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19TH ANNUAL VETERANS D AY PARADE

A Salute to Those Who Served

November 7, 2015


November 7, 2015

19TH ANNUAL VETERANS D AY PARADE

A Salute to Those Who Served

Welcome to the 19th annual long beach veterans day Parade! On behalf of the Long Beach Veterans Day Committee, we thank you for attending today to honor our many veterans who have served in the Armed Forces of the United States. It is because of their service that we enjoy all of our many freedoms. We want to recognize this year’s many sponsors – California Resources Corporation, Edison International and Tesoro Refinery. We are pleased to partner with them and all of our sponsors to bring you this parade. Through the help of our many sponsors we are able to again produce an event that appropriately honors our veterans. The Long Beach Veterans Day Committee is a 501c3 non-profit organization made up of community volunteers. It is responsible for the planning and presentation of this event. This parade is unique in that it is not sponsored by a government entity as are other events of its kind in Southern California. Planning for this parade is a year round effort that results in an event that can be enjoyed by the entire family. A great deal of research has gone into the information presented in this souvenir program. It is our hope that you will take time to read and learn about the branches of the United States Armed Forces from the facts presented. Success of today’s event is due to the efforts of many people. We thank the many parade participants, the parade spectators and the many individuals who have worked so diligently to produce this parade. We want to express our special thanks the following: • • • • • •

Our many Community Sponsors JCL Traffic Control Beacon House Association Volunteers Charter Communications Pageantry Productions Our many Community Volunteers

We invite you to sit back and enjoy the parade as we give our “Salute to Those Who Served.”

Martha Thuente Event Coordinator Veterans Day Parade 2015 Program is a production of

Val Lerch L.B. Veterans Day Committee PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF/ADVERTISING SALES

Neena R. Strichart

PRODUCTION MANAGER/DESIGN

Cierra Hoaglin

PRODUCTION LIAISON

COPY EDITOR/WRITER

939 EAST 27TH STREET

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT/WRITER

S IGNAL T RIBUNE N EWSPAPER . COM

Ashley Goodsell

Martha Thuente

SIGNAL HILL • 562-595-7900 Adam Buchsbaum Ariana Gastelum

Cory Bilicko

Denny Cristales

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19TH ANNUAL VETERANS D AY PARADE

A Salute to Those Who Served

November 7, 2015

Partial list of parade participants EXCHANGE CLUB OF LONG BEACH WELCOME TO THE LONG BEACH VETERANS DAY PARADE LAKEWOOD HIGH SCHOOL NAVY JROTC LONG BEACH POLY HIGH SCHOOL BAND MAYOR ROBERT GARCIA CUB SCOUT PACK 140 COUNCIL MEMBER REX RICHARDSON / DISTRICT 9 WELLS FARGO STAGECOACH COUNCIL MEMBER LENA GONZALEZ / DISTRICT 1 PARAMOUNT HIGH SCHOOL JROTC COUNCIL MEMBER DARYL SUPERNAW / DISTRICT 4 U.S. VETS LONG BEACH POLY HIGH SCHOOL JROTC COUNCIL MEMBER DEE ANDREWS / DISTRICT 6 BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA LONG BEACH POLICE DEPARTMENT ELIZABETH BARBA/ HONORARY GRAND MARSHAL LONG BEACH POLICE DEPARTMENT GRAND MARSHAL ALAN KOBRICK GRAND MARSHAL CLIFFORD CHAFFEE PORT OF LONG BEACH SUPERVISOR DON KNABE 26th U.S. CALVARY PHILIPPINE SCOUTS PRIVATE FIRST CLASS HOWARD GENRICH WWII VFW POST 8615 VFW POST 8615 AUXILIARY CITY ATTORNEY CHARLES PARKIN LONG BEACH FIRE DEPARTMENT CALIFORNIA STATE MILITARY RESERVE LONG BEACH MOUNTED POLICE SOUTH BAY YOUTH MENTORS ASSEMBLYMAN PATRICK O’DONNELL SS LANE VICTORY BALLET FOLKLORICO ALMA DE ORO COMBAT INFANTRYMEN’S ASSOCIATION MILITARY VEHICLE COLLECTOR CLUB JOHN MUIR ALUMNI DRUMMERS ASSOCIATION 19TH U.S. CADET CORPS LONG BEACH CITY COLLEGE JACK W. SHUMAN JR. THE NEW BUFFALO SOLIDERS AMERICAN RED CROSS SALVATION ARMY JOHN ARAMBULA JR AQUARIUM OF THE PACIFIC AMVETS POST 48 & POST 33 CUB SCOUT PACK 206 SIGNAL TRIBUNE NEWSPAPER COUNCILMAN EDWARD H.J. WILSON / SIGNAL HILL ROTARY CLUB OF SIGNAL HILL SUSAN B. ANTHONY DAR

CALIFORNIA YOUTH SPIRIT CORPS LONG BEACH ANIMAL CARE SERVICES EXPLORER HUGHES MIDDLE SCHOOL MALE LEADERSHIP ACADEMY RITMO Y FUEGO VIETNAM VETERANS OF AMERICA CHAPTER 756 AMERICAN GOLD STAR MANOR RUN FOR THE WALL PHAROAHS CAR CLUB DOTS THE CLOWN PETE WRIGHT GARDEN GROVE HIGH SCHOOL BAND SUNBURST YOUTH ACADEMY VFW DISTRICT 4 COMPTON SOUNDERS MILITARY FAMILIES SPEAK OUT PARALYZED VETERANS OF AMERICA / CALIFORNIA CHAPTER LONG BEACH KIWANIS CLUB KIWANIS CLUB OF BIXBY KNOLLS NORTH LONG BEACH LOS ANGELES / PASADENA BASE SUBMARINE VETERANS GUARDIA NACIONAL DE NICARAGUA / CALIFORNIA CHAPTER RANCHO ARROYO COMMUNITY ACTION TEAM LONG BEACH BRANCH NAACP FRIENDS OF LONG BEACH ANIMALS BELLFLOWER/LONG BEACH ELKS LODGE #888 WEST COAST WING CHUN LAKEWOOD AMERICAN LEGION POST 496 UPTOWN LONG BEACH LIONS U.S.S. LONG BEACH MARK KEPPEL HIGH SCHOOL BAND

Thank you to our veterans and active service men and women for your service to our country. It is with deep gratitude, appreciation, and respect that we acknowledge your brave commitment to protecting our freedom. ASSEMBLYMEMBER PATRICK O’DONNELL Proudly serving Long Beach, Signal Hill, San Pedro, and Catalina Island


November 7, 2015

A Salute to Those Who Served

19TH ANNUAL VETERANS D AY PARADE

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19TH ANNUAL VETERANS D AY PARADE

A Salute to Those Who Served

November 7, 2015

A history of the veterans day parade

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ow in its 19th year, the Long Beach Veterans Day Parade has grown from humble origins into a family-oriented event that attracts close to 10,000 people. Themed “A Salute to Those Who Served,” the parade is a way we all can honor our veterans, from all branches of the military and from all eras. “Now, more than ever before, we need to let our troops know that they are supported and that we appreciate they are out there fighting for our freedom. That’s what this whole day of celebration is about,” said Martha Thuente, a member of the Veterans Day Parade committee. The Long Beach Veterans Day Parade has grown far beyond anything former City Councilman Jerry Shultz imagined back in 1996. His original goal was to create a patriotic event in Long Beach. He formed a committee of activists in North Long Beach, and they came up with the idea of having a parade. “One hundred and eight men from Long Beach were killed in Vietnam, and they were never recognized by their own city. These men came from all five of our local high schools. The Veterans Day parade was created to honor all branches of service from all of the wars,” said

