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S erving B ixBy K nollS , C alifornia H eigHtS , l oS C erritoS , W rigley VOl. 32 NO. 20

The White House Breast Cancer Awareness Month and tHe

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Your Weekly Community Newspaper

October 22, 2010

World’s first Pacific Island Ethnic Lowenthal squares off Art Museum opens in Long Beach with Flores-Gibson at

CSULB candidate forum

Vivian J. Malauulu Contributing Writer

Long Beach City College alumnus Iuogafa Salima was 10 years old and on a church malaga– a ceremonial visit taken according to Samoan custom– to the small island of Savai’i in what was then Western Samoa, when she discovered her passion for anthropology. That realization occurred in 1996, and Nafa, as she is affectionately known by family and friends, has been intrigued by stories of her Polynesian ancestors and their rich history ever since. “Our youth group was visiting an abandoned church in a deserted village in the lava fields of Savai’i when I stumbled upon an ancient grave,” Nafa recalls. “I remember how the lava went around the grave but didn’t cover it. I wanted to know how old the grave was, who was buried in it, and what the cause of death was.” That experience changed the course of Nafa’s life. “I love researching ancient civilizations of the Pacific,” she said. “I

Nick Diamantides Staff Writer

Photo by On Point Imaging

Performing at the grand-opening celebration of the Pacific Island Ethnic Art Museum last weekend were the Long Beach-based Kutturan Chamoru Performers. Established in 1993, the group is an authentic Chamoru dance ensemble representing the Marianas Islands in the Micronesian region of the Pacific, which include Guam, Saipan, Tinian and Rota.

love discovering clues about how islanders lived and learning how they acquired different languages and traditions.” As a child, she regularly borrowed such books from relatives, friends, and the local library in Car-

About 250 people attended the candidate forum sponsored by the Long Beach League of Women Voters last Friday afternoon. The event, which took place at the CSULB Pyramid, featured candidates running for two offices: California’s 54th Assembly District seat and California’s 37th Congressional District seat. (Because the Signal Tribune covered a forum with the 37th Congressional District candidates the next day, their comments are not included in this article.) The candidates for the 54th Assembly District seat are incumbent Demo-

crat Bonnie Lowenthal and challenger Republican Martha Flores-Gibson. Flores-Gibson, who spoke first, began by mentioning that she immigrated to the United States from El Salvador when she was 6 years old, learned English and considered herself to be an American from her earliest years. “I knew even then that this was a great land of opportunity,” she said, adding that after graduating from high school she completed college and earned a master’s in social work, among other degrees, and has worked for the Long Beach Unified School District (LBUSD) for 20 years. see foruM page 14

son where she grew up. Her interest in Pacific Islander history motivated her to take a cultural anthropology class at Long Beach City College (LBCC). That was when her passion see pIeaM page 15

Community rallies behind local burglarized diner Brett Ashley Hawkins Editorial Intern

After closing their restaurant at 4390 Atlantic Avenue last Saturday night, George’s 50’s Diner co-owners George and Helen Alvarez arrived the next morning in shock after one of their cooks discovered a hole punched in one door and two back doors pried open– the restaurant had been broken into. Among the items lost were coffee machines, hundreds of pounds of beef, all but two of their 75 die-cast model cars shelved over the top of the front counter (valued at more than $11,000), and several hundred dollars of petty cash. “We responded to the business on Saturday, Oct. 17 at approximately 6am to take a report regarding a burglary that had occurred,” said Nancy Pratt of the Long Beach Police Department’s media relations detail. “The suspects had forced entry into the business and had taken a variety of items.

Cory Bilicko/Signal Tribune

Candidates for the 54th Assembly District seat, Republican Martha Flores-Gibson and incumbent Democrat Bonnie Lowenthal, during last Friday’s forum at Cal State Long Beach

State senator was champion of health, environmental causes Neena Strichart/Signal Tribune

This week, the owners of George’s ’50s Diner have received overwhelming support from locals and regulars who have joined together to donate money and die-cast model cars to help redecorate the restaurant.

However, it was going to take the owners some time to take inventory and determine all of the actual loss. We do not have any suspect information at this time and are asking for the public’s help.”

This week, the Alvarezes have received overwhelming support from the community as several locals and regulars have joined together to donate money and even die-cast model cars to see george’s page 9

District 28 State Senator Jenny Oropeza, whose representation included Long Beach, died Wednesday night at Long Beach Memorial Hospital at the age of 53. After being diagnosed in May with an abdominal blood clot that led to a build-up of fluid in her lungs,

Oropeza missed most of this year’s session. The former state assembly member, whose name will remain on the November ballot as a Democratic candidate, was pursuing a second term as senator, and she was expected to defeat Republican John S. Stammreich, her sole challenger. (If she wins, a special election will determine who will fill the position.) Oropeza had been diagnosed with liver cancer in 2004, and, after unsee oropeza page 8


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OCtOBEr 22, 2010

House Democrats trying to provide $250 payment to Social Security beneficiaries House Democrats will move ahead with legislation to provide Social Security recipients with a one-time $250 payment. The Social Security Administration announced last Friday that there will be no automatic Cost-ofLiving-Adjustment (COLA) for 2011, which means that for the first time ever, 2011 will be the second consecutive year that Social Security retirees, veterans, and people with disabilities will see no increase in their monthly Social Security, SSI, VA Pension and Compensation and Railroad Retirement benefits. This unprecedented situation is a result of economic conditions, not the result of Congressional or Presidential action or inaction. “The lingering effects of the worst economy since the Great Depression mean Americans who need Social Security to survive are in danger of not being able to afford even the basic necessities of life, like food and medication,” said Congresswoman Laura Richardson (D– 37th District). “We will act quickly to enact a one-time $250 payment to seniors, veterans, and people with disabilities who receive Social Security to help them make ends meet during this tough time, when housing values are down, other retirement income is volatile, and many are facing rising expenses. “As the representative of 52,000 seniors in California’s 37th Congressional District, I wholeheartedly support H.R. 5987, the Seniors Protection Act, which will provide a $250 payment to about 54 million Americans in lieu of no increase in their monthly income,” Richardson added. “The President has already budgeted for this, and we can do this in a fiscally responsible way. We can’t leave seniors on Main Street behind as we begin this recovery.” The COLA is automatically calculated using data on inflation published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). October 15 is the day BLS releases the final economic factor that the Social Security Administration uses to calculate the annual COLA. In 2009, Social Security recipients saw a 5.8-percent increase in their benefits, the largest since 1982, as a result of rising costs; but in 2010, they saw no COLA at all. Social Security benefit levels are modest– only $14,000 a year for the average retiree. The median income for senior households is just $24,000, reflecting just how much Social Security means to most elderly Americans. Six in ten seniors rely on Social Security for more than half of their income, and about a third of retirees have little other than Social Security on which to live. In addition, Richardson recently introduced the Social Security Safety Dividend Act of 2010. If signed into law, this legislation will extend the intent of H.R. 5987 by automatically issuing Social Security beneficiaries a $250 check in any year that a cost of living adjustment (COLA) is not increased. For many seniors, Social Security is their only source of income, making it difficult to make ends meet as the cost of living continues to rise. In years when the Consumer Price Index (CPI) determines the average American’s purchasing power to be low, Social Security benefits are supplemented by a cost-ofliving adjustment. However, in years when the CPI formula deems a COLA unnecessary, the real cost of living that seniors face continues to rise. “This additional income can be used to pay for prescription drugs, gas for their cars, utility bills or other unforeseen expenses,” Richardson said. “Though a modest sum, providing this extra income in years not adjusted for the rising cost of living will help increase seniors’ financial security and peace of mind in these tough economic times.” ß


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COMMUnItY MemorialCare Health System appoints new Breast Center director OCtOBEr 22, 2010

Officials at Long Beach Memorial Medical Center (LBMMC) and Orange Coast Memorial Medical Center (OCMMC)– two hospitals in the MemorialCare Health System– have named Homayoon Sanati, MD medical director of the MemorialCare Breast Center at LBMMC and OCMMC. In his new role, Sanati will conduct leading-edge breast cancer research and lead the MemorialCare’s multi-disciplinary breast program in Los Angeles and Orange counties. In addition, he will oversee the breast care team during the expansion of a new Todd Cancer Institute (TCI) Pavilion at Long Beach Memorial, scheduled to be finished in early 2013. The $31 million, 63,000square-foot pavilion will enhance convenience for all cancer patients, moving an array of cancer services– the Breast Center, Cancer Rehabilitation, Lymphedema Clinic, Ambulatory Infusion, Cancer Clinical Research Center, physician office space, TCI administration offices and other related services– together in one building. “With the arrival of Dr. Sanati and the expansion of TCI, our hospitals will improve upon the worldrenowned cancer care already delivered by physicians and staff at Long Beach Memorial and Orange Coast Memorial,” said Diana Hendel, Pharm.D., chief executive officer, Long Beach Memorial and Miller Children’s Hospital Long Beach. “Dr. Sanati brings tremendous expertise to MemorialCare, and we are honored to have him lead our breast team during this exciting time of growth.” Sanati brings with him many years of experience, having served as one of the assistant professors of medicine for the division of Hematology/Oncology at UCI Medical Center, where he specialized in breast cancer. He received his medical degree from the Rosalind Franklin School of Health Sciences/Chicago Medical School and continues to participate in various regional and national administrative service appointments and committees. Sanati completed his fellowship program at UCLA Medical Center in Combined Geriatric and Medical Oncology and is triple-board certified in medical oncology, geriatrics and hospice/palliative care. His research has focused on pain management, quality of life and palliative supportive care. His work has been widely published in peer-reviewed journals, and he has been

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honored with numerous awards, including America’s Top Oncologist selected by Consumer’s Research Council of America. “I am thrilled to be joining a strong team of expert physicians, surgeons, pathologists, breast radiologists, radiation oncologists and medical oncologists dedicated to breast cancer care,” Sanati said. “The expert multidisciplinary team of specialists will allow MemorialCare to improve clinical outcomes and provide new clinical research opportunities for our breast cancer patients.” ß

