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S erving B ixBy K nollS , C alifornia H eigHtS , l oS C erritoS , W rigley

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Your Weekly Community Newspaper

VOL. 32 NO. 21

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S ignal H ill October 29, 2010

Martha Flores-Gibson cites economic Bonnie Lowenthal says her track record qualifies her to continue crisis as her reason for seeking State Assembly’s 54th District representation serving 54th Assembly District Nick Diamantides Staff Writer

Republican Martha Flores-Gibson hopes to replace incumbent Bonnie Lowenthal as representative for California’s 54th Assembly District. Flores-Gibson said the state’s ongoing economic crisis is what motivated her to enter the political arena. “According to a recent survey, 81 percent of the citizens in the 54th District know that our economy is going in the wrong direction, and they are very scared,” she said. “The bottom line is that we need to grow our economy and we need jobs.” Flores-Gibson explained that cutting the state payroll tax will be one of her top priorities if she is elected. “Cutting that tax will enable businesses to hire at least one more person, maybe two,” she said. “Think of how many jobs would be created

if every business in the state hired just one more person.” She added that many companies, stores and restaurants in the 54th District that could make a marginal profit during this time of economic downturn are forced to go out of business because of what she called the exorbitant state payroll tax. “You can drive all around Long Beach and San Pedro and see the closed doors of hundreds of businesses that might have survived if not for the taxes and fees they had to pay to our inefficiently run state government,” she said. “Those closed businesses have resulted in a very high unemployment rate throughout the district.” Making matters worse, according to FloresGibson, even successful large manufacturers like Boeing are moving jobs out of California because see flores-gibson page 7

Fire strikes local juice bar, adjacent businesses receive smoke damage Just before 11am last Friday, units from the Long Beach Fire Department were called to 261 E. Willow St. to a report of a structure fire at a strip mall. Engine 7 was the first to arrive on the scene, and firefighters found the windows of Juice It Up! juice bar stained black with smoke and hot to the touch. The establishment was closed at the time of the fire, so crews were required to use forcible entry. A total of 31 firefighters mounted an aggressive interior attack on the

Nick Diamantides Staff Writer

Incumbent Democrat Bonnie Lowenthal is running for reelection as the California Assembly 54th District representative. “Our state is in a crisis,” she said. “I believe I have delivered for my district, and I want to continue along the same path to address the needs and the economy and to move forward for the district.” Lowenthal said her track record proves she has served her constituents well, and she mentioned three of her accomplishments as legislator. The one of which she is most proud is AB 2098. “This bill will bring 18,000 jobs in California to improve the infrastructure of our state and is perhaps the most important bill passed in the last two years,” she said. “It was a bipartisan bill that created a special resolution for the design,

build and completion of a $1.3-billion upgrade of the 91 Freeway. This will also result in improving regional traffic flow.” Lowenthal said that she worked with Democrats and Republicans and played a key role in the passage of that bill. Another bill of which Lowenthal is proud is the urgency bill she authored that will enable the plans to construct a new courthouse in Long Beach to move forward. Governor Schwarzenegger signed the bill into law last month. The bill exempts the state from having to pay a “possessory interest tax” that is imposed on real property interests on public land. The tax threatened to delay the much-needed project. “Without this bill, there was a real chance that we’d be waiting several more years to start building our courthouse,” Lowenthal said. see lowenthal page 6

Don’t be afraid of the woof, man!

rapidly spreading fire, which appeared to be located at the rear of the business. At least one hole was cut in the roof in an attempt to release the buildup of super-heated smoke and aid interior fire crews in locating the seat of the blaze. The fire, which was confined to a utility room to the rear of the juice bar, was brought under control within a matter of minutes. Adjacent businesses received minor smoke damage. The cause of the fire is currently under investigation. ß

Photo by Samuel Lippke

Courtesy LBPD

A total of 31 firefighters mounted an interior attack on the rapidly spreading fire at the rear of the juice bar last Friday.

As the world’s largest Halloween event for pets, the Community Action Team’s 10th Annual Haute Dog Howl’oween Parade in Belmont Shore will feature four-legged companions donning costumes of all sorts this Sunday, Oct. 31. Costumed kids will lead the parade, for which about 500 dressed-up dogs are expected. The parade will step off at 2:30pm from Livingston Park, 4900 E. Livingston Dr., which will also be the endpoint. The event will also include a pet-adoption and vendor fair from noon to 5pm. For information on more local “haunts” to attend this weekend, see page 11.


2 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

NEWS

OCTOBER 29, 2010

LBPD now using bracelet technology to locate those with cognitive disorders THE NEXT SUPPER The next restaurant for the Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association’s Supper Club will be Phil Trani’s, 3490 Long Beach Blvd. The group will meet on Monday, Nov. 1 at 6:30pm. RSVP to info@bixbyknollsinfo.com. The concept of the Bixby Knolls Supper Club is to support local restaurants on Monday nights, which are typically slow. HELP HOF’S HUT HELP Hof's Hut’s Los Altos location, 2147 Bellflower Blvd., will be hosting a fundraiser dinner to support Meals on Wheels of Long Beach on Nov. 3 from 4pm to 11pm. Fifteen percent of customer purchases will be donated back to Meals on Wheels. Valid for dine-in and take-out, as well as delivery purchases. All are welcome; no reservations are required. Call (562) 597-5811. A PIECE OF HISTORY The Long Beach Sierra Club will present a special program on Wednesday, Nov. 3 at 7:30pm in honor of Native American History Month. Linda Gonzales, a Tongva-Gabrielino/Yaqui, will speak on the history and culture of the LA Basin's indigenous peoples, with a special emphasis on the Long Beach area, home to one of the largest and most sacred of the settlements. The program is free and open to the public, and will take place in the meeting room of the Environmental Services Bureau, 2929 East Willow St. FAMILY FUN Westerly School has announced the launch of a new education series for Long Beach families. The first presentation of the three-part series will be “How Arts Education Builds Student Confidence,” a panel discussion from 6pm to 7:30pm on Thursday, Nov. 4, at the Westerly School Arts Village, located at 2950 E. 29th St. Featured panelists will include: Geraldine Walkup, Visual and Performing Arts Administrator at the Los Angeles County Office of Education; and Carlton Wilborn, artist, life coach, author, and inspirational speaker. Sponsored by Westerly School PTO, this informative and interactive parent education series is free and open to the public. The events are geared toward parents with children aged 5 to 17. Call (562) 981-3151. SHOPPING FOR A GOOD CAUSE The public may do their holiday shopping while enjoying home-baked goods at the Children’s Memorial Hospital Auxiliary’s annual Holiday Faire, 9am to 5pm Thursday, Nov. 4 and Friday, Nov. 5. The Faire will be at Houssel's Forum at Long Beach Memorial Hospital, 2801 Atlantic Ave. Call Collette Anderson at (562) 618-7868. HONORING VETERANS The US Vets–Long Beach Advisory Council will host a luncheon entitled “Honoring Those Who Serve,” as a tribute to veterans, on Friday, Nov. 5 from 11am to 1pm at the Hilton International Ballroom, 701 W. Ocean Blvd. Cost is $75 per person. Business attire is required. Call (562) 388-8015. GET A HEAD START The Assistance League of Long Beach will have its annual major fundraising event, the Second Annual Holiday Gift Boutique, on Friday, Nov. 5 from 9:30am to 7pm, and Saturday, Nov. 6 from 9am to 4pm at the Philanthropic Center, 6220 E. Spring St. More than 35 vendors will be present with highquality gift items, including decorative home accessories, holiday décor, gourmet foods, scarves, purses, stationery, women’s and children’s clothing and more. Admission and parking are free. Major credit cards accepted. Drawings for door prizes will take place hourly. All proceeds will be used to support the League’s philanthropic programs. Call (562) 627-5650 or visit allb.org. CULTURE WITH A CAUSE A Dia De Los Muertos celebration and artists’ reception will take place Saturday, Nov. 6 from 6-10pm at the 2nd City Council Art Gallery and Performance Space, 435 Alamitos Ave. There will be music, dance, children’s art projects, a youth art exhibit, parade and festival. Concessions will be sold, and proceeds support a local charity. The event is free and open to the public. Call (562) 901-0997. COMMUNI-TEA The public is invited to Su Casa’s “Communi-Tea” Friend & Fund Raiser to end domestic violence. The event will take place on Sunday, Nov. 7 from 1pm to 3:30pm at Lakewood Youth Center, Del Valle Park, 5939 Henrilee St. in Lakewood. Cost is $20 for one admission or $25 for two, and $100 to host a table for a group or organization (up to 8 people). Admission includes tea or coffee, tea sandwiches, and sweets. Group recognition for Best Table Theme– arrange a group of 8 friends or club members to plan a theme, then bring decorations, tableware and serving pieces that carry out the theme. Table decorators will be admitted at 12:45pm, and prizes will be given to winners. RSVP by Monday, Nov. 1 to tlwhiteleather@juno.com or by calling (562) 866-8755. TAKE ACTION The 2008-2009 NUSA National Champions, The North Long Beach Community Action Group will have newly elected Long Beach City Prosecutor Doug Haubert as its featured guest speaker Sunday, Nov. 7 from 2pm to 5pm at the North Police Substation, 4891 Del Amo Blvd. This monthly meeting provides education, information and current events for the North Long Beach Community. The meeting is open to the public the first Sunday of each month (except for holidays). Call (562) 428-7710. CLASSICAL PERFORMANCE The Friends of Music at California Heights United Methodist Church will present a concert by the California Baptist University String Ensemble on Sunday, Nov. 7 at 4pm. The group, conducted by Dr. Angela Brand, will perform works by Bach, Mozart and others. The church is located at 3759 Orange Ave. Free-will offering. Childcare provided. Visit calheightsumc.org or call (562) 595-1996. NOVEL DISCUSSION On Saturday, Nov. 13, at 10am, the Los Altos Neighborhood Library Book Group will discuss Cutting for Stone by Abraham Verghese, a sweeping novel that moves from India to Ethiopia to a Bronx hospital, while revealing the intertwined lives of twin brothers. New members are always welcome. The library is located at 5614 E. Britton Dr. Contact the librarian at cliff.phillips@lbpl.org or (562) 570-1045.