Shultz. “The parade has been going pretty strong for a long time now. I remember the very first parade. We had to pass the hat to get the money we needed to buy incidentals. And then we just kept growing, and getting bigger and bigger.” The first two years, the parade was held on Labor Day weekend. In 1998 it was moved to Veterans Day weekend. “The first few years were very low key. We were really a hometown parade. Then the parade began to grow, not only in terms of size but also in notoriety. About ten years ago we began working with a professional parade production company. We just keep growing and adding to the event,” said Thuente. Echoing the sentiment, Jerry Shultz stated, “Today the parade has a military grand marshal and honorary grand marshal. I urge everyone to come out, whether or not you were in the military, whether or not you have relatives that served in the military. As we speak, we’ve got several hundred thousand soldiers in harm’s way in Iraq, Afghanistan and other places around the world. “It’s important that everyone comes out to show them how much we appreciate their service.”


November 7, 2015

A Salute to Those Who Served

19TH ANNUAL VETERANS D AY PARADE

WE SALUTE YOU. YOUR DEDICATION POWERS US ALL. California Resources Corporation is proud to sponsor the 19th Annual Long Beach Veterans Day Parade. We extend our heartfelt appreciation to our country’s men and women in uniform for their service.

California’s largest oil and natural gas producer on a gross-operated basis

crc.com

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19TH ANNUAL VETERANS D AY PARADE

A Salute to Those Who Served

November 7, 2015

GRAND MARSHAL

ADC CLifford A Chaffee USN(RET.)

ADC Chaffee was born in Parsons, Kansas in 1915. As a boy, his family moved to Long Beach, California, where he attended Franklin Jr. High and Poly High before joining the United States Navy in 1933. He served in World War II in the aircraft service at Roy Namur Island. He landed on the beach of Roy Namur Island with the Marines. He was in charge of a group of men who repaired damaged planes from various aircraft carriers and battle groups. During the Korean conflict, he served on the aircraft carrier USS Essex. He retired and transferred to the Fleet Reserve in 1954. He has been a member of the Fleet Reserve Association for 74 years. He has held every position, including president of Board 43. At age 70, he was presented with the Carnegie Hero Medal for saving the life of a neighbor’s 4-year-old during a house fire. He and his wife of 75 years, Grace, resided in Long Beach until her passing in 2013. He now lives with his daughter Jeri. He has two grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.

GRAND MARSHAL

Allan Kobrick Allan Kobrick was born on July 3, 1915. He was raised in Manhattan. He enlisted in the Navy in 1942. During his tour he helped establish a Navy Base in Bahia, Brazil since there was a lot of U-boat activity in the South Atlantic. He obtained the rank of Yeoman First Class before his honorable discharge in 1945. After the war he returned to New York City and worked at the Brooklyn Naval Shipyard.

“Honor to the soldier and sailor everywhere, who bravely bears his country’s cause. Honor, also, to the citizen who cares for his brother in the field and serves, as he best can, the same cause.” – Abraham Lincoln


November 7, 2015

A Salute to Those Who Served

19TH ANNUAL VETERANS D AY PARADE

We Proudly Salute

Our Veterans And Their Service For The Benefit Of All Americans From One Veteran To Another,

Happy Veterans Day! Don Knabe

Supervisor, Fourth District County of Los Angeles www.Knabe.com

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19TH ANNUAL VETERANS D AY PARADE

A Salute to Those Who Served

HONORARY GRAND MARSHAL

Elizabeth Barba Long Beach Police Department • Joined LBPD on June 2006 • Worked LBPD Patrol from 2007-2013 • Currently working as a Recruit Training Officer for the Long Beach Police Academy (2013-present)

Military Service

• Army National Guard and Reserve (1991-2014) • Retired Master Sergeant (E-8) – Served 22 1/2 years with Army National Guard and Reserve • HHC 224th Sustainment Brigade, 2200 Redondo Avenue, Long Beach CA

Military Job Titles and Experience: • First Sergeant • Platoon Sergeant • Squad Leader • Brigade Equal Opportunity Advisor • Support Operations Sergeant

Logistics NCO • Communications Operator

LBPD Awards/ Commendations • Meritorious Class “C” Award 2010 and 2013 • Commendation for stolen vehicle with suspect in custody 2006

Military Decorations, Medals, Badges and Campaign Ribbons • Sharpshooter Marksmanship Badge with rifle • Army Achievement Medal • National Defense Service Medal • Army Service Ribbon • Armed Forces Reserve Medal • Global War on Terrorism • Service Medal (Operation • Enduring Freedom 2004-2005) • California Commendation Medal • California Enlisted Trainers • Excellence Ribbon

November 7, 2015


November 7, 2015

A Salute to Those Who Served

19TH ANNUAL VETERANS D AY PARADE

“Welcome Home” Kits for Veterans The Salvation Army in Long Beach assists homeless Veterans and Veteran Families, who are re-housed through HUD-VASH, to set up housekeeping by bridging a gap in basic services. Each veteran is given a “Welcome (to your new) Home” Kit including dishes, pots and pans, glasses, flatware, kitchen towels and utensils, bath towels, bath mats and rugs, trash can, soap and tooth brush holder and a $40 gift card. The value of these kits is $300, and funds are needed to continue this important program that changes the lives of Veterans and Veteran Families in our community. To make a donation or sponsor a “Welcome Home” Kit, please contact Major Judy Hedgren, Social Service and Community Coordinator at 562.247.3524, or judy. hedgren@usw.salvationarmy.org.

To All the Men and Women Who have Served Our Country.

We Honor and Thank You www.jcltraffic.com

(562) 591-2370

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19TH ANNUAL VETERANS D AY PARADE

Air force According to the national security Act of 1947, the Air Force’s mission is to prepare the air forces necessary for effective prosecution of war unless assigned otherwise and, in accordance with integrated joint mobilization plans, for the expansion of the peacetime components of the Air Force to meet the needs of war. The Air Force is actually one of three military departments within the Department of Defense. It is managed by the civilian secretary of the Air Force and under the control of the Secretary of Defense. Their jobs include explosive ordnance disposal, combat rescue, pararescue, security forces, combat control, combat weather tactical air control party and agents who disarm bombs, rescue downed or isolated personnel, call in air strikes and set up landing