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Homayoon Sanati, MD

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CLEAn UP YOUr COMMUnItY Sixth District Councilman Dee Andrews, in partnership with Neighborhood Services and community resident Rachel Ysasaga, will host the 6th District Neighborhood Clean-Up from 8am to noon, on Saturday, Oct. 23, at 2303 Olive Ave. Volunteers will take to the streets and pick up garbage throughout neighborhoods in the 6th District. The clean-up will cover the 2300 block of Olive and the alleys in between. Included will be: large dumpsters for disposal of all non-hazardous waste, tools, rakes, brooms, shovels, gloves, trash bags, and masks. Call (562) 570-6816 or visit longbeach.gov/district6. WALk WItH A CHILD, WALk FOr A CHILD The Children's Clinic will host its 20th Anniversary Beach Walk & Health Fair Saturday, Oct. 23 at 9am, with registration at 8am, at the Marina Green in downtown Long Beach. The event will begin with a 5K walk down the Shoreline bike path and conclude with a celebration of and barbecue provided by Long Beach firefighters. Musical entertainment will feature Dutchy's Caribbean Tropicanas and performances by local youth groups. This year, Long Beach First Lady Nancy Foster and community organizer Justin Rudd will serve as the honorary grand marshals of the event. To register as a Walk participant or to make a donation, visit beachwalk2010.kintera.org or call TCC's Beach Walk Team HQ at (562) 933-6631. FOLLOW tHE YELLOW BrICk rOAD The classic movie The Wizard of Oz will be shown at the Los Altos Neighborhood Library, 5614 Britton Dr., on Saturday, Oct. 23 at 2pm. Attendees may bring snacks to enjoy during the free screening. Street parking is available. Call (562) 570-1045. It’S A CELEBrAtIOn St. Anthony High School will host a party in the courtyard of its historic downtown Long Beach campus, Saturday, Oct. 23 for its 90th anniversary. The celebration will begin at 4:30pm with the dedication of a new work of art recently completed by Long Beach artists– "St. Anthony's Mural”– located in the entrance of Shea Hall, the high school's main administration building. Following the mural dedication, guests will move into the courtyard of the venerable 90year-old Catholic high school for an evening of celebration, music and dancing. Archbishop Niederauer is the keynote speaker, and six new inductees into the school’s Hall of Fame will be honored. Reservations must be made in advance. Contact St. Anthony High School at (562) 435-4496, ext. 1222 or purchase tickets online at longbeachsaints.org. HAVE FUn FOr A GOOD CAUSE Haven’s Heart, a local nonprofit charity, will host “A Night at the Monte Carlo Casino” fundraising event Saturday, Oct. 23 from 8pm to midnight at the Petroleum Club, 3636 Linden Ave. The entrance fee lets attendees take advantage of casino-style table games, both live and silent auctions, and a complimentary drink ticket to the full bar. All proceeds go to Haven’s Heart, which provides counseling support and cash grants to families struggling to care for chronically ill children at home. Dress is semi-formal. Tickets are $40 in advance or $50 at the door. Call (562) 426-7500 ext. 304. PLAnES & AUtOMOBILES The ninth annual Wings Wheels and Rotors Expo will take place on Sunday, Oct. 24 at Los Alamitos Army Airfield, 11200 Lexington Dr., Los Alamitos, from 9am to 4pm. The event will have various civilian and public safety helicopters with fire, police and military rotorcraft, including some of the media aircraft seen daily in the air around SoCal. Helicopter flights in civilian "choppers" will be available for $45 for a trip by Adventure Helicopters, and free flights in general aviation airplanes will be provided by the Experimental Aircraft Association Young Eagles for youth between the ages of 8 and 17. The largest event will be a car show including custom cars, new automobiles, motorcycles, roadsters, antique vehicles and hot rods, and attendees can still enter their cars in the show right up to Sunday morning. Awards to be presented for best cars. Admission is free, and free parking is available. A portion of the proceeds will go to the JFTB Morale Welfare and Recreation (MWR) funds for armed forces personnel on the base. Donations accepted. Picture ID is required to enter the base. Visit wwrexpo.net. WOrkInG tOGEtHEr The Long Beach Police Department West Division will host a community leadership forum at the West Division Substation, 1835 Santa Fe Ave., on Wednesday, Oct. 27 at 6pm. The purpose is to exchange information between community leaders and the West Division Command staff and officers. RSVP to Jose Vazquez at (562) 570-3461. InCrEASInG AWArEnESS The Neighborhood Resource Center invites the public to a “Tenant Rights Workshop: Learn Your Rights and Your Responsibilities” on Wednesday, Oct. 27 from 6pm to 7:30pm at 425 Atlantic Ave. Learn about additional resources and landlord/tenant issues, get help for specific concerns, and more. RSVP to (562) 570-1010 or email sharron.hinkey@longbeach.gov. This free workshop is presented in English with Spanish and Khmer translation available, and free parking is available. Residents are invited to bring canned food to donate to Food Finders to assist Long Beach neighbors during the current economic crisis. SAVVY SOCIAL SECUrItY PLAnnInG A seminar about “What Baby Boomers Need to Know to Maximize Retirement Income” will be presented by Karen Codman at 1165 E. San Antonio Dr., Suite G, on Wednesday, Oct. 27 from 6:30pm to 9pm. Learn the answers to all your Social Security-related questions. The seminar will cover the basics of Social Security and reveals strategies for maximizing benefits. Feel free to bring a friend or two. RSVP to (562) 728-5800 or email miriam@karencodman.com. CHAMBEr CHOW The Signal Hill Chamber of Commerce's October membership luncheon will take place on Thursday, Oct. 28, from noon to 1:30pm in the Signal Hill Park Community Center, 1780 E. Hill St. behind the library. The featured speaker will be Charlie Basham, a member of the Long Beach Historical Society, with a presentation on the annual Sunnyside/Municipal Cemeteries Tour and historical figures buried there. Lunch prepared by Triple R Catering. Cost is $25 per person but will be discounted to $15 for members with advance non-refundable reservations made before noon on the day before the luncheon. Non-members are welcome at a cost of $25 per person. Make reservations by email to communityrelations@signalhillchamber.com, leaving a voicemail message at (562) 424-6489, or visiting signalhillchamber.com and clicking on the "Pay on Line" tab.


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COMMUnItY

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OCtOBEr 22, 2010

Steinhauser, Oakley and king join Obama to renew Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanic Americans PUBLISHEr/EDItOr In CHIEF

NEENA R. STRICHART ASSOCIAtE PUBLISHEr

STEPHEN M. STRICHART PrODUCtIOn/DESIGn EDItOr

KELLY NIELSEN MAnAGInG EDItOr

CORY BILICKO StAFF WrItErS

NICK DIAMANTIDES RACHAEL RIFKIN COLUMnIStS

CAROL BERG SLOAN, RD JENNIFER E. BEAVER EntErtAInMEnt WrItEr

VICKI PARIS GOODMAN ADVErtISInG COnSULtAnt

BARBIE ELLISEN ADVErtISInG DESIGnEr

LEIGHANNA NIERLE EDItOrIAL IntErnS

BRETT HAWKINS STEVEN PIPER –––––––––––––

the Signal tribune adheres to the following policies

Long Beach Unified School District Superintendent Chris Steinhauser, Long Beach City College President Eloy Ortiz Oakley and Cal State University–Long Beach President F. King Alexander joined President Barack Obama at a White House signing ceremony and reception Tuesday where the president approved an executive order renewing the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanic Americans. More than one in five students in the United States is Hispanic, and Hispanic students are more likely to attend low-performing schools, Obama said at the signing ceremony. “This is not just a Latino problem. This is an American problem, and we have to solve it,” Obama said. “It is an economic imperative.” The three educational leaders from Long Beach have attracted national attention for increasing college access through the Long Beach College Promise program and a Seamless Education partnership that aligns curriculum, instruction and professional development from pre-kindergarten through the doctoral level. The Long Beach leaders had traveled to D.C. to share their successes at a national education summit that started on Monday. “Our Long Beach community should take great pride in knowing that our commitment to all students from preschool through the doctoral degree

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LETTERS

is being recognized nationally as a prototype of seamless education,” said Alexander. “This is perhaps the most important issue our nation faces in the decades to come. We are very pleased to participate with President Obama and the Department of Education to improve public education everywhere.” Hispanics represent the fastest growing minority group in the nation. The White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanic Amer-

icans was established in September 1990 to provide guidance to the Secretary of Education regarding academic opportunities for the Hispanic community. The initiative was subsequently continued by President William J. Clinton and President George W. Bush. Under President Obama, the office has taken further steps to serve the Hispanic community. The latest executive order by Obama is aimed at strengthening the initiative. More than 52 percent of stu-

OPInIOn

The Signal Tribune welcomes LEttErS tO tHE EDItOr. Letters should be signed, dated and include a phone number in order to verify authenticity.

LEttErS tO tHE EDItOr & COMMEntArIES are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Signal Tribune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, please remember that LEttErS tO tHE EDItOr & COMMEntArIES are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact.

Courtesy lBUSD

Long Beach City College President Eloy Ortiz Oakley, Long Beach Unified School District Superintendent Chris Steinhauser and Cal State University– Long Beach President F. King Alexander at the White House on Tuesday

dents in the Long Beach Unified School District are Hispanic. Participation in rigorous Advanced Placement college preparatory classes by Hispanics and other minorities here has increased in recent years. College enrollment is on the rise here too, in part because of the College Promise, a cooperative venture among CSULB, LBCC and LBUSD that has produced promising results in just two years. The program includes a tuition-free semester at LBCC, and it offers guaranteed admission to CSULB for local students. “More than 72 percent of our highschool graduates are pursuing higher education, with half of them attending LBCC or CSULB,” said Steinhauser. “We’re proud of what we’ve accomplished with the help of our partners in higher education, and we’re delighted that the Obama Administration has noticed our ongoing efforts.” At Long Beach City College, more than 500 students this fall are taking advantage of a tuition-free semester, courtesy of the College Promise. “The Long Beach College Promise is a national model for seamless education, and we are honored that President Obama and his education team have taken notice,” said Oakley. “As one of the largest Hispanic-serving institutions in the nation, it gives us great pride to be recognized by the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanic Americans. It is our hope that key elements of our innovative program can be emulated across the country.” ß

by Neena Strichart

My hubby Steve and I love to watch the home-improvement shows and various food-type programming. Last Saturday morning, we had a nice, leisurely breakfast while watching The Best Thing I Ever Ate on The Food Network. Yummy! It was chock full of foodie experts giving details about their favorite dishes from restaurants or shops, including items like gourmet peanut butter and marzipan pastry. Unfortunately for me, I had no way to tell if the items featured during that particular episode were gluten free or full of gluten– a big no-no for me. After watching the show, I decided that I should do a column about what I consider to be the best things I eat– lo-

TO

Say no to bullying The last few weeks have been tragic for those teens across the country who have lost their lives to suicide. Teens like Tyler Clementi, Billy Lucas and Ashler Brown took their lives because they were bullied about their sexual orientation. Our hearts go out to their families and to anyone faced with bullying because of who they are. You may not know that youth who identify as gay or lesbian are four times more likely to commit suicide then those that identify as heterosexual. We have to ensure that all of our children are treated with respect, love and support. Let’s all talk to our youth and children, and please, if you know a teen who needs help, refer him or her to the Trevor Project lifeline, a national hotline for youth contemplating suicide, at (866) 488-7386. Let’s work together to make our city and world a safer place for everyone. Go, Long Beach! robert Garcia Long Beach Councilmember First District

TH E

cally. Now, keep in mind that with only a small amount of space, I can’t include everything. I promise I’ll give Steve a chance to list his favorites, many just full of gluten, in an upcoming issue. So, here goes… in NO particular order: Bamboo teri House (Bixby Knolls)– Una Don bowl (baked eel over rice) Café Bixby (Bixby Knolls)– Lamb, any way, shape or form Delius restaurant, Cherry Ave. at Spring Street (Signal Hill)– Poached eggs wrapped in salmon Hokkaido, Cherry Ave. at Spring

ED I TO R

Welfare woes

I have lived long enough to have seen the good, the bad, and now, the ugly of my America. During the ‘30s, I saw people being evicted from their homes, and my heart ached for them. Welfare wasn’t the answer then because self-respect and pride were still in vogue. I don’t know how those families made it, but they found a way back. In today’s world of handouts and section eights, the hoi polloi think the government is their special bank and if they don’t want to work they have a “right” to expect the government to support them in the manner they think is due them. And the government agrees, so we have generation after generation expecting Uncle Sam to be their special bank. [Having] pride and dignity is a thing for the “ignorant” who have never learned how to cheat and lie for their benefit. I worked for 35 years and paid towards my retirement from my first payroll check. There were days when my children could have used a new pair of shoes, but that money was taken out of my check by my government’s