The Long Beach Police Department (LBPD) has announced Safe Reunion/Long Beach, a program in partnership with EmFinders technology company, to help locate missing loved ones. The program was designed specially for those prone to wander due to cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, autism, and dementia. The LBPD receives and investigates missing-person reports on a daily basis, and timing is crucial in these investigations. While most missing-person cases have a happy ending with the person quickly located and returned home, some do not, and, in some rare cases, the missing person is never located. Typically, the chance of the person being located safely decreases the longer that person remains missing. The “EmSeeQ emergency locator system” by EmFinders will assist police with these often time-consuming in-

vestigations, and help locate and return the missing to their loved ones likely faster than before. The emergency locator system requires the person-at-risk to wear a bracelet, which can be activated after he or she is reported missing. The reporting party must first call the police and provide necessary information in order to generate a report. The report number is provided to the caller who then provides it to EmFinders via their toll-free number, and EmFinders activates the bracelet. The missing person’s location is then transmitted via cell tower to 9-1-1 dispatchers who can send assistance. Last Sunday, representatives from the LBPD and EmFinders unveiled the EmSeeQ device at the Long Beach Convention Center in conjunction with Maria Shriver’s March on Alzheimer’s. Starting Nov. 1, a limited quantity of free bracelets will be provided by

the LBPD to those suffering from a diagnosed cognitive disorder. This offering was made possible by a group of private donors led by Long Beach resident Coralyn Wahlberg, who provided the initial funding for Safe Reunion/Long Beach. The monthly cost for the 24-hour monitoring service is approximately $25. Long Beach Police Chief Jim McDonnell sees many benefits of the department utilizing technology to increase community safety. “Safe Reunion/Long Beach is a great tool for returning loved ones home safely and for minimizing police resources, while locating a person who has a propensity to wander,” he said. For more information about EmFinders’ EmSeeQ emergency locator system, visit emfinders.com. To donate to Safe Reunion/Long Beach, contact the Long Beach Police Foundation at (562) 343-5111 or through lbpolicefoundation.org. ß

Uranga elected chair of Association of Community College Trustees Long Beach Community College (LBCC) Trustee Roberto Uranga has been elected to serve as the chair of the Association of Community College Trustees (ACCT). Uranga was elected last weekend at the annual Community College Trustee Leadership Congress in Toronto, Canada. “I’m extremely proud to have received this honor from an organization that advocates for our community colleges,” said Uranga. “I am humbled to be the

first Latino to serve in this capacity and honored to bring this recognition to Long Beach.” Uranga, currently the vice-chair of the ACCT, becomes the first Hispanic to serve as chair of the national board. The ACCT is a national nonprofit educational organization of governing boards, representing more than 6,500 elected and appointed trustees who govern over 1,200 community, technical, and junior colleges in the

United States and other countries. Uranga remains on the Long Beach Community College District Board of Trustees. He was first elected to serve on the board in 2000. Uranga was unanimously voted president of the Board in 2002 and 2006. “Trustee Uranga is a national leader in community college policy, and we are fortunate to have him as a member of our local governing board,” said LBCC President Eloy Ortiz Oakley. “I am sure he will bring the same level of passion that we have seen here in Long Beach to the Association of Community College Trustees.” ß

Grant to help LBPD institute special traffic operations The Long Beach Police Department (LBPD) is expanding its regular traffic enforcement with special operations funded by a recent $278,000 grant awarded by the California Office of Traffic Safety. Special traffic enforcement measures will include increased enforcement around intersections and traffic lights. “We have made progress, but there is still much work to be done in order to prevent the tragedies that are caused by impaired and distracted driving,” said Chief Jim McDonnell. This grant enables us to continue educating the public on the perils of drunk driving as well as the importance of refraining from texting and driving and using hands-free devices with cell phones.” The Selective Traffic Enforcement Program (STEP) grant is designed to assist in efforts to deal with trafficsafety problems and to reduce the number of persons killed and injured in traffic collisions. Traffic deaths from all causes declined in 2009 in California by 10.3 percent from 3,434

killed in 2008 to 3,081 in 2009. The state recorded 950 alcohol-impaired driving fatalities in 2009, a 7.6-percent decline from 1,025 in 2008; however, DUI deaths remain at 31 percent of fatalities. “Everyone in California should be heartened with these figures,” said Christopher J. Murphy, director of the California Office of Traffic Safety (OTS). “But as encouraging as this is, we can’t let up on the efforts to encourage and enforce traffic safety. Thousands are still losing their lives or being severely injured on our roadways.” The grant activities will target DUI offenders, drivers with suspended or revoked licenses, red light running, distracted driving, motorcycle safety, and seatbelt violations through the use of DUI/driver’s license checkpoints, DUI saturation patrols, and special enforcement operations. The grant also provides funding for additional training of officers in driving under the influence detection and enforcement, as well as

supervising enforcement operations. For the second year in a row, special motorcycle safety enforcement operations will be conducted. In California, motorcycle fatalities have finally dropped following a decade rise in deaths. Motorcyclists killed in 2009 numbered 393, a 29-percent drop from 2008 statistics. However, California remains one of three states that still lead the nation in motorcyclist deaths. Long Beach police officers will be conducting specialized enforcement efforts throughout the course of the next year. Extra officers will be on duty patrolling areas frequented by motorcycles. Officers will be cracking down on traffic violations, made by motorcyclists and other vehicle drivers, that result in far too many motorcycle collisions, injuries and deaths. “More people are making it home safely and alive each day,” said Murphy. “But to keep this trend going, we will continue to strive to meet our vision– toward zero deaths, every 1 counts.” ß

Additional police officers arrested in grand theft case Long Beach Police Department detectives have arrested an officer and a former officer of the department in connection with the Aug. 5, 2010 arrest of former officer Damian Ramos for grand theft of weapons. Ramos, a five-year employee with the department, handled a “found property” call at a Long Beach business, which turned over numerous weapons to him. However, the department discovered that not all of the weapons had been placed into evidence. Detectives following up on this confiscation of weapons determined that the number turned in by the business did not correspond with the number placed into evidence by Ramos. Upon learning of this discrepancy, the department launched an immediate and exhaustive investigation. Significant resources were devoted to the case to determine the

whereabouts of the missing firearms. As the investigation progressed, Ramos became the focus, which led to the service of multiple search warrants and his arrest. Since then, the investigation has been ongoing and additional information was discovered, leading detectives to the arrest of Officer Benjamin De Los Santos and former officer Derrick Dinsmore. De Los Santos, a six-year employee, was arrested Tuesday in Long Beach. He was booked for receiving stolen property, conspiracy, grand theft of firearms, embezzlement, and circulation of a false document, and is being held on $20,000 bail. Dinsmore, a former four-year employee, was arrested Monday night in the city of Walnut. He was booked for receiving stolen property, accessory after the fact, and preparing false documentary evidence, and is being held on

$20,000 bail. At the time of Ramos’s arrest, detectives believed he acted alone. However, during the course of the ongoing investigation, additional evidence was discovered that led detectives to determine that these two additional officers were also involved. “This is an unfortunate situation, but we are committed to ensuring that every investigation of misconduct involving any of our employees is thorough and complete,” said Chief Jim McDonnell. The Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office Justice Integrity Division will be presented with this case and will handle the prosecution. De Los Santos has been suspended without pay pending the outcome of the criminal investigation. Dinsmore was dismissed from employment on Sept. 27, 2010 after his involvement in this investigation was discovered. ß


SIGNAL TRIBUNE

OCTOBER 29, 2010

Cemetery Tour 15th Annual Historical

AND THE DEAD TELL TALES Join us on Halloween Eve at the City’s two oldest cemeteries as costumed actors tell about the lives and deaths of those who have called Long Beach home. Along with ten graveside storytellers, you’ll learn about cemetery symbols, see examples of funeral advertising from around the turn of the century, enjoy free hot dogs and a fun walking tour beneath the trees.

Saturday, October 30, 2010 Sunnyside & Long Beach Municipal Cemeteries

1095 E. Willow Street (between Orange & California Avenues) • Tickets on sale from 9am to 12 noon • Presentations continuously from 9am to 2:30pm • Guided tours leave on the hour @ 9, 10, 11 & 12 Adults $18, Members $12, Students 12-18 $5, under 12 are free

For more information call

(562)

424-2220 www.hslb.org

Bring this co upon for $3.0 the 0 regular adu

lt price

15th Annual Historical C e me

o ff

tery Tour Saturday, Oc tober 30th 1095 W Historical Society of Long Beach

illow Street & Californi (between Orange a Avenues)

WHERE EVERY PLOT HAS A STORY...

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OPINION

4 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

PUBLISHER/EDITOR IN CHIEF

NEENA R. STRICHART ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

STEPHEN M. STRICHART PRODUCTION/DESIGN EDITOR

KELLY NIELSEN

Thoughts from the Publisher by Neena Strichart

MANAGING EDITOR

CORY BILICKO STAFF WRITERS

NICK DIAMANTIDES RACHAEL RIFKIN COLUMNISTS

CAROL BERG SLOAN, RD JENNIFER E. BEAVER ENTERTAINMENT WRITER

VICKI PARIS GOODMAN ADVERTISING CONSULTANT

BARBIE ELLISEN ADVERTISING DESIGNER

LEIGHANNA NIERLE EDITORIAL INTERNS

BRETT HAWKINS STEVEN PIPER INTERNS

TANYA PAz JULIAN ROTHEN –––––––––––––

The Signal Tribune adheres to the following policies The Signal Tribune welcomes LETTERS TO THE EDITOR. Letters should be signed, dated and include a phone number in order to verify authenticity. The Signal Tribune reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, language and space requirements. The Signal Tribune does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other publications. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR & COMMENTARIES are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Signal Tribune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, please remember that LETTERS TO THE EDITOR & COMMENTARIES are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. The Signal Tribune is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. Yearly subscriptions are available for $45.

