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S IGNAL T RIBU NE Serving Bixby Knolls, California Heights, Los Cerritos, Wrigley and Signal Hill with 30,000 issues every Friday

VOL. XL NO. 42

Your Weekly Community Newspaper

www.signaltribune.com

IN THIS ISSUE COMMUNITY ‘Groundbreaking’ expansions to come

Yes

Measure

AAA

No

October 12, 2018

City hones in on three approaches to short-term rental ordinance for council review Options remain in drafting process, public provides feedback at community workshop. Paige Pelonis

Page 6

Aquarium of Pacific welcomes new sea lion, Chase Mammal expert talks to Signal Tribune about how the critter is integrated into the facility.

Page 15

NEWS Council OKs contract to assess environmental impact of Heritage Square

Public input will also be factored into process.

Photo illustration by Sebastian Echeverry, Denny Cristales, Barbie Ellisen | Signal Tribune

Long Beach elected officials say the four measures they have placed on next month's ballot will lead to "a better Long Beach." Several local grassroots community groups claim the reasons given for the measures are unfounded. This week, the Signal Tribune focused on information about Measure AAA. Part 2 next week will focus on the other three measures.

A plan for a better​ city... or a power grab? Measures would change city charter regarding city auditor’s purview​and authority​.

Cory Bilicko Staff Writer

Next month, Long Beach residents will have the power to give even more power to the current and future elected officials of the city, thanks to four measures the mayor and city council have placed on the ballot for voter consideration. AAA, BBB, CCC and DDD– all charter-amendment measures that Mayor Robert Garcia and City Auditor Laura Doud have proposed and that the city council approved unanimously– are “good government” moves, according to abetterlongbeach.com, the website for the Mayor Robert Garcia and City Auditor Laura Doud Committee to Support Good Government Measures AAA BBB CCC DDD. The measures aim to “make Long Beach’s government

more effective, efficient, and ethical,” according to the website, which also refers to the measures as “smart reforms that create a more open and responsive city government.” But those are unfounded claims, according to some local community groups that have joined together in slamming all four measures. In late August, the Long Beach Reform Coalition (LBRC) announced its formation as an alliance of grassroots organizations aiming to inform the citizenry on those measures. As reported in the Signal Tribune last month, Ian Patton, the principal of Cal Heights Conservancy (which led the unsuccessful effort to recall 2nd District Councilmember Jeannine Pearce earlier this year), said his coalition is hoping to “be out there for ‘the little guy.’”

Patton and his group are not alone in their plan to serve as watchdog for the city’s residents. People of Long Beach (POLB) is yet another grassroots organization with its eyes on those propositions. Carlos Ovalle, POLB’s executive director, has been critical of all four measures in public meetings and on social media.   The Signal Tribune last week reached out to the mayor, the city auditor and all nine councilmembers by sending questions about the measures to at least two email addresses per district office, as well as following up with phone calls to several of those offices.   Only one council district office responded, but not with answers to the questions. see MEASURE page 10

Multimedia Editor

Nearly every member of the public who spoke at the final short-term rentals (STRs) workshop Oct. 10 indicated that the three draft options for a new STR ordinance in Long Beach presented by the City still had room for improvement. The well-attended workshop– according to 8th District Councilmember Al Austin– included a review of feedback given from the public at the previous two workshops. It also included a look at additional outreach efforts and introduced drafts of three potential options for addressing the issues surrounding STRs in Long Beach. These three options, likely after additional revision over the course of the next month, are on the agenda for the Nov. 13 council meeting. “I think it’s a little early for me to commit to a position on this right now,” Austin told the Signal Tribune. “I’ve been watching this issue for some time, and I’m respecting the process. Obviously, I’m consee ORDINANCE page 13

(Literally) Walking the walk Local small business owner to walk with hope at Alzheimer’s event in her mother's memory. Paige Pelonis Multimedia Editor

Page 3

LB eliminates fee for online-utility payments Charges also to be eliminated at select CVS, 7-Eleven stores. Page 7

Research says it happens to someone in the U.S. every 65 seconds. For some, it’s a grandfather. For others, it’s a grandmother. Sometimes, it’s a sibling. Sometimes, a friend. For Tori Kormanik, it was her mother, Shirley Marie Schreiber, who faced Alzheimer’s disease for several years and died two years ago in September.

“So, I’m still gettin’ used to the idea,” Kormanik said. “It’s so weird, it’s so strange. It’s such an odd thing to see.” Kormanik, owner of Burnin’ Beak pepper jelly in Long Beach, said her mother was diagnosed just before Christmas several years ago. “I remember my mother saying, ‘You know, I went to the doctor, and he told me, ‘You have dementia,’” Kormanik said. “And she said, ‘Well, I’m almost 80 years old.’ She didn’t want to admit that that was

A variety of LATE-STARTING CLASSES begins Oct. 22

happening. Which, who does?” The Alzheimer’s Association reports that someone in the U.S. develops the disease every 65 seconds, one out of three seniors dies with Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia and more than five million Americans are living with the disease. For Kormanik, her mother was her first up-close experience with Alzheimer’s. “It seems to snowball,” she said. “So, it starts out slow, and then it see ALZHEIMER’S page 14

Courtesy Tori Kormanik

Pictured above are Tori Kormanik (left) and her mother, Shirley Marie Schreiber (right). Kormanik is walking in the 2018 Walk to End Alzheimer’s in honor of her mother, who fought the disease for years before she died in 2016.


2

Signal Tribune

October 12, 2018

The bus is better together.

Long Beach residents 62+ can become a CSC member by picking up a Senior TAP Card for reduced bus fare at our booth at the expo. To learn more about the Club call 562.591.2301, or email us at seniors@lbtransit.com. WHAT: 10th Annual Successful Aging Expo WHEN: Saturday, October 13th WHERE: The Grand Long Beach, 4101 E Willow St, Long Beach, CA 90815

CONNECTED SENIORS CLUB


NEWS

October 12, 2018

Signal Tribune

Signal Hill City Council OKs contract to assess Heritage Square environmental impact

3

Community will have input on proposed development’s environmental-impact report before and after the 12-month study.

Sebastian Echeverry | Signal Tribune

A large group of students march across California State University, Long Beach’s campus on Oct. 8 protesting judge Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation to the United States Supreme Court earlier that week.

Controversial Supreme Court nomination hits The Beach

Courtesy KTGY Architecture

A rendering of the proposed Heritage Square mixed-use development located west of Cherry Avenue between Burnett and Crescent Heights streets, for which the Signal Hill City Council approved an environmental-assessment contract at its Oct. 9 meeting. Anita W. Harris Staff Writer

At its Oct. 9 meeting, the Signal Hill City Council approved three main agenda items: a contract with Michael Baker International to assess the environmental impact of Signal Hill Petroleum’s proposed Heritage Square development; a conditional-use permit for autobody-repair shop Caliber Collision; and an agreement with Utility Cost Management to audit the City’s electric bills.

Heritage Square The council approved a contract agreement with Michael Baker International (MBI) to prepare an environmental-impact report (EIR) for Signal Hill Petroleum’s (SHP) proposed Heritage Square mixeduse development on the west side of Cherry Avenue between Burnett and Crescent Heights streets. Elise McCaleb, economic-development manager, said that the 7.78acre development plan consists of luxury apartments and single-family residences, along with retail and

restaurant spaces. McCaleb said that the City had entered into an exclusive-right-to-negotiate (ERN) agreement with SHP in February 2017, with an amended 12-month extension in May 2018, in order to analyze project feasibility, prepare financial documents, complete an environmental analysis and develop a disposition-and-development agreement. The City had requested proposals from four firms for the environmental analysis, ultimately settling on see COUNCIL page 11

Cal State Long Beach students and victims of sexual assault protest Kavanaugh. Sebastian Echeverry Production Manager

Students basking in the early autumn sun on Oct. 8 out on the lawn in front of the California State University, Long Beach (CSULB) bookstore suddenly looked up from their phones and textbooks to the sight of several of their fellow classmates marching toward lower campus, carrying signs and chanting, “Hey, hey! Ho, ho! Kavanaugh has got to go.” The students, armed with fliers and a megaphone, were referencing Maryland judge Brett Kavanaugh’s Oct. 6 confirmation to the United States Supreme Court and were vocalizing their disapproval of his

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nomination. Christine Blasey Ford, a Palo Alto University professor, had recently come forth and accused Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her while the two were in high school, as nationally reported by media outlets. The accusations led to a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Sept. 27, when Ford recounted the alleged assault. Kavanaugh defended himself against the accusation, while the nation watched and waited as to what would be the next move. Despite the hearing's controversies, senators voted to appoint Kavanaugh Oct. 6 to a lifetime position. The decision trickled down from