Street (Long Beach)– Chocolate fountain with fresh fruit Awesome Sushi, Clark Avenue at Willow Street (Long Beach)– Octopus salad Curley’s, Cherry Ave. at Willow Street (Signal Hill)– One word– CHILI Le Yen (Bixby Knolls)– Phoenix & Dragon (chicken, shrimp, and vegetables) Shenandoah at the Arbor (Los Alamitos) – Maple-glazed salmon, crème brulee Big E Pizza (PCH in Signal Hill)– Greek and/or antipasto salad Alsace Lorraine Bakery (Bixby Knolls)– Flourless chocolate cookies Five Star teriyaki (Signal Hill)– Triple taste sauce on anything E.J. Malloy’s (Bixby Knolls)– Steak salad Panda Garden (Bixby Knolls)– Aromatic shrimp trader Joe’s (Bixby Knolls)– Crème brulee in chocolate cups, frozen food aisle Pho America, Pacific Avenue at PCH (Long Beach)– Mango boba and

demand that I contribute towards my future retirement. I learned to manage, and when I finally retired and received my pension check, I realized how fortunate I was to have done without a few things sooner so I could reap my rewards later. Now, the retirement fund (Social Security) to which all working men and women had to contribute has been savaged by my government to pay for all manner of subsidies, and our retirement has been cut out of cost-of-living adjustment for two straight years while the giveaway programs continue to expand. Let’s give America back to the working American and go back to the days when people of good will had self-respect and tried to do good things for themselves and their families and weren’t too dependent on the government to help them, unless if was for just a leg up to get them going again after a misfortune. Looking to the government for a life of giveme is the ruination of a government and the recipient. Vivian C. nelson Long Beach

A call to get mad What do big corporations, the oil industry, healthcare insurers, pharmaceutical companies,

shrimp spring rolls Patricia’s Mexican restaurant (Bixby Knolls)– Mixta tostada (cold seafood with crispy corn tortilla) Flame Broiler (Bixby Knolls, Long Beach) Steak & brown rice bowl with green onions Pizza Place, Broadway (Long Beach)– Antipasto or Greek salad Arby’s/Green Burrito (Bixby Knolls, Long Beach)– Mini nachos with carnitas Baja Sonora (Long Beach)– Green rice (much different than regular Spanish rice) Golden Eagle (Signal Hill)– Carne asada tacos, their crispy bacon on anything, mango iced tea Georgie’s Place (Bixby Knolls, Long Beach)– Greek or steak salad It’s A Grind (Signal Hill, Long Beach)– Nutty cow– hot hazelnut– flavored coffee drink, YUM! Baba Ghanouj (Bixby Knolls, Long Beach)– Lamb-stuffed grape leaves Arnold’s restaurant (Bixby Knolls, Long Beach– gone, but not forgotten) – Brussels sprout salad

big-box stores and the Republican party have in common? Could it be that they have deliberately done everything possible to keep unemployment high these past two years, so Republicans can regain power in November and in 2012? One of America’s largest stores laid off 11,000 workers this year in Arkansas alone. In Minnesota, two other stores are being boycotted for donating hundreds of thousands of dollars to a radical Republican running for governor. Meanwhile, right here in Signal Hill, I have noticed that one of our most profitable stores often has only two cashier counters open, with as many as 10 people standing in each line. So, you CEOS, stop firing people and hire some new ones with the millions of dollars you are spending to buy our votes. As for you consumers, get mad at those who are manipulating you by forcing you to stand in line and keeping you on hold every time you make a phone call, only to end up talking with someone outsourced by CEOs! And don’t blame Democrat politicians. Blame big corporations and the Republican party for creating the entire economic disaster that got us into this mess in the first place. robert Allan Long Beach


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OCtOBEr 22, 2010

Cemetery Tour 15th Annual Historical

AnD tHE DEAD tELL tALES Join us on Halloween Eve at the City’s two oldest cemeteries as costumed actors tell about the lives and deaths of those who have called Long Beach home. Along with ten graveside storytellers, you’ll learn about cemetery symbols, see examples of funeral advertising from around the turn of the century, enjoy free hot dogs and a fun walking tour beneath the trees.

Saturday, October 30, 2010 Sunnyside & Long Beach Municipal Cemeteries

1095 E. Willow Street (between Orange & California Avenues) • Tickets on sale from 9am to 12 noon • Presentations continuously from 9am to 2:30pm • Guided tours leave on the hour @ 9, 10, 11 & 12 Adults $18, Members $12, Students 12-18 $5, under 12 are free

For more information call

(562)

424-2220 www.hslb.org

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15th Annual Historical C e me

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WHERE EVERY PLOT HAS A STORY...

5


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OCtOBEr 22, 2010

ICt’s world premiere musical When garbo Talks! gives voice to career of movie icon Vicki Paris Goodman Culture Writer

Richard Kaye promised his dying father, lyricist Buddy Kaye, that he would see that the elder Kaye’s last work made it to the stage. Knowing of the son’s earnest vow, how could one help wanting When Garbo Talks! to be a great success? With the younger Kaye’s committed advocacy, and music by Mort Garson, the new musical found its world premiere stage at Long Beach’s International City Theatre. Depicting the rise of mysterious Swedish film star Greta Garbo, When Garbo Talks! certainly has plenty of poignant grist for the theatrical mill. Garbo’s uber-focused devotion to becoming a successful actress is, in itself, a tale sufficiently compelling to inspire an engaging dramatic play or musical. And of course there is far more to the story, all accentuated with effusive passion in this exceedingly hard-driving show. What I can’t quite put my finger on is why When Garbo Talks! has to work so hard to tell its story. Perhaps it’s the score, a line-up of musical numbers that mostly amount to talking set to music. How about instead endowing the musical with an assortment of original songs, each one of a stand-alone quality possessing a hummable melodic line distinct from every other? Alas, those days seem to be long gone. Also less than helpful to the show’s cause is the unimaginative and mismatched choreography, which seemed obligatory and as if borrowed from many other shows.

Jessica Burrows stars as a willowy and passionate Garbo with a more than competent singing voice. Chemistry admittedly sizzles between Burrows and actor Michael Stone Forrest, who looms large in the role of Swedish movie director Mauritz Stiller. Given the homosexuality that renders Stiller unavailable to Greta, this relationship adds interest and the only layer of complexity to the otherwise two dimensional show. Garbo and Stiller, having naively come in good faith from Sweden into the clutches of a heartless Louis B. Mayer, are dismayed at the studio king’s deceitful Hollywood machinations. Mayer, played with an icily confident and business-savvy American gruffness by Matthew Henerson, lends a welcome contrast to the overly emotive Scandinavian sensibility of some of the other characters. (Funny, I never thought I’d place “emotive” and “Scandinavian” in the same sentence.) Mayer’s ruthless team of loyal assistants fare well in the hands of actors Teya Patt and Nick Rogers. The trio came through with strong vocal performances throughout. Christopher Carothers ably delivers the part of Gable-esque love interest John Gilbert. Greta’s ambivalence at Gilbert’s desire to marry her ends badly for Gilbert’s career, as he too falls victim to Mayer’s wrath. Greta’s close friend Signe Enwall is played by a sparkling and sincere Alexandra Ackerman. Scott Kruse adeptly picks up assorted remaining roles. Costume designer Kim DeShazo’s

Courtesy ICT

Jessica Burrows as Greta Garbo and Christopher Carothers as John Gilbert in ICT’s When Garbo Talks!

dresses and other attire are, on their own, almost worth the price of admission. Apart from When Garbo Talks! simply trying too hard, it mostly lacks likeable characters and sufficient dramatic range to allow the audience a breather from the persistent intensity. Where the first act came to an uncomfortable, awkward, and anti-climactic break for intermission, the second act at least made a more consistent and believable appeal to the heart. Given a good show, veteran director Jules Aaron and choreographer Kay Cole both possess the credentials to send a musical into the stratosphere. Unfortunately, When Garbo Talks! barely makes it through the cloud cover. ------------------------------------MORE INFORMATION InternationalCityTheatre.com (562) 436-4610

In his final year leading vocal ensemble, Lock to helm Musica Sacra Singers at Grace Church Grace First Presbyterian Church, 3955 Studebaker Rd., will welcome the Musica Sacra Singers as part of its concert series to the church’s sanctuary on Sunday, Oct. 31 at 3pm. The performance will be a free-will donation concert. The Musica Sacra Singers, with soloists Marilyn Deegan and Stephen Canfield, will perform choral works spanning five centuries of Christian creativity in music by Tomas Luis de Victoria, Johann Sebastian Bach, Karl Graun, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Antonin Dvorak, Benjamin Britten, Herbert Howells, Jan Sanborn, William Lock and John Rutter. The Musica Sacra Singers, in their 35th year, are an ensemble of

auditioned singers directed by Dr. William Lock, with Warren Ediger serving as assistant conductor and Kevin Weed as accompanist. Lock, who is in his final year at the helm of the group, has specialized in the areas of church music and voice, and he has also taught conducting, music history and literature, theory and world music. He has devoted more than 30 years to local church music ministry and served on the faculty at Biola University. A prolific writer and contributor to numerous journals and periodicals, he is also a published composer. -----------------------------------------MORE INFORMATION (562) 420-3393

Courtesy Grace Church

Dr. William Lock has devoted more than 30 years to local church music ministry.

LBCC Music Department to present ‘romantic Cello’ evening The Long Beach City College (LBCC) Music Department will present Timothy Landauer, principal cellist of the Pacific Symphony, in concert with Timothy Durkovic, director of Keyboard Studies at LBCC on Friday, Nov. 5 at 7:30pm.