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Halloween has always been a fun time for me. When I was a child, our family didn’t have much money for things like fancy decorations or costumes. I mostly relied on my parents’ imagination and ingenuity to provide me with a suitable outfit to wear while trick-or-treating through our Signal Hill neighborhood. I remember when I was about 6 years old, Dad bought me a gypsy mask to wear with my red, black and white ruffled dress. Mom helped finish up the outfit as she threw some big, dangly clip-on earrings on me along with a scarf and half a dozen strands of long beads. Once the costume was complete, Dad declared me “Queen of the Gypsies”– what fun! Another time, Mom dug out a sleeveless summer dress of mine that had a solid-color body with rows of different-color flounces at the hem. While I had long, colorful beads tied in a knot across my chest, a little rouge and lipstick along with a ribbon tied across my head, she declared me a flapper from the 1920’s! I felt so pretty. About ten minutes into our trick-or-treat trekking, I thought I was going to freeze to death in that little flapper-style dress. Mom to the rescue– she had brought along a sweater for me “just in case.” Now, even then I was pretty sure flappers didn’t wear button-up sweaters, but Mom convinced me that knits over dresses had been all the rage in the olden days. She sure had a gift of persuasion–

still does. Back then, we didn’t have organized school-, church- or citysponsored carnivals for Halloween. Nope, instead we visited our friends’ and neighbors’ homes, all the while trying to remember who had given out the best candy the year before. Some folks gave out homemade treats (all but forbidden these days). Others gave out pencils, small candies, gum, pennies, or our favorites– full-sized candy bars. In our early years, our parents went trick-or-treating with us. As we got older, we kids traveled in groups and promised to be careful. We’d put the candy in our bags, buckets, sacks or pillowcases while eating and walking, walking and eating, trying to gobble down as much good stuff as we could before going home where Mom and Dad perused our booty for inappropriate treats. After confiscating what they deemed dangerous or questionable, our folks would allow us a piece or two of candy (after we had already eaten our fill on the way home) before sending us off to bed with a sugar high that kept us hyped-up for days. Looking back to those simpler, sweet days, I believe that it was the fun of creating the costumes with my folks that made it so memorable. I don’t think a store-bought outfit would have been as unforgettable, or even worth writing about. Have fun with your kids, grandkids and neighbors this Halloween. You just may build some fond memories. ß

CO M M EN TA RY

Hiring military veterans is good business

OCTOBER 29, 2010 LETTERS  TO

serve our country? What essential set of life skills do military veterans bring to corporate America that makes them an indispensable pairing? The military trains our men and women to lead by example as well as understand the nuances of delegation and motivation. As General Douglas McArthur once said, “a true leader has the confidence to stand alone, the courage to make tough decisions, and the compassion to listen to the needs of others.” Military veterans understand the value of teamwork, which they can apply in our country’s offices and boardrooms. Veterans understand their role within an organizational framework and serve as exemplary role models to subordinates while demonstrating accountability and leadership to supervisors. Veterans generally enter the workforce with identifiable skills that can be transferred to the business world and are often skilled in technical trends pertinent to business and industry. And what they don’t know,

ED ITO R

Hey, neighbor… there’s a car in my view Is there a simple answer to this question and, if so, will somebody please tell me what it is? I have a neighbor who owns more cars and trucks than he/she and family can drive every day so he/she parks in front of a neighbor’s house (mostly mine and another neighbor) every week from sweeper day to sweeper day, and never a word is said or [anything] done to correct this violation. I am unable to look out my own door and see the passing cars and people because there is always a car or truck parked right in front of my house all week. We all have garages, so what do they have in theirs that won’t allow the addition of a car? I use mine every day to park my car in. Our police department is the best in the West so I know, if I called them, they could or would check it out, but who wants to bother the department every week? Vivian C. Nelson Long Beach

Super volunteers? Imagine…after effectively serving on the Long Beach City Council for six years (a very demanding job) then running for State Assembly (political races are an immense strain) then came the tragic unexpected passing of Congresswoman Juanita Millender-McDonald. Laura Richardson decided to run to serve and to do all she could to fill those beautiful shoes on very short notice. She did so heroically, with wonderful intelligence and heart. She has faced difficulties courageously like millions in America. In her personal life, she experienced an anguished divorce with complicated property settlement issues people face. She recovered because of her strength and dedication. Then her father passed away, and she handled the difficult process of probate. Sound familiar, like other real humans you know? Real people, doing all they can with great challenges and surprises life deals them. We are entirely too hard on public servants. They endure torturous criticism. It sometimes borders on abuse. They live under a magnifying glass of scrutiny. Only rare people can do the difficult work our elected representatives do. Our representatives are people who are dedicated and motivated to tackle and solve problems Americans face. They are the super volunteers. It is not an easy job. What if you had to handle such challenging issues? Laura put serving her nation first. She has done a great job. She has given. She has studied the issues. She shares what she learns with us through many venues, personally visiting the community in our district. She communicates. She listens. Her virtual town hall meeting was wonderful, personal and thorough. She demonstrated incredible grasp of the issues with intelligence and clarity. She flies home to see you and all the constituents she represents every week. Because she cares! She has amazing energy and intelligence. She has given it everything she’s got. She is devoted to her job to serving the people. Summer Hansen Long Beach

Candidate correction As an avid reader of the Signal Tribune, I am grateful for the many wellwritten and informative articles published by your community newspaper, including all those covering the election and candidate forums. Please provide your readers with the following corrections/clarifications of facts and/or of my remarks (shown in parentheses) in last week’s article “Topics of welfare, corruption and defense characterize 37th District seat forum.” “I’m the first person since 1950 to get on the ballot (twice or two times in a row) as an Independent candidate for Congress in the State of California.” “…the 37th District, as well as the nation, needs people in Washington who have (will bring) common sense (solutions) and are not under the control of party bosses or special-interest groups.” I mentioned Iraq, not Iran: Dibs noted the wars in (Iraq) and Afghanistan are the primary causes of the government’s deficit spending.

By Bill Whitmore

If your company’s diversity recruiting strategy fails to include military veterans, you are missing out on working with some of our country’s most outstanding men and women. Organizations that fail to recognize the extraordinary leadership qualities that veterans bring to the workplace pass up the opportunity to work with results-oriented employees that have a strong sense of accountability and responsibility. It is time for our country’s corporate leaders to awaken to the reality that combat leadership and military discipline translate into dynamic employees who can enhance an organization’s productivity. While the national unemployment rate hovers around 9.7 percent for civilians, the unemployment rate for young male veterans, including those returning from Afghanistan and Iraq, is more than double the national average at 21.6 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Isn’t it time to shine the employment spotlight on the brave men and women who

TH E

Nick Dibs Candidate 37th Congressional District

To download full issues of the Signal Tribune go to

www.signaltribune.com they are eager to learn– making them receptive and ready hires in work environments that value ongoing learning and training. Veterans represent diversity and collaborative teamwork in action, having served with people from diverse economic, ethnic and geographic backgrounds as well as race, religion and gender. Even under dire stress, veterans complete tasks and assignments in a timely manner as they have labored under restrictive schedules and resources on the battlefields and military installations that they’ve served. Employers can find qualified veterans from a variety of sources, including the Employer Partnership of the Armed Forces, Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve,

Military.com, HireVeterans.com, and the Wounded Warriors Project. Employers can become true partners with selected veterans organizations and work with them proactively to ensure you are maximizing your ability to recruit from this extremely qualified talent pool. Lest we forget, the men and women who have chosen to serve our country are patriots who have made enormous sacrifices to ensure our safety and freedom. By employing military veterans, we are saying, “thank you for your service” and for protecting us from terrorism and other threats. Bill Whitmore is chairman, president and CEO of AlliedBarton Security Services.


COMMUNITY

OCTOBER 29, 2010

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

5

With their own future ventures in mind, two Women’s Conference volunteers learn some invaluable lessons Vivian J. Malauulu Contributing Writer

Every year for the past six years, thousands upon thousands of women gather at the Long Beach Convention Center to attend the annual, and always sold-out, Women’s Conference hosted by California First Lady Maria Shriver. Women arrive from all over the country for a variety of reasons. Some attend just to see the celebrities– more than 150 famous and fearless newsmakers graced the various stages at this year’s three-day event that began on Sunday with a march for Alzheimer’s and ended on Tuesday evening with the Minerva Awards. Other women attend for the exhibits and workshops hosted by hundreds of businesses and organizations. Many women make it an annual road trip with their family, friends, or co-workers to mingle and network. Pennsylvania native Alaina Howard attended this year’s conference for the first time as a volunteer with the sole purpose of witnessing first-hand what it takes to put on a conference of this magnitude. She plans to use this experience to launch her own conference-consulting business in the near future. “I have volunteered at dozens of conferences for many, many years,” said Howard, “but this has to be the biggest, most incredible one of all. The energy at the Convention Center is electrifying. The logistics involved in executing a conference of this magnitude is amazing, and I am learning so much.” This year’s conference theme was “It’s Time,” which certainly applied to Howard. Her imminent business, which she is just about ready to launch, is called Person-to-Person. It will target nonprofit organizations needing to host conferences to boost membership, publicity, and revenue. Years of volunteering at numerous other conferences across the country have given Howard valuable experience and a very unique perspective of what is involved in coordinating similar events. “I am really focusing on how the special guests are handled at this conference,” said Howard, who served as informal security surrounding the main stage during Monday evening’s “A Night at the Village” event. She commended the conference planning staff on their treatment of everyone– celebrity, attendee, worker, or volunteer– with the utmost respect. As an added benefit of volunteering in this capacity, Howard had front-row seats for two of the most anticipated speakers of the night. “Jane Fonda’s testimony was truly inspiring,” Howard said, “and I couldn’t believe Paula Deen started off with just $200. They, along with the other speakers, made me feel like I could really do anything.” This year’s ticket prices for the different conference events ranged from $50 to 100 and sold out in less than one hour. Volunteers were admitted free. Some of the most notable events for which Howard has volunteered include conferences for the Children’s Defense Fund organized by Marian Wright Edelman, the Momentum Awards hosted by the Women’s Foun-

dation of California, and the National Head Start Conference. “Volunteering at these events is truly empowering,” said Howard, who, with every conference she attends, strives to learn something new that will ultimately help her with her own business. “I am able to interact first-hand with positive, forward-thinking people who are committed to making a difference in our world in an extraordinary atmosphere.” Howard, who has never been compensated for her time as a conference volunteer, has to take time off from her job as an outreach specialist at Cal State University Dominguez Hills, in exchange for a T-shirt, a parking pass, meals while on duty, and an occasional souvenir. “But I always walk away with much, much more than just that,” she added. Another first-time volunteer, originally from Northern California, was Long Beach resident Shirley Huling, who served as high-level security prior to First Lady Michelle Obama’s appearance on Tuesday. Huling has plans to launch a nonprofit organization to help women ease the transition between new motherhood and their careers.

