Page 1

Winter 2021


From the CEO Brothers and Friends, Like you, 2020 was a year I will never forget. Even with 20+ years of professional experience, that included at one point, moving from Assistant Executive Director of Sigma Pi to Chief Operating Officer of the Sigma Pi Educational Foundation in 2009 during the Great Recession, there was no gameplan on navigating a global pandemic such as we have endured. It has challenged not only myself but also our undergraduates, volunteers, board members, and staff. I can imagine you have many questions about the Fraternity, where we are, and what the future looks like. I want to take this opportunity to provide updates so you can see, as I do, that we will overcome the malevolent forces that seek to harm us. Like many businesses and nonprofit organizations, the impact of COVID has not circumvented Sigma Pi. Still, our brothers' and volunteers' resolve and focus have decreased its impact that we were bracing for. In addition, the resiliency of our undergraduate leaders has been nothing short of impressive. These young brothers have had an experience that we, as alumni, cannot fathom. It has been encouraging watching them learn new skills, maintain focus, stay calm and work in new settings to operate their chapters in a virtual and socially distanced environment. Upon entering the academic year, we spent many hours with various task forces and committees reviewing strategic decisions and policy changes that would be important for the navigation of COVID and the impact on our chapters across their campuses and communities. I will touch on some of those here and highlight various aspects of those decisions and their impact. READ THE FULL LETTER

You can learn more by checking out my expanded letter on The Emerald Online, An Update from the CEO: Jonathan Frost - February 2021. Fraternally,

Jonathan M. Frost (UMSL '99) CEO & Executive Director

ABOUT THE EMERALD VOLUME CV, NUMBER 1 - Winter 2021 (ISSN 1074-5289, USPS 011-013) The Emerald has been published since 1911 by: Sigma Pi Fraternity 1101 Kermit Dr., Suite 730 Nashville, TN 37217 and additional mailing offices. SUBMISSION DEADLINES Summer - April 10 Winter - October 10 ABOUT SIGMA PI Sigma Pi Fraternity was founded at Vincennes University, Vincennes, Ind. on February 26, 1897. The Executive Office is located in Nashville, Tenn. Sigma Pi has chartered more than 230 chapters in North America and has initiated over 112,000 members since 1897. The founding fathers of Sigma Pi Fraternity are: Rolin Rosco James (1879-1953) William Raper Kennedy (1877-1944) James Thompson Kingsbury (1877-1950) George Martin Patterson (1877-1960) SHARE YOUR STORY Send pictures and stories to: emerald@sigmapi.org or Sigma Pi Fraternity 1101 Kermit Dr., Suite 730 Nashville, TN 37217 UPDATE YOUR INFORMATION To update your contact information, please visit: sigmapi.org/updateinfo or send an email to: records@sigmapi.org CONTACT INFORMATION sigmapi.org @sigmapi linkedin.com/company/sigmapi

R E A D M O R E F R O M C E O F R O S T AT

615.921.2300

sigmapi.org/executive-office FRATERNITY COMMUNICATIONS ASSOCIATION

Copyright © 2021 Sigma Pi Fraternity; Sigma Pi, ACE Project, and the crest are trademarks of Sigma Pi, all rights reserved.

Winter 2021


Contents

IN THIS ISSUE 02

International Digest

03

From the Grand Sage

04

Q&A with Tony Chukuka

07 MYLC

04

16

08

Chapter Reports

14

Volunteer Engagement

15

Volunteer Appointments

15

Volunteer Opportunities

16

Lyle S. Smith Award

18

Alumni News

19

Most Oustanding Alumni Club

20 Charterings 24

Educational Foundation

27

Adytum on High

28

Photo Finish

19

CONTRIBUTORS

About The Cover

EDITOR/CREATIVE DIRECTOR

This cover features a collage of images shared by chapters across the land of Sigma Pi, and focuses on the efforts to overcome adversity during 2020.

Chris Carter (Middle Tennessee '08) ASSISTANT EDITOR

Summer Clarkson

BUSINESS MANAGER

Jen Wyatt

CONTRIBUTORS

Jacob Camilleri (Saginaw Valley State '14) Jeff Cline (North Carolina State '85) Matthew S. Cromwell (Towson '20) CEO Jonathan M. Frost (UMSL '99) Christian Miele (Towson '00) GS Joe Palazzolo (Monmouth '00)

Winter 2020

sigmapi.org

1


From the Executive Office

International Digest News from the World of Sigma Pi

New Appointees to the Grand Council Sigma Pi Fraternity is pleased to announce that Judge Kent Varney (Kentucky ’97), Paul Wydra (UMSL ’96), Justin Todoroff (Cal State Long Beach ’01), and PGS Larry Rovira (Cal State Fullerton ’80) have been appointed to the Grand Council for the remainder of the 20202022 biennium. Varney steps into the role of Grand First Counselor, replacing Will Wojcik (Minnesota ’08). Wydra will replace Neil Thorsbakken (Middle Tennessee ’07) as the Grand Herald. Todoroff steps into the role of Grand Third Counselor, replacing Tim Quick (Iowa State ’98). PGS Rovira assumes the role of Past Grand Sage, replacing PGS Steve Lawler (Iowa ’78). Wojcik, Thorsbakken, Quick, and PGS Lawler resigned their roles on the Grand Council for personal reasons and their replacements were appointed in accordance with Article V of the Fraternity’s Constitution. We thank all of them for their time, dedication, and efforts while serving on the board. Kent Varney (Kentucky ’97) – From 2018 to 2020, Varney served as Province Archon for Kentucky Province. Varney previously served as Chapter Director of Epsilon-Lambda Chapter at Eastern Kentucky for 12 years. Varney has also been a presenter at Convocations and Mid-Year Leadership Conferences and served as an Educational Leadership Consultant for the Executive Office from 2001-2002. In 2005, Varney started as an attorney-at-law for 14 years with a firm practicing mostly in criminal law and personal injury for clients in Kentucky, West Virginia, and Virginia. Currently, Varney is the Circuit Judge in the 35th Judicial District, encompassing Pike County, Kentucky, presiding over all family court issues. Paul Wydra (UMSL ’96) – Wydra previously served as the Province Archon for the Sun Belt 2

Province and is most recently the faculty advisor for Theta-Omega Chapter at Middle Tennessee. Wydra has previously served as president of the Delta-Zeta Housing Management Corporation, Chapter Director from 2005-2010 for ThetaOmega Chapter, and spent over four years on the Executive Office staff in various roles, including Educational Leadership Consultant for the Midwest, Director of Alumni Relations, and Director of Expansion. After leaving the Executive Office staff, Wydra shifted his career to Middle Tennessee. He has worked for more than 13 years in two different roles, initially as the Assistant Director of Alumni Relations and currently as the Director of Development Initiatives. “JT” Todoroff (Cal State Long Beach ‘01) – Since the 2010-12 biennium, Todoroff has served as Parliamentarian at Convocation. He has had the privilege of working alongside Grand Sages of many personalities and perspectives. He most recently served on the Constitution and Bylaws Committee in 2020, and was the Southern California Province Archon in 2012. Professionally, Todoroff serves as a Sales Executive in the transportation industry, and currently oversees railroad, asset, and drayage procurement efforts for a Fortune-200 logistics firm. PGS Larry Rovira (Cal State Fullerton ’80) – PGS Rovira returns to the Grand Council after previously serving for ten years from 2000 to 2010, where he held each position on the board with the exception of Grand Herald. He has more than 40 years of dedication, passion, and experience within Sigma Pi, and established relationships with many chapters around the country. He currently holds the role of senior national account manager for Green Flash Brewing Company in San Diego, California.