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4

Signal Tribune

Thoughts

from

the

M

OPINION

October 12, 2018

Publisher

By Neena Strichart

ost of our readers know that I grew up in Signal Hill/Long Beach. 30 years ago, I bought my childhood home from Mom. I so enjoy living there, as it is a constant reminder of my elementary, junior high-school and senior high-school

days. These days, keeping in touch with friends from my youth has been easy. Many times, I just enter one of my old buddy’s names into Facebook and that person’s account pops up instantly. If we decide to friend each other, the conversation can begin. I recently ran across a posting from former Long Beachean Gary Lewis, who, come to find out, currently lives in Arizona. His posting brought a smile to my face and tickled my heart. I reached out to him, and he agreed to let me use that particular posting for my column this week. Let me know what you think of his musings at neena@signaltribune.com. I am hoping he will favor us with more of his writings. The Great Snipe Hunt by Gary Lewis I was 15 years old and ran around with several friends that were older and had cars. To say that I was naïve would be a serious understatement. Mostly we would cruise around in the evenings looking for things to do. One night, someone suggested we go “snipe hunting.” Well, of course, I had never heard of this, so it was quickly decided that I would be designated as the “catcher.” My friends said that we would need some supplies; a large bag or sack and a bright flashlight. It was decided that a prime snipe location was in a large brushy field out behind Marine stadium. (Yes, at one time, such a field did exist. This was 1957.) We drove out to the field, and they dropped me at one end with the instructions to get down low, holding the open bag in front of me with one hand, and holding the flashlight behind the bag so that the snipe would be drawn to the light. The rest of the group would go down to the other end of the field and began making noise and thrashing the brush to scare the snipe toward me and into the bag. The group drove away, and soon they began making a racket about 200 yards away and, of course, I was ready with my bag and flashlight. This went on for several minutes until the sounds began to fade and finally stop altogether. I assumed they were simply changing positions to better scare the snipe. After about three to four minutes of silence, I started calling to them, but got no reply. Still, it took another five minutes or so to realize I had been had. I started walking to the other end of the field and, there they all were, laughing so hard that their sides hurt. After that, I became a firm skeptic. It took several years for me to finally believe that “grunion” are real and really do beach themselves en masse to mate when the moon and tides are just perfect. That seemed less believable than a snipe hunt. There was no way I was taking a sack and a flashlight to the beach in the middle of the night. I was not falling for that again.

Do you believe in ghosts?

A

recent USA Today poll says that 34 percent of Americans believe in ghosts– that’s one in every three people. Twenty-three percent say they have seen a ghost or believe they have been in one’s presence. Are you one of those 23 percent who have actually had a supernatural encounter? Before you answer that question, you might like to know what type of ghost you allegedly saw. According to those familiar with ghostly phenomena, there are two types of paranormal activity– poltergeists and hauntings. Poltergeist activity usually centers on one individual, usually a teenager who is under some form of emotional stress. These individuals often have problems at home or school. Many are depressed. The anger and upset from these problems somehow manifests itself in a physical way. Their feelings of discontent result in objects moving, flying or breaking. These odd occurrences are often accompanied by sounds, vibrations and other inexpiable physical phenomenon. It’s believed that a sort of energy field is exuded by those individuals and that they unconsciously have the ability to affect the environment around them. A ghost is an apparition one sees– a form of haunting. There are two types of hauntings. The most common is a residual haunting in which a location has picked up and recorded the intense energy exuded by individuals under stress. At times, the actions and words stored in the walls of that site are triggered and, like a video tape, replayed. Experts in paranormal activities believe that someone with a psychic bent, or even certain atmospheric conditions, can trigger this phenomenon. The other, much rarer, sort is an intelligent haunting where someone with psychic talents, or the proper equipment, can actually communicate with the dead. Those who watch the many television shows exploring the supernatural have seen questions posed by the living to the dead answered by raps, knocks or EVPs (electronic-voice phenomena) Courtesy Claudine Burnett from those on the other side. The Long Beach Towne Center In writing this column, I decided to check out a reported haunting I wrote about in my book “Haunted Long Beach 2”– the Long Beach Navy Hospital, now the location of the Long Beach Towne Center. Hospitals seem like a logical place to go looking for ghosts. According to the first law of thermodynamics, energy can neither be created nor destroyed. It just changes shape. After death, the energy that ran the see GHOSTS page 8

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Signal Tribune | Community Newspaper Serving Bixby Knolls, California Heights, Los Cerritos, Wrigley and Signal Hill

S IGNA L T R I BU N E

PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Neena R. Strichart

ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS

Barbie Ellisen Katherine Green Sharon McLucas

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Stephen M. Strichart

STAFF WRITERS

Cory Bilicko CJ Dablo Anita W. Harris

MANAGING EDITOR

Denny Cristales

CULTURE WRITERS

Adam Buchsbaum Ava Homa Rachael Rifkin

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR

Paige Pelonis

EDITORIAL INTERN

Lissette Mendoza

PRODUCTION MANAGER

Sebastian Echeverry

COLUMNISTS

Claudine Burnett Blair Cohn

The Signal Tribune welcomes letters to the editor, which should be signed, dated and include a phone number to verify authenticity. Letters are due by noon on the Wednesday before desired publication date. The Signal Tribune reserves the right to edit l­etters for grammar, language and space requirements. Letters must be 500 words or fewer. The Signal Tribune will publish no more than one “pro” letter and one “con” letter on a particular topic in a single issue. The Signal ­Tribune does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other ­publications or otherwise presented in a public forum. Letters to the editor and commentaries are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Signal Tribune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct i­nformation when possible, letters to the editor and commentaries are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. Letter-writers will be identified by their professional titles or affiliations when, and only when, the editorial staff deems it relevant and/or to provide context to the letter. We do not run letters to the editor submitted by individuals who have declared their candidacies for public office in upcoming races. This policy was put in place because, to be fair, if we publish one, we would have to publish all letters submitted by all candidates. The volume would no doubt eliminate space for letters submitted by other readers. Instead, we agree to interview candidates and print stories about political races in an objective manner and offer very reasonable advertising rates for those candidates who wish to purchase ads. The Signal Tribune is published each Friday with a circulation of 30,000. Yearly subscriptions are available for $50.

1399 E. 28th St., Signal Hill, CA 90755 (562) 595-7900 www.signaltribune.com newspaper@signaltribune.com


COMMUNITY

October 12, 2018

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5

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BEER NIGHT What Storytelling event Who Hosted by Long Beach filmmaker Steven Deeble and local brewer Jason Van Fleet When Friday, Oct. 12, at 7pm Where MADE by Millworks, 240 Pine Ave. More Info The October installment of “The MADE Storytelling Hour(s)” will focus on the topic of craft beer. Local brewers from Liberation Brewing, Ten Mile Brewing and Phantom Carriage Brewing will share their stories at the event. In addition, Christo Brock, director of the documentary “Brewmance,” will screen some of the rough-cut footage. “Brewmance,” which is currently in post-production, covers the local craft-beer scene and follows the teams at Liberation Brewing and Ten Mile Brewing as they build out their breweries and open their doors for business. The event is free. Visit madebymillworks.com.

Where 720 Alamitos Ave. More Info The holistic health clinic will be having a “Be Happy, Be Healthy Wellness Day” to celebrate its grand opening. Guests are invited to live music, food, as well as several other health and wellness services. A Garcia Shack food truck will be there, as well as a live art painting from Long Beach muralist Michael Pukac. Visit mypediatricclinic.com. LEAD WITH LOVE What Domestic-violence awareness event Who Hosted by the WomenShelter of Long Beach When Saturday, Oct. 20, from 11am to 4pm Where The former Citibank parking lot in Belmont Shore, 5354 E. 2nd St. More Info October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, and the WomenShelter of Long Beach (WSLB) is partnering with 3rd District Councilmember Suzie Price to host its 12th Annual Domestic Violence Event. The event seeks to raise awareness about domestic violence and provides attendees with information to learn to identify the early warning signs of an abusive relationship and help those within their own communities who might be experiencing abuse. This free event is open to the public and will have special presentations by community leaders. Call Tatiana Dorman at (562) 437-7233 or email Tdorman@womenshelterlb.org.