The evening of classical music is entitled “The Romantic Cello” and will include the Chopin and Rachmaninoff Sonatas for Cello and Piano, as well as a collection of Schumann fantasy pieces. Reserved seating is $15; non-re-

served students and seniors are $10. The concert will be performed at the Ruth Todd Concert Hall, 4901 East Carson St. Seating is limited, and the concert is expected to sell out early. Call (562) 938-4411 for more information and reservations. ß

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topics of welfare, corruption and defense characterize 37th District seat forum Nick Diamantides Staff Writer

About 200 people attended the California 37th Congressional District candidates forum at the community center of Martin Luther King Jr. Park in Long Beach last Saturday. The event was sponsored by the Long Beach Chapter of the National Council of Negro Women (NCNW) and featured incumbent Congresswoman Laura Richardson, Republican challenger Star Parker, and Independent challenger Nicholas Dibs. Parker, who was selected by a draw to speak first, began by telling the audience that many years ago she was a welfare mom, but her life changed dramatically after Christian conversion, enabling her to graduate from college and start a business in Los Angeles. She explained that she later founded her nonprofit group, the Washington D.C.-based Center for Urban Renewal and Education (CURE), which is a public-policy think tank that proposes market-based solutions to fight poverty. Parker said that until recently she had no desire to run for public office and was content to work behind the scenes to bring about positive change. “But things have changed. Our nation is tremendously divided, and we cannot go on against our core principles,” she told the audience. “So this March, when the Los Angeles County Party asked me to return home and fight for freedom from inside the Congress, I agreed.” Parker lamented the fact that many people in the 37th District have come to believe that they cannot survive without government-funded entitlements such as welfare. “Yes, I do believe that the income redistribution laws are unacceptable in a rich, free and bursting-with-opportunities environment,” she said Dibs began his opening remarks by noting that in June, July and August more than 14,000 people signed petitions to put his name on the ballot. (This is Dibs’s second time on the ballot challenging Richardson.) “I’m the first person since 1950 to get on the ballot as an Independent candidate for Congress in the State of California,” he said. “That’s because our election system makes it very difficult for someone who is not part of the party apparatus to get on the ballot.” He noted that the U.S. and all its

Cory Bilicko/Signal Tribune

Members of the League of Women Voters (far left) sponsored a forum last Friday in Cal State Long Beach’s Walter Pyramid for California’s 37th Congressional District candidates. All three candidates for that seat attended, including (left to right, from center) Republican Star Parker, Independent Nick Dibs, and incumbent Democrat Laura Richardson.

states and communities face many challenges and crises, and the 37th District, as well as the nation, needs people in Washington who have common sense and are not under the control of party bosses or special-interest groups. Dibs told the audience that greed, corruption, and injustice practiced against the American people are at the core of all problems faced in the country today. “By and large, the American people have been deceived by many of their elected leaders for over 50 years,” he said. “It’s time that we sent an Independent to Congress who can stand up for truth and justice and the best interests of the people.” Early in her opening remarks, Richardson noted that she is a lifetime member of NCNW and shared the values of that organization. “I am running because, back in 1968, I was six years old, and I had an opportunity to see that some of the laws (on the books) at the height of the Civil Rights movement didn’t make sense, and they weren’t fair for everyone,” she said. “So my mother told me, ‘you should be a person who makes better laws.’” In an obvious jab at Parker, Richardson added, “I am not here because I was recruited by the Republican Party. I’m not here because I am supported by Sarah Palin, who dumped a bunch of money in our district thinking we wouldn’t know the difference between a counterfeit and a real person in our community. The reason I became a public servant was because I felt that it was important to use the skills that I gained as a graduate to be able to help somebody else.”

Later, Richardson told the audience that because she worked in the business sector for 14 years she understands the needs of business people. She added that, unlike Parker, she has lived in the 37th District for many years. “You need a member of Congress that will continue to fight for you,” she said. After the introductory remarks, Long Beach Unified School District Board Vice President Felton Williams, who served as moderator, asked each candidate questions specific to statements each had made during the past few weeks of campaigning. He asked Parker to explain why she believes that abolishing minimum-wage laws for those under the age of 21 could significantly reduce the wave of illegal immigrants coming to America. “The reason I want to abolish minimum-wage laws for everyone under the age of 21 is not because of the illegal immigration problem,” Parker replied. “I want this because too many of our young people are spending their time hanging out on street corners and getting engaged in gang activity.” Parker noted that the breakdown of the family and the moral relativism taught in public schools have not helped young people make wise choices, but abolishing the minimum wage for those under 21 would enable more employers to hire youth and teach them skills that would put them on the path to leading independent, productive lives. Next, Williams referred to Dibs’s oft-repeated statements that he favored having a flat tax for everyone but the poor. “How would you determine who

Wells that provide SH with water are temporarily out of service Nick Diamantides Staff Writer

Both wells that supply water for the City of Signal Hill have been shut down for repairs. Until at least one of them is back in service, the City will be purchasing water from the Metropolitan Water District (MWD), which imports water to the region from Northern California and the Colorado River. The problem with that scenario is that MWD water is much more expensive than water the City pumps from its own wells. “To avoid the high cost of purchasing water from MWD, the City owns and operates two groundwater wells,” said Rick Olson, acting director of public works. “These two wells, number 7 and number 8, were put in service in 1978 and 1980, respectively, and have provided the City with its water since that time.” Olson explained that, in the cooler months, the two wells normally produce enough water to meet the daily demands of Signal Hill residents and businesses, but, during the warmer summer months, the daily demands often exceed the pumping capabilities of the two wells, requiring the City to purchase MWD water to make up the shortfall. Well number 8 was temporarily taken out of service several months ago due to excessive sand being drawn into

the pump. In response to a question asked by Councilman Larry Forester, Olson said well number 8 was still out of service and he didn’t know when it would be able to produce water for the City again. Olson noted that, in January 2010, the pump bowl assembly in well number 7 was replaced due to wear. “One of the factors contributing to pump wear is the fact that well number 7 produces a moderate amount of sand during pumping operations,” he added. “After replacement of the pump bowl assembly, the well was put back in service and was producing about 1,300 gallons of water per minute.” According to Olson, for several months after the well was back in operation, public works staff noticed it was producing a moderate amount of sand, but that amount was consistent with the historic performance of the well. Things changed in early September, when staff observed an increase in the amount of sand as well as a small amount of gravel in the water coming out of the well. “The problem quickly developed into larger gravel being observed, and the well was taken out of service,” Olson said. “The gravel appears consistent with the gravel pack that was installed around the outside of the original well casing when it was installed in 1978.” Olson traced the well’s problems

back to 2006, when crews relined its casing due to a rapid increase in sand production. He explained that inspections performed at that time indicated several holes in the casing, which required the installation of a smaller sleeve to be installed in the original casing from top to bottom. “It is unlikely that the water flow from the well could pull gravity very far up the casing simply due to gravity,” Olson noted. “At this point, the assumption is that the problem is near or above the pump.” Olson added that a video survey will be conducted during water-flowing conditions to identify the location of the problem, and, once that is done, the necessary repairs will be undertaken. He said he is hoping to have the well back in operation by the end of December. In other actions, the Council: approved an $8,000 employment contract with James Davis, who will serve as interim public works director until a permanent replacement for former director Barbara Munoz is found; awarded a $90,347 contract to Mega Way Enterprises for upgrades to Reservoir Park; and authorized an agreement with the Gateway City Council of Governments for funding to improve the intersection of Orange Avenue and Willow Street. The Council’s next meeting will be at 7pm on Nov. 2 in the Council Chamber of Signal Hill City Hall. ß

is poor?” Williams asked. “What I stated was that the tax code is thousands of pages, and we need to simplify it and cut out the corporate loopholes,” Dibs replied. “You and I have to pay taxes, but the offshore corporations and the money people who profit at the expense of us don’t pay their fair share. In order to eliminate the corporate loopholes, we need a flat tax for corporations and people.” He added that a revised tax code would have to include some kind of a graduated scale so as not to place undue burdens on those below the poverty line, which is determined by the federal government. Williams then asked Richardson what federal expenditures could be reduced and how the money could be better spent. Richardson said one example that comes to mind is a recent study conducted on 96 missile defense systems. According to Richardson, by eliminating waste and inefficiencies in those systems, the federal government could save more than $296 billion. “What would I like to do with that money?” Richardson asked. “There are a lot of things I would rather do than have a missile defense system that really, at this time, is not working.” She explained that she would put that money back into the nation’s schools and spend it on programs that provide assistance to the needy and to seniors. Williams asked all three candidates

about their ideas on Social Security reform. Parker said she would push to exempt seniors from all taxes and look for ways to allow working people to put part of the amount deducted for Social Security into private retirement accounts, which would generate more money for them in the long run. She added that the Social Security system was set up like a pyramid scheme and is now in danger of collapsing because, with the influx of retiring Baby Boomers, there will be more people taking money out of it than putting into it. “There are a lot of things we can do with Social Security,” Parker said. “It is an open debate.” Dibs offered another solution to the Social Security crisis. “We don’t have a lock box on Social Security,” he said. “One of the first things I would do is propose legislation to put a lock box on it. The problem is the government deficit spends, and they borrow out of the Social Security Trust Fund.” Dibs noted the wars in Iran and Afghanistan are the primary causes of the governsee foruM 2 page 8

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LBUSD, California School Employees Association reach tentative agreement with job-protection provisions The Long Beach Unified School District (LBUSD) has reached a tentative agreement with the California School Employees Association Long Beach Chapter 2. The agreement, reached during a time of continuing cuts to public education funding statewide, includes job-protection provisions for this fiscal year and the next one. The agreement would provide some job restoration in exchange for five furlough days this year and up to seven furlough days next year, along with other changes to salaries and benefits. For employees working a standard work week, the five furlough days for this school year would be scheduled

Forum 2 continued from page 7

ment’s deficit spending. “Bringing the troops home will enable us to put more money into important programs like Social Security,” he said, adding that the federal government also needs to help grow the economy so that more people are employed, producing a greater revenue stream for that Trust Fund. Richardson agreed with Parker that the large number of Baby Boomers who will soon be over 65 will put a large stress on the Social Security system. However, she strongly disagreed with Parker’s suggestion that the government should stop taxing seniors. After lambasting the Bush administration for its tax cuts and war spending, which, according to Richardson, are the primary causes of the federal deficit, she said, “Let’s face the fact– we do not have the money to properly fund Social Security.” Richardson also agreed with Dibs that the federal government has to end costly wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and use the money now spent on the wars to supplement the Social Security

for Nov. 22 to 24 of 2010, and for March 25 and March 28 of 2011. Despite the state’s attempt to reduce the amount of education cuts in California’s recently adopted budget, LBUSD must deal with a budget shortfall of more than $50 million in the next two years. The proposed agreement also includes a five-percent contribution toward healthcare costs beginning Jan. 1, 2012, and the suspension of step advancement on the classified salary schedule for this school year and the next one. The agreement would become final if ratified by the union’s membership and if approved by LBUSD’s Board of

Education in the coming weeks. “I deeply appreciate the willingness of CSEA’s leadership to consider some reasonable compromises during these lean times for public schools,” said LBUSD Superintendent Chris Steinhauser. “I also commend our classified employees, who have waited patiently for bargaining to conclude. The result is a tentative contract that maintains competitive salaries and benefits while helping us to cope with severe budget cuts.” CSEA represents custodians, maintenance workers, cafeteria workers, groundskeepers, bus and truck drivers, mechanics, instructional assistants,

warehouse workers, school support staff and other employees. Job protections include an agreement not to lay off CSEA members for the remainder of this fiscal year and next fiscal year, with some exceptions. If the state reduces LBUSD’s funding by $50 or more per pupil, for instance, negotiations may be reopened. The tentative contract’s job restoration language says LBUSD will restore roughly 36 percent of the remaining CSEA Unit A and Unit B members on a reemployment list who have been laid off since April 19. Unit A includes clerical and support services employees. Unit B includes construction/repair and

transportation workers. An exact number of how many employees would be restored was not immediately available, but the percentage was negotiated as a means of assuring parity with a recently approved contract with the Teachers Association of Long Beach, which resulted in the restoration of 200 positions. The tentative agreement also includes changes to health benefits, including the elimination of the PacifiCare plan, a change in pharmacy plans and other modifications that will save more than $3 million while still providing employees with competitive benefits. ß

system. The candidates then spent close to an hour discussing how to improve the nation’s educational system, eliminating the federal deficit, reforming health care, solving the problem of illegal immigration, and several other topics. Parker and Richardson exchanged several sharp criticisms during the forum, and each had many supporters in the audience who applauded loudly at their candidate’s comments. In closing, Parker said, “I am the best candidate for this office because we need to do something about the political insanity of redistribution programs that have gripped the poor communities of this country for 40 years and are now spreading across the nation. The last thing we need to do is to collapse this society by expanding government dependency.” She added that, if elected, she will fight to save America’s schools and work hard to pass legislation that encourages free enterprise. “If elected, I will bring new energy, new leadership and new ideas to Washington so that we can build our economy by attracting private-sector business to create jobs,” she said. “I will work to build our education sys-