“Day care issues forced me to leave a career I loved and excelled in when I gave birth to my son four years ago,” said Huling, who was an executive in fashion retail with Nordstrom. “I had to compromise between my new baby and my career, and no woman should have to do that.” Huling wants to help companies provide on-site day care for mothers who want to continue working after having children. “This conference is definitely the place to be to meet the right people and to learn the ins and outs of forming nonprofits and other businesses,” said Huling. “I’ve met so many women who are excited about my idea and who have offered to help me get it off the ground.” Huling plans to volunteer at next year’s conference with her nonprofit, Plan-It, already operational. She encourages other women who have personal and professional goals to volunteer as a means of networking to realize those goals. “I usually submit a letter of inquiry to an organization asking if volunteers are needed and expressing my interest in assisting them,” said Howard. “They are usually very receptive to and grateful for volunteers who want nothing in

Courtesy Vivian J. Malauulu

Long Beach resident Shirley Huling and Pennsylvania native Alaina Howard both volunteered at this week’s Women’s Conference.

return but to attend.” Howard registered to volunteer for the Women’s Conference online in March and obtained the confirmation she was waiting for in June. She received periodic

emails and updates, and last week was told where to check in on the date of the event. “This is a very smooth operation, considering the enormity of the conference.” ß

Community Services Department

Brunch with Santa Saturday, December 11, 2010

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Signal Hill Park Community Center 1780 E. Hill Street Choose your preferred time: Breakfast (pancake buffet): 9-11am Lunch (sandwich buffet): 12-2pm Tickets include a meal, craft for children, entertainment by Wilson High School Choir, and story time with Santa Claus. Remember to bring your camera for a photo opportunity with Santa! There will be assigned seating for this event. Resident registration begins Monday, November 1. Children 13 & under $13; Adults $8. Non-resident registration begins Monday, November 8. Children 13 & under $18; Adults $13.

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Come and enjoy stories, songs, finger plays and more with our very own Mrs. Searcy. An interactive playtime with age-approprate toys and learning equipment follows. A snack is included.

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NEWS

6 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

OCTOBER 29, 2010

As 55th District Assemblymember, Furutani keeps career/technical education as top priority Nick Diamantides Staff Writer

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Democrat Warren Furutani is the incumbent Assemblymember for the state’s 55th District. He hopes to be reelected to his second full term in that office. “I am running to finish the business I have been working on since I was first elected,” he said. Furutani noted that his first priority is to advance career/technical education. He explained that he established a legislative committee on career technical education, and he has organized the first community college caucus in the legislature for that purpose. “I am working with all the different groups involved in career/technical education and hoping to create a comprehensive system that will help more students get that kind of education,” he said. Furutani said career/technical education is critical to the future of the district and the entire state, but it has not been given as much attention as it deserves. “I am a firm believer in higher education, and we need to do everything we can to support and expand our colleges and universities,” he said. “But I also know that not everyone is going to college. Rather than having such a large percentage of students dropping out of high school and not learning any skills, let’s develop a career training program for our young people.” Furutani noted that, with large numbers of Baby Boomers approaching retirement, hundreds of thousands of jobs that require skills will soon be available to young people, but most of them do not have those skills. “We also need to train our youth in the new skills related to advancements in technology and in the new trend toward green industries,” he said. Furutani stressed that about 25 percent of all California highschool students drop out before graduating, and in the inner city high schools, the drop-out rate ranges from 33 to 50 percent. “Another issue is that students entering junior colleges are not prepared to

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Another bill that she authored– AB 2629– prevents patients who live in residential care facilities from being forced into nursing homes when they are recovering from surgery. “Very often, the elderly who are living in assisted-living homes, and want to stay there, were forced out,” she said. Lowenthal also authored AB 2435, which was signed by the governor this year. She explained that the new law requires all mental-health professionals to have elder abuse training. “The recognition of elder abuse is really critical,” she said. “Elder abuse is one of the fastest growing crimes in California. Lowenthal explained why she thinks she is the best choice for the 54th Assembly seat. “I have the experience and track record that tells people that I am focused on delivering for my district,” she said. “This is a job that requires difficult choices that go beyond campaign promises.” Speaking of difficult choices, Lowenthal explained her vote with the majority of her colleagues in the legislature to take $3.5 billion from local governments, which included $1.7 billion taken from the schools– $176 million from the Long Beach Unified School District. “In the last two years, we had to cut

Warren Furutani

succeed in college,” he said. “We need to better prepare high-school students who want to go to college, and we need to provide career/technical education to those who do not want to go to college.” Furutani strongly defended his stance on career/technical education against charges that it is motivated by the unions that contribute to his campaign. “I have been a union guy my entire adult life,” he admitted. “But I am looking out for the interests of working people, whether they are in a union or not. I am not owned by the unions. You ask anybody that knows me, and they will tell you there are two adjectives that describe me: honesty and integrity.” Furutani said his second priority is to continue working on improving the way goods are moved through the district. “On one hand, the movement of goods is critical to the economies of California and the western United States,” he said. “On the other hand, if we are moving goods, it must not be at the expense of children getting asthma, and other health problems caused by the diesel particulates that are coming from trucks and trains.” He said that he has been working with officials of the two ports to make them greener and he hopes to continue those discussions. Furutani said he is proud of the legislation he has authored that has been signed into law. “Last year,

an enormous amount– billions of dollars– from the state budget because we don’t have the revenues,” she said. “That included municipalities and school districts. Everybody was hurting, and the money was not there to provide the critical services. People had been asking us to cut government and we did.” Lowenthal noted that although her opponent Martha Flores-Gibson has sharply criticized her for voting to cut the $176 million in state funding for LBUSD, the California Teachers Association and almost every member of the LBUSD Board of Education has endorsed her. “I am supported by the parents, and by the people who care the most about education,” she said. “They know that I am watching very closely to ensure that the districts get at least as much as they had last year, if not more. Education is sacred to us in California, and I will continue to guard all of the school districts in the 54th Assembly District.” Lowenthal also talked about eliminating wasteful expenditures in the state government. “There is a great deal of auditing going on,” she said. “One of the audits being done by the state auditor was at my request.��� She explained that she had asked the bipartisan Joint Legislative Audit Committee (JLAC) to look into the ongoing development of the state’s Court Case

one of my bills, AB 37, was passed,” he said. “It conferred honorary college degrees to JapaneseAmericans that were forced out of colleges and forced to live in internment camps during World War II, and that helped right a past wrong.” Other Furutani bills signed into law include: AB 1847, which strengthens existing law by allowing prosecutors to initiate income deductions from convicted criminals to ensure that victims of crime receive court-ordered restitution; and AB 2444, which makes it easier for inter-district transfer students in K–12 schools to stay in the schools to which they have transferred. Furutani also talked about the public’s poor image of the state legislature, and he acknowledged that its failure to adopt a budget on time is one of its biggest problems. “As soon as the election is over, we need to get to work immediately on the state’s budget,” he said, explaining that legislators typically do not begin talking about the budget until mid-January and don’t start serious work on it until May. He noted that he is the chair of Budget Committee Four, which deals with state administration. “As chair, I am gong to ask all the committee members to immediately start looking at how we can be more efficient as a state government,” he said. “We need to start work on next year’s budget immediately.” Furutani graduated from Antioch University with a bachelor’s degree in liberal arts, served on the Los Angeles Board of Education for eight years, and on the Los Angeles Community College Board for 10 years. He was elected to the Assembly in a special election in 2007 and reelected for his first full term in 2008. “I want to thank the people of the 55th District for electing me to this office,” Furutani said. “I think they see the wisdom and experience that I have brought to this office. I commit to continue to do the best I can to serve the people of this district.” ß

Management System. She noted that the project was originally estimated to cost approximately $200 million, but legislators were later told that it could cost as much as $2 billion. After looking into the matter, JLAC asked the state auditor to audit the project, and that process has now begun. Lowenthal noted that she also serves on the Assembly’s Accountability Committee in order to examine any excesses and lack of efficiencies that exist in state government. Lowenthal earned her master’s degree in clinical psychology from Cal State University Long Beach and has served on the LBUSD Board of Education, as well as the Long Beach City Council. “I believe very strongly that I am the person to represent the people of the 54th District,” she said. “I have been appointed the chair of the Assembly Committee on Transportation, which will allow me to have oversight of the $10 billion the voters have invested in high-speed rail. She noted that she is also working with experts and stakeholders to make sure infrastructure for plug-in vehicles is in place in the near future. “I am very actively working for environmental issues, for business issues, for economic development, to improve the educational system in our state and for jobs,” she said. ß