REPUBLICAN ROUNDUP What Meeting Who Hosted by the Long Beach Lincoln Club When Thursday, Oct. 18, at noon Where Long Beach Yacht Club, 6201 Appian Wy. More Info Janet Nguyen, the first Vietnamese-American state senator in the U.S., will discuss her plans for the next four years in the State Senate. She will also have a presentation on how she escaped her homeland on a small wooden 10-meter boat by sailing across the South China Sea. The cost is $35. To RSVP, email Paul Carter GENE MACHINE at pc@lawbbc.com or call (562) What Seminar 435-1426. Who Hosted by the Questing Heirs Genealogical Society LISTEN UP When Sunday, Oct. 21, at 1pm What Hearing-aid demo Where The Lakewood Masonic Who Hosted by the Hearing Loss Center, 5918 E. Parkcrest St. Association of America More Info Linda Sena will speak When Saturday, Oct. 20, from on the topics of DNA and Native 10:30am to noon American research. Contact Liz Where The Weingart Center, 5220 Stookiesberry at (562) 760-3027 or Olivia Ave. visit qhgs.info. More Info Participants will be allowed to try out more than 50 hear- ART FOR THE HEART ing-assistive technology devices. What Art day The event is free. Call (562) 630- Who Hosted by MemorialCare 6141 or visit hlaa-lb-lakewood.org. Miller Children’s & Women’s Hospital Long Beach HOLISTIC HEALTH When Friday, Oct. 26, from 2pm What Community-health fair to 6pm Who MY Pediatrics and Respira- Where Miller Children’s & Womtory Care en’s Houssels Forum, 2801 AtlanWhen Saturday, Oct. 20, from tic Ave. 11am to 1pm More Info In honor of Arts Month,

the Artful Healing Program is hosting an Art Day Celebration. The event will include an art exhibition featuring the artwork of current and former patients. Attendees are encouraged to test their creative abilities with three interactive art projects and an interactive music session. Contact Denise Clayton-Leonard at (562) 243-0170 or email dclpaints@aol.com. PREPARED AND AWARE What Self-management class Who Hosted by The Diabetes Program at MemorialCare Long Beach Medical Center When Friday, Oct. 26, and Friday, Nov. 2, from 4pm to 7pm Where MemorialCare Miller Children’s & Women’s Hospital Long Beach Pavillion, Conference Room A2, 2801 Atlantic Ave. More Info The class will be two sessions and will cover diabetes medication and management. Participants will be able to discuss blood-glucose monitoring, nutritious meal planning, fitness motivation and more while learning about acute and long-term complications and skills that contribute to a healthier lifestyle. To RSVP, call (562) 933-5043. Parking will be validated. HOTEL OF HORRORS What Halloween event Who Hosted by Khmer Girls in Action When Friday, Oct. 26, from 6pm to 9pm Where 1355 Redondo Ave., Suite 9 More Info The event aims to both entertain and educate attendees. It will feature a “haunted maze”, an interactive photo booth, music, dancing, raffle prizes, as well as information to prepare for the Nov. 6 midterm elections. The event is free. Visit kgalb.org. DRUG DROP What Pharmaceutical collection Who Hosted by MemorialCare Long Beach Medical Center, The Long Beach Police Department and the LA Drug Enforcement Administration When Saturday, Oct. 27, from 10am to 2pm Where Long Beach Medical Center, 2801 Atlantic Ave. More Info The free event collects expired pharmaceutical drugs in order to properly dispose of them. This is a drive-thru, drop-off event. Visit memorialcare.org.

Farmer relocation

According to 9th District Councilmember Rex Richardson’s office, the Farmer’s Market, formerly at Houghton Park, will now be at the Michelle Obama Neighborhood Library Learning Garden, 5870 Atlantic Ave., on the second Tuesday of each month from 3pm to 7pm.

The Signal Tribune has reached over 400 followers on Twitter! Connect with us. @signaltribune


6

NEWS

Signal Tribune

October 12, 2018

Photos by Liezl Estipona

Staff Report

‘Groundbreaking’ expansions to come

Signal Tribune

City officials, including Long Beach Mayor Robert Garcia and 1st District Councilmember Lena Gonzalez, broke ground for the 14th Street Park Expansion Oct. 10 during a ceremony at 14th Street and Long Beach Boulevard. The groundbreaking event, which featured the demolition of an empty restaurant building at the site, is the first step in creating an eastern gateway to 14th Street Park that will include landscape and a gateway sign. Following the demolition, officials will fine-tune park designs, a process that will be in partnership with the community, according to the City of Long Beach Oct. 1. A $250,000 grant from the County of Los Angeles 4th District Supervisorial Funds, $100,000 from Transportation Development Act funds and supplemental park-impact fees are financing the project. The expansion comes on the heels of recent improvements made to the park in June and July, when safety surfacing for the playground, resurfaced courts, shade structures and benches were implemented.

Vote-by-mail ballots to arrive for CA residents, local event to inform about updated VSAP initiative Staff Report Signal Tribune

Election Day is less than a month away, and a local community forum next week seeks to inform residents about the vote-by-mail process and the updated Voting Solutions for All People (VSAP) initiative. The City of Long Beach announced a public event about the Nov. 6 statewide election, to be hosted by City Clerk Monique De La Garza and other Los Angeles County officials, on Oct. 16 from 5pm to 6pm at the City Council Chamber, 333 W. Ocean Blvd. “We are excited for the public to see our newly redesigned vote-bymail ballots for the upcoming Nov. 6 general election and to learn more about our efforts to modernize voting in LA County in 2020,” said Dean Logan, registrar of voters for

LA County, in the Oct. 5 City press release. According to vsap.lavote.net, the Los Angeles Registrar-Recorder/ County Clerk developed VSAP in 2009 to “address an aging voting system and an increasing large and complex electorate.” “Our office will continue to work closely with the Los Angeles County Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk to provide local-election updates and the best service to voters,” De La Garza said in the release. “Our priority is to help Long Beach voters make their voices heard.” In an Oct. 9 press release, California Secretary of State Alex Padilla’s office wrote that state voters who chose to vote by mail can expect to start receiving their ballots in the coming days. His office also wrote that, per State statistics, 67.7 percent of votes casted during

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

the June 5, 2018, statewide primary election were vote-by-mail ballots. “Voting by mail offers California voters a convenient, hassle-free way to participate in our elections,” Padilla said in the release. “As ballots begin to arrive, Californians should make a plan for how they will cast their ballot. Voting by mail allows California voters to complete their ballots in the comfort of their own homes and saves a trip to the polls on Election Day.”

LONG BEACH ANIMAL CARE SERVICES PRESENTS

Parking for the public Oct. 16 event will be available at the West Broadway Parking Garage, 332 W. Broadway. Visit longbeach.gov/cityclerk/ for more information about the voting process and the measures appearing on the Nov. 6 ballot. The City Clerk office can also be reached at (562) 570-6101.

Thursday, October 18, 2018 6 – 7 pm

The Long Beach City Clerk’s office provided the following key dates and information for California residents: • Vote-by-mail ballot mailing and application period: Oct. 9 to Oct. 30 • Registration deadline for Election Day: Oct. 22 • Election Day: Nov. 6 • To register to vote: registertovote.ca.gov • Checking voter-registration status: lavote.net/vrstatus • Local polling places: lavote.net/locator • County-district/precinct maps: lavote.net/precinctmap

Information from LB City Clerk

This ad sponsored by:

Infograph by Denny Cristales | Signal Tribune

Wildlife in Urban Areas Communi�y Mee�ing

Discovery Well Park Community Center 2200 Temple Avenue, Signal Hill Join us for a discussion with Ted Stevens, Long Beach Animal Care Services Manager, on the challenges of living with wildlife in urban areas. Topics of discussion will include laws surrounding wildlife protection and tips to mitigate wildlife concerns. Open to the public. Please RSVP to 562-989-7330 by Monday, October 15, 2018.


NEWS

October 12, 2018

Signal Tribune

7

LGB, CSULB partner to launch art program spotlighting student works

Infographic by Denny Cristales | Signal Tribune

City of LB eliminates fee for online-utility payments

Officials also say that additional charges to be eliminated at select CVS, 7-Eleven stores for cash-only payments. Denny Cristales Managing Editor

Those who advocated against fees that were incurred for paying utility bills online might have a reason to be content this week, as a recent City decision has led to the permanent elimination of said charges. The City of Long Beach’s Department of Financial Management announced in a press release Oct. 8 that those paying utility bills online will no longer be charged a convenience fee, effective that same day. Originally, the online service would charge utility customers $3.75 per payment and $0.95 per eCheck. The City also wrote that utility customers can pay their bills, including shut-off notices, without an additional charge of $1.50 at all participating CVS Pharmancy and 7-Eleven locations starting Oct. 15.

These payments must be made in cash and applied to accounts on the same day, according to the City. For those paying a utility bill in person on or before Oct. 14, the City is instructing them to pay their bill at the same location they have previously frequented. For payments after Oct. 15, residents can access new locations that are listed (in the image above) that utilize the “PayNearMe” service. Residents can find a PayCode on the back of their printed utility bills or at longbeach.gov/utilityservices. On the website, users can select the “Pay As Guest” and “Cash” options, upon which folks can visit any participating store that is listed to make the payment. PayCodes are unique for all billing accounts, according to the City, also adding that there is a maximum amount of $1,000 for each cash

transaction. The Long Beach City Council voted July 2017 to eliminate the convenience fees, a decision that was made in response to public requests. The item was moved forward to approve a new vendor to manage utility payments, according to the Department of Financial Management in an email to the Signal Tribune Oct. 8. The email also noted that the City did not receive any of the previous convenience fees. “Those fees were charged by the vendor to cover the cost of collecting and processing the credit card, debit card and e-check transactions,” according to the department. For more information, visit longbeach.gov/utilitybilling, email go-utilitybilling@longbeach.gov or call (562) 570-5700.