tem so that students can get the best possible education. I will build selfsufficiency and independence by strengthening our nonprofits with charity tax credits.” In his closing remarks, Dibs warned that it’s time for the American people to wake up. He noted that both political parties are under the domination of the country’s elite, who care little about what is best for the people. “The Republicans and Democrats have controlled the agenda for the last 50 or 60 years,” he added. “If you are okay with what Bush did to our country for eight years, vote for Star Parker. If you are happy with what’s been going on

since then, vote for Laura Richardson. If you like neither, vote for me.” Dibs told the audience that, by electing him, they would make him the only Independent member of Congress, which would send a shock wave throughout the nation. He also stressed that, unlike Parker or Richardson, he would be able to work with members of Congress from both parties. When Richardson had her turn, she noted that 35,296 children in the 37th District do not have health insurance, and 70,800 people are unemployed. “We have problems, and we need people in Congress who can work with President Obama to better our commu-

nity,” she said, because like it or not, he is our president. Underscoring her sharp philosophical differences with her Republican opponent, Richardson added that she strongly disagrees with Parker who wrote in a book that “welfare is an insidious parasite that sucks self-reliance dry at its best and, at its worst, is responsible for the deterioration of urban America.” Richardson noted that in the last two years her staff had helped hundreds of people who were having problems with the bureaucratic red tape of a federal agency and her primary focus will always be to help people in need. “I ask for your vote again,” she said. ß

prohibited smoking in state parks. Oropeza launched her political career as student body president at California State University Long Beach, and she was later appointed to the university’s board of trustees. She served on the Long Beach Unified School District Board from 1988 to 1992, Long Beach City Council from 1994 to 2000 (as its first Latina member), and on the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation

Authority Board from 1996 to 2000. Elected to the state assembly in 2000, Oropeza chaired the Budget Committee during two of the worst deficits in state history while simultaneously campaigning to become the first female Democratic Speaker. She lost that race by a narrow margin but garnered the position of Transportation Committee chair. She and her husband Tom Mullins had been married since 1977. ß

Oropeza continued from page 1

dergoing surgery, was declared cancer-free the following year. Her cancer diagnosis had prompted her to introduce several bills that would help reduce pollution around the Port of Los Angeles. She was also known for championing other health and environmental causes, including unsuccessful legislation that would have

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Small Business Administration now accepting nominations for several awards Each year, during National Small Business Week, the US Small Business Administration (SBA) recognizes outstanding small-business owners and advocates for their contribution to the American economy and society. President Obama has declared May 15–22, 2011 as National Small Business Week. SBA is currently accepting nominations for several SBA award categories, including the 2011 Small Business Person of the Year Award. The Los Angeles SBA Office serves Los Angeles, Ventura and Santa Barbara counties. Trade associations, chambers of commerce and business organizations frequently sponsor candidates. A business owner may also nominate themselves or other candidates. “The SBA looks forward to honoring these entrepreneurs who are contributing to our community and economy in their respective industries.” Said Theodore Holloman, acting Los Angeles SBA district director. “Our tri-county service area of Los Angeles, Ventura and Santa Barbara counties has one of the most vibrant and diverse small business communities in the nation.” Nomination criteria and deadline dates for all award categories can be found at sba.gov/ca/la in the “Spotlight” section or by contacting Patrick Rodriguez at (818) 552-3222. Nominations may be mailed to the US Small Business Administration, 330 N. Brand Blvd., Suite 1200, Glendale, California, 91203, Attn: Patrick Rodriguez. ß

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help redecorate the restaurant and restore it to its former glory. “The regulars who eat here have been most supportive,” said George Alvarez. “I’m thankful for their business and for their friendship.” The Alvarezes intend to use the money to replenish their beef stock and to update the restaurant with a new security system. “I’m not worried,” said Parvati Ward, a regular of the restaurant. “These people are some of the most resourceful people in this city, and they have a lot of friends that’ll help pick them back up again. The support I’ve seen so far is unbelievable. Everyone loves this place.” ß

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HALLOWEEn 2010

OCtOBEr 22, 2010

For its 5th Halloween event, Cabrillo Aquarium to dredge up some real (and unreal) sea creatures Cabrillo Marine Aquarium’s 5th annual Halloween event, “Sea Scare,” will wash ashore on Saturday, Oct. 30 from 6pm to 9pm. The aquarium will be transformed into an underwater world of chills, thrills and gills. Participants are invited to attend dressed for the costume contest and join in the masquerade of spooks and ghouls, trick-or-treat throughout the aquarium at six different treat stations, or walk along the docks of the “Port Town” scare zone. Attendees may visit the aquatic nursery for a special treasure hunt, witness scary sea creature feedings and chilling cryogenic demonstrations, then stop by the exploration center for some treats, participate in bioluminescent crafts and learn about deep-sea creatures that lurk in our oceans. Then they may enter the marine research library for

some creepy creations and spooky stories. Newly offered this year is a journey through the event’s haunted walkthrough attraction, “Deep Fear,” that lets participants come face to face with the Aquarium’s resident cannibal, Red Bone, and to try their luck at some games of chance or have their fortunes read at the newly expanded “Voodoo Village.” Also available will be: closeup magic, a hula-hoop contest, dancing in the all-new “Sea Scare Glow Party zone,” and the stage show “Evilution.” Admission is $5 for adults and $1 for children and seniors. Aquarium members are free. Cabrillo Marine Aquarium is located at 3720 Stephen M. White Drive in San Pedro. For more information or costume guidelines, call (310) 548-7562 or visit cabrillomarineaquarium.org. ß

Spotlight on Advertisers Through Memorial HealthCare IPA’s state-ofthe-art senior center, members enjoy free senior yoga, free balance classes, and free fitness assessments. In addition, all senior members are automatically enrolled in Memorial HealthCare IPA’s Senior Living Club, which brings to its members “doc talks” given by knowledgeable medical staff, dance lessons, movie days, a book club, and an annual art fair featuring senior artists. The healthcare organization will team with Willow Wellness Center to host a senior center Halloween celebration on Friday, Oct. 29 from 2pm to 5pm at Willow Wellness Senior Center, 2799 Temple Ave., in Signal Hill. The event, which will feature a costume contest, festival games, prizes, lunch and pumpkin pie, is free for Memorial HealthCare IPA members and $10 for non-members 55 and older. Those interested in attending should RSVP by Tuesday, Oct. 26 by calling 1-877-506-0409. The local Fresh & Easy neighborhood Market, 2475 Cherry Ave., in Signal Hill, will host fundraising “Shopping Nights” to benefit local schools between now and the end of the year, allowing schools to receive five percent of a store’s total sales from 4pm to 8pm on designated evenings. The dates and benefiting schools are: Nov. 3, Hudson School; Nov. 4, Burroughs Elementary; Nov. 10, Robert E. Lee Elementary; Nov. 15, Roosevelt Elementary; and Nov. 17, New City Public Schools. More information is available at freshandeasy.com/shopforschools.


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HALLOWEEn 2010

Historical Society of LB to unearth ‘monumental’ plots with its 15th cemetery tour

Courtesy HSlB

Attendees at last year’s cemetery tour, including former Long Beach Mayor Eunice Sato (seated center) learn about the city’s historical inhabitants through the performances of costumed actors.

The Historical Society of Long Beach will present its annual historical tour of the two oldest cemeteries in the city on Saturday, Oct. 30, with presentations from 9am to 2:30pm, at Long Beach Municipal and Sunnyside cemeteries, 1095 Willow St. To commemorate the event’s 15th anniversary, this year’s theme is “Monumental”– in recognition of the life accomplishments and interesting markers that are the final statement of those whose stories will be told. The cemetery tour is a unique, engaging and educational daytime family event where visitors are “taken back in time” by the city’s past residents, portrayed by authentically costumed actors. From the Heartwell Mausoleum high on the hill in Municipal, to Sunnyside’s Abel monument, which proudly proclaims “Lieutenant Governor of South Dakota,” visitors will learn about those whose lives are now etched in stone– and in some cases, in the streets, parks and neighborhoods that bear their names, like Heartwell, Stearns, Wardlow, and Bixby. Amidst the 20,000 tombstones and markers, tour participants stop in at 10 selected graves to hear first-hand narratives of those at rest. Many tell tales of the crimes, tragedies and scandals that followed them all the way to the grave. Each person’s life story provides glimpses of the customs, attitudes and culture of bygone eras. The stories make up the mosaic that is the city’s history. Tickets can only be purchased on the day of the event at Sunnyside Cemetery from 8:30am until noon. Visitors will be free to map their own itinerary of grave presentations with a

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13

SH Halloween carnival to feature Toy Story theme

The Signal Hill Community Services Department will present its annual Halloween carnival on Saturday, Oct. 30 from 2pm to 5pm on the Signal Hill Park basketball courts, 1780 E. Hill St. This year’s theme will be “Sid’s Scary Story” from the Toy Story movies. Characters from the films, including Buzz and Woody, will be on hand to be included in photos. The carnival offers a safe environment for families to celebrate the holiday. Admission for children 12 years and under is $2; adult admission is $1. There will be themed carnival games, prizes, trivia, food, and a Buster Balloon twisting stage show. ------------------------------------MORE INFORMATION (562) 989-7330

Courtesy City of SH

Signal Hill’s annual carnival offers a safe environment for families to celebrate the holiday.

self-guided tour– performance times are given in the tour program and on signage at each grave stop. Or, if they wish, visitors may take a guided tour– the first departs at 9am, with additional tours leaving on the hour until noon. Admission costs are: $18 general admission; $12 for Historical Society members; $5 for students 12 to 18; and free for children 11 and under. -------------------------------------MORE INFORMATION hslb.org (562) 424-2220

Food is NOT the enemy! Don’t be afraid to eat healthily! Sustainable energy from complex whole foods is the key. Eat smart. Play hard. Work hard. Laugh all the time!

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Available at your nearest stores: Whole Foods Market (SoCal) Mother’s Kitchen & Markets It’s A Grind Coffeehouses Online Store Only: FREE bars with purchase! Try it!

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Society of St.Vincent de Paul Thrift Store

Our LOW, LOW prices on Halloween costumes and decorations will save you $$$! Usable donations accepted: 800-97-HELP-1

2750 Pacific Coast Highway, Long Beach 562-494-9955 • 9:30am - 6:30pm, Monday - Saturday • 10am - 6:30pm, Sunday


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14 SIGnAL trIBUnE very difficult budget, which brought the praise of some and the condemnation of others. This job is not for the faint of heart. This job requires difficult choices that go beyond campaign promises. I have created bipartisan consensus to get things done.” As an example of that, Lowenthal explained that she teamed up with Assemblywoman Audra Strickland (R– 37th District) to pass a bill that is aimed at ensuring protection for “whistle blowers” among the 20,000 state employees in the state court system. Lowenthal also noted that she partnered with Jeff Miller, a Republican Assemblyman (71st District) to pass a bill that cleared the way for a $1.3 road improvement to the 91 Freeway. “We had to navigate the conflict between public unions and local governments,” she said. “The result will be 18,000 privatesector jobs on a project that is funded with existing local taxes and toll fees “ Lowenthal also talked about a bill she authored that will keep the $300 million courthouse project on track in Long Beach. “We are using an innovative public-private partnership to get this much needed courthouse built years earlier than many thought possible,” she said. “And doing it now, when construction costs are down, means not only a lot of good jobs in Long Beach, but it also means we are getting good value for your money and delivering a public asset that should last for generations.” Lowenthal told the audience that California’s economic crisis is part of the ongoing global economic crisis. “We can’t wish it away. We can’t blame it away. We have to work through it,” she said. “I am willing to do that.” After their opening statements, moderator Bea Antenore asked the candidates what they would do to get back the many jobs that have left the state in recent years.