Varney

Wydra

Todoroff

PGS Rovira

Winter 2021


Grand Council

From the Grand Sage A Message from Grand Sage Joe Palazzolo Brothers, Some see this continuing pandemic as an opportunity to focus on the worst. You know who these individuals are - they are the ones who relish in being the first to tell you the latest bad news, that the worst may be yet to come. They are the broken-spirited people who try to darken any light that tries to shine during these times. I pity those people and their defeatist attitude. Especially considering that Sigma Pi Fraternity’s path to the future is lit by so many points of light.

GRAND SAGE Joe Palazzolo (Monmouth '00)

For example, even with the complications of remote recruitment, nearly 25 of our chapters either grandsage@sigmapi.org met or exceeded their new member numbers during fall 2020 as compared to one year earlier, prepandemic. The Fraternity’s success stories run the gamut from large-sized groups like Zeta-Mu Chapter at Michigan State improving from 22 new members in Fall 2019 to 28 new members in Fall 2020 to medium-sized groups like Theta-Theta Chapter at Ferris State improving from 8 new members in Fall 2019 to 10 in Fall 2020. Even our smaller-sized groups saw growth, including Epsilon-Chi Chapter at the University of San Diego, who improved from two new members in Fall 2019 to 5 new members in Fall 2020. These chapters, and many others, prove that Sigma Pi undergraduates are resilient. And that resilience was on display in the next major point of light for the Fraternity: the first-ever virtual Mid-Year Leadership Conference (MYLC) in January 2021. Not only was this the largest MYLC in recent memory, but it was the first MYLC that offered completely free registration to every executive council member in every chapter and colony. The Fraternity could offer this incredible benefit due to the support from the Sigma Pi Educational Foundation and the generous gifts of GTC Justin Todoroff (Cal State Long Beach ‘01) and PGC Steve Lawler (Iowa '78). We are thankful for the validating support from these men, which reinforces the critical role that alumni can play in being a source of light for our undergraduate leaders. And finally, one of the brightest points of light that we experienced in the last few months was the virtual awards ceremony, recognizing the top accomplishments from the 2018 - 2020 biennium. I wanted to use this space to recognize our William Raper Kennedy Grand Sage’s Award winner (Tier 2), Gamma-Gamma Chapter at the University of Central Missouri, and our James Thompson Kingsbury Grand Sage’s Award winner (Tier 3), Epsilon-Nu Chapter at Cal State-Fullerton. And in a special way, I want to recognize our two repeat Grand Sage’s Award winners - the Rolin Rosco James Grand Sage’s Award winner (Tier 1), Omega Chapter at Oregon State University, and the George Martin Patterson Grand Sage’s Award winner (Tier 4), Iota-Tau Chapter at St. John’s University. These chapters achieved remarkable success and are great models of the very best that Sigma Pi Fraternity has to offer. I am incredibly proud of them! Resilience continues to light the path forward for Sigma Pi Fraternity as we face an ever-changing environment. Our undergraduate leaders and alumni volunteers have preached the power of personal connections during times of social distancing. They have promoted the audacity of authentic and genuine relationships in a loud and deceptive world. And they have proven the resilience of real brotherhood in a brutal and unfair landscape. History will remember those men and the new points of light they provided for Sigma Pi Fraternity during these times. I hope that the alumni reading this magazine consider how they can support our brotherhood, which has provided generations of men with a beacon of light even in the worst of times. And I hope that our emerging undergraduate and young alumni leaders will continue to forge a path forward by choosing to make the Fraternity stronger tomorrow than it is today! Fraternally,

GS Joe Palazzolo (Monmouth '00) Grand Sage #47 of Sigma Pi Fraternity

sigmapi.org

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Feature

VP of Human Resources at Nestle USA

Tony Chukuka by The Emerald Staff

Tony Chukuka (Cal State Long Beach ‘98) is currently the Vice President of Human Resources at Nestle USA. He possesses over 15 years of progressive HR experience across multiple industries, including Automotive, Government Contracting, and CPG. Tony received his Bachelor of Science in Finance from California State University, Long Beach, and his Masters of Arts in Management from the University of Redlands. He also possesses a Professional in Human Resources (PHR) certification.

You’ve been with Nestle for almost ten years, tell me about how you got to this point in your career? A couple of things have helped me get to this point in my career. One is having courage; it is important to have courage and challenge the status quo within your organization and to challenge your team/colleagues to be great. Intrinsically people want to be great, and it’s your job to help them attain greatness. The other thing is being open to feedback. It’s important to continuously improve and being open to feedback helps

4

with that. This was something I learned at El Rancho High School, while participating in athletics and it carried over into my undergraduate days in Sigma Pi. As a leader, I need to do my best to ensure that I and the team I lead continue to get better every day. The last thing is an appreciation for diversity. I attended Cal State University-Long Beach (CSULB), which is a very diverse school and commuter campus. Our chapter there represented that diversity and it allowed me to understand the importance of diversity and how to manage everyday biases that may negatively impact growth.

Winter 2021


Feature My experience at CSULB with Sigma Pi influenced my approach within the D&I space at Nestle USA, especially the importance of managing everyday biases. Throughout the organization, we have implemented training for our employees to support bringing your best self to work and help with the management of everyday biases. We have curated journey impact maps that provide constant learnings for our employees around various D&I topics to continue to grow and continue the engagement and conversations with our employees.

Within this culture, with the progression of diversity and inclusion (D&I), do you feel mental health improves as well? Most definitely, especially around inclusion. Many studies show that as an organization becomes more advanced on the D&I maturity curve, mental health within the organization improves. The improvement is due to employees feeling more engaged, knowing they can bring their authentic self to work without fear of judgment or retribution. Also, life at home is enhanced as well.

You manage a large team; how do you implement mental health and just general work life balance? I have to admit, this is something I'm not the best at, but I have improved over the recent years, especially now that my children are getting older. The first thing I tell my team is that I do not model work-life balance and ask that they don't follow my path. I tell my team to focus on recharging their batteries and take mental breaks, either by taking vacations, partial days off, or renewal breaks throughout the workday. Work-life balance and mental health are essential for teams to perform at an optimal level. During our monthly meetings, I remind my team that if they aren't at their best, we can't be at our best, and I need everyone at their best if we want to help the organization win. If you're on vacation, someone else can take care of the task; we aren't building rockets, we're making Hot Pockets and Mac and Cheese.

You created and executed North America D&I Strategy for Nestle USA, what would you say is the biggest challenge to diversity and inclusion in the workplace? Wow, that's a great question. There are quite a few challenges, but I really think it's two-fold. First, it's sigmapi.org

understanding everyone has biases, and that's okay. As I mentioned before, it's important to manage those biases, so you can bring your optimal self to work for the organization and your team. The second is realizing D&I isn't just social responsibility; it's how you use it as a competitive advantage to drive sustainable growth. Other organizations view D&I from a social responsibility lens, which is why they aren't winning in the D&I space.