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“The Mountain,” by Manny Krakowski

Courtesy City of LB

Staff Report Signal Tribune

Long Beach Airport (LGB) is getting a little more artsy, as LGB officials and California State University, Long Beach (CSULB) have partnered to begin the School of Art Review (SOAR) pilot program, which will utilize student artwork at the facility to “engage the community,” according to a City press release Oct. 5. Students, both current and alumni, will get the chance to exhibit their artwork outdoors in the LGB’s public plaza between the terminal and the concourse. The City press release specifies that the SOAR program is seeking to spotlight those who specialize in sculpture, wood, ceramics, fibers and metal art pieces. “It has been a pleasure to partner with Cal State Long Beach and present this opportunity for student artists to have their work on display for the thousands of travelers that come through Long Beach Airport every day,” Jess Romo, airport director, said. “Long Beach has a rich history of aviation and the arts, so it’s wonderful to have a program like SOAR that incorporates these themes into their work.” A group of LGB panelists reviewed seven projects, four of which were selected for display for a six-month period, according to City officials. On display is the “The Mountain,” by Manny Krakowski, and “Luggage for Native Soil,” by Lena Wolek. Sometime in spring 2019, “Drifting,” by Jojo Solo, and “Collection,” by Amy Williams, will replace those artworks. The Signal Tribune reached out to City officials for further comment, but did not get a response by press time.

Port of LB moves record-breaking TEUs for ‘18 fiscal year Staff Report Signal Tribune

The Port of Long Beach has broken another record, this time having closed out the 2018 fiscal year with a total movement of 8,000,929 20-foot equivalent units (TEUs), the most ever, according to its officials this week. The port’s fiscal year was from Oct. 1, 2017, to Sept. 30, 2018. The numbers represent a 10.7-percent increase from the previous fiscal year, officials wrote in a press release Oct. 9. “We are poised to break our calendar-year record at the end of December,” Mario Cordero, executive director of the port, said. “Despite the tariffs imposed by Washington and Beijing, international trade is showing resilience. And, at our port, we are providing a conduit for commerce that’s efficient for our customers, and getting their cargo to destinations faster, saving them money.” However, port officials in the press release also noted that September’s total volume was flat, with a slight decrease of 0.1 percent compared to September 2017. Imports decreased 2.5 percent to 357,301 TEUs compared to the previous year. Exports were down 3 percent to 121,561 TEUs, while empties increased 5.9 percent to 222,343 TEUs.


8

Signal Tribune

Ghosts

COMMUNITY

October 12, 2018

Protest

continued from page 4

continued from page 3

human body is transformed. It must continue on in some form. What better place to look for that energy conversion than a place where many deaths occur, such as a hospital, especially one built over Long Beach’s Native American village of Puvungna. Puvungna, which many of you know, was a sacred site to our indigenous people. It was a place of powerful energy, which was so powerful that many believed that all life in the world emerged from a nearby sacred spring. I wanted to find out if residual energy from the hospital and/or Puvunga still remains. Were “ghostly� things still happening? Few realize that the original 89.7-acre Navy Hospital was located where the VA hospital is today. In 1941, Uncle Sam began looking for locations to build permanent government hospital facilities. Long Beach, with the Navy nearby on Terminal Island and the new Naval Reserve Air Station in Los Alamitos just a few miles away, seemed like a perfect spot. Construction on the $3-million institution began in October 1941, but it was delayed by a mysterious fire that burned through the wooden forms used in pouring concrete for the walls. Despite this setback, the hospital was commissioned on Dec. 15, 1942. The Long Beach Navy Hospital on 7th Street was short-lived. Following World War II, the Navy began cutting expenses. It seemed the Navy Hospital itself was about to die, scheduled to close in June 1950. However, Long Beach City Health Officer Dr. Irving D. Litwack wasn’t about to see it happen without a fight. Litwack traveled to Washington to speak before a congressional subcommittee overseeing military cutbacks, telling them that closing the Long Beach Navy Hospital would create “an acute public health emergency� in the Long Beach area. The committee agreed to a compromise. The Van Nuys unit for veterans would move to Long Beach and take over the Long Beach Navy Hospital. On June 1, 1950, 1,200 patients, nearly half of them non-ambulatory and paraplegic cases, were transferred from the Birmingham VA hospital in Van Nuys to the newly acquired Long Beach VA hospital. In a brief ceremony in front of the administration building, the Navy struck its colors and ended its occupancy and the Veterans Administration took over. The Long Beach Navy Hospital was reborn in a new location, in a new facility, a decade later. In April 1962, in the midst of the Vietnam War, the United States House of Representatives voted to expend $9.1 million to open another facility in Long Beach. The new hospital at 7500 E. Carson St. was commissioned on Feb. 1, 1967. It became well known for its alcoholic-recovery unit, which hosted former First Lady Betty Ford, Billy Carter and Senator Herman Talmadge. It closed its doors permanently on March 25, 1994. The hospital was torn down, and the Towne Center retail plaza was erected on the site. In writing “Haunted Long Beach 2,� I came across many reports of paranormal happenings at the Carson Boulevard Navy Hospital. In one instance, a heavy metal and glass door that shielded the isolation room in the intensive-care unit on the fourth floor would close by itself, usually between 2am and 3:30am. If it were already closed, it would rattle and open slightly. When this happened, some claimed to have felt the presence of someone going in and out of the room. I decided to interview employees at businesses in the Towne Center, agreeing to keep their names and company names confidential. Many were afraid of “getting into trouble� if they spoke openly. Two employees in the same store told me they had a heavy door that they liked to prop open, but it would inexplicably close itself, very similar to the door in the Navy Hospital’s intensive-care unit! Employees in other establishments told of items mysteriously falling off shelves and hearing “heavy breathing� when they were the only ones around. So, it does appear as if “odd� things still occur on the site. A residual haunting seems the most logical explanation, if you believe in such things! Another business, located in Signal Hill and whose owners wish to remain anonymous, has employees that claim to hear a young girl crying and letting out loud sighs. Some have seen shadows late at night when no one else is there. Some have heard banging on walls and other noises when they thought they were alone. Computers suddenly turn off and on. In investigating the location, I found it was first the site of an Air Force hospital, but from 1947 to 1983, the land was occupied by the Long Beach General Hospital and became a hospital for the homeless, indigent, alcoholics, people in permanent comas, etc. It wasn’t actually an asylum, just a hospital where anyone without money could go or be sent there. Could residual energy from former patients still remain? If you have any stories of your own you would like to share, I would love to hear from you. Contact me through my website at claudineburnettbooks.com or by emailing the Signal Tribune at newspaper@signaltribune.com. Burnett is a former Long Beach librarian who, during her 25 years of researching local history, has uncovered many forgotten stories about Southern California that she has published in nine books. She has degrees from UC Irvine, UCLA and Cal State Long Beach. For more information, visit claudineburnettbooks.com.

    

“

[...] many of the people in our march are victims of sexual violence themselves. – Annika Horvath CSULB student

�

the nation’s capitol and found its way to The Beach this week. Protesters concluded their march under the Liberal Arts 1 (LA-1) building located on the upper level of campus. Annika Horvath, a CSULB student, told the Signal Tribune after the march that the protesters wanted individuals who feel distressed about sexual assault to discuss it in an understanding environment. “A lot of feelings are coming up with Kavanaugh’s confirmation, especially since many of the people participating in our march today are victims of sexual violence themselves,� she said. “We wanted to make sure that people had a safe space, that they could come to afterwards, to debrief, talk through their emotions and find a sense of community on campus.� Horvath said the Women’s Equity Center, located on the first floor of LA-1, is a place where students

can openly discuss sexual-assault trauma with professionals. It is open from 8am to 5pm every week. Shortly after the protest, another student, Bryce Sullivan, approached the group and stated that the protester's claims of Kavanaugh being a “sexual assailantâ€? were completely false. Sullivan claimed that Dr. Ford’s legal team did not do a proper job of the hearing, and he stated that Dr. Ford’s legal team forced her to modify her testimony. “The accusation of rape, I believe, is completely false,â€? he said. “He did conduct his manner very unprofessionally in that court room– I do agree that he should have had a more professional feel. If there were any other solutions that were grounded and brought forward further investigation, I would absolutely wanted that to be pursued as well. I am not for rapists whatsoever.â€? Horvath said she and other protesters were frustrated with federal officials who voted for Kavanaugh, despite many of them claiming they believed Dr. Ford’s testimony. “We had senators that were in the same breath saying, ‘I believe Dr. Ford. She had a very credible case. But I’m still going to vote “yesâ€? for Kavanaugh,’ so we don’t believe that those ideals can lineup,â€? Horvath said. âœŚ