A History of our military branches

zones in forward locations. However, other jobs range from flight combat operations to working in a dining facility. these fields include computer specialties, mechanic specialties, communications systems, avionics technicians, medical specialties, civil engineering, public affairs and more. The U.S. Army Signal Corps began the Aeronautical division in 1907, in the wake of the Wright brothers’ flight at Kitty hawk in 1903. The division experimented with aircraft and mostly explored balloons and dirigibles. In 1914, the Army started the Aviation section of the Signal Corps, and soon thereafter World War I began. However, all the other Europeancombatants’ aeriel technology outstripped American technology. President Woodrow Wilson took notice and established the Army Air Service, placed directly under the War department, on May 24, 1918. The Air service grew to more than 19,000 officers, 178,000 enlisted men and 11,754 aircrafts. Post-war demobilization and a name change resulted in the Air Corps, a modest peace-

time operation. World War II came. The Department of War created the Army Air Forces (AAF) and deemed it equal to the Army Ground Forces. The Air Corps remained a branch of the Army, subordinate to the AAF. The AAF fought in every theater of war and had 80,000 aircraft and 2.4 million personnel at its peak. Again, America demobilized postwar, and the U.S. Air Force finally earned its independence from the Army on September 18, 1947. The increased power of new aviation technology, the Vietnam War and the Cold War arms race accelerated the capabilities of the U.S. Air Force. The Air Force also began to explore space with the advent of launch vehicles and orbital satellites. In the 1970s, the Air Force focused on modernizing its fleet and missiles. The Iran Hostage Crisis spurred America to further develop the Air Force. By the 1990s, a collapsed Soviet Union led the U.S. to streamline the Air Force and downsize it overall. Colors Ultramarine blue and Air Force yellow

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Motto “Aim high... fly-fightWin” Song “The Air Force song” Off we go into the wild blue yonder, Climbing high into the sun; Here they come zooming to meet our thunder, At ‘em boys, Give ‘er the gun! (Give ‘er the gun now!) Down we dive, spouting our flame from under, Off with one helluva roar! We live in fame or go down in flame. Hey! Nothing’ll stop the US Air Force! Minds of men fashioned a crate of thunder, Sent it high into the blue; Hands of men blasted the world asunder; How they lived God only knew! (God only knew then!) Souls of men dreaming of skies to conquer Gave us wings, ever to soar! With scouts before And bombers galore. Hey! Nothing’ll stop the US Air Force! Here’s a toast to the host Of those who love the vastness of the sky, To a friend we send a message of his brother men who fly. We drink to those who gave their all of old, Then down we roar to score the rainbow’s pot of gold. A toast to the host of men we boast, the US Air Force! Zoom!

Together We’re Generating More Than Electricity Edison International is proud to sponsor the 18th Annual Long Beach Veterans Day Parade We salute our local veterans for their commitment to serve and protect our country. LIFE. POWERED BY EDISON.


November 7, 2015

A Salute to Those Who Served

19TH ANNUAL VETERANS D AY PARADE

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19TH ANNUAL VETERANS D AY PARADE

A Salute to Those Who Served

November 7, 2015

Your Amish Furniture Experts for over 20 years www.house-to-home-furniture.com


November 7, 2015

A Salute to Those Who Served

19TH ANNUAL VETERANS D AY PARADE

Veterans Mural Salutes men, women who served in all branches, wars Rachel Rifkin Contributing Writer

Every person who’s served our country has a story, but the individual experience often gets lost in the enormity of war. The Long Beach Veterans Mural was created to honor our local veterans and share their stories, one person, one face, at a time. Located in north Long Beach, the mural faces the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Houghton Park. It has also been the starting and finishing point for the annual Long Beach Veterans Day Parade since it was unveiled on Veterans Day in 2006. Designed by former Long Beach resident and artist Art Mortimer, the mural depicts images of military men and women from all branches of military, from the Civil War to the present.The Long Beach mural program, which is part of the Parks, Recreation and Marine department, commissioned Mortimer to complete the mural. “After I got input from the community, I looked for photographs and images that related to the subject,” said Mortimer. “I went to the historical society, got people’s personal photographs and talked to veterans. I always look for pictures that I have some connection to. ”The mural displays all six logos of the armed forces and a large flag serves as the backdrop for the mural. Starting from the far left, there is an image from 1940 of two Civil War Veterans and two army officers saluting. In the center of the mural, there is a group of Civil War veterans standing with a drum that reads “Long Beach Calif. G.A.R. (Grand Army of the Republic) Martial Band.” To the right of the Civil War veterans, there are three men celebrating the end of WWI. The man in the center holding the flag and the sailor on the right have switched hats. At top center there are two female pilots. The female pilot on the left is Loretta Foy, who served

in the Women Airforce Service Pilots in WWII. To the right of Foy is a family picture of Paul Bice, who served in the South Pacific and the Middle East, and his mother. Next to the female pilots are two armed servicemen on their base in Korea during the Korean War. They are surrounded by the medals that were awarded to servicemen during Vietnam. Below the female pilots there is an image of Cliff Chaffee, a career Navy man, posing with his biplane in 1937. In 2006, 91-year-old Chaffee served as Honorary Grand Marshall of the Veterans Day Parade. Next to Chaffee is a group of Veterans at the dedication of the Long Beach Vietnam Veterans Memorial. To the right of the group of veterans is former city councilman Jerry Shultz, a Vietnam veteran and the driving force behind the Long Beach Vietnam Veterans Memorial. “It’s such an honor to have my picture on the mural, especially when you have kids. It’s always nice to be recognized for your service, especially as a Vietnam vet,” said Shultz. “We didn’t exactly have a welcoming party when we returned. I served my country, I did my time and I was lucky that I returned.” To the right of Shultz sits the USS Long Beach, a nuclear-powered guided missile cruiser that reminds us of Long Beach’s once strong naval base. Tuskegee Airman Aaron Herrington is next to the USS Long Beach. The Tuskegee Airmen were America’s first black military airmen. Herrington graduated from the U.S. Army Corps as a second Lieutenant. After the war, he and his wife Maycie settled in Long Beach. The last image is of PFC George

Torres, the first Long Beach marine to die in Iraq. He and his parents lived only a block from the mural. “One of my favorite images was the picture of PFC George Torres,” said Mortimer. “That was really special because he was related to Dora Cortes, one of the ladies from the redevelopment agency. She took me to her cousin George’s house to meet his parents. His parents were from Mexico and this had been such a blow to them. The Marines had sent back his belongings and his parents hadn’t opened

the box yet. But they opened it for me. It was very emotional for them. His Purple Heart medal was in there.” Cortes was delighted to find out that George was one of the veteransselected to be in the mural. “It’s an awesome feeling to know that my cousin is in the mural and has affected so many people. When I walk by with somebody, I get to say, ‘Hey, that’s my cousin.’ It makes me a proud American and makes me proud of my family and my culture,” said Cortes.

“On this Veterans Day…

I am honored to recognize our veterans for their courage and sacrifices while preserving the freedom of our country.” CONGRESSMAN ALAN LOWENTHAL

Paid for and Authorized by Alan Lowenthal for Congress. ID# C00498212

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19TH ANNUAL VETERANS D AY PARADE

A Salute to Those Who Served

November 7, 2015

The Long Beach T

his mural is a tribute to Long Beach veterans in the U.S. armed services. It is painted on the side of a building facing Houghton Park, in North Long Beach on the corner of Atlantic Avenue and Harding Street. It is directly across the street from a Vietnam Veterans Memorial in the park. This intersection is the starting and finishing point for Long Beach’s annual Veterans Day Parade and is a fitting location to honor Long Beach veterans. The mural depicts historical images of Long Beach veterans of many conflicts, from the Civil War through Iraq, as well as medals honoring veterans for bravery and service. These images are arrayed against a patriotic banner flowing the length of the wall.

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his image (above) is of three servicemen on their base in Korea during the Korean War. the soldier in the center is the uncle of one of the veterans who helped with the planning and research of the mural. this image is flanked by two medals awarded to U.S. servicemen for serving in Vietnam.