Forum continued from page 1

Flores-Gibson noted that 10 years ago, then LBUSD Superintendent Carl Cohn asked her to serve as a liaison to the state legislature for the school district, but at that time she was not interested in the position. “But guess what, ten years fast forward, I am ready,” she said, adding that she has been involved in the school district, at CSULB, in programs to help the homeless and in a women’s business development program. “I am an activist for the community, and I am happy to be where I am at now,” she said. Flores-Gibson also explained that, because she has served on many task forces in the past 20 years, she is keenly aware of the problems faced by the people of the 54th District. “I am here to tell you that I am ready to take this challenge because our district needs a tough leader in these tough economic times, and I am a strong leader,” she said. Flores-Gibson said that, if elected, she would work to provide state tax cuts to businesses in order to stimulate the state’s economy and create more jobs. “We don’t just need jobs for the special-interest groups, we need jobs for all Americans,” she said. “We need jobs for the elderly, for the veterans and for the youth, and we need to have those jobs now. I am a job creator. I am not a job killer. Being in office, I will create those jobs.” In her opening statements, Lowenthal asserted that she has served in the state assembly for two years in a respectful, bipartisan way. “I have authored bills that will bring jobs to California, economic activity to our community and make government more accountable to the people it serves,” she said. “I have voted for a

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“If we can cut the payroll taxes of the businesses by at least 50 percent, then they can employ more people,” Flores-Gibson said, adding that doing so would in turn produce more state revenues. “Economic development is critical for us in California,” Lowenthal said. She noted that she has worked on economic-development programs since her days as a Long Beach Councilmember, and she is currently working on legislation that will spur the economy, bring new businesses to the state and create jobs. Antenore then asked, “What would you do to encourage business in the state?” Flores-Gibson said: “If you cut the payroll taxes, they can hire another person, and I am talking about all Americans, the elderly, the vets, and the youth.” Lowenthal said that she has voted for some tax breaks for businesses. “I have voted to cut budgets over the past two years. In so doing, we had a balance of tax breaks for businesses,” she asserted. “We are very sensitive to the needs of small businesses.” Flores-Gibson rebutted by saying, “My opponent in the past two years has voted for the highest tax increase in the history of California. She has also voted to raid our local schools by taking close to $200,000.” (After the forum, FloresGibson said that she meant to say close to $200 million.) She explained that the raid on LBUSD revenues led to the layoffs of many teachers and staff. Lowenthal partly acknowledged that Flores-Gibson’s accusation was true, but she strongly defended the legislature’s actions. “This year we passed a budget without any new taxes,” she said. “Last year we had to have a strategic temporary tax in order to keep our schools open, out universities open, hospitals open, and to be able to hire

firefighters. It is temporary, and it was strategic.” Later, Antenore brought up the subject of the impact of public employee retirement pensions on governmental budgets. Both candidates agreed that pension reform was absolutely necessary, but neither offered a specific plan for how the state could reduce its pension expenditures in the present. Lowenthal noted that she voted for several pension reform bills this year, including one that extended the retirement age and one that requires more transparency from the California Public Employee Retirement System. In many of her answers, FloresGibson either seemed to be groping for the right words to say or had a tendency to veer off of the subject that was being discussed. “I know I didn’t do a very

good job of presenting my case at this particular forum,” she acknowledged afterwards. “I knew the answers to the questions, but for some reason, I just froze up, but that does not mean that I do not have very clear ideas about how I would go about changing how things are done in Sacramento.” In their closing remarks, the two women echoed some of their opening statements and described their education, background and community activism. Lowenthal said that her many years as an elected official make her the candidate best qualified to serve the constituents of the 54th Assembly District. Flores-Gibson countered that she herself would provide the residents of this region with a fresh start and that it is time to change the failed policies of state legislature. ß

The Campaign Trail The Lincoln Club will host Congressman Dana Rohrabacher (Republican–46th District) at its meeting on Thursday, Oct. 28 at noon at the Long Beach Yacht Club, 6201 E. Appian Way. Rohrabacher will share his predictions for the upcoming election and what can be expected from Washington for the remainder of 2010, as well as how it will affect California. The luncheon is $25 for members and $35 for non-members. RSVP by calling (562) 439 9390 or emailing dkla1@verizon.net. The East Anaheim Street Business Alliance (EASBA) will host a postelection roundtable at the Long Beach Playhouse, 5021 E. Anaheim St., on Thursday, Nov. 4 from 6:30pm to 8pm. Confirmed panelists include: Long Beach Mayor Bob Foster; Long Beach Vice Mayor Suja Lowenthal; Fourth District Councilmember Patrick O’Donnell; Third District Councilmember Gary DeLong; Long Beach City Manager Pat West and others. “Many political pundits believe this could be one of the most significant elections in our nation’s history,” said Rod Wilson, EASBA president. “We look forward to these timely discussions and what the elections mean to Long Beach, the county, the state and the nation. It’s going to be an exciting evening, no doubt full of lively exchange of ideas.” Admission is $20 in advance; $25 at the door (cash or check only). The event will include catering provided by Moon Dance Catering of Long Beach. Seating is limited to 200. RSVP by Oct. 29 at (562) 494-1014.

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PIEAM continued from page 1

for anthropology– the study of humanity– became a career possibility. Upon her graduation from LBCC with an associate’s degree in liberal studies in 1996, she transferred to the University of Hawaii (UH) at Manoa, where she is currently a senior pursuing a bachelor’s degree in anthropology. Nafa plans to continue her education through graduate school and beyond. “I feel the need to immerse myself completely in Pacific art, archaeology, and anthropology,” she said. “I tried everything I could to find ways to travel throughout the Pacific to join excavations, but being a broke college student on a limited budget made that impossible. That’s when I heard of PIEAM, and here I am.” Nafa is referring to the brand-new, only-one-of-its-kind Pacific Island Ethnic Art Museum that just commemorated its grand opening in downtown Long Beach last weekend. “The community has been a great force in creating this museum,” said PIEAM Director Brenna Barrett. “I hope everyone comes to appreciate the rich history and cultures of the Pacific, and I hope everyone recognizes the importance of this museum.” Barrett, who served as executive director in 1994 during the inception of the Ethnic Art Institute of Micronesia (EAIM) on the island of Yap in the Federated States of Micronesia, was instrumental in solidifying the PIEAM vision on the mainland. When asked why Long Beach was chosen as the destination for the museum, Barrett cited the city’s central location to many diverse Pacific Islander cultures as a geographic gate-

Photo by On Point Imaging

Local dancers perform at last weekend’s grand opening of the Pacific Island Ethnic Art Museum, the first in the world to display the diverse cultures of Micronesia, Melanesia and Polynesia.

way to and from countries of the Pacific Rim. “This museum is truly an honor for our city,” said Long Beach Mayor Bob Foster. “It definitely helps mark 2010 as a monumental year for the arts in Long Beach. The city is energized about hosting this fantastic cultural experience.” “PIEAM is also conveniently located next to MOLAA (Museum of Latin-American Art),” said Barrett, “which has been very successful in introducing people to an under-appreciated art form. PIEAM hopes to interest the same type of audience.” PIEAM is the first museum in the world to display the diverse cultures of all three regions: Micronesia, Melanesia, and Polynesia. Featuring rotating exhibits that include tours, story telling, films, sculptures, textiles, paintings, tools, jewelry, carvings, and more, PIEAM’s staff hope the museum will be both educational and inspiring to guests.

“This museum is a superb addition to the East Village Arts District,” said State Senator Alan Lowenthal (27th District). “It provides a unique opportunity to showcase the diverse cultures of the Pacific that are part of the fabric of our community.” More than 3,000 distinguished guests attended the three-day grandopening gala, held throughout both the Museum of Latin American Art (MOLAA) and PIEAM facilities. Community blessings by various individuals representing every island in the Pacific took place throughout the weekend, along with performances by a variety of musical guests and dance groups. Multiple vendors were on hand, offering an assortment of island foods and goods. Friday evening’s highlight was the highly regarded Fire Knife of Samoa ceremony. Saturday’s events included coconut husking and basket weaving demonstrations. Sunday’s activities included multiple dance and ukulele

workshops. PIEAM’s motto– “Many islands, many stories, one museum”– reflects its goal to bring ethnic and living arts from all regions of Oceania under one roof for the world to experience through its artifact presentations, community-driven events, educational programs, museum store, media room, sculpture garden, family art activities, outreach classes, and more. The exhibition which generated the most enthusiastic response from guests was the community-driven exhibit Walk In. This multi-dimensional display was the chosen inaugural exhibit for the grand-opening celebration because the people visiting the display actually became the art. “I really enjoyed the traditional medicine display in the Walk In exhibit,” said Line Sevaaetasi Scanlan, who drove more than three hours from Ridgecrest to attend the festivi-

SIGnAL trIBUnE

ties. “When I was a little girl, traditional medicine was used to cure everything. It wasn’t sophisticated at all, but it worked. The museum did a good job of capturing that aspect of our island history.” According to US Census statistics, more than one percent of Long Beach’s population is Pacific Islander, and approximately .04 percent of the state’s population claims a Pacific heritage. Nafa, who is currently on leave from UH, hopes to share her enthusiasm for anthropology by volunteering at PIEAM this semester. “I remember when I first fell in love with the history of my Pacific ancestors, and I hope to play a small role in helping others fall in love with it too.” PIEAM is located at 695 Alamitos Ave. --------------------------------------MORE INFORMATION pieam.org

SH accepting applications for Civil Service Commission The City of Signal Hill is seeking applications from residents who are interested in serving on the Signal Hill Civil Service Commission. This vacancy is to fill the unexpired term due to a mid-term resignation on the Commission. The term ends May 31, 2013. To serve as a Civil Service commissioner, one must be a US citizen, 18 years of age or older, a registered voter and resident of Signal Hill at least 29 days prior to the date of appointment. Commission members must continue to reside in the city for the dura-

tion of the term of office. Those interested in serving as a Civil Service commissioner may call (562) 989-7305, or visit cityofsignalhill.org for an application or for further information. Candidates who meet the minimum qualifications will be invited to verbally present their qualifications to the Signal Hill City Council at the regular meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 2 at 7pm in the Council Chamber of City Hall, 2175 Cherry Ave. Applications will be accepted until Wednesday, Oct. 27 at 5:30pm.

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monthly membership luncheon - October 28, Noon-1:30pm Featured Speaker: Charlie basham (member Historical Society of Long Beach) Topic: Sunnyside Cemetery Tour Presentation Signal Hill Park Community Center • 1780 E. Hill Street (behind the library) • lunch by Triple R Catering $15 with reservations / $25 at the door • RSVP by calling (562) 424-6489

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” g n i r a h S e n i W “ Rubber Duck ! h c a e B g n o L f o Tour Sunday, November 14, 2010 5pm-6:30pm The Heart of delius restaurant ™ dave and Louise Solzman ™ Food is a passion and an art for Louise Solzman. She has been cooking as long as she can remember, and works to rave reviews as Executive Chef at delius restaurant in Signal Hill, that she operates with her husband, dave, the General manager/Sommelier. Chef Louise is inspired by tastes from all over the world and carefully plans the weekly menus with emphasis on foods in season as well as the changing trends in dining. She is assisted by an experienced and efficient staff. Even though Louise is usually busy in the kitchen, that doesn't mean you won’t see her popping out to visit with the guests every now and then to see what they think of the cuisine.

