taxes reported by a payer to the IRS. Sometimes, fraudsters even include an explanation on their Form 4852 that cites statutory language on the definition of wages or may include some reference to a paying company that refuses to issue a corrected Form W-2 for fear of IRS retaliation. Taxpayers should resist any temptation to participate in any variations of this scheme. Filing this type of return may result in a $5,000 penalty. Abuse of charitable organizations and deductions IRS examiners continue to uncover the intentional abuse of 501(c)(3) organizations, including arrangements that improperly shield income or assets from taxation and attempts by donors to maintain control over donated assets or the income from donated property. The IRS is investigating schemes that involve the donation of non-cash assets– including situations in which several organizations claim the full value of the same non-cash contribution. Often these donations are highly

overvalued or the organization receiving the donation promises that the donor can repurchase the items later at a price set by the donor. The Pension Protection Act of 2006 imposed increased penalties for inaccurate appraisals and set new standards for qualified appraisals. Disguised corporate ownership Third parties are improperly used to request employer identification numbers and form corporations that obscure the true ownership of the business. These entities can be used to underreport income, claim fictitious deductions, avoid filing tax returns, participate in listed transactions and facilitate money laundering, and financial crimes. The IRS is working with state authorities to identify these entities and bring the owners into compliance with the law. Misuse of trusts For years, unscrupulous promoters have urged taxpayers to transfer assets into trusts. While there are legitimate uses of trusts in tax and estate planning, some highly questionable transactions promise reduction of income subject to tax, deductions for personal expenses and reduced estate or gift taxes. Such trusts rarely deliver the tax benefits promised and are used primarily as a means of avoiding income tax liability and hiding assets from creditors, including the IRS. IRS personnel have seen an increase in the improper use of private annuity trusts and foreign trusts to shift income and deduct personal expenses. As with other arrangements, taxpayers should seek the advice of a trusted professional before entering a trust arrangement.

Avoid sunroof problems

Juneau

Be sure to use an authorized installer for your sunroof & convertible, winterizing, repair & service! Headliners • seat Covers • Complete ClassiC restoration • new installations • annual sunroof serviCing • Beautiful replaCement tops • autHorized installer

Juneau is a white neutered male Samoyed mix, about 4 years old. He’s great on a leash, knows some tricks and loves being around people. He has a minor leg condition, but it doesn’t bother him any. He won’t work as a sled dog— but, hey. Ask for A457887 on the shelter side of the Companion Animal Village at 7700 East Spring St., (562) 570-PETS. Sponsored by:

BUD’S

Since 1947

Auto Upholstery Sunroofs

Beach Cities

www.budsrestyling.com

562-595-6370

2637 St. louis Ave. Signal Hill

Come in today!

GroominG • Food • SupplieS • SelF-Service WaSh

2oFF Self-Service pet Wash

$

Not valid with any other offer. Expires 3/30/12. one per customer. BK store only.

4102 Orange Ave.

#113

at Carson St. Open Tues–Sun 562-427-2551

10oFF Full-Service Grooming

$

on first visit or $3 off next visit. $25 min. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 3/30/12. one per customer. BK store only.

expert care • Gentle Grooming • Walk-ins Welcome*

* aS Space permitS

HoW To AVoID PRoBATE Probate is a very costly and long process that can last from 9 to 18 months in most cases. Fortunately, there are several alternatives available that remove the asset from one’s probatable estate while that person is still alive. Naming a beneficiary on life insurance policies, IRA’s, 401(k)’s, and annuities before your death assures the asset is transferred straight to the chosen beneficiary. Joint Tenancy is where the owner of the asset names a co-owner of an account or real property. Caution: Joint tenancies have risks as the co-owner has the same rights to the asset as the original owner and a loss of Stepped-up valuation. Pay-on-death Accounts are similar to naming a beneficiary in that the bank account owner completes banking paperwork which names the person(s) who will receive the bank account upon the bank owner’s death. Lifetime Gifts given during your life avoids probate because probate only applies to those assets owned at time of death. A Living Trust is very beneficial when dealing with titled real property and other assets. A complete estate plan included in the Living Trust includes many ancillary documents that protect you financially, physically and allows for peace of mind.