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his historical image (right) is of a military band of Civil War veterans. The writing on the bass drum reads “Long Beach Calif. G.A.R. (Grand Army of the Republic) Martial band.” It is painted from a historical photo taken some time afterthe Civil War.

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n the left is the USS Long Beach, a nuclear-powered guided missile cruiser. Long Beach has a long history as the site of a large Navy Base, now closed, and the city is home to many Navy veterans. On the right is a portrait of Aaron Herrington, who was a Tuskegee Airman and Long Beach resident. The Tuskegee Airmen were a squadron of AfricanAmerican pilots who performed heroically and very successfully in Europe during WWII, escorting U.S. bombers and in aerial combat with enemy fighters. They never lost a bomber.

Photos courtesy ArtMortimer.com


November 7, 2015

A Salute to Those Who Served

19TH ANNUAL VETERANS D AY PARADE

Veterans Mural

Mural created by Art Mortimer, 21 x 108 ft., Nov. 2006 • Long Beach, California

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his painting (below) depicts PFC George Torres, the first Marine from Long Beach killed in Iraq. Next to PFC torres is his Purple Heart medal, awarded to those injured in battle. PFC Torres’s parents live about one block from the mural site.

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n the top left is a historical image of men celebrating the end of WWI. The Army man in the center (holding the flag) and the sailor on the right have switched hats. The gentleman on the left is not in uniform but is wearing an Army hat; perhaps he is the father of one or both of the two young men. Top center is an image of two female pilots. Pictured left is Loretta Foy, who was active in aviation for many years in long beach and served in the WASPs in WWII. The image on the right is from a family photo of Long Beach native Paul Bice and his mother. Paul served in the south Pacific and the Middle east, including Iraq. This image emphasizes that all veterans have families who are affected by their service as well.

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he picture on the left is of Cliff Chaffee, a career Navy man, posing with his biplane in 1937. In 2006 Cliff was 91 years old and was honorary grand marshal of that year’s Veterans Day Parade. The center image is from a snapshot of a group of veterans taken at the

dedication of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial directly across the street from the mural site. The wall behind the flags in the painting is the wall the mural is now painted on. On the right is an image of Jerry Shultz, painted from the last photo taken of him in uniform. Shultz is a

highly decorated Vietnam veteran who later became a Long Beach Councilman for the district the mural is in. He was one of the first organizers of the Veterans Day Parade and a major force in the creation of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

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A Salute to Those Who Served

November 7, 2015

Giving back

Veteran services aim to provide resources Denny Cristales Signal Tribune

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t’s the month of November that brings about the season of thanks and giving, the transitional phase of fall to winter and, well, for some, it’s just another dip in the schedule that gives everybody a few days off from work. But, for so many others, it is a time of the month to play a part in recognizing the individuals who have helped secure and establish freedom and democracy in the United States of America. It’s individuals like Assemblymember Patrick O’Donnell who have such an emotional connection with Veterans Day. O’Donnell’s father served in the Korean War. When he thinks of Veterans Day, O’Donnell thinks of veterans around the world who helped secure the foundation and principles on which this country is grounded. And that is why it’s important to give back and reach out to them in any way that we can,

O’Donnell said. Veteran resources and programs are available statewide and locally in the Long Beach and Signal Hill community, and it’s going to take a lot more than just lounging around and thinking about veterans to truly support and provide these services, O’Donnell said. “Long Beach has a long history of veterans,” he said. “We can’t sit in an office and hope that they will come and get these services. We need to continually outreach to ensure that these veterans know that these services are available.” Resources and programs are available for any level of veteran– homeless or ill. O’Donnell said that it’s important to reinforce these services and to make them widespread and prominent so that, as opposed to just waiting for the veterans to come in on their own accord, people go out of their way to present these resources to them. A real effort needs to be made to connect with veterans on the

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Denny Cristales/Signal Tribune

The VA Long Beach Medical Health Center is one of many places that veterans have access to as a resource.

ground level, O’Donnell said. “Veterans Day is about recognizing the people that built democracy and spread it around the world,” he said. “Very simply, they are the reason we are free.” O’Donnell spoke with the Signal Tribune and provided a listing of the various programs and services that veterans can take advantage of statewide and in the community. Gold Star Manor The American Gold Star Manor was incorporated as a charitable, nonprofit corporation for the purpose of providing a national home for mem-

bers of American Gold Star Mothers, Inc. American Gold Star Mothers are moms who had lost sons and daughters in the service of their country. The manor has nine three-story units and one two-story unit for a total of 348 apartments. Gold Star Manor is located at 3021 N. Gold Star Dr. To join, applicants must meet the following criteria: Natural or adoptive mothers must have been a legal U.S. citizen at the time of their child’s induction into the United States Armed Forces and when they subsequently became missing or died in action; stepmothers


November 7, 2015

must have been legal citizens and taken responsibility of their child when they were under 15 years of age and after they became missing or deceased. Husbands, children and grandparents of members of American Gold Star Mothers, Inc may join as associate members using the same application. Associate members pay no dues, hold no offices and may not vote. An honorary membership to the American Gold Star Mothers Inc. may be granted to mothers who were not citizens at the time of their sons’ or daughters’ induction into the United States Armed Forces and whose sons or daughters died while on active duty or when they became missing. To apply or find more information, visit goldstarmoms. com . Fisher House The Fisher House Foundation provides comfortable homes for families of patients receiving medical care at major military and VA medical centers. There are 65 Fisher Houses across the United States, Germany and United Kingdom. More than 250,000 families have been provided 5.8 million nights of lodging, saving them more than $282 million since the program began in 1990, according to Fisher House officials. These homes are located at major military and VA medical centers nationwide, close to the medical center or hospital they serve. Fisher Houses have up to 21 suites, with private bedrooms and baths. Families share a common kitchen, laundry facilities, a dining room and a living room. For more information, visit fisherhousesocal.org . VA Long Beach Healthcare System The VA Long Beach Healthcare System, 5901 E. 7th St.,

A Salute to Those Who Served provides the necessary health services for all veterans. Services in mental health and physical ailments that range from bone-density scans, to cardiology issues, CT scans, trauma and speech impairments, plus many more, can be accessed at the VA. Depending on the issue, treatment is given on a no-appointment or appointment basis. Visit longbeach.va.gov to make an appointment or to learn more about services. Villages at Cabrillo The Century Villages at Cabrillo (CVC) is a nonprofit community development organization that serves as the steward of the Villages at Cabrillo. CVC delivers property management, real-estate development and supportive services that aim to empower residents, restore health and inspire hope. Villages at Cabrillo is a residential community established to break the cycle of homelessness. The housing community provides housing on any given night to over 1,000 individuals. These people include veterans and non-veterans, families and children, ranging from shelter, to transitional housing, to permanent housing. CVC provide services that include case management, lifeskills training, substance-abuse treatment, affordable childcare, a homeless-education program, an employment center, a career center, a foodservice program and a VA medical clinic. To get involved and for more information, visit centuryvillages.org . CalVet The California Department of Veterans Affairs (CalVet) strives to ensure that veterans of every era and their families get state and federal benefits and services they have earned as a result of their military ser-