$25 per person (all-inclusive) reservations are required and space is limited. The Rubber Duck is an amphibious vehicle that gives tours of the Long Beach port by land and by sea. We will board the Duck at Delius and drive to downtown Long Beach. The Duck will then splash into the water and give an aquatic tour featuring an evening view of the downtown skyline and the Queen Mary. The tour will end back at Delius at roughly 6:30pm. To make these outings even better, I encourage you to bring a special

bottle of wine to share with your fellow adventurers. Now is the time to open that special bottle that you have been saving (unless it's a 20-year-old white. Keep that one to yourself, please). As another incentive, Chef Louise is coming along with us. We will provide cheese and crackers and will have a couple bottles of our own to share. Come tour with us, Dave Solzman

2951 CHErry AvEnuE, SiGnAL HiLL 562.426.0694 • www.deliusrestaurant.com


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OCtOBEr 22, 2010 TST3568 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SAlE tS no. 100083558 title order no. 10-8-342096 investor/insurer no. 1704662040 aPn no. 7217-011-020 you are in default under a deed of truSt, dated 08/21/2007. unleSS you taKe aCtion to ProteCt your ProPerty, it may Be Sold at a PuBliC Sale. if you need an exPlanation of tHe nature of tHe ProCeeding againSt you, you SHould ContaCt a laWyer." notice is hereby given that reContruSt ComPany, n.a., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the deed of trust executed by Karen denniS, a Single Woman, dated 08/21/2007 and recorded 08/30/07, as instrument no. 20072026360, in Book , Page ), of official records in the office of the County recorder of los angeles County, State of California, will sell on 11/19/2010 at 10:30am, at the West side of the los angeles County Courthouse, directly facing norwalk Blvd., 12720 norwalk Blvd., norwalk, Ca 90650 at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said deed of trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced deed of trust. the street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2854 eaSt 19tH Street, Signal Hill, Ca, 907551109. the undersigned trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. the total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the notice of Sale is $316,861.28. it is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. in addition to cash, the trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ''aS iS'' condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said deed of trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the note secured by said deed of trust with interest thereon as provided in said note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the trustee and of the trusts created by said deed of trust. dated: 10/22/2010 reContruSt ComPany, n.a. 1800 tapo Canyon rd., Ca6914-01-94 Simi valley, Ca 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale information (626) 9274399 By: - trustee's Sale officer reContruSt ComPany, n.a. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. any information obtained will be used for that purpose. aSaP# fnma3758509 10/22/2010, 10/29/2010, 11/05/2010 TST3567 trustee Sale no.: 20100028701012 title order no.: 100415134 fHa/va/Pmi no.: notiCe of truStee’S Sale you are in default under a deed of truSt, dated 4/30/2007. unleSS you taKe aCtion to ProteCt your ProPerty, it may Be Sold at a PuBliC Sale. if you need an exPlanation of tHe nature of tHe ProCeeding againSt you, you SHould ContaCt a laWyer. ndex West, llC, as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to deed of trust recorded on 05/08/2007 as instrument no. 20071110043 of official records in the office of the County recorder of los angeles County, State of California. executed By: John l thompson and Kathleen m thompson, will sell at public auction to highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check/cash equivalent or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the united States). date of Sale: 11/12/2010 time of Sale: 10:30 am Place of Sale: at the front entrance to the Pomona Superior Courts Building, 350 West mission Blvd., Pomona, Ca Street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2300 amelia Court, Signal Hill, Ca 90755 aPn#: 7217-028-018 the undersigned trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said deed of trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said deed of trust, fees, charges and expenses of the trustee and of the trusts created by said deed of trust. the total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the notice of Sale is $674,951.71. the beneficiary under said deed of trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written declaration of default and demand for Sale, and a written notice of default and election to Sell. the undersigned caused said notice of default and election to sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located. for trustee Sale information Please Call: Priority Posting & Publishing 17501 irvine Blvd., Suite one tustin, Ca 92780 714-5731965 www.priorityposting.com ndex West, llC as trustee dated: 10/16/2010 ndex West, llC may be acting as a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. any information obtained will be used for that purpose. P753893 10/22, 10/29, 11/05/2010 TST3548 trustee Sale no. Ca09001127-10-1 . loan no. 0015625577 title order no. 100401094-Ca-lPi aPn 7215-019-072 notiCe of truStee’S Sale you are in default under a deed of truSt dated 6/28/2006. unleSS you taKe aCtion to ProteCt your ProPerty, it may Be Sold at a PuBliC Sale. if you need an exPlanation of tHe nature of tHe ProCeedingS againSt you, you SHould ContaCt a laWyer. on 11/9/2010 at 10:30 am, at the front entrance to the Pomona Superior Courts Building, 350 West mission Blvd., Pomona, Ca mtC financial inc., dba trustee Corps, as the duly appointed trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain deed of trust recorded on 07/11/2006 as instrument

PUBLIC nOtICES no. 06 1522540 of official records in the office of the recorder of los angeles County, Ca, executed by: denise miller, an unmarried woman, as trustor, in favor of lending 1st mortgage, as Beneficiary, Will Sell at PuBliC auCtion to tHe HigHeSt Bidder, in lawful money of the united States, all payable at the time of sale, that certain property situated in said County, California describing the land therein as: as more fully described in said deed of trust the property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. the street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2101 eaSt 21St Street #308 , Signal Hill, Ca 90755 the undersigned trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said deed of trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances if any, under the terms of the deed of trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the trustee and of the trusts created by said deed of trust. the total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligations secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the notice of trustee’s Sale is estimated to be $262,976.73 (estimated), provided, however, prepayment premiums, accrued interest and advances will increase this figure prior to sale. Beneficiary`s bid at said sale may include all or part of said amount. in addition to cash, the trustee will accept a cashier`s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the California financial Code and authorized to do business in California, or other such funds as may be acceptable to the trustee. in the event tender other than cash is accepted, the trustee may withhold the issuance of the trustee`s deed upon Sale until funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a matter of right. the property offered for sale excludes all funds held on account by the property receiver, if applicable. if the trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder`s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. date: 10/15/2010 mtC financial inc dba trustee Corps tS no. Ca09001127-10-1 . 17100 gillette ave irvine, Ca 92614 949-252-8300 Clarisa gastelum, authorized Signature Sale information Can Be oBtained on line at www.priorityposting.com automated SaleS information PleaSe Call 714-573-1965 Compliance with California Civil Code Section 2924f: the Beneficiary or Beneficiary’s agent has indicated that the requirements of California Civil Code Section 2924f have been met. regarding the property that is the subject of this notice of sale, the “mortgage loan servicer” as defined in Civil Code § 2923.53(k)(3) declares that it has obtained from the Commissioner a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to Civil Code section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date this notice of sale is recorded. the time frame for giving a notice of sale specified in Civil Code Section 2923.52 subdivision (a) does not apply to this notice of sale pursuant to Civil Code Sections 2923.52. Clarisa gastelum, authorized Signature truStee CorPS iS a deBt ColleCtor. any information oBtained Will Be uSed for tHat PurPoSe. P750176 10/15, 10/22, 10/29/2010 TST3560 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SAlE trustee Sale title order no.: no.: 20100028700967 100402567 fHa/va/Pmi no.: you are in default under a deed of truSt, dated 09/26/05. unleSS you taKe aCtion to ProteCt your ProPerty, it may Be Sold at a PuBliC Sale. if you need an exPlanation of tHe nature of tHe ProCeeding againSt you, you SHould ContaCt a laWyer. NDEx West, llC, as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to deed of trust recorded on 10/04/05, as instrument no. 05 2388743 of official records in the office of the County recorder of lOS ANGElES County, State of California. exeCuted By: WIllIAM AllEN DAVIS, Will Sell at PuBliC auCtion to HigHeSt Bidder for CaSH, CaSHier’S CHeCK/CaSH eQuivalent or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the united States) DATE OF SAlE: November 4, 2010 TIME OF SAlE: 11:30 AM PlACE OF SAlE: At the front entrance to the Pomona Superior Courts Building, 350 W. Mission Blvd. Pomona, CA. STREET ADDRESS and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2119 RIDGEVIEW TERRACE DRIVE, SIGNAl HIll, CA 90806. APN# 7217-029-007 the undersigned trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said deed of trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said deed of trust, fees, charges and expenses of the trustee and of the trusts created by said deed of trust. the total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the notice of Sale is $1,050,965.71. the beneficiary under said deed of trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written declaration of default and demand for Sale, and a written notice of default and election to Sell. the undersigned caused said notice of default and election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. for truStee Sale information PleaSe Call: nationWide PoSting & PuBliCation, inC. 5005 WindPlay drive, Suite 1, el dorado HillS, Ca 95762-9334 916-939-0772, www.nationwideposting.com NDEx West l.l.C. MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COllECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COllECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WIll BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NDEx West, l.l.C. as Trustee, By: ric Juarez dated: 10/10/10 nPP0166877 10/15/10, 10/22/10, 10/29/10

TST3546 / 20101380573 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: tHe BooKKeePer, 160 Covina ave., long Beach, Ca 90803. registrant: Kim JoSePH oniSKo, 160 Covina ave., long Beach, Ca 90803. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Kim Joseph onisko. the registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. date started business was September 29, 2010. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on September 28, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 1, 8, 15, 22, 2010. TST3547 / 20101385485 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: Jr'S landSCaPing, 197 e. Hullett St., long Beach, Ca 90805. registrant: fernando Carrillo, 197 e. Hullett St., long Beach, Ca 90805. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: fernando Carrillo. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on September 29, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 1, 8, 15, 22, 2010. TST3557 / 20101347666 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: WilloW run enterPriSeS, 388 e. ocean Blvd. #1106, long Beach, Ca 90802. registrant: tHomaS H. Buffington, 388 e. ocean Blvd. #1106, long Beach, Ca 90802. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: thomas H. Buffington. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on September 22, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 8, 15, 22, 29, 2010. TST3558 / 20101425067 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: CamBodian exPreSS ServiCe, 843 e. anaheim St., long Beach, Ca 90813. registrant: KuntHie PiCH, 5450 Paramount Blvd. #44, long Beach, Ca 90805. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Kunthie Pich. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 6, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 8, 15, 22, 29, 2010. TST3559 / 20101425068 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: 1. dymamiC glaSS, 2. dynamiC glaSS By dyana, 3. glaSS By dyana, 3305 Brayton ave., Signal Hill, Ca 90755. registrant: dyana duPeray anderSen, 3305 Brayton ave., Signal Hill, Ca 90755. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: dyana andersen. the registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. date started business was april, 2005. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 6, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 8, 15, 22, 29, 2010. TST3561 / 20101457590 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: King Cameran foundation, 6186 atlantic ave., long Beach, Ca 90805. registrant: folloWerS of tHe Way miniStrieS, 6186 atlantic ave., long Beach, Ca 90805. this business is conducted by: a Corporation. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: William Jones, President. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 13, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 15, 22, 29, & november 5, 2010. TST3562 / 20101457591 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: green Corner, 4103 viking Way #B, long Beach, Ca 90808. registrant: HemPeror'S neW ClotHeS, 4103 viking Way #B, long Beach, Ca 90808. this business is conducted by: a limited liability Partnership. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: lawrence King. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 13, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 15, 22, 29, & november 5, 2010.