ELIZABETH ARNETT VOZZELLA Attorney at Law • (562) 426-9876


12 SIgNAL TRIBuNE

BuSINESSES & SERVIcES ARCHIVING

AI R C O N D I T I O N I N G / H EAT I N G

MARcH 2, 2012

B O O K K E E P I N G / TA X E S

We offer Service Specials, Duct Cleaning & Free Estimates on Installation!

bookkeeping & Tax Services Certified Quickbooks Pro advisors/Training

business & Personal bookkeeping Cambodian & Spanish Speaking CTeC registered Tax Preparers

g ratin b e l Ce our d

PHONE: 562-283-0558 fAx: 562-283-0561

5y3 ear! r

CONTR.LIC #168999

2669 Myrtle Ave, Ste 207

Signal Hill • www.madkatinc.com

2517 CerritosTyphus Avenue, Signal Hill www.longbeachair.com • 562-424-4985 continued from page 1

I N K & TO N E R

Genus Computer Services LLC Declares WAR on high ink & toner prices!

Brother & Canon 5-Cartridge Combo Pak

$39.99

HP 940XL 4-Cartridge Combo Pak

$67.99

562-912-4657 InkPeace.com

PuBLIc NOTIcES TST3983 / 2012 020872 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: AFK EVENTS, 1535 Termino Ave. #P1, Long Beach, CA 90804. Registrant: ALAN KATZ, 1535 Termino Ave. #P1, Long Beach, CA 90804. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Alan Katz. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 6, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 10, 17, 24, & March 2, 2012. TST9384 / 2012 020928 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: HARMONY DEVELOPMENT, 4224 Ocana Ave., Lakewood, CA 90713. Registrant: PHILIP ALAN RUPPRECHT, 4224 Ocana Ave., Lakewood, CA 90713. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Philip Rupprecht. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 6, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 10, 17, 24, & March 2, 2012. TST3989 / 2012 017087 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: PCH BEAUTY SUPPLY, 1014 E. Pacific Coast Hwy., Long Beach, CA 90806. Registrant: PS BEAUTY SUPPLY, INC., 1014 E. Pacific Coast Hwy., Long Beach, CA 90806. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Philip Shin, CEO. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on January 31, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 10, 17, 24, & March 2, 2012. TST3990 / 2012 022806 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: THINK TOOLS, 1512 Armando Dr., Long Beach, CA 90807. Registrant: 1. ANTON STRIEGL, 2. KATHLEEN STRIEGL, 1512 Armando Dr., Long Beach, CA 90807. This business is conducted by: a Husband and Wife. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Anton Striegl. The registrants have not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 8, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 10, 17, 24, & March 2, 2012. TST3994 / 2012 019544 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: FOX WEST INDUSTRIES, 550 Orange Ave., Suite 316, Long Beach, CA 90802. Registrant: 1. EBEN CLAPSADDLE, 2. BRADLEY FOX, 550 Orange Ave., Suite 316, Long Beach, CA 90802. This business is conducted by: a General Partnership. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Eben Clapsaddele. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant started doing business under this Fictitious Business Name on February 3, 2012. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 3, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 17, 24, & March 2, 9, 2012. TST3992 / 2012 023225 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. EIGHT SIX EIGHT (868) NEW MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS, 2. 868 NEW MEDIA & PR, 3. 868 MEDIA AND PR, 15000 Halldale Ave., Gardena, CA 90247. Registrant: ASHLEY JONES, 15000 Halldale Ave., Gardena, CA 90247. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Ashley Jones. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 9, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of

F LO O R I N G

COMPUTER SERVICES

A Full-Service Computer Company - Home or Office • Computer Sales • Repair & Installation • Website Design & Hosting • Network Setup, Support, Cabling & Wireless • Internet Installation & Configuration • Remote Back-up & Data Recovery • Camera Surveillance Security Systems

562.989.4666

MEMBER

Better Business Bureau

4047 long Beach Blvd

this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 17, 24, & March 2, 9, 2012.

ize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: March 2, 9, 16, 23, 2012.