19TH ANNUAL VETERANS D AY PARADE

vice. According to CalVet, California is home to 1.8 million veterans, representing eight percent of the total U.S. veteran population. California anticipates receiving an additional 30,000 discharged members of the armed services each year for the next several years– more than any other state. CalVet provides service in the areas of education, employment, healthcare, housing, advocacy and assistance and VA claims. For more information on all available resources and programs and where to apply, visit calvet.ca.gov . CalJOBS CalJOBS has an Employment Development Department (EDD) that assists veterans and their eligible spouses in order to help maximize their employment and training opportunities. Veterans are entitled to many resources designed to help in their search for employment. The EDD veterans’ representatives specialize in assisting veterans in their efforts to return to work and are located in many local EDD offices. Services provided include a veteran 24-hour priority hold on all job listings, customized job search assistance, job fairs, employer recruitments and other

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events and resources. Veterans are encouraged to schedule an appointment with an EDD veterans’ representative for personalized services and assistance to achieve professional goals. For more information, visit caljobs.ca.gov . Troops to Teachers Troops to Teachers is a U.S. Department of Defense program that helps eligible military personnel begin a new career as teachers in public schools where their skills, knowledge and experience are most needed. Registration is available on the program’s website at proudtoserveagain.com . Feed Our Vets Feed Our Vets is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to help veterans and their spouses and children whose circumstances have left them in hunger. The program seeks to solve this hunger problem by providing free food to veterans and their families, distributing goods and services and also public education and outreach. Food pantries and other foundations seek to provide these resources for needy veterans. For more information, visit feedourvets.org . ✦


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19TH ANNUAL VETERANS D AY PARADE

Army

The Army is the oldest branch of the U.S. military that p r o v i d e s landbased military operations. Their mission is to fight and win wars by providing prompt, sustained land dominance across the range of military operations and spectrum of conflict in support of commanders. They accomplish missions assigned by the President, Secretary of Defense and Combatant Commanders. The Army is divided into major branches: Air defense Artillery, Infantry, Aviation, Signal Corps, Corps of Engineers and Armor. The Army is made up of three components. The active component is the regular Army. The two reserve components are the Army National Guard and the Army Reserve. These are part-time soldiers who train once a month. These are known as unit-training assemblies. They conduct two to three weeks of annual training each year. The Army is led by a Civilian Secretary of the Army, who conducts all affairs of the Army

A History of our military branches

under the authority, direction and control of the Secretary of Defense. The Chief of the Staff is the highest-ranked military officer in the Army. This person is the military advisor and executive agent for the secretary of the Army along with a Joint Chiefs of staff member, a Body of the Service Chiefs from each of the Department of Defense military services who advise the President, Secretary of Defense and National Security Council. The Army also has both an operational and institutional portion. The operational Army consists of armies, corps, divisions, brigades and battalions that conduct a full spectrum of international operations. The institutional Army trains, equips, deploys and ensure readiness to support the operational Army. It began as the Continental Army in 1775, formed by the second Continental Congress in response to the Revolutionary War. George Washington was its Commander-in-Chief. Prior to this formalized National Army, there were only cobbled-together, local militias without a Chain of Command. Washington described his new army as, “A mixed multitude of people under very little discipline, order or

Thank you to

all who have bravely served our country.

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government.” With the Revolutionary War over, the Continental Congress disbanded the Continental Army in 1784. Congress did not wish the United States to have a standing army during peacetime. However, conflicts with Native Americans spurred Congress to allow and create the Legion of the United States. Its four sub-legions would go on to become the first four regiments of the U.S. Army. The Army went on to fight the British in the War of 1812, then afterwards was heavily involved in us western expansion, fighting Native Americans and winning the Mexican-American War in 1848. The Civil War began in 1861 and split the nation, and the Army. The Army recombined in its aftermath and won the Spanish-American War in 1898, followed by victory in the Philippine-American War, which lasted from 1899 to 1902. As America entered the 20th century, it entered both World War I and World War II. Next came the Korean War amid the larger Cold War, followed by the Vietnam War. The 1990s saw the Persian Gulf War in response to the invasion of Kuwait. The 2000s witnessed the military

November 7, 2015

occupation of Afghanistan and Iraq in the wake of 9/11. Motto “This We’ll Defend” Official song of the Army “The Army Goes Rolling Along” Intro: March along, sing our song, with the Army of the free Count the brave, count the true, who have fought to victory. We’re the Army and proud of our name, We’re the Army and proudly proclaim Verse: First to fight for the right, And to build the Nation’s might, And The Army Goes Rolling Along.Proud of all we have done, Fighting till the battle’s won, And the Army Goes Rolling Along. Refrain: Then it’s Hi! Hi! Hey! The Army’s on its way. Count off the cadence loud and strong (TWO! THREE!) For where e’er we go, You will always know That The Army Goes Rolling Along. Verse: Valley Forge, Custer’s ranks, San Juan Hill and Patton’s tanks, And the Army went rolling along Minute men, from the start, Always fighting from the heart, And the Army keeps rolling along. Verse: Men in rags, men who froze, Still that Army met its foes, And the Army went rolling along. Faith in God, then we’re right, And we’ll fight with all our might, As the Army keeps rolling along.

TERRY ROGERS

TERRY ROGERS: A Realtor with Integrity & a Personal Touch.

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November 7, 2015

A Salute to Those Who Served

19TH ANNUAL VETERANS D AY PARADE

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We honor the  men and women A Salute to Those Who Served 22 19  A V D P  who have so selflessly protected our country. TH

NNUAL

ETERANS

AY

ARADE

      to Thank you      all  (562)   997-1122  our Veterans. 

 

  

We honor the men and women   who(562) have997-1122 so selflessly protected our country. 

 

  

Thank you to   our   Veterans.  all 

 

(562) 997-1122

We honor our resident Veterans with pride! HHHHHHHHH

We pause to reflect on their courage and sense of duty.

  

November 7, 2015

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November 7, 2015

A History of our military branches

Coast Guard George Washington authorized and began the Coast Guard, then known as the “cutters,” on Aug. 4, 1790 as part of the Tariff Act. Ten vessels would enforce federal and tariff laws, and stop smuggling. As the infant nation grew, the scope of the “Revenue Cutter Service” grew. The US Coast Guard was founded then, but it was established on Jan. 28, 1915 to be an official military branch. There are 11 missions dealing with ports,waterways and coastal security, drug interdiction, aids navigation, search and rescue, living marine services, marine safety, defense readiness, migrant interdiction, marine environmental protection, ice operations and other law enforcements. There are 38,000 active- duty men and women, 8,000 reservists, and 35,000 Auxiliary personnel who serve in a variety of job fields ranging from operation specialists and small-boat operators and maintenance specialists to electronic technicians and aviation mechanics. The Coast Guard was created after five separate federal services were combined: the U.S. Lighthouse Service, the Revenue Cutter Service, the Steamboat Inspection Service, Bureau of Navigation and the U.S. Lifesaving service. In 1915, a congressional act combined the Life-Saving Service and Revenue Cutter service to form the Coast Guard. The service was placed under the control of the Treasury Department until 1967, when an executive order transferred the Coast Guard to the newly formed Department of Transportation. Currently, the Coast Guard operates under the Department of Homeland Security during peacetime and under the Navy during wartime, or by special presidential order. In addition to protecting our nation’s waterways, the