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October 12, 2018

Signal Tribune

9


10

NEWS

Signal Tribune

Measure

October 12, 2018

continued from page 1

Celina Luna, chief of staff for 7th District Councilmember Roberto Uranga, wrote in an emailed reply that she had forwarded the request for information to Kevin Lee, public-affairs officer with the city manager’s office, because he “is handling all press requests as it relates to the charter amendments.” The Signal Tribune emailed Lee, who indicated in his emailed response that answering the questions would be out of his jurisdiction and that the city manager’s office is “in the world of straight-up informational content on the measures.” However, Doud and Mark Taylor, who is serving as the spokesperson on behalf of the campaign to support the measures, did indeed respond with answers to the questions. (Taylor is also Garcia’s chief of staff.) The Signal Tribune also reached out to Ovalle with questions about why his group opposes all four measures. Measure AAA The first measure proposes to amend sections 803 and 806 of the city charter, relating to the duties of the city auditor and clarifying her/ his access to City records. “Measure AAA strengthens the city auditor by authorizing the city auditor to conduct performance audits of the operations and management of all departments, boards, agencies, commissions and offices,” according to abetterlongbeach.com. “Measure AAA also authorizes the city auditor to access and examine all City records needed to conduct financial and performance audits. Passage of this amendment will enable the city auditor to more effectively perform their job as an objective and independent watchdog of public resources and assures Long Beach taxpayer money is spent efficiently, appropriately, and always with the best quality of service in mind.” Signal Tribune: I understand that you support the measure, but can you explain why? Laura Doud: Given the complexity of today’s government organizations, an effective city auditor must be able to conduct not only financial audits, but also performance audits that evaluate government operations and management. To conduct these performance audits, the city auditor requires access to all City records and documents, not just financial-related records. However, the existing city charter language governing the city auditor’s authority was written over a century ago, when audits were strictly focused on the City’s finances and when access was restricted to financial records. Measure AAA is important because it does two things: 1) explicitly allows the city auditor to conduct performance audits, in addition to financial audits, of any City department, agency or commission; and 2) requires the City to grant the city auditor with access to all City records, not just contracts and financial records. The two provisions of Measure AAA are not exceptional. California cities with known internal audit functions indicate that these audit organizations all have charter provisions or other authorizing documents that authorize their city auditors to conduct performance audits and provide their city auditors with access to all city records. These jurisdictions include Los Angeles, San Diego, Sacramento, San Jose, San Francisco, Oakland and Berkeley. ST: How will the measure, if

passed, help your office conduct its business? LD: Long Beach voters bestowed upon me the responsibility to serve as an independent steward of the City’s resources. I am honored to have been granted the public’s trust and take this responsibility with the utmost seriousness. For these reasons, since assuming office, I have raised the bar with respect to the quality and professionalism of audit work by ensuring adherence to modern government auditing standards established by the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO). The GAO’s government auditing standards guide local, state and federal government auditors nationwide on how to effectively conduct financial audits and performance audits. According to these standards and to every other authority on auditing and accounting (i.e., Institute of Internal Auditors and American Institute of Certified Public Accountants), the unrestricted ability to examine records deemed necessary is an absolute requirement to perform an effective audit. Otherwise, the findings and conclusions of an audit could be compromised. The GAO warns government entities against the “restrictions on access to records, government officials, or other individuals needed to conduct an audit.” Such restrictions could mean that the auditors “will not detect a mistake, inconsistency, significant error, or fraud in the evidence.” It is noteworthy that the city charter requires the city auditor be a current certified public accountant, recognizing the importance that the person who holds this office possesses the appropriate knowledge, training and experience in auditing. Furthermore, many of our auditors are rigorously certified by the Institute of Internal Auditors and must adhere to their professional standards. Conducting audits without the opportunity to examine all the necessary records and evidence is contrary to what CPAs, auditors and the profession represent. We’re already doing these performance audits, but what’s happened over the past few years is that there’s a disconnect between what the charter says and what we’re actually doing today. Measure AAA will update the charter language to ensure that city auditors are empowered to conduct performance audits and to examine all necessary City records without restriction. Over the years, the city auditor has obtained non-financial City records and conducted performance audits of City operations, but has been challenged in the past regarding access to some documents and performing certain types of audits. These limitations create inefficiencies for auditors, restrict the scope of audits and recommendations. Measure AAA would eliminate these challenges to the city auditor’s authority. ST: Opponents to the measure have claimed that AAA actually has the potential to allow for corruption concerning contracts and how the City’s funds are managed. What would you say to this criticism? LD: Voters need to know that the changes being proposed in Measure AAA strengthen the authority of the city auditor. Measure AAA ensures the city auditor can continue conducting performance audits, not just financial audits, without restriction. Measure AAA ensures that City departments and offices must provide the City Auditor with access to all City records, not just financial records.

Let me clarify a few important things: [With regard] to access to records, the replacement of the word “timely” from “immediate” is reasonable and consistent with the charter language of other cities in California with a city auditor. The city auditor’s office has always been cognizant of the fact that providing records requires time and effort on the part of City employees. The office has always given City employees a reasonable timeframe within which to provide requested records to our office. Any unreasonable delay in providing such records would be addressed with city management, mayor and/or city council. Measure AAA does not remove the current charter provision that gives the city auditor the ability to receive certified copies of all City contracts. Authorizing the city auditor to conduct performance audits and to have access to all City records enables the city auditor to promote good government, transparency and accountability in an ever-changing Long Beach city government. In fact, this can be seen in audits we’ve conducted related to City contract oversight. We are the only office that has objectively reviewed the City’s administration and oversight of contracts, identified risks and made recommendations for contract oversight improvement. ST: Regarding Measure AAA, opponents have used the old adage, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” What was the impetus for putting AAA on the ballot? In other words, what is “broken” that needs to be fixed? Mark Taylor: Currently, the charter only allows city auditor to do financial audits. Measure AAA would update the city charter to specifically empower the city auditor to do performance audits and to provide access to the records required to do that work. This change is needed to ensure that the city auditor has the power needed to improve effectiveness of our government. Those audits only happen now with cooperation from [the]

city manager and city attorney. ST: Considering one may argue that the mayor’s, the city auditor’s and the council’s intentions seem logical, why are you still opposed to the measure? Carlos Ovalle: The current charter does not explicitly state that the auditor’s office can or cannot do performance audits, but it is understood that these audits are good practice and in keeping with generally accepted government auditing standards. Nobody in government would ask the city auditor to not do the performance audits that have won that office many accolades. (I refer you to the auditor’s office press releases over the years.) However, we feel that this and other minor changes are simply a smoke screen to hide the fact that the

measure takes away the right of the city auditor to request documents immediately, instead replacing that with “timely.” What does “timely” mean? It means nothing when it comes to requesting documents from the City; it allows for the possibility to delay these requests as long as necessary for documents to get lost [or] altered, or other documents created to alter the results. We’re not saying that certain departments will do things against the law, but as the recent and ongoing TigerText fiasco shows, we never know. Documents requested by [another newspaper] with regard to TigerText have yet to be released months after the initial request. The Signal Tribune will publish part 2 of this story in next week’s issue.

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COMMUNITY

October 12, 2018

Council

Signal Tribune

11

continued from page 3

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an opportunity to review the draft EIR and provide additional input during a 30-day public-review period required under CEQA, as well as during a subsequent Planning Commission workshop and public hearing and city-council public hearing, according to the staff report. “There’ll be plenty of opportunity for public comment during the entire process,” Charney said. “We started with some core documents, like a preliminary traffic report, so that when [SHP] starts the process and is engaging in developer outreach, they have some data to share.” Caliber Collision The council approved a CUP to expand Caliber Collision’s allowed use from an autobody-repair facility to an auto-center accessory. Colleen Doan, planning manager,

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allowing a variety of auto-related uses, such as autobody repair, to be located off the main dealership sites and in industrial zones throughout the city.” During the council’s public hearing Tuesday, two representatives of Caliber Collision expressed support for the CUP, and no one opposed. The council unanimously approved both a “negative declaration” that Caliber Collision auto-repair usage was not detrimental and CUP 18-02 allowing its use as an auto-center accessory. SCE audit The council also approved an agreement with Utility Cost Management, LLC (UCM) to audit Southern California Edison’s (SCE) billing on all City accounts. City Manager Charlie Honeycutt explained that UCM offers this service because of the complicated nature of SCE billing, in which fees are calculated based on separate rate schedules for uses, such as street lights, traffic signals, public parks and buildings and water facilities. “Over time, this company has identified that sometimes the rate you’re getting charged at could be incorrect,” Honeycutt said, adding that he has received good feedback about UCM’s services for nearby cities, such as Lakewood, La Mirada, Norwalk and Paramount. Honeycutt said the City will not pay UCM anything up-front, but if the company finds a discrepancy in the City’s bills over the past year, it will pursue a rebate or credit from SCE. The City would then pass on 42 percent of that amount to UCM,

plus that share of any savings realized over the next three years. Councilmember Edward Wilson said he was concerned about how the agreement will be administered, especially if the City ends up paying UCM part of any savings over the next three years. “It’s easy to recognize when you get the credit or get a check from SCE,” he said. “It’s more difficult to sort out when your bill is just ‘less’ and then you have to send a check to someone– a lot of people forget about that agreement.” Wilson also expressed disappointment that UCM did not attend the council meeting. “There’s a multitude of firms that do this,” he said. “I just think it’s important that at least they show up.” Nevertheless, instead of rescheduling the agenda item, the council unanimously agreed to approve the agreement. New employee Mayor Tina Hansen and Finance Director Scott Williams introduced Arezou Biabani, a new account specialist with the Finance Department. “Arezou has worked in accounting and human resources in the private sector and wanted to bring her experience to public service,” Hansen said. “She’s happy to be joining the Signal Hill community because she enjoys environments where she can connect with and work closely with the personnel.” The next Signal Hill City Council meeting will take place Tuesday, Oct. 23, at 7pm in the council chamber at 2175 Cherry Ave.