How do biases affect the workplace? Everyone grows up different and, as a result, have developed biases based on their experiences. In the workplace, we need to do a better job of managing those biases as they can impact decisions we make every day. Those decisions can have a lasting impact on people and your organization. Some say the system is broken, but it’s the people in the system who cannot manage their biases. If we equip people to manage biases, they’ll do a better job within the system and hire the right talent to build and foster an inclusive environment, which in turn enhances the workplace and society.

What does the "Corporate Function" in your title entail? There are three components of my job: D&I, Community Affairs (community outreach), and HR Business Partnering for Corporate Functions (where I provide HR guidance and leadership to the Chief Financial Officer, Chief Legal Officer, Chief Digital Officer, and Senior Vice President of Corporate Affairs at Nestle, among others.) Community Affairs focuses on driving the philanthropic strategy for Nestle USA. For example, my Community Affairs team will host multiple volunteer events for our employee base throughout the year, partnering with a variety of charities aligned to our corporate strategy, where employees can donate not just money but also their time. We encourage participation by providing time off to our employees to volunteer and by matching a portion of their monetary donations to these charities.

What do you love most about your job? There is a lot I love about the job, but the first thing that comes to mind is that I get to make a positive impact every day. The second thing I love is that I work with people who want to do the right thing; to me, that’s huge. As I’ve gotten older, working with people who want to do the right thing and want to be successful is something I really cherish.

5


Feature

In his role, Chukuka oversees the community outreach at Nestle. Photo credit: nestleusa.com

As undergrads transition beyond college, how can they implement that philanthropic mindset into their future careers? It's important to give back to the community. Whichever organization they join, it is important to get involved, and the best way to get involved is by finding something they are passionate about and can connect to.

What professional advice would you give to those individuals? First, you should create clear goals; people struggle when they don't know their goals. As a leader in a fraternity or your organization, set goals for yourself and the people you lead. Second, embrace risk-taking. People need to be comfortable with taking risks, especially when it's psychologically safe to do so. Risk-taking leads to learning and growth. The final thing is to focus on joining a great culture or creating one of your own. A lot of times, we forget about the importance of culture. Culture is a gamechanger, and if you can create a winning culture, you will be surrounded by people who will walk through walls for you, challenge the status quo, and accomplish great things. A great example of this is the NBA World Champion Los Angeles Lakers. Even though I'm a Clippers fan, I must admit they have created a winning culture. They have done this by setting clear goals, setting expectations for

6

performance, holding people accountable, and letting people take a risk. This allows people to do great things and win!

How should chapters optimize their diversity and inclusion when it comes to recruitment and members? For the chapters, I think it’s about understanding the overall demographics at their institutions. You can’t say, “I want to recruit Latinos when there isn’t a strong Latino demographic on campus.” If the chapter has access to student population data, then go analyze the data and provide recommendations to chapter leadership on what they should focus on from a recruiting standpoint. Let’s say there is a strong black population on the campus; the chapter should have a strategy focused on recruiting black students for the coming rush season. There are large amounts of data related to the demographics of the students at each institution. The chapter members need to access and use the data to drive decision making.

What are some things you enjoy doing in your spare time? Outside of the office, I enjoy spending time with my family, playing sports, and serving on the Board of Directors for the Boys and Girls Club of Long Beach and the Nestle USA Foundation.

Winter 2021


Education and Programming

2021 Mid-Year Leadership Conference In response to the ever changing environment that was created by the pandemic, Sigma Pi made the decision to host the 2021 Mid-Year Leadership Conference as a virtual experience. After in depth evaluation the Fraternity chose to utilize the Cvent platform to host what was the first virtual conference of Sigma Pi in its extensive history. As Sigma Pi was able to conclude the event with nearly 500 registered attendees and representation from over 90 chapters across the country, in one of its larger conferences, the Fraternity plans to continue to evaluate opportunities where it can leverage virtual events for the good of all of its members.

Facilators

Speakers

JACOB CAMILLERI

NELSON FARRIS

KEVIN CAREY

TONY CHUKUKA

QUENTIN GROCE

DR. JAY MORGAN

Saginaw Valley State ‘14 Director of Alumni Engagement and Annual Giving Illinois Wesleyan ‘09 Illiana Province Archon

Grand Valley ’06 Michigan Province Archon PAUL KE

Cal State Long Beach ’63 Senior Director, Nike, Inc. Cal State Long Beach ‘98 Vice President of Human Resources, Nestlé USA

Murray State ‘85 President, Morehead State University DOUG GOLD

Purdue ’88 Missouri Province Archon

Santa Clara ’88 Chief Financial and Marketing Officer, Mitchell Silberberg & Knupp LLP

JEREMY LESSMANN

ADAM DIBBLE

Franklin and Marshall ’88 Iota-Nu (Washington State) Chapter Director MIKE LONG

Ferris State ’03 Director of Marketing, Profile Products ERIC COLE

Oakland ‘03 Greater Detroit Province Archon

Ferris State ’07 General Manager, Learfield IMG College Ticket Solutions

ALEXANDER PETTIGREW

DR. MATT JOHNSON

Indiana of Pennsylvania ‘15 Director of Education and Programs

Saginaw Valley State ’00 Associate Professor, Central Michigan University

RYAN POST

JADON BELL

Valparaiso ’09 Beta-Tau (Valparaiso) Chapter Director SCOTT QUINLAN

Fairmont State ‘95 Director of Chapter Support Services

Partner Service Specialist, OmegaFi

SANDY CARPENTER

National Service Specialist, OmegaFi

MATT SMITH

Valparaiso ‘01 Chairman, Education Task Force

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Chapter and Colony Reports

THE SEMESTER IN REVIEW

CHAPTER REPORTS

BALANCE - Ø indicates a zero balance; $ indicates that money is owed to the national organization UNDERGRADUATE MEMBERS - Total number of undergraduates during the fall 2020 semester NEW MEMBERS - Total number of new members during the fall 2020 semester INITIATES - Total number of initiates during the fall 2020 semester LIVING ALUMNI - Total living alumni members DONORS - Number of members who donated to the Educational Foundation so far during the 2020-21 fiscal year. CHAPTER EDUCATIONAL FUND - Indicates if the chapter has started a CEF or not CEF MINIMUM BALANCE RECEIVED Indicates if the minimum balance of the Chapter Educational Fund has been met *All data as of December 31st, 2020

Zeta-Epsilon Chapter at Michigan Tech

8

Winter 2021


S TAT E

BALANCE

U N D E R G R A D UAT E M E M B E R S

PLEDGES

I N I T I AT E S

L I V I N G A LU M N I

DONORS

C H A P T E R E D U C AT I O N A L FUND

CEF MINIMUM BALANCE RECEIVED

Alabama

$

94

25

0

400

1

No

No

Auburn (Alpha-Delta)

Alabama

$

139

43

41

1638

17

Yes

Yes

West Alabama (Theta-Gamma)

Alabama

Ø

12

5

0

220

0

No

No

Arizona State (Beta-Kappa)

Arizona

Ø

78

10

0

580

2

Yes

No

Northern Arizona (Beta-Iota)

Arizona

Ø

36

1

6

509

4

No

No

Arkansas (Alpha-Sigma)

Arkansas

Ø

57

20

24

554

11

Yes

Yes

Arkansas State (Alpha-Pi)

Arkansas

Ø

16

6

7

891

13

Yes

Yes

Arkansas Tech (Iota-Lambda)

Arkansas

$

41

4

6

155

0

No

No

Southern Arkansas (Epsilon-Kappa)