TST3993 / 2012 024460 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. THE PUBLIC THEATRE OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, 2. THE PUBLISC THEATRE, 525 E. Seaside Way #902, Long Beach, CA 90802. Registrant: DENIS MCCOUTR STRYJEWSKI, 525 E. Seaside Way #902, Long Beach, CA 90802. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Denis McCourt Stryjewski. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 10, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: February 17, 24, & March 2, 9, 2012.

TST4003 / 2012 031451 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. REMCO, 2. A REAL ESTATE & MANAGEMENT COMPANY, 3. A REAL ESTATE AND MANAGEMENT COMPANY, 4. REMCO A REAL ESTATE AND MANAGEMENT COMPANY, 2020 Cherry Ave., Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: A REAL ESTATE & MANAGEMENT COMPANY, INC., 2020 Cherry Ave., Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Drew C. Baker, President. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 24, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: March 2, 9, 16, 23, 2012.

TST4001 / 2012 028897 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: WHOLESOME WHOLESALE CLUB, 315 W. 3rd St. Unit 206, Long Beach, CA 90802. Registrant: LOUIE DO IT ALL INDUSTRIES, INC., 315 W. 3rd St. Unit 206, Long Beach, CA 90802. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Susan Munoz Arete, Vice President. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 21, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). P u b . T h e Signal Tribune: February 24, & March 2, 9, 16, 2012. TST4006 / 2012 031952 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. EMERALD SMALL BUSINESS SOLUTIONS, 2. EMERALD SBS, 500 Ximeno Ave. #322, Long Beach, CA 90814. Registrant: MICHAEL STOKESBERRY, 500 Ximeno Ave. #322, Long Beach, CA 90814. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Michael Stokesberry. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 27, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself author-

TST4002 / 2012 024506 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: E.R. CLEANING SERVICES, 2109 Ohio Ave., Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: BLANCA JAUREGUI, 2109 Ohio Ave., Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Blanca Jauregui. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 10, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: March 2, 9, 16, 23, 2012. TST4007 / 2012 033450 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: HOT JOBS, 646 W. Pacific Coast Hwy. #10, Long Beach, CA 90806. Registrant: BOB S. TURNER, 646 W. Pacific Coast Hwy. #10, Long Beach, CA 90806. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Bob S. Turner. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on February 29, 2012. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: March 2, 9, 16, 23, 2012.

TST4008

LAN D S CAP E D E S I G N E R

ALfORD’S

The

Tile Zone Ceramic & Porcelain Tiles Custom Design & Installation

3677 Atlantic Avenue

562-988-8429 W W W. T H E T I L E Z O N E . C O M

English

gARDENS ...where your garden begins

Landscape & Garden

• Design • Installation • Maintenance 562.997.4111

www.kathyalford.com

Don’t forget! Your DBAs y 5 years! must be filedne heevlper with your fictitious

Let the Signal Tribu blication. business statement filing & pu !We have one of We’ll go to the county for you, too and the forms the lowest prices in the county to get you started right away!

S We also run LegAL NAme ChANge at low, low rates.