NEWS

OCTOBER 29, 2010

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Hoping to unseat Furutani for Assembly’s 55th District, Salabaj pushes for education reform

make sense to me that someone would offer a bill that would do away with a class that could help rid the nation of that epidemic,” he said. “The bill was obviously a favor to the unions, but it was not even passed by the Assembly.” Salabaj added that Governor Schwarzenegger recently vetoed another bill authored by Furutani that would have replaced many foreign-language and fine-arts classes in the public schools with tradeschool classes. “So once again, during this severe budget crisis, he is hammering away trying to get this thing passed for a special-interest group,” Salabaj said. “My first priority is job creation,” he said. “We have to create jobs in California, and I am very interested in creating jobs in my district. We have such a great location to bring in companies and small businesses that can offer jobs to our residents, and we are not taking advantage of that.” “My second priority is our schools,” he said. “Our state has to go through major educational reform. The first thing is our relationship with the schoolteachers. In order to be successful, school districts have to be like small communities that govern themselves. School districts like LAUSD are just too spread out to be run the right way. The state needs to step in and break up the huge school dis-

tricts to give more power to the parents and the teachers. That’s the only way the schools are going to be run in the right way.” Salabaj also said that as a state legislator he would look into how school districts, colleges and universities purchase books. “The way that we purchase our books is statemandated and questionable,” he said. “It basically opens the door for corruption.” He explained that he suspects that taxpayers are footing the bill for exorbitantly overpriced textbooks and college students are also forced to pay outrageously high prices for their textbooks. “The books are basically chosen on the basis of who knows who.” Salabaj said his third priority would be to attack the corruption that exists in state government. “I have talked to people who are in office who say that is a losing battle,” he said. “But someone has to be in office who really questions what the other politicians are doing and brings it out to the public.” Salabaj noted that recently Harbor College invited Furutani to speak to the students there, but neglected to invite Salabaj. He said that was a form of corruption because the school is funded by taxpayer dollars and yet seems to be encouraging students to vote in a particular way. Salabaj graduated from the University of Laverne with a bachelor’s degree in physical education and is now completing a teacher credential program at California State University, Dominguez Hills. He has been a real-estate salesman for the last nine years. He had worked for LAUSD as a physical-education instructor for several years but was laid off last February and is now a football coach for Bishop Montgomery High School, a private school in Torrance. “It is very important that everyone get out and vote in this election,” he said. “We are in a pivotal point in our state’s history, and we need to pick the right leaders to represent the people and not special-interest groups.” ß

comp payments to two years, but the problem is that some conditions last more than two years, so the injured employees who still cannot work because of their injuries must then go on welfare. So the state’s welfare costs increase. We need an audit to see how much money is being spent on welfare payments for those who are no longer able to collect workers comp payments.” Flores-Gibson also strongly condemned the way the legislature, with Lowenthal’s approval, chose to balance the budget last year. “In July 2009, my opponent voted to take $3.5 billion from local governments and school districts,” Flores-Gibson said. “Stripping local governments and school districts of money from their budgets, after many of them already forced employees into early retirement, cut back positions and dipped into reserves, is just plain irresponsible and doesn’t hold Sacramento accountable for its years of reckless spending.” Making matters worse, according to Flores-Gibson, Lowenthal and a majority of state legislators also voted to raise taxes in 2009. “We were told that higher taxes would keep teachers and firefighters working– it did not,” she said. “And, because of higher taxes, more businesses are leaving the state and our unemployment rate is higher.” According to Flores-Gibson, of the

aforementioned $3.5 billion, $1.7 billion came from state funds that would normally have gone to school districts. “How can my opponent say now that she cares about our schools when she votes to take so much money away from them, including $176 million from the Long Beach Unified School District?” Flores-Gibson asked. She said that, if she is elected, one of her first actions will be to introduce a bill that will bring back the $3.5 billion taken from the local governments and school districts. “I will also demand thorough audits of every state agency, department and commission to eliminate unnecessary entities, stop fraud and increase inefficiency,” she said. “We cannot afford two more years of business as usual in Sacramento.” Flores-Gibson earned a master’s degree in social work from Cal State University Long Beach and worked for the LBUSD for 20 years, mostly as a social worker, until budget cuts forced her layoff last March. The layoff gave her more time for a business she started two years ago, selling prepaid legal services. “I am not a polished career politician, but I do have the welfare of the people of the 54th District at heart,” she said. “By electing me, the people of the 54th Assembly District will be sending a clear message to Sacramento– we need to change the way our state government operates.” ß

Nick Diamantides Staff Writer

Republican Christopher Salabaj believes it’s time to change things in Sacramento, and he hopes the voters send him there to do so. Salabaj is running against incumbent Democrat Warren Furutani for the California Assembly 55th District seat. “The main reason I am running is because I and many other people in this district feel that our current politicians are not working for us,” he said. “It is very clear to all of us that our politicians are looking out for the people who are contributing to their election campaigns and that’s why we are in the mess that we are in right now.” Salabaj ran against Janice Hahn for the 15th District seat of the Los Angeles City Council in 2009 and lost. He said that race taught him much about how the election process works. “It’s not about whether you are a Democrat or a Republican– it’s about making decisions and passing laws that put the people first,” he said. “I want to represent the people of our district and make changes that Mr. Furutani can’t because he owes favors to the various unions and special-interest groups that contribute to his campaign.” Salabaj said that Furutani demonstrated his loyalty to his large campaign contributors during his last term. “If you look at all the bills that he drafted, they all relate to who gave him money and have nothing to do with helping our district,” he said. As an example, Salabaj mentioned a bill authored by Furutani that would have taken away the requirement that highschool students complete two years of physical education before being able to graduate. “Mr. Furutani wrote a bill that would have eliminated that requirement and instead offer the kids trade-school classes,” Salabaj said, adding that it was unconscionable for Furutani to try to get such a bill passed during a time when the youth of the country are experiencing an obesity epidemic. “It did not

Christopher Salabaj

Flores-Gibson continued from page 1

of the payroll tax and other burdensome taxes and fees imposed by state and local governments. “Nobody even asked Boeing why just this month alone it moved 500 local jobs to Oklahoma,” she said, adding that as a legislator she would have met with Boeing officials to ask if there was something that the state could do to keep those jobs here. “The payroll tax, the fees, the amount of paperwork that needs to be done and all the other forms of red tape are driving jobs out of California,” she said. Flores-Gibson added that the state’s workers compensation system also needs to be revamped. She said that, if she is elected, she will conduct a symposium on workers comp fraud and inefficiency to see how the state can reduce the amount of money employers have to pay for that insurance in California. She also wants to extend it beyond the two-year limit so that injured workers have adequate time to recover. “The problem is that Governor Schwarzenegger cut back on the amount of time that someone can collect on workers comp,” she said, explaining that the cutback amounted to little more than a shell game, because while the state’s workers comp costs have decreased, welfare costs have increased. “The governor cut workers

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8 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

OCTOBER 29, 2010


OCTOBER 29, 2010

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

9


CULTURE

10 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

OCTOBER 29, 2010

Local councilman, celebrities try to elicit guffaws for a good cause– or two Brett Ashley Hawkins Editorial Intern

In a fundraising effort for January 2011’s 23rd Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Peace & Unity Parade Celebration and the I Am S.H.A.N.T.E. Foundation, Sixth District Councilman Dee Andrews and Boss Lady Entertainment’s Shante Broadus hosted “Laughin’ Large,” a red-carpet comedy fundraiser Thursday of last week at The Laugh Factory in Long Beach. Comedians who performed that evening included Chris Spencer, Yvette the Funny Lady, Scruncho, Deon Cole, Faizon Love, Rick Harris, and Tiffany Haddish. Spencer, who served as mas-

ter of ceremonies, set up the other six comics to take the stage, and then called Broadus on stage to close the show with her thanks to everyone who bought a ticket to the show. Broadus’s I Am S.H.A.N.T.E. Foundation (standing for “Seeking Her Ambiton Necessary to Excel) teaches young girls the essentials of becoming a lady and developing teamwork, good health, proper etiquette, and being environmentally green. “We empower young girls from ages 7 to 18,” said Broadus, who is married to hip-hop artist Snoop Dogg. “So far, we put on a double-dutch camp for the girls over the summer.” The foundation’s mission statement adds that it will chal-

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lenge and cultivate the minds of these girls through a series of workshops, seminars, field trips, mentorship, volunteer campaigns, artistic expression, and developmental awareness to grow a sense of leadership. When she had been offered the chance to run the event in conjunction with the City of Long Beach’s Martin Luther King Jr. Peace & Unity Parade Celebration, Broadus jumped at the chance. “It’s important to support, give back, and help others,” she said at the event. “It’s why we’re here tonight.” Despite the parade’s funding being reduced by more than 50 percent from the past three years, Andrews’s Office, which produces it, remains optimistic that they can gather the funds required for the parade to take place. “I’ve known Mrs. Broadus for years and years,” said Andrews. “Partnering with her has been a pleasure, especially to support these two important causes.”

Brett Hawkins/Signal Tribune

Comedian Chris Spencer and Shante Broadus arrive outside the Laugh Factory to greet press and fans at the “Laughin’ Large” benefit last week.

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GLASSES? NEEDS WHO Celebrating over 80 Years of 3D entertainment. Boston Marriage Closing Weekend! don't miss Boston Marriage, a wickedly funny comedy closing this Saturday in the Studio. "Mamet's Boston Marriage masterfully weds comedy with emotional power." -vicki Paris goodman, Signal Tribune

Murder by the Book october 16 - november 20 is it possible to commit the perfect murder? Come and find out on the Mainstage! "...a zigging-&-zagging saga of murder, mistakes, misleading clues and enticing characters (tricky, vulnerable, nasty, even silly), wrapped in sharp humor. It's a fun, murderous treasure." -Joseph Sirota, Buena Park Independent Studio Nights at the Long Beach Playhouse november 20 at 11pm Join us for a night of laughs and good times as you enjoy a late night at the Playhouse, our cash bar, and some groovin' tunes. Come experience it!