Arkansas

$

19

2

3

436

4

No

No

Cal Poly (Eta-Delta)

California

Ø

60

0

0

332

18

Yes

No

Cal State Chico (Theta-Mu)

California

Ø

43

0

13

249

2

No

No

Cal State Fullerton (Epsilon-Nu)

California

Ø

60

10

17

916

7

No

No

Cal State Long Beach (Beta-Omicron)

California

$

77

8

1

1464

19

Yes

No

California-Irvine (Eta-Upsilon)

California

Ø

41

0

10

518

13

Yes

No

California-Santa Cruz (Iota-Eta)

California

$

26

0

0

347

0

No

No

Carson, CA (Eta-Iota)

California

Ø

16

0

0

333

2

No

No

San Diego (Epsilon-Chi)

California

$

23

5

5

412

1

No

No

Santa Clara, CA (Zeta-Eta)

California

$

83

0

0

792

6

No

No

UC Berkeley (Iota)

California

Ø

37

0

0

653

8

No

No

UC Santa Barbara (Alpha-Omicron)

California

$

78

18

0

580

4

Yes

Yes

UCLA (Upsilon)

California

Ø

18

0

0

1375

43

Yes

Yes

Colorado (Zeta-Delta)

Colorado

Ø

126

27

0

601

0

No

No

CHAPTER

Alabama (Theta-Omicron)

sigmapi.org

9


BALANCE

U N D E R G R A D UAT E M E M B E R S

PLEDGES

I N I T I AT E S

L I V I N G A LU M N I

DONORS

C H A P T E R E D U C AT I O N A L FUND

CEF MINIMUM BALANCE RECEIVED

Colorado

$

42

16

11

248

0

No

No

Florida State (Eta-Epsilon)

Florida

$

111

27

0

731

5

No

No

Orlando, FL (Iota-Kappa)

Florida

$

53

19

0

321

1

No

No

South Florida (Iota-Sigma)

Florida

$

18

0

0

102

0

No

No

Georgia (Alpha-Phi)

Georgia

Ø

89

20

18

899

5

Yes

Yes

Eastern Illinois (Beta-Gamma)

Illinois

$

10

7

4

1878

18

No

No

Illinois State (Epsilon-Eta)

Illinois

Ø

106

19

19

494

3

No

No

SIU-Carbondale (Beta-Nu)

Illinois

Ø

25

7

0

950

8

No

No

Western Illinois (Epsilon-Zeta)

Illinois

$

19

3

0

682

5

No

No

Indiana (Beta)

Indiana

$

141

27

0

1901

11

No

No

Purdue (Eta)

Indiana

$

32

9

6

927

11

No

No

Southern Indiana (Theta-Psi)

Indiana

Ø

27

10

0

112

2

No

No

Valparaiso (Beta-Tau)

Indiana

Ø

10

4

4

622

7

Yes

Yes

Vincennes (Alpha)

Indiana

Ø

16

8

11

973

5

No

No

Iowa (Xi)

Iowa

$

62

30

0

765

8

No

No

Iowa State (Sigma)

Iowa

Ø

33

8

0

588

8

No

No

Kansas

Ø

48

12

4

161

1

No

No

Eastern Kentucky (Epsilon-Lambda)

Kentucky

$

36

13

0

531

5

Yes

No

Kentucky (Epsilon-Beta)

Kentucky

Ø

46

13

7

1026

5

No

No

Louisville (Iota-Omicron)

Kentucky

Ø

7

0

0

96

0

No

No

Morehead State (Delta-Rho)

Kentucky

Ø

13

4

4

523

12

Yes

Yes

Murray State (Gamma-Upsilon)

Kentucky

$

25

3

8

659

16

Yes

Yes

CHAPTER

S TAT E

Chapter and Colony Reports

Colorado State (Eta-Sigma)

Kansas (Beta-Delta)

10

Winter 2021


S TAT E

BALANCE

U N D E R G R A D UAT E M E M B E R S

PLEDGES

I N I T I AT E S

L I V I N G A LU M N I

DONORS

C H A P T E R E D U C AT I O N A L FUND

CEF MINIMUM BALANCE RECEIVED

Maryland

Ø

17

0

0

229

0

No

No

Towson (Eta-Nu)

Maryland

Ø

18

2

21

394

0

No

No

Bentley (Iota-Theta)

Massachusetts

$

49

0

13

152

0

No

No

Bridgewater State (Eta-Eta)

Massachusetts

Ø

37

0

0

436

13

No

No

Fitchburg State (Eta-Tau)

Massachusetts

Ø

32

3

3

264

4

No

No

Worcester Polytechnic (Gamma-Iota)

Massachusetts

Ø

85

22

0

763

9

No

No

Central Michigan (Delta-Alpha)

Michigan

$

92

18

0

870

2

No

No

Detroit-Mercy (Gamma-Alpha)

Michigan

$

16

0

0

543

11

No

No

Ferris State (Theta-Theta)

Michigan

$

30

10

0

199

4

No

No

Grand Valley State (Theta-Rho)

Michigan

$

87

27

10

291

6

No

No

Lawrence Tech (Zeta-Omicron)

Michigan

$

10

0

4

313

2

No

No

Michigan State (Zeta-Mu)

Michigan

$

88

28

8

524

1

No

No

Michigan Tech (Zeta-Epsilon)

Michigan

Ø

37

9

3

354

0

No

No

Oakland (Zeta-Pi)

Michigan

Ø

29

6

4

314

15

Yes

No

Saginaw Valley State (Theta-Beta)

Michigan

$

25

1

4

219

3

No

No

Wayne State (Gamma-Omega)

Michigan

$

34

0

0

415

3

No

No

Minnesota (Iota-Zeta)

Minnesota

$

38

10

0

196

2

Yes

No

Mississippi (Beta-Mu)

Mississippi

Ø

83

29

0

559

5

No

No

Central Missouri (Gamma-Gamma)

Missouri

Ø

47

9

8

723

9

No

No

Drury (Epsilon-Rho)

Missouri

Ø

25

5

5

484

1

No

No

Missouri S&T (Alpha-Iota)

Missouri

Ø

48

8

9

883

20

No

No

Missouri State (Alpha-Rho)

Missouri

$

87

26

36

1180

10

No

No

CHAPTER

Salisbury (Theta-Xi)

sigmapi.org

11


BALANCE

U N D E R G R A D UAT E M E M B E R S

PLEDGES

I N I T I AT E S

L I V I N G A LU M N I

DONORS

C H A P T E R E D U C AT I O N A L FUND

CEF MINIMUM BALANCE RECEIVED

Keene State (Iota-Rho)

New Hampshire

Ø

19

3

8

67

1

No

No

Plymouth State (Plymouth)

New Hampshire

$

14

0

0

0

1

No

No

Ewing, NJ (Theta-Delta)

New Jersey

Ø

22

0

11

389

0

No

No

FDU-Florham (Iota-Phi)

New Jersey

Ø

29

0

0

24

0

No

No

FDU-Metropolitan (Epsilon-Xi)

New Jersey

Ø

6

0

1

250

1

No

No

Monmouth (Delta-Beta)

New Jersey

Ø

37

3

0

418

21

Yes

Yes

Montclair State (Iota-Iota)

New Jersey

$

23

8

2

135

0

No

No

NJIT (Alpha-Mu)