Call 562-595-7900 cITY Of SIgNAL HILL TST4004 NoTICE oF A PUBlIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Planning Commission of the City of Signal Hill will hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, March 13, 2012, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chamber located at City Hall, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, to consider: AMENDMENT TO CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 05-01: A REQUEST TO MODIFY AN EXISTING WIRELESS TELECOMMUNICATIONS FACILITY BY REPLACING EXISTING ANTENNAS, SHIFTING THEIR LOCATIONS AND ADDING ADDITIONAL ANTENNAS, EQUIPMENT AND SCREENS AT A TWO-STORY OFFICE BUILDING LOCATED AT 1850 REDONDO AVENUE IN AREA 3 OF THE SP-10, PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY SPECIFIC PLAN, ZONING DISTRICT Applicant: FHMC Corporation for AT&T Wireless ALL INTERESTED PARTIES are hereby invited to attend this Public Hearing to present written information, express their opinions or otherwise present evidence on the above matter. If you wish to legally challenge any action taken by the City on the above matter, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the Public Hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City prior to or at the Public Hearing. PURSUANT TO CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ACT Guidelines Section 15162, the revisions under the proposed Conditional Use Permit do not result in conditions that require the preparation of a subsequent or supplemental negative declaration. THE PUBLIC IS INVITED to submit written comments to the Community Development Department prior to the public hearing. A negative declaration for the proposal was previously approved in 2005 and is on file at the Community Development Department. Written comments may also be submitted at the public hearing. FURTHER INFORMATION on this item may be obtained at the City of Signal Hill Community Development Department located at 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, or by calling Reina Schaetzl, Assistant Planner at 562-989-7341.

Published in the Signal / Tribune newspaper on: March 2, 2012 Posted at City Hall, the Library and Reservoir Park on: March 2, 2012 Mailed to affected property owners within 300’ on: March 2, 2012


MARcH 2, 2012

BuSINESSES & SERVIcES MEDICINE

BUSINESS MACHINES

SIgNAL TRIBuNE

J&D

plumbing &heating commercial • residential • industrial

S uperior C opier S ervice

HUNDREDS OF LOCAL REFERENCES OVER 35 YEARS EXPERIENCE BIXBY KNOLLS RESIDENT FULLY INSURED

Drains & Sewers • Water Heaters • Copper Repiping • Disposers • Gas Piping • Video Sewer Inspection • Furnace Repairs/Installation • Electronic leak Detection

“A-rated” on angieslist.com Contractor’s License #629882

562-427-2555

Call Dennis Bartlett:

Lic. # 462161

Workman’s Comp • General Liability

562-867-7000 Fax: 562-616-1567

robert@superiorcopier.com PAI N T I N G

PLUMBING

PREMIUM ROOFING

COPIERS • FACSIMILES LASER PRINTERS SALES, SERVICE & SUPPLIES

13

(562) 427-0688

P H OTO B O OT H

T O O L R E PA I R S

Put on an event they won’t forget!

TOOLWORKS

1806 Gaviota Ave. www.jdplumb.com

24-Hour Emergency Service

P LU M B I N G

Tool Repairs, Sales and Service

“Your Neighborhood Painter” • residential • Commercial • interiors • exteriors • Woodworking Ward • faux finishes Rich CALIC 864357

562.528.6258

mAkeS A greAT WeDDiNg or pArTY fAvor!

Rent a portable photobooth for your next event for 1 hour for only $250! • Includes portable booth, props, and one staff member CALL FOR DETAILS

877-foToSTrip

1431 28th St, Signal Hill (562) 988-9150

ADverTiSe WiTh TheSe profeSSioNALS for AS LoW AS $20 per Week CALL The SigNAL TriBuNe AT 562-595-7900

FoR RENT Banquet Room available for parties or events at 16426 Bellflower Blvd. Call Steve at (562) 9255750 for details.

P IAN O T U N I N G / R E PAI R

TuNINg & REPAIR

ChristineKay

(562)

208-1853

Call for a free estimate

Recommended by many local music teachers Associate Member of the Piano Technicians Guild