43,327 active-duty members of the Coast Guard perform search and rescue, law enforcement and environmental cleanup operations. The US Coast Guard Academy is a four-year service academy located in New London, Conn. Around 225 cadets graduate each year. They receive a Bachelor of Science degree and a commission as an ensign in the Coast Guard. These graduates must serve a minimum of five years on active duty. Some become Desk Watch officers or Engineer Officers in training. Others can be assigned directly to the Naval Air Station Pensacola for flight training. The Coast Guard’s research development, Test and Evaluation (RDT&E) program works on more than 80 projects that support Coast Guard requirements at any given time. This program is made up of the office of RTD&E at Coast Guard headquarters in Washington, DC and the Research and Development Center (RDC) at New London, Connecticut. In 1915, a Congressional act merged the Revenue Cutter Service with the US Life-Saving Service, another government agency devoted to saving the shipwrecked, and thus made the Coast Guard. The Lighthouse Service joined the Coast Guard in 1939, and Congress moved the Commerce Department’s Bureau of Marine Inspection and Navigation to the Coast Guard in 1946. The Coast Guard has been involved in wars such as the War of 1812, the Mexican-American War and the American Civil War. The last time the Coast Guard operated as a whole within the Navy was during World War II. Usually, military and combat units within the Coast Guard will operate under Navy or joint control while others remain under the Department of Homeland Security. Colors White, Coast Guard blue, Coast Guard red Motto Semper Paratus (Always ready) Song “Semper Paratus” From North and South and East

19TH ANNUAL VETERANS D AY PARADE

and West, The Coast Guard’s in the fight. Destroying subs and landing troops, The Axis feels our might. For we’re the first invaders, On every fighting field. Afloat, ashore, on men and Spars, You’ll find the Coast Guard shield. We’re always ready for the call, We place our trust in Thee. Through howling gale and shot and shell, To win our victory. “Semper Paratus” is our guide, Our pledge, our motto, too. We’re “Always Ready,” do or die! Aye! Coast Guard, we fight for you. From Aztec shore to Arctic zone, To Europe and Far East. The Flag is carried by our ships, In times of war and peace. And never have we struck it yet, In spite of foe-men’s might, Who cheered our crews and cheered again, For showing how to fight. We’re always ready for the call, We place our trust in Thee. Through howling gale and shot and shell, To win our victory. “Semper Paratus” is our guide, Our pledge, our motto, too. We’re “Always Ready,” do or die! Aye! Coast Guard, we fight for you.

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Surveyor and Narcissus, The Eagle and Dispatch, The Hudson and the Tampa The names are hard to match; From Barrow’s shores to Paraguay, Great Lakes or ocean’s wave, The Coast Guard fought through storms and winds To punish or to save. We’re always ready for the call, We place our trust in Thee. Through howling gale and shot and shell, To win our victory. “Semper Paratus” is our guide, Our pledge, our motto, too. We’re “Always Ready,” do or die! Aye! Coast Guard, we fight for you. Aye, we’ve been “Always Ready” To do, to fight, or die Write glory to the shield we wear in letters to the sky. To sink the foe or save the maimed Our mission and our pride We’ll carry on ‘til Kingdom Come Ideals for which we’ve died. We’re always ready for the call, We place our trust in Thee. Through howling gale and shot and shell, To win our victory. “Semper Paratus” is our guide, Our pledge, our motto, too. We’re “Always Ready,” do or die! Aye! Coast Guard, we fight for you.


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19TH ANNUAL VETERANS D AY PARADE

Marine Corps The United States Marine Corps (USMC) serves as an expeditionary force-inreadiness. Their mission is primarily responsible for: the seizure or defense of advanced naval bases and other land operations to support naval campaigns; the development of tactics, technique and equipment used by amphibious landing forces in coordination with the Army and Air force; and other duties directed by the President. The USMC fulfills the role in national security as an amphibious and expeditionary force, capable of forcible entry from the air, land and sea. It is capable of asymmetric warfare with conventional, irregular and hybrid forces. A committee of the Continental Congress formed two Marine

A History of our military branches

battalions on Nov. 10, 1775 to combat the British– and so began the Continental Marines. In the peacetime that followed the end of the Revolutionary War, the Continental Marines were dissolved, as were other branches of the US Armed Forces, in 1783. The US agreed with Britain to remain a neutral trader in Britain’s war with Revolutionary France; France, though a former ally, was furious and seized American ships trading with Britain. An attempt at negotiation began with French diplomats attempting to extort America via bribery in the infamous XYZ Affair. This incensed the American public and sparked the Quasi-War with France, socalled because never was a formal war declared. Congress mobilized the Armed forces, such as the Navy, and in 1798 established the Marine Corps. A treaty ended the Quasi-War in 1800. The First Barbary War tested the new republic. Pirates from

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the Barbary Coast (Algiers, tunis, Morocco, and tripoli) captured American merchant ships and enslaved their crews. America paid off all the countries to stop the piracy and restitute prisoners save for one country, Tripoli– and the two nations went to war. In 1805, a force combining Marines and mercenaries successfully captured the Tripolitan city of Derna, forcing the ruler to agree to end hostilities and return captured Americans in exchange for ransom. The Mexican-American War further cemented the Marine Corps reputation. The two wars brought the Marines glory now immortalized in the opening lines of the Marines’ hymn: “From the Halls of Montezuma/To the shores of Tripoli.” The Barbary War also began another Marine Corps tradition, the Mameluke sword. Worn by Marine officers today, the first Mameluke sword was a present from Prince Hamet Bey for the Marines’ victory at Derna; Bey was rightfully restored as ruler of Tripoli from the victory. The Marines were not strongly involved in the Civil War. In its aftermath, they spent time leading American forces abroad and ashore in the Philippines, Cuba and Puerto Rico. John Philip sousa joined the Marine Band at age 13 and headed the Marine Corps band in 1880. He would go on to compose the official march of the Marines, “Semper Fidelis,” and the National March of the US, “The Stars and Stripes Forever.” The Marines also quelled the boxer rebellion in China. Marine Corps aviation began in 1912 with the nation’s earliest aviation camp. World War I struck soon after, and the Marines began Parris Island, their first base dedicated solely to training, which remains today. In 1918, Opha Mae Johnson became the first enlisted female Marine, though she did not serve in a war zone. That same year, Marines legend says they earned

November 7, 2015

the nickname “Devil Dogs” from their German enemies after victory at the Battle of Belleau Wood. Next came World War II. Between 1942 and 1949, the first wave of black Marines enlisted as America slowly desegregated. Women made further strides with 1943’s formation of the Marine Corps Women’s reserve– their roles were expanded into manufacturing and assembly. Photographer Joe Rosenthal froze the Marines and the Battle of Iwo Jima in time with his iconic photo featuring five Marines and a Navy corpsman mounting the national flag. The Marines went on to fight in both the Korean War and the Vietnam War; more Marines were deployed in service during the Vietnam War than World War II. The Marines joined the other branches of the armed services post-9/11 in US operations in the Middle East, especially the Iraq War. Motto Semper Fidelis Mascot English Bulldog Colors Scarlet and Gold Song “Marines’ Hymn” From the Halls of Montezuma, To the shores of Tripoli; We fight our country’s battles In the air, on land, and sea; First to fight for right and freedom And to keep our honor clean: We are proud to claim the title Of United States Marine. Our flag’s unfurled to every breeze From dawn to setting sun; We have fought in every clime and place Where we could take a gun; In the snow of far-off Northern lands And in sunny tropic scenes; You will find us always on the job. The United States Marines. Here’s health to you and to our Corps Which we are proud to serve; In many a strife we’ve fought for life And never lost our nerve; If the Army and the Navy Ever look on Heaven’s scenes; They will find the streets are guarded By United States Marines.