New Jersey

Ø

22

1

5

855

27

Yes

Yes

Rowan (Zeta-Chi)

New Jersey

$

45

0

19

494

3

No

No

Rutgers (Gamma-Eta)

New Jersey

Ø

21

5

0

669

8

Yes

No

Stockton (Iota-Upsilon)

New Jersey

$

42

2

0

64

8

Yes

No

William Paterson (Theta-Tau)

New Jersey

Ø

12

1

0

139

0

No

No

Cornell (Mu)

New York

$

88

0

0

1301

6

No

No

St. John's (Iota-Tau)

New York

Ø

49

10

0

103

0

No

No

East Carolina (Eta-Kappa)

North Carolina

$

66

10

14

273

0

No

No

Elon (Epsilon-Theta)

North Carolina

Ø

33

5

0

640

5

No

No

North Carolina State (Rho)

North Carolina

$

60

10

0

834

21

No

No

Wake Forest (Alpha-Nu)

North Carolina

Ø

72

4

4

1152

14

No

No

Miami (OH) (Eta-Phi)

Ohio

$

82

0

0

730

1

No

No

Ohio Northern (Zeta)

Ohio

Ø

25

9

0

975

12

Yes

Yes

Carleton (Eta-Rho)

Ontario

$

16

0

0

407

0

No

No

Oregon State (Omega)

Oregon

Ø

46

4

5

730

4

No

No

CHAPTER

S TAT E

Chapter and Colony Reports

12

Winter 2021


S TAT E

BALANCE

U N D E R G R A D UAT E M E M B E R S

PLEDGES

I N I T I AT E S

L I V I N G A LU M N I

DONORS

C H A P T E R E D U C AT I O N A L FUND

CEF MINIMUM BALANCE RECEIVED

Pennsylvania

Ø

28

3

0

776

2

No

No

Indiana of Pennsylvania (Theta-Epsilon)

Pennsylvania

Ø

12

3

2

190

1

No

No

Penn College (Theta-Phi)

Pennsylvania

Ø

14

0

0

120

2

No

No

Penn State (Theta)

Pennsylvania

Ø

69

8

25

1230

7

No

No

Penn State-Altoona (Theta-Iota)

Pennsylvania

$

7

5

4

193

3

No

No

Ursinus (Theta-Sigma)

Pennsylvania

$

20

7

0

149

0

No

No

West Chester (Zeta-Alpha)

Pennsylvania

Ø

30

5

0

429

1

No

No

Tennessee

$

38

10

17

182

11

Yes

No

Houston (Theta-Nu)

Texas

Ø

21

7

2

151

1

No

No

UTSA (Iota-Delta)

Texas

$

28

8

0

174

3

No

No

Old Dominion (Theta-Eta)

Virginia

Ø

49

21

7

221

3

Yes

Yes

Radford, VA (Theta-Lambda)

Virginia

$

41

10

7

221

21

Yes

No

Virginia (Beta-Pi)

Virginia

Ø

35

0

11

952

7

No

No

William & Mary (Alpha-Eta)

Virginia

$

33

4

6

808

7

No

No

Washington

$

59

1

4

184

0

No

No

Wisconsin (Tau)

Wisconsin

Ø

23

0

2

186

0

No

No

Wisconsin-Oshkosh (Gamma-Mu)

Wisconsin

Ø

40

17

6

513

8

Yes

Yes

Wisconsin-Platteville (Delta-Iota)

Wisconsin

Ø

28

5

1

554

8

No

No

CHAPTER

East Stroudsburg (Beta-Psi)

Middle Tennessee (Theta-Omega)

Washington State (Iota-Nu)

sigmapi.org

13


Volunteers

A Year in Review:

Volunteer Engagement by Jacob Camilleri (Saginaw Valley State '14), Director of Alumni Engagement and Annual Giving

S

igma Pi has been making strategic strides to provide our Alumni Volunteers more resources than ever before.

In spring 2020, we invested in online learning modules for all of our Province Archons and Chapter Directors. To date, 68 out of 124 or 54.8% of volunteers have completed the course which gives them knowledge on their advisor role, relationships, interfraternal experience, hazing prevention, mentoring college students and eradicating harmful traditions. These will be utilized for assessing our appointed volunteers as we conduct annual reviews on our volunteer program. Another strategic stride we have made is incorporating a volunteer code of conduct that must be signed by all Province Archons and Chapter Directors. To date, 96 out of 124 or 77.4% have signed the document. Sigma Pi has an obligation to ensure volunteers are educated and provide acknowledgement of Sigma Pi policies as well as to ensure compliance with insurance and policy expectations.

14

The importance of these modules and code of conduct is to provide education for our volunteers to keep you aware and knowledgeable about the issues and problems that are facing the undergraduate members every day, and how you can help navigate them through these issues. Even more so, we want to keep our volunteers up to date with the changes in the greek industry and enhance the opportunity to properly respond to a situation. If you are in a position other than Province Archon or Chapter Director and would be interested in enhancing your knowledge base, please contact volunteer@sigmapi.org. More resources than ever before are available to you on sigmapi.org/resources, including: PhiredUp Recruitment and Chapter Builder resources, updated Province Archon, Chapter Advisor, Alumni Club, and Alumni Advisory Board manuals. You can also find general Fraternity information on this page, including brand standards and marketing tools, financial tools, and much more.

Winter 2021


Volunteers

Volunteer Appointments Chapter/Colony Directors BRIDGEWATER STATE (ETA-ETA)

KEENE STATE (IOTA-RHO)

EAST CAROLINA (ETA-KAPPA)

LOUISVILLE (IOTA-OMICRON)

EAST STROUDSBURG (BETA-PSI)

UC BERKELEY (IOTA)

FDU-METROPOLITAN (EPSILON-XI)

UCLA (UPSILON)

FITCHBURG STATE (ETA-TAU)

UTSA (IOTA-DELTA)

William Tkaczuk Bridgewater State '16

Nicholas Kepka Calvetti Worcester Polytechnic '13

Ryan Hagwood East Carolina '18

Tony Stevens Morehead State '81

Charles Ehnot Temple '72

Grant Hannon Colorado State '17

Seth Horowitz FDU-Metropolitan '11

Joshua Trifunovic UCLA '00

Patrick Gallahue Fitchburg State '11

Richard Norwood UTSA '14

INDIANA OF PENNSYLVANIA (THETA-EPSILON)

Zachary Elmer Indiana of Pennsylvania '12

Volunteer Opportunities

Check Out the Open Province Archon and Chapter Director Roles Province Archons Ontario Province Cornell (Mu) Carleton (Eta-Rho)

Chapter/Colony Directors Cal Poly (Eta-Delta)

Orlando, FL (Iota-Kappa)

Cal State Chico (Theta-Mu)

South Florida (Iota-Sigma)

Central Missouri (Gamma-Gamma)

Texas A&M-Corpus Christi (Delta-Theta)

Drury (Epsilon-Rho)

Western Illinois (Epsilon-Zeta)

Missouri State (Alpha-Rho)

For information on the roles and responsibilities of Chapter Directors and Province Archons, please visit

sigmapi.org/volunteer

sigmapi.org

15


Volunteers

Lyle H. Smith Award

Angela Woods Becomes First Woman to Win Award by Summer Clarkson, Assistant Director of Public Relations