NEWS

14 SIgNAL TRIBuNE cITY Of SIgNAL HILL TST4005 PUBlIC HEARING NoTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Tuesday March 13, 2012, the Planning Commission of the City of Signal Hill, California, will conduct a public hearing at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chamber located at City Hall, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, to review the items described below. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Tuesday March 20, 2012, the City Council of the City of Signal Hill, California, will conduct a public hearing at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chamber located at City Hall, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, to review the items described below. ZONING ORDINANCE AMENDMENT 12-02 A REQUEST TO AMEND THE DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS CONTAINED IN AREAS 3 AND 4 IN THE SP-19, GENERAL INDUSTRIAL SPECIFIC PLAN BY REDUCING THE SETBACK STANDARDS FOR CALIFORNIA AVENUE FROM 20 TO 15 FEET. THE CHANGES WILL ONLY AFFECT THE EDCO RECYCLING AND TRANSFER STATION PROJECT CURRENTLY UNDER CONSTRUCTION AT 2755 CALIFORNIA AVENUE AND EDCO ADMINISTRATIVE TERMNAL PROJECT CURRENTLY UNDER CONSTRUCTION AT 950 E. 27TH STREET. SETBACKS ON OTHER STREETS, INCLUDING 28TH STEET, PATTERSON AVENUE, 27TH STREET AND MRYTLE AVENUE, WILL NOT CHANGE.

EYE ON CRIME Crimes reported by the LBPD Feb. 21 to 23 Council Districts 6 (North of PCH) 7 & 8 (East of the L.A. River & North to Del Amo Blvd.) Wednesday, feb. 22 Felony arrest 9:30am– 1700 block of E. Pacific Coast Hwy. Officers detained and arrested an adult male felony suspect, who was in possession of an illegal firearm.

Applicant:EDCO Transport Services AN ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT was previously approved for the project. The Initial Study and material relevant to the Environmental Impact Report may be inspected between the hours of 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday through Thursdays, and 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Fridays, in the Community Development Department at City Hall. PURSUANT TO CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ACT Guidelines Section 15162 and 15163, the revisions under the proposed General Plan Amendment and proposed Zoning Ordinance Amendment do not result in conditions that require the preparation of a subsequent or supplemental environmental impact report. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS are hereby invited to attend the public hearing to present written information, express their opinions or otherwise present evidence on the above matter. If you wish to legally challenge any action taken by the City on the above matter, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing as described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the City prior to or at the public hearings. Written comments may be submitted to the Community Development Department prior to or at the public hearings. You may also email us with your comments and/or concerns at scharney@cityofsignalhill.org FURTHER INFORMATION on the project may be obtained at the City of Signal Hill Community Development Department located at 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California, or by calling Planning Manager Scott Charney at (562) 989-7343. Published in the Signal Tribune newspaper on: March 2, 2012 Posted in accordance with S.H.M.C. 1.08.010 on or before: March 2, 2012 Mailed to affected property owners on or before: March 2, 2012

Have you had your air ducts cleaned in the last five years? do they look like this?

$249

improves efficiencyn a when cle

Duct Cleaning Special Restrictions apply. See LBHA for details. Up to 8 ducts. $15 each additional. Done with the Rotobrush system.

We ServiCe ALL BrANDS Call us for a FREE in-home estimate on new installation!

562-424-4985 Free Estimates for Commercial Facilities

Burglary suspects arrested Noon– 2100 block of Pacific Avenue Officers responded to a report of two adult male suspects breaking into the garage of a local residence. Officers responded, located the suspects and took them into custody without incident.

WRD continued from page 1

money collected from the RAs to replenish underground aquifers because the amount of water percolating underground from annual rainfall is not enough to keep pace with the amount of water being pumped. According to Quilizapa, several studies presented to WRD revealed that the agency was overcharging the Central Basin cities, but WRD still refused to lower the RA for the Central Basin. Albert Robles, president of the WRD’s board of directors, strongly disagreed with Quilizapa’s insistence that the agency must comply with Proposition 218. “The proposition has a number of requirements, and it is our position that none of the requirements apply to WRD and the water rights,” he said. “The travesty here is that if Proposition 218 is found to apply to WRD, that will mean higher water rates for all our constituents.” He explained that the complex financial analysis and notice requirements of Proposition 218 would likely add tens of millions of dollars to WRD's annual expenditures and those costs would eventually show up in the water bills paid by residents and businesses in the region. Quilizapa denounced WRD’s lawsuit as a “delaying tactic” that the agency was using to avoid complying with a court order resulting from the