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Long Beach Opera in Chicago, Bill was (LBO) this week analso director of Denounced the appointvelopment at Vital ment of Bill Eisentraut Bridges, the Howard as its new director of Brown Health Center, Development. His seand the Gay & Leslection follows an exbian Center. tensive national search “Bill’s experience conducted by Los Anwill strengthen the geles-based Arts Conteam that continues sulting Group, North our tradition as one of America’s leading the nation’s most innoprovider of executive Courtesy LBO vative opera compasearch and other connies,“ said Board Bill Eisentraut sulting services for the President Sue Biarts and culture sector. Since 2004, enkowski. “Under the leadership of LBO has expanded its budget from Andreas Mitisek, the company has $430,000 to 1.2 million, more than shown impressive development, and doubled its audience, and has quadru- we look forward to working with Bill pled its subscriber base. to bring LBO to the next level by ex“Bill’s depth of experience in all as- panding our audiences in Southern pects of development and fundraising, California and beyond. along with his strong love of music, “I am very pleased to be selected make him the ideal person to help as director of Development for LBO’s continued growth as a leading LBO,” said Eisentraut. “I have loved arts company and to further its goal of opera and classical music all my life, providing more daring and innovative and I very much look forward to reoperas to increasing audiences,” said turning to Southern California and to Andreas Mitisek, artistic and general working with Andreas and the Board director. “All of us at LBO are thrilled of Directors to help LBO realize its to have Bill as part of our team.” exciting goals.” Eisentraut brings 15 years of senEisentraut studied applied voice ior development experience to LBO, at Drake University. He is a memmost recently as director of Resource ber of the Chicago chapter of the Development and Public Affairs at Association of Fundraising ProfesNeighborhood Housing Services– sionals and will join the Los AngeChicago, Illinois’s leading commu- les chapter upon relocation to nity development organization. While Southern California. ß

LB Symphony Orchestra conjuring up a bewitching night with Wicked Divas The Long Beach Symphony Orchestra will present Wicked Divas on Saturday, Oct. 30, featuring Principal POPS! Conductor Steven Reineke and starring special guests Julia Murney and Erin Mackey from the Broadway show Wicked. Murney and Mackey will perform classic songs from such notable Broadway shows as Chicago, My Fair Lady, The Phantom of the Opera, Ragtime, Titanic, and of course, Wicked, all backed by the lush sounds of the Long Beach Symphony Orchestra. Audience members are invited to celebrate Halloween a day early and come dressed in costume; prizes will be awarded for the best. The floor of the Long Beach Arena will be adorned with 300 decorated tables of 10, and attendees may bring foods and beverages of choice, or inquire about having a table catered. Wicked Divas will start at 8pm at the Long Beach Arena, 300 East

Courtesy lBSo

Julia Murney, who has portrayed Elphaba in Broadway’s Wicked, will perform classic songs from notable shows of the Great White Way.

Ocean Blvd. Tickets begin at $20. For more information or to purchase tickets, call (562) 436-3203, or visit LBSO.org ß


OCTOBER 29, 2010

HALLOWEEN 2010 awarded at 3pm inside the Tot Lot. Visit hautedogs.org.

H alloween A DEVIL OF A GOOD TIME The Signal Hill Public Library will screen The Exorcist on Friday, Oct. 29 at 6pm at the Community Center, 1780 E. Hill St., as part of its “Final Friday Film Night.” Children under 18 not permitted, since the R-rated film contains strong language and disturbing images. Call (562) 989-7323. FRIGHTENING FAMILY FUN Gatsby Books, 5535 E. Spring St., will offer a “haunted” book signing with Claudine Burnett, author of Haunted Long Beach 2, during a free book-signing party with family-friendly scary stories on Friday, Oct. 29, beginning at 7pm. Refreshments will be provided, and costumes are welcome. Call (562) 208-9783 or email gatsbybooks@hotmail.com. IT’S NOT FOR REAL! On October 30, 1938, radio listeners tuned in to CBS, expecting a dramatic adaptation of a literary classic, and heard what sounded like an actual news bulletin announcing the landing of a Martian spacecraft. People panicked across America as they listened to the fictional War of the Worlds. The Long Beach Shakespeare Company, 4250 Atlantic Ave., will perform this dramatic adaptation before a live audience at 8pm on Friday, Oct. 29 and Saturday, Oct. 30, and at 7pm on Sunday, Oct. 31. The production is directed by Helen Borgers, with music and sound effects from the original broadcast. General admission is $15, and $10 for students. Visit lbshakespeare.org or call (562) 997-1494. A GHOULISH GOOD TIME Bixby Park Preservation will host its first “Bixby Park Halloween Carnival” from 11am to 3pm on Saturday, Oct. 30 at Bixby Park, located on the corner of 1st Street and Junipero Avenue. This family event will include prizes for carnival games, a Halloween costume contest, ghoulish activities, an Edgar Allen Poe-try Contest, a best homedecorated/home-carved pumpkin contest and scary arts and crafts. Tickets are 50 cents each, contest entries are $2 and bouncer is $1. Proceeds from the event will be used for a new playground and improved landscaping. Contact (562) 983-8139. ZOMBIES ON PARADE The Greater Long Beach Arts Lab (GLOBAL) will host the 3rd annual 4th Street zombie Walk celebration on Saturday, Oct. 30 from 5pm to midnight, with live music, ghoulish food & drinks, maniacal make-up stations, a zombie flash-mob dance perform-

ance, and more. The event culminates with the zombie Walk down 4th Street (starting at 8:30pm from Portfolio Coffeehouse) and ending at the Art Theatre for the screening of Shaun of the Dead at 9:30pm. More info at mondocelluloid.com/zombiewalk. HALLOWEEN…LATIN STYLE! The Museum of Latin American Art, 628 Alamitos Ave., will present a free Day of the Dead (Dia de los Muertos) Festival on Sunday, Oct. 31 from noon to 4pm, with a variety of activities for the whole family, such as art workshops, face painting, an altar display, live music and folkloric dancing. Call (562) 437-1689 or go to molaa.org. HAVE A BALL Rancho Los Alamitos Historic Ranch and Gardens, 6400 E. Bixby Hills Rd., will be the site of an afternoon of international fun on Sunday, Oct. 31, from noon to 4:30pm. Kids and adults will be entertained by the Jumbo Shrimp Circus and the Southern California Band Organs. Participants can win prizes by playing international ball games and competitions throughout the gardens. Kids will have the chance to create crafts representing harvest lore from around the globe. Visit rancholosalamitos.org or call (562) 431-3541.

MUSIC IN THE SCARE At the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts (CCPA), 12700 Center Court Dr., the Pacific Symphony will present a “Halloween Family Concert” on Sunday, Oct. 31, at 3pm. In this family-friendly celebration promoting music appreciation and exploration, the symphony will play frightfully fun movie music, including selections from Pirates of the Caribbean, Star Wars, and Harry Potter. Children are encouraged to come dressed in their favorite costumes. Tickets, which are $30, are available at the CCPA ticket office, at cerritoscenter.com, or by calling (562) 467-8818. Tickets are $18 each if four or more tickets are purchased. TRUNK OR TREAT The California Heights United Methodist Church, 3759 Orange Ave.,

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

will offer its “Trunk-or-Treat Spooktacular” event on Sunday, Oct. 31 from 5pm to 7pm. The event will include trick-or-treating from decorated cars in the parking lot, activities, and games. More info at calheightsumc.org or (562) 595-1996. GOBLINS ON THE GREEN? The Wrigley Area Neighborhood Al-

11

liance (WANA) will have its 4th Annual Halloween party on Sunday, Oct. 31 on the Green at 20th Street and Daisy Avenue from 6pm to 8:30pm. The costume contest will begin at 7pm and offers prizes for the best costume in the age categories of: 1 to 4, 5 to 8 and 9 to 12. Call (562) 427-5021 or email wrigleyalliance@msn.com. ß

Come to the Halloween Trunk-or-Treat Spooktacular! October 31 from 5-7pm

California Heights United Methodist Church • decorations es am • activities • trick-or-treating •g

3759 Orange Ave., Long Beach www.calheightsumc.org • 562-595-1996

LIVING TOUR WITH THE DEAD Rancho Los Cerritos, 4600 N. Virginia Rd., invites the public to its “Living History Tour” on Sunday, Oct. 31, with free tours offered on the half-hour between 1pm and 4pm. “Ghosts from the past” (costumed living history characters from the 1840s, 1870s or 1930s) will entertain visitors with stories of their lives, as visitors tour the two-story adobe home and grounds. Visit rancholoscerritos.org or call (562) 570-1755. HAPPY HOWL’OWEEN! The Community Action Team will host what it describes as “the biggest Halloween pet event in the world” with its 10th annual “Haute Dog Howl’oween” Parade on Sunday, Oct. 31 at 2:30pm on the sidewalks of 2nd Street. The cost is $15 per dog for advance registration, but it’s free to spectate (frontrow chair rentals available for $5 each along the route). The pre-parade entertainment, vendors, adoption fair and the “SoCal Kids Halloween Contest” will take place at Livingston Park, at East Livingston Drive. Kids will meet before 2:20pm in the Tot Lot at Livingston Park and then walk the Howl’oween Parade route in advance of the dogs. Judges will be stationed along the route and cash prizes will be

Society of St.Vincent de Paul Thrift Store

Our LOW, LOW prices on Halloween costumes and decorations will save you $$$! Usable donations accepted: 800-97-HELP-1

2750 Pacific Coast Highway, Long Beach 562-494-9955 • 9:30am - 6:30pm, Monday - Saturday • 10am - 6:30pm, Sunday


COMMUNITY

12 SIGNAL TRIBUNE SElf-SErviCE WaSh tOO!

Expert Care • Gentle Grooming

2Off Self-Service Pet Wash

$

Not valid with any other offer. Expires 11/19/10. One per customer. BK store only.

Collier named local Elk of the Month The Bellflower/Long Beach Elks Lodge No. 888 has named Leon C. Collier as Elk of the Month. Born March 7, 1936, in Pedernal, New Mexico, Collier moved with his family to southern California in 1943. He attended elementary school and graduated from Banning High School in Wilmington. He later worked for Pacific Telephone for 29 years, except for the two years he served in the Army, most of which was spent at Fort Huachuca in Arizona. He was initiated into the

lodge on March 21, 1977. He has chaired the Visiting of the Sick Committee since 1991, and he serves as staff photographer for the lodge, backup bookkeeper, and a member of the Breakfast Committee.

in business’ to be focus of 10Off full-Service Grooming ‘Veterans CSULB Notable Speaker Series event

$

On first visit or $3 off next visit. $25 min. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 11/19/10. One per customer. BK store only.