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said that the Planning Commission had reviewed Caliber Collision’s request to expand its allowed usage at a public workshop in August and a September public hearing. After that hearing, the commission had recommended that the council approve the CUP since the firm had provided a letter from Honda’s vice-president of dealer operations indicating that Caliber Collision is a “majority-service provider” to Honda for autobody repairs. The commission had also found that the condition of Caliber Collision’s site at 2370 Walnut Ave.– consisting of six buildings with multiple units for offices, storage and auto-body repair– is not detrimental to the community or vicinity properties in the light-industrial zone and contains sufficient parking, Doan said. Doan explained that allowing such expansion of auto-repair usage is consistent with the City’s Auto Center Accessory Uses Ordinance, adopted in 2016. “The purpose of the ordinance is to facilitate the auto center’s economic viability,” Doan said. “The ordinance accomplishes this by

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Signal Tribune

TST5763 / 2018 218518 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: BEAN LIGHTING, 1600 E. 29th Street, Unit A, Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: SETH MORGAN PORTER, 1231 E. 4th Street, Unit 1, Long Beach, CA 90802. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Seth Morgan Porter. The registrant has not begun to use this fictitious business name. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on August 29, 2018. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: September 21, 28 & October 5, 12, 2018.

TST5764 / 2018 232412 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: KNICK KNACK, 112 E. 22nd St., San Pedro, CA 90731. Registrant: TROY JAMES GARCIA, 112 E. 22nd St., San Pedro, CA 90731. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Troy James Garcia. The registrant has begun to use this fictitious business name. The registrant began using this fictitious business name in September, 2018. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on September 12, 2018. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: September 21, 28 & October 5, 12, 2018.

TST5765 / 2018 238285 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: PARLOUR MARIE, 4166 Norse Way B, Long Beach, CA 90808. Registrant: JOHNATHAN COOLEY, 4682 Milo Dr D, Huntington Beach, CA 92649. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Johnathan Cooley. The registrant has begun to use this fictitious business name. The registrant began using this fictitious business name in September, 2018. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on September 19, 2018. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: September 21, 28 & October 5, 12, 2018. TST5766 / 2018 212519 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: UNDEFEATED ADACEMY, 332 Argonne Avenue, Long Beach, CA 90814. Registrant: ROBERT SCOTT WEBB, 332 Argonne Ave., Long Beach, CA 90814. This business is conducted by: a General Partnership. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Robert Scott Webb, General Partner. The registrant has begun to

PUBLIC NOTICES use this fictitious business name. The registrant began using this fictitious business name in August, 2018. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on August 22, 2018. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: September 21, 28 & October 5, 12, 2018. TST5769 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE: APN: 7211-030-075 TS No: CA0800033618-1 TO No: 18-0002059-01 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE (The above statement is made pursuant to CA Civil Code Section 2923.3(d)(1). The Summary will be provided to Trustor(s) and/or vested owner(s) only, pursuant to CA Civil Code Section 2923.3(d)(2).) YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED November 16, 2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On October 25, 2018 at 09:00 AM, Vineyard Ballroom, Doubletree Hotel Los Angeles-Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650, MTC Financial Inc. dba Trustee Corps, as the duly Appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust recorded on November 23, 2005 as Instrument No. 05 2856992, of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, executed by JOSE DE JESUS CASTRO, A SINGLE MAN, as Trustor(s), in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as nominee for AMERICA`S WHOLESALE LENDER as Beneficiary, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of sale, that certain property situated in said County, California describing the land therein as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1509 EAST 23RD STREET #B, SIGNAL HILL, CA 907553562 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the Note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said Note(s), advances if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligations secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of this Notice of Trustee’s Sale is estimated to be $368,534.93 (Estimated). However, prepayment premiums, accrued interest and advances will increase this figure prior to sale. Beneficiary’s bid at said sale may include all or part of said amount. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the California Financial Code and authorized to do business in California, or other such funds as may be acceptable to the Trustee. In the event tender other than cash is accepted, the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustee’s Deed Upon Sale until funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a matter of right. The property offered for sale excludes all funds held on account by the property receiver, if applicable. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. Notice to Potential Bidders If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a Trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a Trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free

and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same Lender may hold more than one mortgage or Deed of Trust on the property. Notice to Property Owner The sale date shown on this Notice of Sale may be postponed one or more times by the Mortgagee, Beneficiary, Trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about Trustee Sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call Auction.com at 800.280.2832 for information regarding the Trustee’s Sale or visit the Internet Web site address www.Auction.com for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case, CA08000336-18-1. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: September 11, 2018 MTC Financial Inc. dba Trustee Corps TS No. CA08000336-18-1 17100 Gillette Ave Irvine, CA 92614 Phone:949-252-8300 TDD: 866-660-4288 Myron Ravelo, Authorized Signatory SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ONLINE AT www.Auction. com FOR AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: Auction.com at 800.280.2832 Trustee Corps may be acting as a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained may be used for that purpose.ISL Number 49718, Pub Dates: 09/28/2018, 10/05/2018, 10/12/2018, SIGNAL TRIBUNE

TST5770/ 2018 235906 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: EICHNER FUKUI DESIGN, 2925 Cedar Avenue, Long Beach, CA 90806. Registrant: 1. MAUNA EICHNER, 2. LEE FUKUI, 2925 Cedar Avenue, Long Beach, CA 90806. This business is conducted by: a General Partnership. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Mauna Eichner, Partner. The registrant has not begun to use this fictitious business name. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on September 17, 2018. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: September 28 & October 5, 12, 19, 2018. TST5768 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. CA-14-704988-RY Order No.: 160055931-CA-VOI YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 7/12/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial

publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor(s): LILIA LOPEZ, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN Recorded: 7/20/2006 as Instrument No. 06 1599635 of Offcial Records in the offce of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California; Date of Sale: 11/20/2018 at 10:00 AM Place of Sale: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA 91766 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $569,934.38 The purported property address is: 2388 CERRITOS AVENUE, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 Assessor’s Parcel No.: 7211-019-010 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 916-939-0772 for information regarding the trustee’s sale or visit this Internet Web site http://www.qualityloan.com, using the fle number assigned to this foreclosure by the Trustee: CA-14-704988-RY. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be refected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. Date: Quality Loan Service Corporation 2763 Camino Del Rio South San Diego, CA 92108 619645-7711 For NON SALE information only Sale Line: 916-939-0772 Or Login to: http:// www.qualityloan.com Reinstatement Line: (866) 645-7711 Ext 5318 Quality Loan Service Corp. TS No.: CA14-704988-RY IDSPub #0145543 10/5/2018 10/12/2018 10/19/2018

TST5777 / 2018 247420 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: BORG’S FRAMING, LLC, 1930 E. 15th St., Los Angeles, CA 90021. Registrant: BORG’S FRAMING, LLC, 3601 Bluebell St., Seal Beach, CA 90740. This business is conducted by: a Limited Liability Company. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Casey Harry Borg, Owner. The registrant has begun to use this fictitious business name. The registrant began using this fictitious business name in September, 2018. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on September 27, 2018. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in

October 12, 2018 this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: October 5, 12, 19, 26, 2018. TST5757 / 2018 226289 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. MORRISSEY FABRIC 2. MORRISSEY MADE 3. MORRISSEY DESIGN 4. MORRISSEY GOODS 5. MORRISSEY HOME, 2692 Dawson Avenue, Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: ANITA J. MORRISSEY, 30 VIA DI ROMA WALK, Long Beach, CA 90803. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Anita J. Morrissey. The registrant has begun to use this fictitious business name. The registrant began using this fictitious business name in September , 2015. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on September 6, 2018. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: September 14, 21, 28 & October 5,2018. TST5778 / Case No. NS034594 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME, SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, 275 Magnolia Ave., Long Beach, CA 90802. PETITION OF Mario Alberto Consuelo Gonzalez TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: 1. Petitioner: MARIO ALBERTO CONSUELO GONZALEZ has filed a petition with this court for a decree changing his name as follows: Present Name: MARIO ALBERTO CONSUELO GONZALEZ to Proposed Name: EITAN ELIAV CONSUELO GONZALEZ 2. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: November 16, 2018; Time: 8:30A M; Dept. S27, Room 5400. The address of the court is the same as above. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, THE SIGNAL TRIBUNE, 1399 E. 28th, Street, Signal Hill, CA 90755: October 12, 19, 27 & November 2, 2018 ___//ss//___ Mark C. Kim, Judge of the Superior Court

Dated October 3, 2018

TST5779 / 2018 247986 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: PLAUSIBLE DENIABILITY, 3553 Atlantic Avenue B-1201. Registrant: 1. SEAN MCCABE, 3139 Cedar Avenue, Long Beach, 90806 2. DANIEL SAMARIN, 1931 E. 3rd Street, Long Beach, CA 90802. This business is conducted by: a General Partnership. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Sean McCabe, General Partner. The registrant has begun to use this fictitious business name. The registrant began using this fictitious business name in August, 2018. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on September 28, 2018. NOTICE: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: October 12, 19, 26, & November 2, 2018.