MARcH 2, 2012

Protest the protesters’ flier. The standard is defined as the wage negotiated in the collective bargaining agreement, which includes health care and pension benefits to the contractor’s employees. The Signal Tribune contacted the Hale Corporation on Feb. 28 for comments regarding the dispute but only received “no comment.” CS Drywall had not responded to calls by press time. “I want the temple to accept responsibility for hiring these contractors that aren’t paying their employees their health care and taking advantage of them,” Littlejohn said. “By not paying their employees and not taking care of their health care, that puts the obligation and burden on the local community. That’s why we’re here.” The Carpenters Local 2361 has stated that the reason for their labor dispute has to do with the fact that Temple Israel-Long Beach should not be able to insulate themselves behind “independent” contractors. The union previously spoke with Rabbi Steven Moskowitz and the Temple Israel-Long Beach Executive Committee in regard to its obligation to the community and is asking them to see that the area wage standards are met for the construction work on their new

project. In a statement released in response to the labor dispute, Temple Israel said they are not engaged in a labor dispute with any union. The temple stated that with the assistance of an independent project manager, the Board of Trustees of Temple Israel selected the lowest responsible bid, which was that from the Hale Corporation. The temple specified that it does not have any contractual relationships with any subcontractors. CS Drywall’s most recent accusation of violations occurred in August of 2011. The Los Angeles Community Development Commission (LACDC) found CS Drywall in violation for not paying their employees correctly. Last December, the LACDC ordered restitution in the amount of $50,000 in response to the violation. Jacob Saas, 23, whose father is a carpenter, is protesting in support of union workers. “I’m here because Temple Israel is hiring non-union workers, and they are not getting paid the standard,” he said. “We’re hoping that they switch their subcontractor to a union contractor so they are getting paid the right wages.” The union is now hoping that the public will respond to the dispute and help correct the situation at hand.

lawsuit filed in 2010 that the cities won. “We did get a court order in April 2011,” she said, explaining that the court invalidated the RAs going back to 2006 and ordered WRD to comply with Proposition 218 from that point forward. “That meant that any new RA would have to comply with the proportionality requirements of 218 specifically,” she said, explaining that WRD could no longer charge Central Basin Water pumpers more than what it cost the agency to replenish groundwater in the Central Basin. “We told WRD that we could not pay the RA because it was in violation of the court order and, therefore, they did not have the authority to collect it,” she said. “Paying it would constitute a gift of public funds.” Elsa Lopez, WRD’s manager of external affairs, disagreed with Quilizapa’s rationale. “This interpretation misrepresents the effect of the court ruling by suggesting that the decision is final. The fact is the judicial process remains open,” she said. “Case law recognizes that a final court decision requires that the judicial process run its complete course. This case may go on for up to two more years” Quilizapa noted that the RA has consistently increased since 2006, when it was from $138 per acre-foot to the current $245 per acre-foot. (An acre-foot is slightly more than 325,000 gallons.)

Robles noted that 43 cities are in WRD’s jurisdiction and the overwhelming majority of them have not protested the RAs because they understand the importance of what WRD does for the region and the fact that the cost of doing anything is rising. “If anyone living in Downey, Cerritos or Signal Hill stopped paying their water bill to the city for even three months, these cities would turn off the resident’s water,” he added. “Ironically, these cities are continuing to charge and collect from their residents for the very same groundwater for which they are refusing to pay.” Lopez added that the cities of Bellflower and Pico Rivera have also not paid the RAs to WRD for the past several months, but those cities are currently negotiating with the agency in regard to the bills, thus a lawsuit against them is not necessary. According to Lopez, the breakdown of accrued unpaid bills to date is as follows: Downey owes WRD $4,134,853; Cerritos owes $2,496,601; Pico Rivera owes $1,281,324; Signal Hill owes $392,837; and Bellflower owes $39,183. The total is $8,344,798 The next court hearing on this matter is scheduled for March 15 at Los Angeles County Superior Court in downtown Los Angeles. Quilizapa said the hearing pertains to a refund requested by the five cities for RAs paid from 2006 to 2010.

continued from page 1

HARBoR AREA FARMERS MARKETS Major credit cards accepted

CONTR LIC #168999

Senior discounts available

2517 Cerritos Avenue, Signal Hill • www.longbeachair.com

Next week in the Signal Tribune:

Spruce Up Your Home for Spring!