November 7, 2015

A Salute to Those Who Served

19TH ANNUAL VETERANS D AY PARADE

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19TH ANNUAL VETERANS D AY PARADE

A Salute to Those Who Served

Kluger Architects pay homage Architects pay homage to ourKluger military personnel. to our military personnel. We salute their and We salute their bravery bravery and commitment to our country. commitment to our country.

Kluger

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www.klugerarchitects.com

November 7, 2015

Thank You for serving our country & protecting our freedom!


November 7, 2015

A History of our military branches

Merchant Marines

The United States “Mariners” are the dedicated men and women of our nation who are designated to help m o v e passengers, goods and cargo between regions within the United States and to outside nations. The Mariners are a part of the United States Merchant Marine (USMM), which is the the fleet of U.S. Merchant vessels that facilitate the distribution and transportation of imports and exports during peace time and war time. During peace time, transporting cargo and passengers is an important responsibility; during war time, the USMM acts as an auxiliary to the Navy, providing troops, supplies and a variety of necessities to the military. This service also is activated during the time of national emergencies. Though the Mariners do not partake in combat, they play a

large role in protecting and facilitating vital cargo. These U.S. Mariners are facilitated by the U.S. Coast Guard, the Department of Transportation and the U.S. Maritime Administration (USMA). In addition, a Mariner’s duty involves the world-wide waterway operation of maintaining and controlling a plethora of vessels including, but not limited to: tugboats, towboats, ferries, dredges, excursion vessels, and deep-sea merchant ships. According to the USMA, they ensure that their Mariners also regulate: shipbuilding and repairs, water and land transportation efforts, adequate ports and appropriate reservations for ship-space during a national emergency. During the time of national emergency, a special fleet, known as the National Reserve Defense Fleet (NRDF) can be activated, and is comprised of ships that are directed by the USMA. According to the USMA, the USMM have played important roles in national conflicts since 1775, including their large impact

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in World War II, contributing to the U.S. victory. The USMM Corps was founded on March 15, 1938, overseen by President John F. Kennedy’s father, Joseph P. Kennedy and were initially trained on government ships, before President Franklin D. Roosevelt recognized the important role the Mariners could play in World War II; Roosevelt then ordered mass amounts of liberty ships and established the U.S. Maritime service in the same year. President Franklin D. Roosevelt stated: “[Mariners] have written one of its most brilliant chapters. They have delivered the goods when and where needed in every theater of operations and across every ocean in the biggest, the most difficult and dangerous job ever undertaken. As time goes on, there will be greater public understanding of our merchant’s fleet record during this war [World War II].” Prior to World War II, there were 55,000 trained Mariners, yet after the U.S. Maritime Service began accepting Mariners as young as age 16 (in preparation for war), the numbers skyrocketed to 215,000, including retired sailors and the physically impaired, who were still able to assist with the operations of regulating imports, exports and cargo. During World War II, all branches of the military were on full force, without the exclusion of the USMM. Amongst this time, Mariners delivered troops, ammunition, food, tanks, bombs, airplanes, fuel, and the list goes on. For the war, the Mariners’ motto was: “We deliver the Goods.” Some military leaders even deemed the USMM as the “Fourth arm of defense.” On September 27, 1942, a large act of heroism took place on the Liberty Ship during the war. The ship came into contact with a German raider ship and was compromised to fight back. Aboard the Liberty, an engine cadet fired final shots, wrecking and sinking the German vessel. However, 40 other Mariners, including the young cadet, were killed by shrapnel, sinking the casualties and the Liberty. The Liberty survivors (19) then completed a 2,000-mile trek to

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brazil, in a lifeboat. in the Southwest Pacific area, the USMM then played a vital role, spanning their duties to rescue soldiers and putting themselves in danger, as if they were a soldier in combat. In addition, U.S. escort ships were attributed with sinking over 110 submarines. In relation to the war efforts by the USMM, General Douglas MacArthur said, “I hold no other branch in higher esteem than the Merchant Marine.” Furthermore, to train Mariners in preparation for the war and further service as a Mariner, the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy (USMMA) was born in the 1940s; in 1943, the campus was dedicated to President Roosevelt. Graduation from this academy was, and still is, as honorable as a graduation from the Coast Guard Academy, or West Point. According to the USMMA, they are a federal service academy that provides education and grants licenses to Merchant Marine officers of good nature, which upon graduation, will serve America as marine transporters and defensive specialists with dire needs during peace time and war time. Currently, the U.S. Maritime service of World War II only exists now through these Maritime Academies. Thousands of Mariners continue to be trained all across the nation, whether employed by the government or the USMMA, to assist in the valiant efforts of transport at sea. Song: “Heave Ho, My Lads!” Heave Ho! My Lads! Heave Ho! Verse: Give us the oil, give us the gas Give us the shells, give us the guns. We’ll be the ones to see them thru. Give us the tanks, give us the planes. Give us the parts, give us a ship. Give us a hip hoo-ray! And we’ll be on our way. Chorus: Heave Ho! My Lads, Heave Ho! It’s a long, long way to go. It’s a long, long pull with our hatches full, Braving the wind, braving the sea, Fighting the treacherous foe; Heave Ho! My lads, Heave Ho! Let the sea roll high or low, We can cross any ocean, sail any river. Give us the goods and we’ll deliver, Damn the submarine! We’re the men of the Merchant Marine!


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19TH ANNUAL VETERANS D AY PARADE

National Guard The National Guard is the designated militia force of the United States, and is also the oldest military branch of our nation (and is one of the oldest military units in the world), dating back to 1636. The Army National Guard and the Air National Guard are two main components of the regiment. Combined, the soldiers and “airmen” of this militia force are vital facets that have helped shape the dramatic history our nation, with valiant efforts. While the Air National Guard was assembled in the 20th century with increased technological and organizational innovations, the Army National Guard made its debut on December 13, 1636 (the National Guard birthday), when the three-month-old militia was assembled by the general court of the Massachusetts Bay Colony for their very first drill in Salem, Massachusetts. Since that December day in

A History of our military branches

1636, the National Guard has been an active part in any conflict or war of our nation. It wasn’t until post-World War II that the National Guard’s aviation units assembled officially, to become the Air National Guard. Certain aviation units were active in World War I, however, were not deemed their actual title until later. In 1916, these units once referred to as “the militia” earned their title as the National Guard– initiating almost 400 years of service to the nation’s community and state, defending the united states’ every move. From 1961 to 1962, the National Guard risked their lives for u.s. freedom, battling through the Cold War by sending both soldiers and airmen to fight in Korea, during the Berlin Crisis. Respectively, throughout the Vietnam War, almost 9,000 militia forces were sent to Vietnam, and about 23,000 forces were called up for active duty. Though the National Guard has been active in every battle pursuit since the 1600s, other significant moments in history include Operation Desert Storm in 1991 (over 75,000 National Guard forces), responses in the 1990s for Haiti and especially Iraq. The National

Guard has since been called in for peace-making attempts in various countries– initiating positive responses throughout the nation. Since the terrorist attacks in New York City on September 11, 2001, the National Guard has carried a new meaning for defense of our nation.While rescue and recovery were two vital components of this mission, the National Guard was also there to protect, secure and ease our nation back to comfortable. The National Guard has been placed in airport security checkpoints and various facilities to ensure a smooth process of security for all. More recent events proved the tenacity and poised heroism of the National Guard, as they continue to defend our country through the war on terrorism, following the tragic acts of 9-11 in 2011. Not only have Guardmembers been called up for security purposes, they have also been deployed to fight for our nation on these accounts. Since the Korean War, the terrorist movement has engaged and deployed more members of the National Guard than ever. The National Guard may be called in a variety of instances to protect, serve or secure our nation.