NEWS

October 12, 2018

EYE ON CRIME CRIMES REPORTED BY THE SIGNAL HILL POLICE DEPARTMENT Thursday, Oct. 4 8:56am Identity theft 2300 block Promontory Dr.

900 block E. 33rd St.

2700 block Cherry Ave

11:14pm Trespassing 2700 E. PCH (suspect arrested)

12:32pm Identity theft 2100 block Ridge View Terrace

2pm Auto burglary 1800 block Molino Ave.

Sunday, Oct. 7 2:01pm DUI Orange Ave./E. Willow St. (suspect arrested)

3:44pm Identity theft 2500 block Cherry Ave.

7:44pm Battery California Ave./E. 25th St.

3:47pm Robbery 2500 block Cherry Ave.

8:59pm 3 misdemeanor warrants 1600 block E. Willow St. (suspect arrested)

4:19pm Burglary 1900 block Cherry Ave.

11:33am Auto burglary E. 33rd St./Orange Ave.

Friday, Oct. 5 11:15am Auto burglary 900 block Las Brisas Way 2:20pm Possessing paraphernalia; possessing controlled substance; appropriate los property; 4 misdemeanor warrants 3300 Atlantic Ave. (suspect arrested) 9pm Possessing controlled substance; misdemeanor warrant E. PCH/Cherry Ave. (suspect arrested) Saturday, Oct. 6 5:11pm Battery

5:33pm Battery 900 block E. Spring St. Monday, Oct. 8 9:56am Grand theft– motor vehicle 700 block E. 29th St. 10:12am Trespassing 2700 block E. PCH (suspect arrested) 12:32pm Identity theft 2000 block Junipero Ave. 2:16pm Auto burglary 1800 block E. Willow St. Tuesday, Oct. 9 10:58am Burglary

7:42pm Forgery; false checks/records/certificates/etc; passing completed check: intent to defraud; make/pass fictitious check; obtain credit/ etc; use others id. 2200 block E. Willow (suspect arrested) Wednesday, Oct. 10 9:24am Burglary 1000 block E. 32nd St. 11:12am Battery 2400 block Cherry Ave. 2:26pm Grand theft 700 block E. Spring St. 5:24pm Grand theft 2400 block Cherry Ave. 6:50pm Grand theft 2500 block Cherry Ave. 7:39pm 2 felony warrants 2700 block Cherry Ave.

Save the Date 22 AnnuAl ND

Veterans Day Parade and Festival November 10, 2018 at 10am Atlantic Ave. & Harding Ave. Long Beach

Join us As we give

“A salute to those who served”

Signal Tribune

Ordinance

13

continued from page 1

cerned about our housing stock and the ability for people to have affordable housing in the city of Long Beach, but, also, I respect the rights of individuals to use their properties as income as well. I think we need– as a city council– to find a place that balances all of those interests moving forward.” Austin also said the diversity of each pocket of Long Beach will play into the variety of opinions from the public and will need to be factored into the council’s decision-making process. “I think my district is impacted a little differently than other areas of the city and, so, the diversity of Long Beach is going to play out with this issue, I think, in a big way,” Austin said. Long Beach Development Services defines STRs as “a home, or portion of a home, rented by paying guests for short stays (30 days or less),” according to Wednesday’s presentation, which included a brief recap of the process that has been unfolding about the issue since the city council gave a directive for a review of STR regulation in March 2017. In the year and several months that has passed since then, Lisa Wise Consulting, Inc. has worked closely with the City to incorporate public input into the process of developing a proposal for an ordinance to regulate STRs for the city council’s consideration. STRs represent less than 1 percent of the city’s housing stock, and the majority of STRs in the city are along the coastline, according to the presentation. “We expect these options to be revised and refined and put together into a draft report,” Jennifer Daughterty, senior associate with Lisa Wise, said at the workshop. “That draft report will be presented to council on Nov. 13, and, from that meeting, we expect to get direction from council on how to proceed. If council gives us direction to move forward with drafting an ordinance, then we will move forward with public hearings.” “Broadly speaking, in terms of themes, we’ve heard from the community, we’ve heard both positive and negative [feedback],” Daughtery said, highlighting the issues that have surfaced during the public-input process. Per the presentation, the primary arguments in favor of STRs in the city include hosts depending upon the supplemental income from renting out their property, STR guests supporting local businesses and increased curb appeal of houses that are used as STRs as a result of owners keeping up with maintenance and improvements. Primary arguments opposed include complaints about noise and parking issues that occur (more often in non-hosted STRs, where the owner does not reside on the property with the renters), “party houses” developing as a result of lack of enforcement for noise regulations and any house rules given by owners and concerns about the impact of STRs on the rental stock and housing shortage. Daugherty said the three options presented Wednesday were part of the “alternatives” phase of the process and that there would still be time to incorporate feedback from the public into the options before presenting them to council next month. She said the three options were still to be considered “works in progress.” In every option, the City’s noise ordinance would apply.

Option one has the least regulations built into it and requires owners to register with the City, provide a local 24-hour contact, pay the City’s 12 percent Transient Occupancy Tax (TOT)– also known as the hotel bed tax, according to the City’s website– and provide a registration number in listings of the rental property. Option two includes all of the above and specifies that owners may have up to two STRs or three if one is the primary residence (a hosted STR). This option also limits the number of STRs in multi-family buildings, limits un-hosted stays in an owner’s primary residence to 90 days and includes a maximum occupancy of two people per bedroom plus two people in a room other than a bedroom, but no more than 10 people total in one night. The third option includes all of the above and prohibits un-hosted STRs in designated areas through a petition process. After Daugherty presented the three options, she opened the floor for public comment. The majority of people who spoke during public comment were owners of STRs who either had questions about the different options for better understanding, had significant criticism of one or more of the options or both. One commenter asked if a “no-action” option were being considered and evaluated equally with the other options. After Daughtery indicated that, no, that was not a piece of their proposals thus far, a member of the audience yelled, “Can we vote for that?” Daugherty said it ultimately is up to council to choose to move forward on none of the options presented, and that the option is available regardless of it being included in the draft proposal. Representatives with Airbnb, the most common platform for owners to list their STRs in Long Beach, according to the presentation, was present at the workshop. None of the representatives, including spokesperson Rebecca Morales, could speak on-the-record, but Morales sent the company’s official statement to the Signal Tribune via email. “It is encouraging to see city leaders take a proactive and transparent approach to addressing this important issue,” John Choi, Airbnb public policy manager, said. “As community feedback has shown, Long Beach residents want to preserve the economic benefits that homesharing provides for them, local businesses and the city. We look forward to working with the community and lawmakers to enact regulations that are fair, affordable and streamlined and do not pit neighbors against neighbors.” Daugherty included in the presentation overlapping themes that indicate what is wanted is an approach where any regulations put in place are enforceable, a simple registration process is established and a grace-period to allow for the adjustment to new requirements is provided. Following Wednesday’s workshop, public input will be reviewed and incorporated into the three options where possible. The revised and finalized proposal will be presented to council for review at the regularly scheduled Nov. 13 city council meeting at 5pm at the council chamber, 333 W. Ocean Blvd., and public comment will be available at that time. ✦


14

Signal Tribune

Alzheimer’s

COMMUNITY

October 12, 2018

continued from page 1

Courtesy Tori Kormanik

Tori Kormanik is pictured above with her mother and family. Kormanik is walking in the 2018 Walk to End Alzheimer’s in honor of her mother, Shirley Marie Schreiber, who fought the disease for years before she died in 2016.

gets more and more and faster and faster. At least, it did for us. I mean, we look back and we say, ‘Ya know, I think she was already developing it then.’” Kormanik said her mother started waking up in the middle of the night, and she didn’t know why she was awake. She would be wide awake, and she would get up and start watching television. “And my dad would find her watching TV, and he’d go, ‘I don’t know what’s happening,’” she said. The Alzheimer’s Association reports that nearly two-thirds of Americans with the disease are women and is the only “top-10 cause of death” in the country that cannot be prevented, cured or slowed. “It’s not like you go to the hospital and you get treatment for it,” Kormanik said. “It’s not like getting cancer or heart disease. I mean, there isn’t even medication for it. So, there’s so much more that needs to be done.” Kormanik remembers going to visit her mom when she was still well enough after her diagnosis to go out, and the two of them would go fabric-shopping because her mom had a passion for quilting. “She made quilts for every family member that she knew and for my friends’ kids [...] her quilts are everywhere in this country, it’s amazing. Hundreds of hundreds of quilts for people,” Kormanik said. “She would just scour the whole [store], and we would exclaim on all these fabrics and how beautiful they were. And she loved color, like bright colors. Oranges and reds and yellows and greens and blues, and she loved soft fabrics. She would stay up all night and quilt.” Her mother won first prize at a county fair for her very first hand-quilted quilt she ever made. Kormanik said her mother had been one of the younger ladies in the contest that year, and her mom said “all these old ladies” came over to look at her stitching and were not too happy that she had won on her first entry. One day, as the disease progressed, Kormanik’s mother decided to cut some of the pieces of that very quilt, as if she were going to to sew them together to make a new one. The original quilt is irreparable. “Alzheimer’s is a devastating and fatal disease impacting millions of Americans and threatening to bankrupt Medicare,” Harry Johns, Alzheimer’s Association