• Thursdays in Bixby Knolls • Fridays in Downtown Long Beach

• Saturdays at the Cerritos Towne Center • Sundays at the Alamitos Bay Marina since 1980

• Local farm-fresh produce • Food artisans

GOODVEG.ORG

• Plants & flowers • Baked goods, honey, and more!

866-GOODVEG

We gladly accept EBT food stamp cards!


NEWS

MARcH 2, 2012 Marina facility that closed about seven years ago. The Redondo Avenue mail facility is within the Long Beach city limits, but the loss of so many employees troubles Signal Hill Mayor Larry Forester. The City wrote a letter to Laura Richardson, who represents the 37th U.S. Congressional District on the matter. Forester also expressed concern for the future of the main postal office for Signal Hill. “From the standpoint of the city, it’s very critical that we have a local post office for our citizens to go to,” Forester said in a telephone interview Tuesday. He added that, if in the future the Postal Service chooses to close the post office entirely, he would like for the City to help find a new location for the post office in Signal Hill. Signal Hill doesn’t have its own post office, but it has a special tie to the facility on Redondo Avenue. Forester said the city does have its own ZIP code,

Richardson released a statement Wednesday indicating that the concontinued from page 1 gresswoman supports proposed legislation that seeks to prevent closure of post ices at this time. Maher confirmed that, offices in high-poverty and high-unemfor now, the Redondo Avenue facility ployment areas and addresses other will still offer retail service, access to postal service issues, including the post office box services, and business retiree health benefits issue raised by the mail entry service. Carrier delivery Postal Service. units will still report there to prepare Since the final disposition of the mail for delivery. facility is yet to be determined, it’s too The threat of the plant’s closure, soon to talk about the real estate, however, affects the future of hundreds according to Maher. The question of of local employees. According to whether to sell all or part of the Maher, about 686 employees at the Redondo Avenue facilities would Redondo Avenue facilities are working require further analysis, Maher said. He at that processing unit. confirmed that the Postal Service plans “The Postal Service will make to continue to use the facility for its every effort to reassign employees to retail services for now. other positions,” Maher said. He also In addition to the proposal to close acknowledged that the agency is also processing centers throughout the coundiscussing retirement incentives with try, Maher confirmed that there is also a the unions since about 54 percent of the separate proposal that would change employees are eligible to retire. how quickly a first-class letter can be A spokesperson for the delivered. local chapter of the National “The movement of mail-proPostal Mailhandlers Union cessing units operations in and of (NPMHU) said he and othitself will not slow down the ers believed that the Postal mail,” Maher said, “but the Service is just waiting for Postal Service has proposed to the May 15 moratorium change first-class mail delivery deadline to pass before they standards nationwide. Now, if move forward with the that is approved and impleplans to close the facility. mented, the time it takes to “It’s not a wise decision. deliver mail would change If the Postal Service was regardless whether the mail is trying to do the best thing processed in Long Beach or Los for the American public, Angeles. And it would change they would not be closing whether we close that plant or the plant,” said Eddie whether it would open.” Cowan in an interview last He said that the proposed File photo Friday. Cowan serves as the president of the local chap- The post office located at 2300 Redondo Ave. in Long Beach change eliminates the overnight ter of the union that solely was named in honor of Steve Horn, who was responsible for delivery of local mail nationwide and that all first-class mail would represents the mailhandlers. Signal Hill acquiring its own ZIP code. be delivered in two or three days. He estimated that about “So what that would mean is, if 130 of the mailhandlers he represents thanks “100 percent” to the efforts of have tenures of around 20 to 25 years, former Rep. Steve Horn. That post you’re in Signal Hill and you mail a and some may have up to 30 years with office is named after the former con- [first-class] letter to Long Beach, it gressman who passed away last year. would not be delivered overnight,” the Postal Service. According to Congressional record, Maher said. “But if you’re in Signal Hill He added that it’s not the first time that some of the workers have faced the new ZIP code was sanctioned by the and you mail a letter to New York, it closure. Some of the employees had Postal Service in January 2002 and took would be delivered in the same amount of time as it is today, three days.” been transferred from the Inglewood effect that June.