O

n December 17, 2020, Sigma Pi Fraternity named Angela Woods a winning recipient of the Lyle H. Smith Award. The Lyle H. Smith Award is presented biennially to the Chapter Director who best exemplifies and carries out the position's duties. She is the first woman not only to receive the Lyle H. Smith Award but the first female volunteer to be recognized by the Fraternity. Chapter Director is one of many hats Woods wears when it comes to serving Beta-Mu Chapter at the University of Mississippi. She also acts as House Mother, Kitchen Manager, and Operating Manager of the Sigma Pi Mississippi Housing Corporation. Woods has played an active role with the brothers of Beta-Mu Chapter for over five years as Chapter Director, and according to Neal Wilkerson (Mississippi '11), "Angela has gone above and beyond the call of duty to support our young men." Woods has been an instrumental part in handling the Chapter's day-to-day operations and has even stepped in to help the Chapter with its financial obligations. She instills the values of Sigma Pi into the brothers by encouraging their involvement on campus and around the community. With low involvement from other young alumni, Woods ensures the Chapter runs smoothly, even going as far as coordinating the parent events. Whether it is talking to parents and alumni or coordinating with the university, Woods exceeds all expectations of a typical volunteer through her endless dedication to Beta-Mu Chapter. “Quite honestly, Miss Angela is like a second mother to me,” said Sage of Beta-Mu Chapter, Alexander Kontz (Mississippi ‘19). “She’s always looking out for us and keeping our best interests at heart, and it's safe to say we are incredibly grateful to have her as our Chapter Director.” The Lyle H. Smith Award would have typically been presented to Woods at the 2020 Convocation Awards Ceremony, but since Convocation's cancellation, the award was presented virtually. Kontz will have the privilege of delivering the award in-person. Woods is one

16

of three recipients of the Lyle H. Smith Award; it also goes to Bill McKnight (Auburn '59), Chapter Director for Alpha-Delta Chapter at Auburn University, and Matt Kuhn (Embry-Riddle - Daytona Beach '88), Chapter Director for Eta-Sigma Chapter at Colorado State University. If the brothers of Beta-Mu Chapter haven't kept her busy enough, Woods also owns a gourmet grocery store in Oxford, MS, called Ya Ya's Yummys, INC. Since cooking and creating new recipes has always been a passion of Woods, she created Ya Ya's Yummys in 2012. Woods said, "I love taking a recipe and making it my own or creating one from scratch." Join us in congratulating Angela Woods as the first woman to win Lyle H. Smith Award, and be sure to visit Ya Ya's Yummys on your next visit to Oxford,MS! Miss the awards presentation? Check it out!

Awards Video

Winter 2021


Alumni News, Events, And Accomplishments

Masking Up from Coast to Coast NJ Couple Donates More Than 100,000 Masks to Frontline Workers and Families in Need

T

o help do their part during the pandemic, New Jersey residents Barton Henderson (Montclair State '09) and his wife Kristina donated and helped distribute 20,000 masks to 2,200 families in need at a drive-thru food distribution at Bader Field in Atlantic City in partnership with Community FoodBank of New Jersey and the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority (CRDA). This donation is part of the Henderson's broader donation of 108,000+ masks from their factory in Santa Ana, California, to food banks and various nonprofits in New Jersey, New York, California, Pennsylvania, and Florida. The "Masking Up from Coast to Coast" campaign aims to assist in the fight against COVID-19. "Masks are expensive, and for many Americans, they simply are not in the budget. People who are struggling right now, out of work and finding it difficult to put food on the table for their children, will keep wearing dirty, disposable masks because they can't afford to buy new

18

ones. Our donation to families and frontline workers is one way we can help make a difference. We want to thank Feeding America and Feeding New York State Association for helping us locate areas with great need," said Barton Henderson, Esq., Chief Business Development Officer and Co-Owner of Henderson Promos, based in Red Bank, New Jersey. "My husband and I just want to help. Our business pivoted to PPE production at the onset of the pandemic, and we see the demand for masks first-hand. It is our pleasure to provide frontline workers at food banks and other nonprofits, as well as families in need, with essential masks to help keep them safe during these unprecedented times. Nobody should be at greater risk of contracting or spreading the virus because they can't afford clean masks," said Kristina Henderson, Chief Executive Officer and Co-Owner of Henderson Promos, and the current Mrs. New Jersey American titleholder.

Winter 2021


OCAA Awarded Most Outstanding Alumni Club

F

or the second biennium in a row, and the seventh time overall, the Orange County Alumni Association was recognized with the Most Outstanding Alumni Club Award for 2018-2020 by Sigma Pi Fraternity. The OCAA goes above and beyond by hosting several events and activities throughout the year, including its annual scholarship golf tournament, where $15,000 was raised. Between alumni hosted cocktail hours, Zoom gatherings, sports outings, and various small social gatherings, Fullerton’s Sigma Pi alumni continue to generate interest in the brotherhood. “We developed a foundation and mindset early on,” says alumni president David DeFilippo (‘88), “where our alumni look forward to gathering with one another. Rather it’s Rob Norden (’80) hosting his annual 19781985 alumni social, or Rob Russell (’88) coordinating his “Thrilla Tee Times” golf for alums from 1986-1990 era, our alumni remain focused on the brotherhood network.” Even during a pandemic, the alumni remained engaged and hosted several Zoom calls. An example of unfathomed brotherhood and excellence was when the chapter alumni heard of Greg Kerr (’85) being diagnosed with a shortened lifespan. On a Saturday afternoon this past April, 86 Epsilon-Nu alumni, along with several Little Sisters, joined in on a Zoom call to share stories and tears with Greg during his final days. To add to this excellence, the brotherhood raised $25,000 in two weeks to help defray funeral costs. “Actions like this are one of the many reasons why our alumni continue to give back to Epsilon-Nu and Sigma

sigmapi.org

Pi Fraternity,” said alumni vice-president and Past Grand Sage Larry Rovira (’80). “Our members actually believe in our creed, practice our values, and raise the bar for the next generation of Sigma Pi. We want to continue the joy of fraternal brotherhood, and as alumni, we need to set the example that the brotherhood does not end at graduation. It IS a life-long commitment to excellence.” The alumni club has also been successful with its fundraising over the years, as well. When the OCAA was tasked to raise funds to re-colonize, the board of directors raised $25,000 one year to offset the expansion costs. Then the following year raised another $25,000 to support scholarships and educational programming. Today, the chapter alumni continue to support the John J. Merino Scholarship, allocates campus bookstore scholarships to outstanding service towards the chapter (such as to the recruitment chairman for a great rush or to an undergraduate member elected to the student body leadership), and gives to various chapter events to offset costs. “The alumni are here to support the undergraduate chapter,” says Ed Gogin (’78), treasurer/secretary of the OCAA. “The stronger the chapter, the stronger the alumni participation; we love seeing them succeed!” The OCAA was chartered in 1984, shortly after EpsilonNu Chapter chartered at California State University, Fullerton, and won their first of three Grand Sage’s Cups. Sigma Pi Fraternity’s Most Outstanding Alumni Club Award is given to the chartered alumni club, demonstrating superior overall performance in the biennium. 19


Chartering

WELCOME BACK

ETA- NU

AT TOWSON UNIVERSITY by Matthew S. Cromwell (Towson '20) and Christian Miele (Towson '00), contributing writers

20

Winter 2021


Chartering HISTORY OF THE COLONY After a five-year absence, Eta-Nu Chapter of Sigma Pi Fraternity was recolonized on November 16, 2018, in Room 0304 of the West Village Commons building, by nine undergraduate students at Towson University. These young men were brought together by Russell Kizior and Jason Artrip of the Executive Office, who were tasked with establishing the colony and overseeing its growth and development. Kizior and Artrip began their work by making presentations to sororities on campus to inform them that Sigma Pi was coming back on campus. At the end of each presentation, they asked the sisters to write down the names of men whom they believed embodied the values of Sigma Pi as communicated in their presentation. Kizior and Artrip then contacted the recommended men through Instagram or by phone and reached out to students who went through recruitment but did not receive bids from or otherwise join the other fraternities on campus.