and Alzheimer’s Impact Movement (AIM) president and CEO, said in a press release last month. “But much-needed new funding is accelerating the pace of progress, fostering collaboration and data sharing and bringing us closer to our vision of a world without Alzheimer’s.” A new federal law signed into law last month will bring the largest-ever funding increase to Alzheimer’s and dementia research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), according to the release, which calls Alzheimer’s the “most expensive disease in the country.” The Alzheimer’s Association and AIM advocated for the funding increase of $425 million, and the bill was signed into law Sept. 28– just ahead of Mental Illness Awareness week, which is commonly observed the first week of October. Last year, Kormanik walked for her first time in the Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s, which is organized annually in more than 600 communities across the city, according to the event website. Kormanik said that, last year, when she did the walk, she didn’t share the experience with anyone because she was still grieving. This year, she committed to raising funds with her walking effort, and she has raised $540 so far. She will be walking alongside the hundreds of Long Beach participants on Saturday, Oct. 13, at Rainbow Lagoon Park. A resident of Long Beach for nearly 10 years, Kormanik brought her mother’s love for cooking to life through her small business, Burnin’ Beak, where she handmakes pepper jellies in all varieties. “[My mother] loved to cook, and she loved food […] and she loved her kids,” Kormanik said. “And she was a good cook […] I remember, as a kid, just being in the kitchen with her and watching her cook and learning how to cook. She had tons of cookbooks, and she followed recipes, and she exchanged reci-

pes with her sisters […] nobody exchanges recipes anymore. And there was no Pinterest back then!” Burnin’ Beak officially launched in 2011, and the product is on the shelf at five local brick-and-mortar locations. She also bring her pepper jelly to festivals and community events all over Southern California. With the help of her sister, Kormanik’s jellies have crossed state lines and are for sale in her hometown of San Antonio, Tex. “One thing I like about the product is that it’s a basic product […] it doesn’t have fruit in it,” Kormanik said. “It has a flavor, but not a fruit flavor, and that gives it the ability to be versatile. So, you can combine with other ingredients. You can make a sauce out of it, you can make a glaze out of it […] you can mix into other ingredients and make a marinade for meat or fish or chicken out of it. Or you can make a salad dressing […] it gives it a little bit of a tang and a little bit of a fire. As my husband says, ‘Your only limitation is your imagination with what you can do with it.’” She said the most unusual thing she has tried it on yet was vanilla ice cream. “It’s just like, ‘Wow! What is this?” she said, describing how the sweet vanilla and the tangy jelly go together. As the holidays approach, Kormanik said her customers can most likely expect a few seasonal surprises. Her family gathers in San Antonio for Thanksgiving each year, and the jellies make a regular

appearance atop their traditional family meal. She said it was during their last Thanksgiving with their mother when their father unexpectedly ended up the hospital, forcing “[us] to become the parents.” “At the height of when my mom was going through this, [my dad] ended up– on Thanksgiving Day– [...] on the bedroom floor having a seizure,” she said. “And he was in the hospital for about six weeks for the seizures […] something burst, and he had to have a surgery. He was in the hospital, and my mom was at home […] and she was having a hard time, and so we got her into an assisted living memory care facility. And then when my dad got out of the hospital, he went to the memory care to be with her. That was about eight months, and that’s when she passed. Things were just thrown at us, and we had to make decisions for our family because they weren’t able to– neither of them.” She said her parents were right at 60 years of marriage when her mom died– “All their lives. A lifetime.” Describing her father’s upbringing as very serious and straightforward, Kormanik said she thinks one of the things her father loved most about her mother was that she had a big personality. “She was so gregarious– and she loved that word,” Kormanik said. “She loved people and being with friends, and she loved children. She was so outgoing and so fun, and she was always smiling and laughing.” Kormanik and her siblings had talked with their parents about settling into a retirement facility of sorts before, but the combination of their dad being in the hospital and their mom struggling with Alzheimer’s put the ball in motion for the

decision. “We were able to tell [my mom], at that point, that, ‘Once dad gets out of the hospital, he’s going to come and join you here,’” Kormanik said. “And she was OK with that, and he was OK with that […]. She didn’t want to be without him, she didn’t want to live without him in a different place.” As she prepares for the upcoming Alzheimer’s walk for her mother, Kormanik remembers how much hope she felt at the event last year, rather than sadness or grief. “Being at the event, with all the other people, and knowing what they’re going through, and knowing what they’ve been through, and knowing how much they love their family members and the support of everyone who was there […] it was a joyful event,” she said. “It wasn’t a somber event. It could’ve been, for sure, it could’ve been. But you have to be hopeful about it, rather than having a defeatist attitude about it. I mean, because, otherwise, where is the hope? So, it was the atmosphere, a lot of it was the atmosphere, and that’s why I’m excited about doing [the walk] again this year.” The Alzheimer’s Association funds research, care and support services for people with the disease and their care-givers. Eighty-three percent of the help provided to older adults in the United States comes from family members, friends or other unpaid caregivers, according to the association’s findings. “I think the support that they have for people, for not only for caregivers for family members, but just the community support is valuable to people these days,” Kormanik said. “Plus, I think the research, in the long-term, is going to make a difference.” ✦

LIVES LIVED Lawrence Lum 67 Anthony Sao 46 Mary Mangano 83 Marie Sevetick 83 Jeanne Cooper 95 Rose Botsko 94 Ruth Stotland 92 Gloria WhitT 70 Thomas Gattinella 58 Sally McCulloch 86 Margaret Weuve 79 Sherri Kenyon 72

The families were assisted by McKenzie Mortuary. For more details on service dates and times, contact (562) 961-9301.

Pet of the week: Steely Dan Steely Dan has a steely look made even more piercing by his mesmerizing, deep-blue eyes that seem to follow you wherever you go. He’s a male lynx point, about 5 years old who’s both beautiful to look at and a charming fellow. Wanna be a Steely Dan groupie? Meet him on the shelter side of the Companion Animal Village at 7700 East Spring St., (562) 570-PETS. Ask for ID#A612703—and Rikki, don’t lose that number. (This rescue encouraged by the usual suspects.)


FEATURE

October 12, 2018

Signal Tribune

Aquarium of the Pacific welcomes new sea lion, Chase

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Mammal expert explains integration process for the new critter.

Lissette Mendoza Editorial Intern

Chase the sea lion spends his time swimming in loops in the back of his new home within the Aquarium of the Pacific. While a couple of the sea lions were seen swimming in sync on one side of the tank Oct. 9, Chase was seen on the other side, calmly swimming upside down by himself before making a loop, returning to his original starting point and drifting backwards into his loop once again. The 4-year old, 280-pound male joined the rest of the seal and sea lion family a week ago. He was specifically chosen from a group of other optional animals, as he was seen as the best fit to integrate into the aquarium, according to experts. Factors that are used to determine whether an animal will be the best fit include receptive responses to being in a public setting, such as an aquarium, an animal that is not going to challenge others for a hierarchy position and trainability, according to Rob Mortensen, assistant curator of birds and mammals at the aquarium. In an interview with the Signal Tribune Oct. 9, Mortensen described the extensive process of getting Chase integrated into his new habitat. “The first thing we do with any new animal is that we quarantine them,” he said. “We want to make sure if he had any diseases that they wouldn’t transmit to other parts of the collection. Whether that's a bird, a fish or a mammal, that’s an auto-

matic safety precaution. We keep the animal in a back area for 30 to 60 days, depending on the animal.” Once they are medically cleared, the animals learn some trained basic behaviors. In the case of sea lions, experts teach them to respond to certain commands, avoid competitiveness with others for food and recognize shapes so the animal responds to the corresponding visual with its trainer. Mortensen said that sea lions get hazed when introduced into new homes. “There has to be some sort of pecking order that has to be established with these animals,” he said. “Sometimes, if one comes in that’s new and there’s a bigger, more assertive animal, you will have some jostling back and forth until they re-establish their pecking order. It’s pretty normal. This is something they do in the wild, as well. [Chase] has, but he’s a little bit of a bigger animal, so he’s had a little bit of an easier time integrating into the collection, and he was accepted pretty readily.” Chase can be told apart from the three other sea lions– Parker, Harpo and Cain– by his slightly darker coat color and bigger head. In the exhibit, Chase is also joined by three harbor seals, Ellie, Shelby and Troy. When asked what stood out about Chase the most, Mortensen said, “I love Chase. He’s a very willing animal [and] very, very calm, so he’s usually doing what we ask him to do. He is very cooperative [and] wants to please.” ✦

Scan the above QR code with a smartphone or tablet device to view a Signal Tribune video, by Lissette Mendoza, about Chase.

Chase, the Aquarium of the Pacific’s latest sea lion

Courtesy Aquarium of the Pacific


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Signal Tribune

October 12, 2018

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Oct. 12, 2018 | Vol. XL No. 42  
Oct. 12, 2018 | Vol. XL No. 42  
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