Post Office

SIgNAL TRIBuNE Whether or not Long Beach keeps its processing unit, there still might be change to how mail gets delivered, according to Maher. “Even if the decision was made to keep Long Beach open, but they did change the service standards, there would still be no local overnight delivery of first-class letters,” Maher said. He emphasized that the closure of the mailprocessing facilities is a separate issue from the proposed service standards for delivery. “That said,” Maher added, “the closure of about 250 facilities nationwide could not be done unless we change service standards.” The agency is waiting for advisement from the Postal Regulatory Com-

15

mission on this particular proposal, he said, adding that those proposed changes would not affect other services like Priority Mail and Express Mail if customers need overnight delivery. The Postal Service spokesperson acknowledged that the Postal Service of the future must change. “But we believe that, with the proper changes through comprehensive legislation, that the Postal Service can remain a strong cornerstone of the American economy and continue to provide service to every community in the U.S.” Maher said. “But we do have to change. We have to be smaller and leaner and more efficient and more competitive as we move into this century.”

! "##$%&'!(#)!*!(+,!'##-! "## $%&'!(#)!* !*!( !(+,!'##-! !

../"0123345! /"0123345! ! 26+!5 %'&*7!8%77!! 26+!5%'&*7!8%77!! 9# ::;&%<=!>#;&-*<%#&!&++-?!=#;@A! 9#::;&%<=!>#;&-*<%#&!&++-?!=#;@A! ! /BB#)<;&%<%+?!<#!6+7B!,%<6C! /BB#)<;&%<%+?!<#!6+7B!,%<6C! ! z!>;&-)*%?%&'!3D+&<?! z!>;&-)*%?%&'!3D+&<?!

zz!9#&E+)<?!%&!<6+!F*)$! 6+!F*) *)$! !9#&E+)<?!%&!<6+!F

z!G-:%&%?<)*<%D+!H#)$! zz!"%I)*)=!F)#')*:?! *)=!F) =!F)#')*:?! z!G-:%&%?<)*<%D+!H#)$! !"%I)*) ! 9*77!JKLMN!OPOQRSST!(#)!:#)+!%&(#):*<%#&@! 9*77!JKLMN!OPOQRSST!(#)!:#)+!%&(#):*<%#&@! ! !!!!U*$+!*!-%((+)+&E+!<#-*=A! !!!! U*$+!*!-%((+)+&E+!<#-*=A!

Want some snacks to go with that wine? Happy Hour Monday - Friday from 4-7pm

Wine Bar open nightly

Happy Hour Menu • Fish Tacos

(3) Fried fish tacos with cabbage slaw, cilantro aioli and spicy salsa $6

• Build-your-own Bruschetta Herbed toast points with goat cheese spread, roasted red bell pepper hummus and diced tomato and basil mix $7

• asian Chicken Lettuce Wraps $8 • sliders – Beef or BBQ pork (2) $6 • Homemade potato Chips $4 • onion Fries with horseradish cream and chipotle dipping sauces $5

Drinks • Draft Beer $2 off • Well Drinks $4 • Well Martinis $6 For more information, visit our website

2951 Cherry Avenue, SignAl hill For reservations, call 562-426-0694. w w w. d e l i u sr e s t a ur a n t . c o m


MARcH 2, 2012

SIgNAL TRIBuNE

16


ST3339