INSTALLAT IO N TEAM GRAND SAGE

Christian J. Miele (Towson ‘00) GRAND SECOND COUNSELOR

Joseph J. diMonda (Towson ‘91) GRAND THIRD COUNSELOR

Paul C. Williamson (Towson ‘90) GRAND FOURTH COUNSELOR

Jason E. Kelly (Towson ‘94) GRAND FIRST COUNSELOR

Benjamin F. Sorteberg (Salisbury ‘14) GRAND HERALD

PGS John H. Williams, Jr. (Widener ‘85)

CH ART E RING O FFICER S SAGE

Connor M. Loube

The first meeting between the prospective members took place in the basement of Kizior and Artrip's Airbnb. This was the first time that the students who would revive Sigma Pi had ever been brought together. They quickly got to know one another, and it was clear from that first meeting that there was an instant connection between the selected students. From that night, the eternal flame of brotherhood began to burn as these men worked toward recolonization.

SECOND COUNSELOR

After that initial meeting, it became a weekly occurrence for the men to meet in the Airbnb basement. During these meetings, the original nine members laid the foundation for the organization. They decided what their image would be and how they planned to represent Sigma Pi at the university and in the community. While preparing this colony's future, the original founding fathers developed an inseparable bond that will last a lifetime. They bonded over the common goal of creating and being a part of something much larger than themselves.

Theodore M. Cornwell

After the recolonization, the refounding fathers began tabling in the University Union together. During their tabling, they also held a toy/clothing drive during the holidays and collected over 300 articles of clothing, more than 40 toys, and over 200 video games. The clothes were donated to the Salvation Army, and the toys went to the John Hopkins Children's Center in nearby Baltimore.

Todd G. Clingerman, Jr.

From the basement of an Airbnb to our own fraternity house, we are very pleased to say that Eta-Nu is back on the map! REINSTALLATION Eta-Nu Chapter was reinstalled on August 29, 2020, in the Roman Room of the Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of Maryland in Cockeysville, Maryland. There were 22 charter members.

Michael J. Ash THIRD COUNSELOR

Kevin A. Olkowski FOURTH COUNSELOR

Joseph L. Molnar FIRST COUNSELOR

Bradley L. Lang HERALD

ME MB E RS Michael J. Ash Miles T. Barber James M. Bice, Jr. Spencer D. Barron Theodore M. Cornwell Matthew S. Cromwell Jeremy A. Franks Dominick A. Hernandez Kamel B. Jones, Jr. Neil P. V. Labio Shawn L. Gregory Bradley L. Lang Connor M. Loube Holden S. M. Masi Joseph L. Molnar Kevin A. Olkowski Mario D. Romeo Colin M. Schraudner Robert H. Simms III Markus K. Stevenson

sigmapi.org

21


Chartering

WELCOME BACK

E PSILON -THETA AT ELON UNIVERSITY

22

Winter 2021


Chartering HISTORY OF THE COLONY In early February 2019, Sigma Pi began contacting potential new members through sororities, Greek life, and other referrals to re-establish EpsilonTheta Chapter at Elon University. By March of 2019, Sigma Pi staff members arrived on the Elon campus and began conducting interviews. The ideals and core values of Sigma Pi resonated with many young men on the Elon campus. Over the next few months, the group extended bids to 35 gentlemen. The pinning ceremony of these men occurred on April 13, 2019. Prior to colonization, the Executive Council for the Colony was chosen. The six men selected were as follows: Sage Ben Whetstone, Second Counselor Frank Otillo, Third Counselor Andrew Harper, Fourth Counselor Connor McDermott, First Counselor Joe Perry, and Herald Harold Franklin.

INSTALLAT IO N TEAM GRAND SAGE

GS Joe Palazzolo (Monmouth '00) GRAND FIRST COUNSELOR

L.A. Sarmiere (Elon '90) GRAND SECOND COUNSELOR

Chris Bell (Elon '89) GRAND THIRD COUNSELOR

Todd Griffin (East Carolina '90) GRAND FOURTH COUNSELOR

Bill Clarke (Elon '91) GRAND HERALD

Bill Coffman (Elon '83)

On April 12, 2019, the Colony participated in its first community involvement event. The whole group helped with setup and teardown for a maker fair at the Holly Hill Mall in Burlington. This was a great opportunity to get involved with the community and show the Sigma Pi value of inspiring service. Colony members also got to meet local alumni in the area and form a connection with them that would become essential to the Colony's growth.

CH ART E RING O FFICER S

Throughout the following year, the Colony grew an increasingly strong brotherhood and hosted many recurring brotherhood events. One of the favorites was watching football at their on-campus house in Elon's Loy Center. These events were a chance to hang out together and enjoy football with the occasional pizza or wings. The first of these events was on September 5, 2019, the very first game of the regular season that year.

FOURTH COUNSELOR

Later that month, the Colony hosted their first Philanthropy event at the school tailgate for parents weekend. The philanthropy of choice was RAINN (Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network), the nation's largest anti-sexual violence organization.

ME MB E RS

Epsilon-Theta Colony submitted the petition to charter in February 2020 and was approved later that month by the Grand Council. Due to the conditions placed on student organizations at Elon because of Covid-19, the plans for a chartering ceremony were difficult to nail down, and the plans were halted until a successful ceremony could take place. REINSTALLATION Epsilon-Theta Chapter was reinstalled on January 16, 2020, through the first-ever virtual chartering experience. Led by Grand Sage Joe Palazzolo (Monmouth '00) and organized with the help of the Director of Chapter Support Services Scott Quinlan (Fairmont State '95), the ceremony took place through a Zoom video session. Byron Uzzell (East Carolina '17) served as the Marshall during the ceremony. There were 32 charter members.

sigmapi.org

SAGE

Samuel Coffey SECOND COUNSELOR

Zach Penta THIRD COUNSELOR

Matt Koeller Connor McDermott FIRST COUNSELOR

Joseph Perry HERALD

Ryan Lampmann

Jackson Abele

Connor McDermott

Creed Beavers

Jack McIntyre

Teagan Blum

Jon Mersereau

Leo Castellaneta

Jack Minkowitz

Samuel Coffey

John Mullin Jr.

Sean Coughlin

Abhinav Nitesh

James Edmunds Jr.