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their heroic and consistent efforts have not only helped mold America for what it is today, they have also proved the strength and boldness of our nation as one. Song: “I Guard America” I was a minuteman at Concord Bridge/ The shot heard ‘round the world/ and I was there on Bunker Hill/ When “Old Glory” was unfurled/ And when my country called me/ From within or from afar I’ll be first to answer/ Proud to be the Guard Defending Freedom protecting dreams/ This is the spirit of what it means to me/ For my God and my home that I love I guard America/ And in the eyes of my enemies/ Or the eye of a storm/ I face the dangers as they come/ In any shape or form I am your sons, your friends, your fathers/ And your daughters working hard/ To be the best and keep us strong/ Proud to be the Guard/ Defending Freedom protecting dreams This is the spirit of what it means to me/ For my God and my home that I love I guard America Defending Freedom protecting dreams/ This is the spirit of what it means to me/ For my God and my home that I love I guard America Guarding America America


November 7, 2015

A Salute to Those Who Served

19TH ANNUAL VETERANS D AY PARADE

LONG BEACH WATER DEPARTMENT

SALUTES ALL VETERANS

JOIN THE MISSION

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19TH ANNUAL VETERANS D AY PARADE

Navy

The mission of the Navy is to maintain, train and equip combat-ready naval forces capable of winning wars, deterring aggression and maintaining freedom of the seas. The department of the Navy has three principal components: The Navy Department, consisting of executive offices mostly in Washington, D.C.; the Operating Forces, including the Marine Corps, the reserve components, and, in time of war, the U.S. Coast Guard (in peace, a component of the Department of Homeland Security); and the shore establishment. The Department of the Navy is under civilian leadership of the Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV). The most senior naval officer is the Chief of naval operations, a four-star admiral who reports to SECNAV. The Chief of Naval Operations is also one of the Joint Chiefs of staff, the second-highest body of the Armed Forces after the U.S. National Security Council. They are responsible for organizing, recruiting, training and equipping the Navy. There are nine components in the operating forces of the U.S. Navy: the U.S. Fleet Forces Command, U.S. Pacific Fleet, U.S. Naval Forces Central Command, U.S. Naval Forces in Europe, Naval Network Warfare Command, Navy Reserve, U.S. Naval Special Warfare Command, Operational Test and Evaluation Force and Military Sealift Command. The Navy has six active numbered fleets. These fleets are further grouped under Fleet Forces Command, Pacific Fleet, Naval Forces Europe Africa and Naval Forces Command. The third,

A History of our military branches

fifth, sixth, seventh and tenth fleets are each led by a threestar vice admiral, and the fourth fleet is led by a rear admiral. Most of the bases are located in the U.S. However, there are a number of facilities maintained abroad. They are under a status of Forces Agreement, an agreement between a host country and a foreign nation stationing military forces in that country. the largest overseas base is in Yokosuka, Japan. The names of commissioned U.S. Navy ships are prefixed with the letters “U.S.S.,” which stands for United States Ship. Each ship also has a letter-based symbol for classification to indicate the vessel’s type and number. The Navy began as the Continental Navy. Soon after the end of the Revolutionary War, the last ship was sold, and the Continental Navy was disbanded. The Continental Navy was founded on Oct.. 13, 1775, which was the day of the passage of the resolution of the Continental Congress at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. This was also the day Congress authorized the purchase of two vessels to be armed against British merchant ships, the Andrew Doria and Cabot. Eleven years later, conflicts between American merchant shipping and pirates in the Mediterranean Sea led to the Naval Act of 1794, which created the U.S. Navy. The Department of the Navy was established on April 30, 1798. The first victory for the U.S. Navy was on July 7, 1798, when the U.S.S. Delaware captured Le Croyable, a French Privateer during the Revolutionary War. The first victory over an enemy warship was when the Frigate Constellation captured the French Frigate l’lnsurgente on Feb. 9, 1799. Over the next 20 years, the Navy fought the French Navy in the Quasi-War, Barbary states in the first and

second Barbary Wars and the British in the War of 1812. On Dec. 7, 1941, the Navy fought in World War II after the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. Soon after, the Navy fought in the battle of the Coral Sea, the Battle of Midway and battle of Leyte Gulf. The U.S. Navy’s Sea, Air and Land teams (SEAL) are that branch’s principal special operations force and a part of the naval special Warfare Command. They originated sometime during the second World War, when the U.S. Navy found the need for the covert reconnaissance of landing beaches and coastal defenses. Colors Blue and Gold Motto “Not for Self, But for Country” March “Anchors Aweigh” Stand Navy out to sea Fight our battle cry: We’ll never change our course So vicious foes steer shy-y-y-y. Roll out the T. N. T. Anchors Aweigh. Sail on to

November 7, 2015

victory. And sink their bones to Davy Jones, hooray! Bridge: Yo ho there shipmate, Take the fighting to the far off seas. Yo ho there messmate. Hear the wailing of the wild banshees All hands, fire brands. Let’s Blast them as we go. So, Verse 2 Anchors Aweigh my boys, Anchors Aweigh Farewell to foreign shores (or “Farewell to college joys”) We sail at break of day ‘ay ‘ay ‘ay O’er our last night ashore Drink to the foam Until we meet once more Here’s wishing you a happy voyage home! Bridge: Heave a ho there sailor Everybody drink up while you may Heave a ho there sailor For your gonna sail at break of day Drink away, Drink away, For you sail at break of day, Hey! Verse 3: Blue of the Mighty Deep Gold of God’s Sun Let these our colors be Till all time be done By Severn Shore we learn Navy’s stern call Faith, Courage, Service True With Honor Over, Honor Over All.


November 7, 2015

19TH ANNUAL VETERANS D AY PARADE

A Salute to Those Who Served

God Bless America Rotary International - District 5320

Our Vets!

Honoring Love!

HONORING VETS!

Honoring Liberty!

Thank you from a grateful citizenry!

Signal Hill Club

Meets weekly at “The World Famous” Curley’s Café 1999 E. Willow St./Signal Hill We are a breakfast club, Thursdays at 7:30 am (sharp) to 8:30am www.signalhillrotary.com President: Bob Mendoza

Honoring Loyalty!

Lakewood Club

Meets weekly 5000 Clark Ave., Lakewood Thursdays at Noon-1:30pm www.rotaryoflakewood.org President: Valarie Frost

Long Beach Club

Meets weekly at the “Great Ship” Queen Mary, Wednesdays Noon-1:30pm www.rotarylongbeach.org President:Gregory Burnight

Service above Self

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19TH ANNUAL VETERANS D AY PARADE

A Salute to Those Who Served

November 7, 2015

Profile for Signal Tribune

2015 Veterans Day Parade Program  

2015 Veterans Day Parade Program  

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