TST3563 / 20101457592 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: rendezvouS toBaC-Sundi reCordS, 11400 W. olympic Blvd. #1510, los angeles, Ca 90064. registrant: g.a. CaBot, 11400 W. olympic Blvd. #1510, los angeles, Ca 90064. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: g.a. Cabot. the registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. date started business was January 12, 2005. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 13, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 15, 22, 29, & november 5, 2010. TST3564 / 20101457593 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following persons are doing business as: roSSmont HomeoWnerS aSSoCiatgion, 2135 florida St., long Beach, Ca 90814. registrant: 1. deBra t. Bennett-JoneS, 5599 olive ave., long Beach, Ca 90805, 2. viCtoria l. WeSt, 80 Park ave., long Beach, Ca 90803. this business is conducted by: an unincorporated association other than a Partnership. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: debra t. Bennett-Jones. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 13, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 15, 22, 29, & november 5, 2010. TST3565 / 20101436454 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: CHill Coffee lounge and Cafe, 510 e. Broadway, long Beach, Ca 90802. registrant: alex Kotoyantz, 4324 gardenia ave, long Beach, Ca 90807. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: alex Kotoyantz. the registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. date started business was october 1, 2010. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 7, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 15, 22, 29, & november 5, 2010. TST3569 / 20101496099 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: exeCutive valet, 2012 7th ave., los angeles, Ca 90018. registrant: Jorge floreS, 2012 7th ave., los angeles, Ca 90018. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Jorge flores. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 20, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 22, 29, & november 5, 12, 2010. TST3570 / 20101496100 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: traSHout and reCovery, 2669 myrtle ave., Ste. 211, Signal Hill, Ca 90755. registrant: verna m. CHarleS, 2101 e. 21st St. #306, Signal Hill, Ca 90755. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: verna m. Charles. the registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. date started business was october 1, 2010. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 20, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 22, 29, & november 5, 12, 2010.

SPEnD-LESS CIGArEttES CIGArS • InCEnSE

4378 Atlantic Blvd.

Long Beach, CA 90807 Next to George’s 50’s Diner

Specialty Tobaccos Hours: M-F 11-7pm Sat 11-6pm

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17

Pet of the Week

Curly may seem like an odd name for a domestic shorthair until you find out that he has two brothers named Moe and Larry who are also up for adoption. The only stooge is the person who didn’t neuter the mother, but any or all of these kitties will provide you with as much amusement as did their namesakes. Companion Animal Village 7700 East Spring St. (562) 570-PEtS Sponsored by:

EYE ON CRIME

Crimes reported by the LBPD October 15 to 19 Council Districts 6 (North of PCH) 7 & 8 (East of the L.A. River & North to Del Amo Blvd.) Saturday, October 16 Assault 7:00pm - 4000 block of Atlantic Avenue Two unknown suspects stabbed a male adult in the upper body. The victim was transported to the hospital with non-life threatening injures. Sunday, October 17 Homicide 12:00am - 1900 block of Pine Avenue Two victims were shot in the 1900 block of Pine Avenue. Both victims were transported to the hospital for treatment of their injuries. One victim was pronounced dead a short time later. The second victim is expected to survive. The suspect is in custody. robbery 6:00pm - 3000 block of Long Beach Blvd. Three adult suspects walked into a local business and robbed the clerk at gunpoint. The suspects and the loss are still outstanding. Monday, October 18 Felony Suspects Arrested 9:00am - PCH / Long Beach Blvd. Patrol units responded to a strong-armed robbery. Officer’s investigation led them to two male adult sus-


St3220 - oct22:layout 1 10/22/10 10:11 am Page 18

BUSInESSES & SErVICES

18 SIGnAL trIBUnE

A C C O U N T I N G / TA X E S

Accounting, Bookkeeping & Tax Services

AI R CON DITION I NG / H EATI NG

AUTOMOTIVE

Sunroof and Convertible Top Headquarters

Certified QuickBooks Pro Advisors/Training Back Office

Cambodian & Spanish Speaking CTEC registered Tax Preparers

PHOnE: 562-283-0558 2669 Myrtle Ave, Ste 207

Contr.liC #168999

562-424-4985 we offer Service Specials, duct Cleaning & Free Estimates on Installation !

OCtOBEr 22, 2010

ing brat Cele our

5e1ar!

• New installations • Annual sunroof servicing • Beautiful replacement tops • Authorized installer r Fix youseat! g n saggi

yOur LOCAL LEAdEr in:

2517 Cerritos Ave., Signal Hill l o n g b e a c h a i r. c o m

Leather Care, Repair & Replacement Bud’S Auto Upholstery Call: 595-6370 Beach Cities Sunroofs 2637 St. louis Ave. Signal Hill

AI R CON DITION I NG

BUSINESS MACHINES

COMPUTER SERVICES

Time's Running Out

COPIERS • FACSIMILES LASER PRINTERS SALES, SERVICE & SUPPLIES

Genus Computer Services LLC

Signal Hill • www.madkatinc.com

Upgrade your Forced Air System for a $1500 Federal Tax Credit Expires 12/31/2010 Family Owned & Operated Since 1966 Repair - Service - Installation We'll Treat You Fairly and always Stand behind Our Work! Proud members of Better Business Bureau and Signal Hill Chamber of Commerce

562-429-1546 • 2502 N. Palm Drive, Signal Hill Contractor's License No. 242528 / C10-C20

F LO O R I N G

I N K & TO N E R

Ceramic & Porcelain Tiles Custom Design & Installation

3677 Atlantic Avenue

562-988-8429 W W W. T H E T I L E Z O N E . C O M

y

S uperior C opier S ervice 562-867-7000 Fax: 562-616-1567

robert@superiorcopier.com LAN D S CAP I N G

Commercial residential

The

Tile Zone

st

Declares WAR on high ink & toner prices!

reusing is the highest form of recycling. trade in your empties to We receive prices Deliver 30%-70% lower than across the street.

562-912-4657 InkPeace.com

MEDICINE

TRUST lANDSCAPE • Complete Designing and layout • Tree trimming • “All concrete work” • Sprinkler systems • New lawns, trees, shrubs • Maintenance

562-422-3806

A Full-Service Computer Company - Home or Office • Computer Sales • Repair & Installation • Website Design & Hosting • Network Setup, Support, Cabling & Wireless • Internet Installation & Configuration • Remote Back-up & Data Recovery • Camera Surveillance Security Systems MEMBER

Better Business Bureau

4047 long Beach Blvd

LAN DSCAPE DES IG N ER

English

GArDEnS Landscape & Garden

• Design • Installation • Maintenance 562.997.4111

PA R T Y F U N

PLUMBING

J&d

plumbing &Heating commercial • residential • industrial

rent a Portable Photo booth for your next event • Includes portable booth, props and staff of two • 4 hours of unlimited photos and fun! CALL FOR DETAILS

877-FOTOSTrIp PIANO LES SON S

PREMIUM ROOFING

“First in Service” H UnDrEDS OF LOCAL rEFErEnCES O VEr 35 YEArS ExPErIEnCE B IxBY k nOLLS rESIDEnt “A-rated” on angieslist.com Contractor’s License #629882

Call Dennis bartlett:

(562) 427-0688

ROOFING

Windward roofs

1806 Gaviota Ave.

562-427-2555 www.jdplumb.com lic. # 462161

24-Hour Emergency Service

License #783947

562.528.6258 PIANO TU N I NG / REPAI R

tUnInG & rEPAIr

ChristineKay

(562)

208-1853 Call for a free estimate Recommended by many local music teachers Associate Member of the Piano Technicians Guild

T O O L R E PA I R S

FOR RENT

TOOLWORKS

Banquet room available for parties or events at

Tool Repairs, Sales and Service

Free estimates 562-981-6644 Phil reno

• residential • Commercial • Interiors • Exteriors • woodworking Rich Ward • Faux Finishes CALIC 864357

Drains & Sewers • Water Heaters • Copper Repiping • Disposers • Gas Piping • Video Sewer Inspection • Furnace Repairs/Installation • Electronic leak Detection

Serving Wrigley District rEPAIrS WELCOME

www.windwardroofs.com

“Your Neighborhood Painter”

...where your garden begins

www.kathyalford.com

mAkES A grEAT wEddINg Or pArTy FAvOr!

PAI NTI NG

ALFOrD’S

LICENSED • BONDED • INSURED State license C27 #642266

Put on an event they won’t forget!

562.989.4666

1431 28th St, Signal Hill (562) 988-9150

16426 Bellflower Blvd. in Bellflower Call Steve at (562) 925-5750 for details.

AdvErTISE wITH THESE prOFESSIONAlS FOr AS lOw AS $20 pEr wEEk CAll SIgNAl TrIBuNE AT 562-595-7900


St3220 - oct22:layout 1 10/22/10 10:11 am Page 19

SIGnAL trIBUnE

OCtOBEr 22, 2010

19

Authentic Brick Oven Pizza, GOURMET PIZZA, PASTA, SAlADS AND MORE DELIVERY TO CAL HEIGHTS, BIXBY KNOLLS & SIGNAL HILL

Gluten-free crust now available!

Since 1990

Old-Fashioned Service with Today’s Technology

• Foreign and Domestic Cars • ASE Certified Technicians • Shuttle Service Visa - MasterCard • 5H Rating on RepairPal.com AMEX - Discover • WiFi and Kids Center in our waiting room

Transmission Maintenance Special

Get Your Car In Gear Appointment Recommended

“Favorite Pizzerias” –– l.A. l.A. Times Times Critics Critics and Food Writers Writers and Food

Mario Martinoli Mario Martinoli K-Cal News K-Cal 99 News

401 W. Willow St., Long Beach • (562) 595-6138

TOMMY’S

Have our experts service your car’s transmission system & save 20% when you mention this ad!

“Named Four of Four One of “Named One Best Places Pizza Places Best Pizza in CA!” So. CA!” in So.

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250 W. Ocean Blvd., Downtown Long Beach • (562) 432-2211 www.buonospizza.com

Chinese Family Restaurant since 1970

Le Yen Restaurant has been offering authentic Chinese cuisine to the Long Beach community since 1970. Family-owned and operated, we pride ourselves on offering delicious food made with the freshest ingredients, in a fun family atmosphere, and at a price you can afford!

Authentic Mandarin and Cantonese cuisine At Le Yen, you can eat it here, or take it to go! Made with the freshest ingredients available, our food is prepared and supervised by Chef Ray Chan of San Francisco.

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990 East willow Street, Signal Hill (Corner of California)

Hours: m-F 8am-5:30pm, Sat 8am-3pm Email: tommysautoservicelB@yahoo.com

562-427-1937 562-427-1937 562-424-2817 562-424-2817


St3220 - oct22:layout 1 10/22/10 10:11 am Page 20

20 SIGnAL trIBUnE

OCtOBEr 22, 2010


Signal Tribune Issue ST3220  

Signal Tribune Issue ST3220

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