Grooming Food Supplies 4102 Orange Ave #113 @Carson Tues–Sun • 562-427-2551

Walk-ins Welcome

* aS SPaCE PErmitS

Sharing the challenges and opportunities veterans face when they return to the business world after the battlefield will be the focus of the next Cal State Long Beach (CSULB) Notable Speaker Series event on Thursday, Nov. 4, at 7pm in Room 139-A of the College of Business Administration (CBA) Building. Titled “Veterans in Business: Challenges and Victories,” the presentation will feature a panel discussion with

HOURS: Monday-Saturday 8:30am-10:30pm Sunday 8:30am-9pm

5

$ 00 OFF

OCTOBER 29, 2010

when you purchase

2 Dinner Plates 2 Drinks

3626 Atlantic Ave. • Bixby Knolls 562-426-7547 • Fax: 562-426-0684

successful professionals who are also veterans, including Michael O’Gorman, director of the Farmer-Veteran Coalition, and Steve Peck, president and CEO of United States Veterans Initiative. Mike Murray, director of government and external affairs for Verizon, will serve as the moderator. The Notable Speaker Series was established by the CSULB College of Business Administration to add relevance to current students’ learning experiences and offer opportunities for professional development and intellectual engagement to alumni, staff, faculty and the community. There is no cost to attend the event, but reservations are required. Visitors to the campus must purchase a parking permit at one of the yellow kiosks for $5 in Lot 15. Those attending the event should park in the parking structure on Merriam Way adjacent to the CBA Building and may park in the spaces marked “Employee Permit” in Lot 15 after 6pm. -------------------------------------More Information csulb.edu/colleges/cba/nss

In memory of

rOnALd A. mAyO OCtObEr 1941 – OCtObEr 2010 Mr. ronald A. Mayo, born October 17, 1941, went to be with his Savior, October 14, 2010. He is survived by his wife of 23 years, Susan Mayo; by his children, Sheri basham, tim Mayo and wife Hollie, Wendy Wang and husband Conan, Daniel Mayo, Dana Veca and husband Joe; by his grandchildren Jessica, Jacob and Megan, Pamela and Mya. He is preceded in death by his parents, Clifford and Maxine Mayo. ron was a loving husband, a gentle father, and a caring man. Even through his last days, he left behind a legacy that will forever remain in the hearts of those he touched. While in the hospital, his family encountered many instances of the nurses and other patients who came in to thank ron for the ways that he touched their hearts. ron was an amazing soul, and always wanted to leave people feeling better about themselves than they ever had. ron worked as an aerospace engineer for trW then Northrop Grumman for almost 35 years. His children often fantasized about his real job, as they were always told it was a secret. He could have been traveling to the moon and back, and just may have in their minds. He was an avid violinist and lulled his children to sleep. After retirement, he picked up the violin again and was on his way to performing on a CD of his youngest son’s band. After his retirement, ron was able to become even more involved in his church and was able to join his wife in greeting the patrons Sunday mornings. Mr. Mayo always had a smile and encouraging word, and would welcome the newcomers just as readily and happily as the regular churchgoers. He was always such a positive man, and gave people the uplifting support they needed. ron will be sorely missed by his friends and family, and the many people he touched throughout his life. A memorial service was held at Los Altos Grace brethren Church on October 26.



” g n i r a h S e n i W “ Rubber Duck ! h c a e B g n o L f Tour o Sunday, November 14, 2010 5pm-6:30pm The Heart of delius restaurant ™ dave and Louise Solzman ™ Food is a passion and an art for Louise Solzman. She has been cooking as long as she can remember, and works to rave reviews as Executive Chef at delius restaurant in Signal Hill, that she operates with her husband, dave, the General manager/Sommelier. Chef Louise is inspired by tastes from all over the world and carefully plans the weekly menus with emphasis on foods in season as well as the changing trends in dining. She is assisted by an experienced and efficient staff. Even though Louise is usually busy in the kitchen, that doesn't mean you won’t see her popping out to visit with the guests every now and then to see what they think of the cuisine.

$25 per person (all-inclusive) reservations are required and space is limited. the rubber Duck is an amphibious vehicle that gives tours of the Long beach port by land and by sea. We will board the Duck at Delius and drive to downtown Long beach. the Duck will then splash into the water and give an aquatic tour featuring an evening view of the downtown skyline and the Queen Mary. the tour will end back at Delius at roughly 6:30pm. to make these outings even better, I encourage you to bring a special

bottle of wine to share with your fellow adventurers. Now is the time to open that special bottle that you have been saving (unless it's a 20-year-old white. Keep that one to yourself, please). As another incentive, Chef Louise is coming along with us. We will provide cheese and crackers and will have a couple bottles of our own to share. Come tour with us, Dave Solzman

2951 CHErry AvEnuE, SiGnAL HiLL 562.426.0694 • www.deliusrestaurant.com


OCTOBER 29, 2010 TST3568 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE tS no. 100083558 title order no. 10-8-342096 investor/insurer no. 1704662040 aPn no. 7217-011-020 you are in default under a deed of truSt, dated 08/21/2007. unleSS you taKe aCtion to ProteCt your ProPerty, it May Be Sold at a PuBliC Sale. if you need an exPlanation of tHe nature of tHe ProCeeding againSt you, you SHould ContaCt a laWyer." notice is hereby given that reContruSt CoMPany, n.a., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the deed of trust executed by Karen denniS, a Single WoMan, dated 08/21/2007 and recorded 08/30/07, as instrument no. 20072026360, in Book , Page ), of official records in the office of the County recorder of los angeles County, State of California, will sell on 11/19/2010 at 10:30aM, at the West side of the los angeles County Courthouse, directly facing norwalk Blvd., 12720 norwalk Blvd., norwalk, Ca 90650 at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said deed of trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced deed of trust. the street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2854 eaSt 19tH Street, Signal Hill, Ca, 907551109. the undersigned trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. the total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the notice of Sale is $316,861.28. it is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. in addition to cash, the trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ''aS iS'' condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said deed of trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the note secured by said deed of trust with interest thereon as provided in said note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the trustee and of the trusts created by said deed of trust. dated: 10/22/2010 reContruSt CoMPany, n.a. 1800 tapo Canyon rd., Ca6914-01-94 SiMi valley, Ca 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale information (626) 9274399 By: - trustee's Sale officer reContruSt CoMPany, n.a. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. any information obtained will be used for that purpose. aSaP# 10/22/2010, 10/29/2010, fnMa3758509 11/05/2010 TST3567 trustee Sale no.: 20100028701012 title order no.: 100415134 fHa/va/PMi no.: notiCe of truStee’S Sale you are in default under a deed of truSt, dated 4/30/2007. unleSS you taKe aCtion to ProteCt your ProPerty, it May Be Sold at a PuBliC Sale. if you need an exPlanation of tHe nature of tHe ProCeeding againSt you, you SHould ContaCt a laWyer. ndex West, llC, as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to deed of trust recorded on 05/08/2007 as instrument no. 20071110043 of official records in the office of the County recorder of los angeles County, State of California. executed By: John l thompson and Kathleen M thompson, will sell at public auction to highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check/cash equivalent or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the united States). date of Sale: 11/12/2010 time of Sale: 10:30 aM Place of Sale: at the front entrance to the Pomona Superior Courts Building, 350 West Mission Blvd., Pomona, Ca Street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2300 amelia Court, Signal Hill, Ca 90755 aPn#: 7217-028-018 the undersigned trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said deed of trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said deed of trust, fees, charges and expenses of the trustee and of the trusts created by said deed of trust. the total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the notice of Sale is $674,951.71. the beneficiary under said deed of trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written declaration of default and demand for Sale, and a written notice of default and election to Sell. the undersigned caused said notice of default and election to sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located. for trustee Sale information Please Call: Priority Posting & Publishing 17501 irvine Blvd., Suite one tustin, Ca 92780 714-5731965 www.priorityposting.com ndex West, llC as trustee dated: 10/16/2010 ndex West, llC may be acting as a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. any information obtained will be used for that purpose. P753893 10/22, 10/29, 11/05/2010 TST3548 trustee Sale no. Ca09001127-10-1 . loan no. 0015625577 title order no. 100401094-Ca-lPi aPn 7215-019-072 notiCe of truStee’S Sale you are in default under a deed of truSt dated 6/28/2006. unleSS you taKe aCtion to ProteCt your ProPerty, it May Be Sold at a PuBliC Sale. if you need an exPlanation of tHe nature of tHe ProCeedingS againSt you, you SHould ContaCt a laWyer. on 11/9/2010 at 10:30 aM, at the front entrance to the Pomona Superior Courts Building, 350 West Mission Blvd., Pomona, Ca MtC financial inc., dba trustee Corps, as the duly appointed trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain deed of trust recorded on 07/11/2006 as instrument no. 06 1522540 of official records in the office

PUBLIC NOTICES of the recorder of los angeles County, Ca, executed by: denise Miller, an unmarried woman, as trustor, in favor of lending 1st Mortgage, as Beneficiary, Will Sell at PuBliC auCtion to tHe HigHeSt Bidder, in lawful money of the united States, all payable at the time of sale, that certain property situated in said County, California describing the land therein as: as more fully described in said deed of trust the property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. the street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2101 eaSt 21St Street #308 , Signal Hill, Ca 90755 the undersigned trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said deed of trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances if any, under the terms of the deed of trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the trustee and of the trusts created by said deed of trust. the total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligations secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the notice of trustee’s Sale is estimated to be $262,976.73 (estimated), provided, however, prepayment premiums, accrued interest and advances will increase this figure prior to sale. Beneficiary`s bid at said sale may include all or part of said amount. in addition to cash, the trustee will accept a cashier`s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the California financial Code and authorized to do business in California, or other such funds as may be acceptable to the trustee. in the event tender other than cash is accepted, the trustee may withhold the issuance of the trustee`s deed upon Sale until funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a matter of right. the property offered for sale excludes all funds held on account by the property receiver, if applicable. if the trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder`s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. date: 10/15/2010 MtC financial inc dba trustee Corps tS no. Ca09001127-10-1 . 17100 gillette ave irvine, Ca 92614 949-252-8300 Clarisa gastelum, authorized Signature Sale inforMation Can Be oBtained on line at www.priorityposting.com autoMated SaleS inforMation PleaSe Call 714-573-1965 Compliance with California Civil Code Section 2924f: the Beneficiary or Beneficiary’s agent has indicated that the requirements of California Civil Code Section 2924f have been met. regarding the property that is the subject of this notice of sale, the “mortgage loan servicer” as defined in Civil Code § 2923.53(k)(3) declares that it has obtained from the Commissioner a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to Civil Code section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date this notice of sale is recorded. the time frame for giving a notice of sale specified in Civil Code Section 2923.52 subdivision (a) does not apply to this notice of sale pursuant to Civil Code Sections 2923.52. Clarisa gastelum, authorized Signature truStee CorPS iS a deBt ColleCtor. any inforMation oBtained Will Be uSed for tHat PurPoSe. P750176 10/15, 10/22, 10/29/2010 TST3560 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE trustee Sale no.: 20100028700967 title order no.: 100402567 fHa/va/PMi no.: you are in default under a deed of truSt, dated 09/26/05. unleSS you taKe aCtion to ProteCt your ProPerty, it May Be Sold at a PuBliC Sale. if you need an exPlanation of tHe nature of tHe ProCeeding againSt you, you SHould ContaCt a laWyer. NDEx West, LLC, as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to deed of trust recorded on 10/04/05, as instrument no. 05 2388743 of official records in the office of the County recorder of LOS ANgELES County, State of California. exeCuted By: WILLIAM ALLEN DAVIS, Will Sell at PuBliC auCtion to HigHeSt Bidder for CaSH, CaSHier’S CHeCK/CaSH eQuivalent or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the united States) DATE OF SALE: November 4, 2010 TIME OF SALE: 11:30 AM PLACE OF SALE: At the front entrance to the Pomona Superior Courts Building, 350 W. Mission Blvd. Pomona, CA. STREET ADDRESS and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2119 RIDgEVIEW TERRACE DRIVE, SIgNAL HILL, CA 90806. APN# 7217-029-007 the undersigned trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said deed of trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said deed of trust, fees, charges and expenses of the trustee and of the trusts created by said deed of trust. the total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the notice of Sale is $1,050,965.71. the beneficiary under said deed of trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written declaration of default and demand for Sale, and a written notice of default and election to Sell. the undersigned caused said notice of default and election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. for truStee Sale inforMation PleaSe Call: nationWide PoSting & PuBliCation, inC. 5005 WindPlay drive, Suite 1, el dorado HillS, Ca 95762-9334 916-939-0772, www.nationwideposting.com NDEx West L.L.C. MAY BE ACTINg AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTINg TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NDEx West, L.L.C. as Trustee, By: ric Juarez dated: 10/10/10 nPP0166877 10/15/10, 10/22/10, 10/29/10

TST3557 / 20101347666 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: WilloW run enterPriSeS, 388 e. ocean Blvd. #1106, long Beach, Ca 90802. registrant: tHoMaS H. Buffington, 388 e. ocean Blvd. #1106, long Beach, Ca 90802. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: thomas H. Buffington. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on September 22, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 8, 15, 22, 29, 2010. TST3558 / 20101425067 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: CaMBodian exPreSS ServiCe, 843 e. anaheim St., long Beach, Ca 90813. registrant: KuntHie PiCH, 5450 Paramount Blvd. #44, long Beach, Ca 90805. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Kunthie Pich. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 6, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 8, 15, 22, 29, 2010. TST3559 / 20101425068 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: 1. dyMaMiC glaSS, 2. dynaMiC glaSS By dyana, 3. glaSS By dyana, 3305 Brayton ave., Signal Hill, Ca 90755. registrant: dyana duPeray anderSen, 3305 Brayton ave., Signal Hill, Ca 90755. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: dyana andersen. the registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. date started business was april, 2005. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 6, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 8, 15, 22, 29, 2010. TST3561 / 20101457590 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: King CaMeran foundation, 6186 atlantic ave., long Beach, Ca 90805. registrant: folloWerS of tHe Way MiniStrieS, 6186 atlantic ave., long Beach, Ca 90805. this business is conducted by: a Corporation. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: William Jones, President. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 13, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 15, 22, 29, & november 5, 2010. TST3562 / 20101457591 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: green Corner, 4103 viking Way #B, long Beach, Ca 90808. registrant: HeMPeror'S neW ClotHeS, 4103 viking Way #B, long Beach, Ca 90808. this business is conducted by: a limited liability Partnership. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: lawrence King. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 13, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 15, 22, 29, & november 5, 2010.

TST3563 / 20101457592 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: rendeZvouS toBaC-Sundi reCordS, 11400 W. olympic Blvd. #1510, los angeles, Ca 90064. registrant: g.a. CaBot, 11400 W. olympic Blvd. #1510, los angeles, Ca 90064. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: g.a. Cabot. the registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. date started business was January 12, 2005. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 13, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 15, 22, 29, & november 5, 2010. TST3564 / 20101457593 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following persons are doing business as: roSSMont HoMeoWnerS aSSoCiatgion, 2135 florida St., long Beach, Ca 90814. registrant: 1. deBra t. Bennett-JoneS, 5599 olive ave., long Beach, Ca 90805, 2. viCtoria l. WeSt, 80 Park ave., long Beach, Ca 90803. this business is conducted by: an unincorporated association other than a Partnership. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: debra t. Bennett-Jones. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 13, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 15, 22, 29, & november 5, 2010. TST3565 / 20101436454 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: CHill Coffee lounge and Cafe, 510 e. Broadway, long Beach, Ca 90802. registrant: alex KotoyantZ, 4324 gardenia ave, long Beach, Ca 90807. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: alex Kotoyantz. the registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. date started business was october 1, 2010. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 7, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 15, 22, 29, & november 5, 2010. TST3569 / 20101496099 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: exeCutive valet, 2012 7th ave., los angeles, Ca 90018. registrant: Jorge floreS, 2012 7th ave., los angeles, Ca 90018. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Jorge flores. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 20, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 22, 29, & november 5, 12, 2010. TST3570 / 20101496100 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: traSHout and reCovery, 2669 Myrtle ave., Ste. 211, Signal Hill, Ca 90755. registrant: verna M. CHarleS, 2101 e. 21st St. #306, Signal Hill, Ca 90755. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: verna M. Charles. the registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. date started business was october 1, 2010. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 20, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 22, 29, & november 5, 12, 2010.

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TST3572 / 20101479530 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following persons are doing business as: fruit BatS and CatfiSH, 1835 e. florida St., long Beach, Ca 90802. registrant: 1. MiCHael Cole, 1835 e. florida ave., long Beach, Ca 90802, 2. guStavo Caldron, 9 Barrington, aliso viejo, Ca 92656. this business is conducted by: a general Partnership. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Michael Cole. the registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. date started business was September 1, 2010. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 15, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 29, & november 5, 12, 19, 2010. TST3573 / 20101537238 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: ProJeCt ClotHing, 12626 e. 213th St., lakewood, Ca 90715. registrant: Brian allan BelCHer, 12626 e. 213th St., lakewood, Ca 90715. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Brian allan Belcher. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 27, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 29, & november 5, 12, 19, 2010. TST3574 / 20101537239 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following persons are doing business as: aalaS diStriCt 8 2012, 6475 e. Pacific Coast Hwy. #323, long Beach, Ca 90803. registrant: 1. deniSe BreaZeal, 25924 Sandalia drive, valencia, Ca 91355, 2. elliot SCHWed, 1817 Knoxville ave., long Beach, Ca 90815. this business is conducted by: an unincorporated association other than a Partnership. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: elliot Schwed. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 27, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 29, & november 5, 12, 19, 2010.

CITY OF SIGNAL HILL TST3571 2175 Cherry Avenue Signal Hill, CA 90755-3799 PUBLIC WORKSHOP NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY gIVEN THAT on tuesday, november 9, 2010, the Planning Commission of the City of Signal Hill, California, will conduct a public workshop at 7:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers located at City Hall, 2175 Cherry avenue, Signal Hill, California, to consider recommendations on the following: PROPOSED ZONINg ORDINANCE AMENDMENT a WorKSHoP to ConSider Staff reCoMMendationS aMending Signal Hill MuniCiPal Code CHaPterS 20.20.020, related to Storage uSeS and 20.22 Storage yard fenCeS. iteMS to Be ConSidered inClude: • ProHiBit neW Storage yardS • ProHiBit tHe folloWing at aPProxiMately 100 exiSting Storage yardS WitHin tHe City, WHiCH are alloWed to reMain and SuBJeCt to tHe folloWing StandardS: • no StaCKing of ContainerS (none found By inSPeCtion) • no Storage on toP of ContainerS (aPPlieS to five Storage yardS) • MiniMuM 5’ SetBaCK for outdoor Storage if aButting a reSidential Zone (aPPlieS to tHree Storage yardS) • reQuire Storage, WitH tHe exCePtion of veHiCleS, at exiSting Storage yardS to Be adeQuately ConCealed froM vieW froM adJaCent PuBliC rigHtS of Way (aPPlieS to ten Storage yardS) applicant: City of Signal Hill ALL INTERESTED PERSONS are hereby invited to attend this Workshop to present written information, express their opinions or otherwise present evidence on the above matter. tHe file containing material relevant to the proposed project may be inspected by the public between the hours of 7:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Monday through thursday, and 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on fridays, in the Community development department at City Hall. THE PUBLIC IS INVITED to submit written comments to the Community development department prior to the Workshop by tuesday, november 9, 2010. Written comments may also be submitted at the workshop or via email at rschaetzl@cityofsignalhill.org Published in (no less than 1/8 Page) in the Signal tribune newspaper: october 29, 2010 Posted in accordance with S.H.M.C. Section 1.08.010 on or before: october 29, 2010 Mailed to affected property owners: october 29, 2010


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SIGNAL TRIBUNE

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OCTOBER 29, 2010


Signal Tribune Issue 3221