Zach Penta

Aidan Evens

Joseph Perry

Bennet Flynn

Jeff Pinarchick

Guy Harper

Charles Purrington

Matthew Holt

Joe Rotunno

Jacob Keaveney

Jack St. Pierre

Matt Koeller

Zachary Stomberger

Ryan Lampmann

Nicholas Teitler

Noah Levinson

Ryan Turner

Thomas Mataconis II

Ben Whetstone

Casey McCauley

23


Sigma Pi Educational Foundation

From the Chairman Brothers and Friends, The Sigma Pi Educational Foundation provides scholarships, grants, and financial support for educational programming to members of the Fraternity through the generous support of our membership. When asked why they give, brothers have responded that they desire to pay back for the benefits they have received in their fraternal experience, strive to develop undergraduates and their pursuit of knowledge or life skills, or because they want to memorialize members of their Chapter. But one response is universal, all give because they believe in Sigma Pi. As a donor today, you can be an active partner in the development of the Sigma Pi leaders of tomorrow by creating the financial support they need to continue their educational pursuits and reach their goals. Please find below a summary of recent Foundation activity, in cooperation with the Executive Office: • Changed mail campaign support provider from Gabriel to OmegaFi

CHAIRMAN Jeff Cline North Carolina State '85

BOARD MEMBERS CHAIRMAN

Jeff Cline North Carolina State ’85

• Adopted Classy.org platform to create a fresh new look to the website donation landing page

VC INVESTMENTS

• Launched the reimagined Delta Society and new Owl Society

VC LEGAL

• Launched the 10 Stars Campaign to support a new Founders’ Month of Giving

Mike Long Oakland ’03

• Digitized CEF Disbursement Request process

TREASURER

• Changed donor recognition from ribbons at convo to lapel pins for any event

Daniel Daugherty Morehead State ’88

• Launched CEF semi-annual fund updates

SECRETARY

• Evaluating freewill.com as a platform for planned giving

Taylor Lapsys UC Irvine ’04

• Developing Virtual Leadership Series with the support of Paul Hansen (Valparaiso ’80)

TRUSTEE

• Executing the first Chapter Housing Fund (CHF) with Rho Chapter at North Carolina State – designed to receive tax-deductible donations for the support of a chapter’s housing needs through grants for the educational percentage of the purchase, construction, or renovation of the chapter house, the furnishing and equipping of the designated educational areas, and the educational percentage of ongoing operating expenses We encourage you to reflect on how Sigma Pi has enhanced your life and consider a taxdeductible gift to the Educational Foundation. On behalf of the Board of Trustees, and all the men of Sigma Pi who have benefited from your generous contributions, we thank you for your continued commitment and ongoing support of the Educational Foundation. Because we all believe in Sigma Pi…. Fraternally,

David Presson Murray State ’77

Robert Pankau Oakland ’02 TRUSTEE

Jason Walker Georgia ’92 TRUSTEE

Paul Gorman Seton Hall ’93 TRUSTEE

Patrick Reimer Morehead State ’94 TRUSTEE

Diogo Tavares Seton Hall ‘96 HONORARY LIFE TRUSTEE

Jeff Cline (North Carolina State '85) Chairman, Sigma Pi Educational Foundation

24

PGS Frank C. Fryburg Penn State ’44 DEVELOPMENT CHAIR

Paul Hansen Valparaiso ’80

Winter 2021


Sigma Pi Educational Foundation

Ways to Give Online Giving with your debit or credit card online at sigmapi.org/donate is a quick and secure way to make a contribution, which accepts Visa, American Express, MasterCard, and Discover.

Mobile On your mobile device, you can quickly and easily visit sigmapiedfund.org/gift

Mail You can mail a check or credit card gift to the SPEF at the address below: Sigma Pi Educational Foundation 1101 Kermit Drive, Suite 730 Nashville, TN 37217

Phone To make a donation over the phone, or for more assistance, please give us a call at 615-921-2300.

SPEF Announcements We are proud to announce two changes to the recognition levels of the Sigma Pi Educational Foundation: the redeveloped Delta Society for undergraduate giving recognition, and the brand new Owl Society for young alumni giving.

Delta Society The Delta Society is an honorary membership society recognizing those who have begun a tradition of financial support for the Sigma Pi Educational Foundation during their collegiate experience. Their generosity helps the Fraternity in continued development of educational and leadership initiatives, including the Bayard Membership Experience and Mid-Year Leadership Conference, among other programs that ensure the continued growth and development of our members. As an undergraduate member of Sigma Pi, you have the opportunity to help build the future of our Fraternity. The selfless giving back by a Delta Society member further serves as an invaluable example for his chapter brothers. “The Brother who becomes fully involved with Sigma Pi will continue to enjoy and benefit from it throughout his lifetime.” – Sigma Pi Manual

Owl Society The Owl Society has been created for our young alumni (age 35 and under), who can start an unrestricted monthly gift of $18.97. Once giving has been established, the donor will receive a special lapel pin recognizing their membership in the Owl Society. After one year of annual payments, the donor will also receive a special gift from the Fraternity. Not long ago, you made the important decision to join an organization that has developed leaders for almost 125 years. You are one of these many future leaders that will change the world and build upon our great Fraternity. Becoming an Owl Society member allows you to give back to your Brotherhood so that more emerging leaders that will come after you have the resources and tools they need to succeed.

TO L E A R N M O R E A B O U T T H E S E R E C O G N I T I O N L E V E L S , PLEASE VISIT

Corporate Matching Numerous companies match an

sigmapiedfund.org

employee’s personal donation to a nonprofit, tax-exempt organization. Ask your employer for details.

sigmapi.org

25


Sigma Pi Educational Foundation

Addressing Modern Day Challenges

How Sigma Pi Is Addressing COVID-19, the Abolish Greek Life Movement, and Other Challenges In many parts of the country, Sigma Pi undergraduates returned to campuses this fall to an environment that was completely different from what they had left in the spring. Social distancing, mask wearing, and Zoom classes and meetings are just a few of the new normals that students have adjusted to. Even in these tumultuous times, it is comforting to know that our undergraduate brothers have remained committed to promoting fellowship, developing character and leadership, advancing heightened moral awareness, enabling academic achievement, and inspiring service. The Sigma Pi Educational Foundation has never been more dedicated to supporting the young men in our active chapters. As we push forward together through the pandemic, it’s imperative that we also live by our core values and advance our brotherhood’s impactful ideals. During this season of giving, Sigma Pi alumni can rest assured that gifts of all sizes to the educational foundation will make a tremendous difference in the lives of our undergraduate brothers. Along with the pandemic, there has been another unwelcome movement related to Greek life that some of you may have heard about in recent months. The Abolish Greek Life movement has popped up on several college campuses. Driven largely by former sorority members who have posted various negative claims on social media, the Abolish Greek Life movement has primarily targeted fraternity men with sexual assault accusations and Greek chapters about not being inclusive when it comes to diversity and equity during recruitment. As Sigma Pi alumni, we can attest that Greek life is a crucial component to the college experience and life after graduation. What the Abolish Greek Life movement proponents fail to realize is that fraternities like Sigma Pi were founded on the ideals of empowering young men to fight issues such as sexual assault and inequalities. We at Sigma Pi Fraternity and the Sigma Pi Educational Foundation will forever be devoted to inspiring, promoting, and supporting the lifelong development of our brothers. While there appears to be a light at the end of the tunnel of the pandemic with vaccine options on the way, 26

Alpha-Nu Chapter at Wake Forest

the health and safety of our undergraduate brothers are still paramount. One of the challenges COVID-19 created for Sigma Pi chapters nationwide was how to handle recruitment this fall. Many chapters conducted recruitment via Zoom or other virtual platforms, which obviously is more challenging than trying to recruit potential new members in person. Nevertheless, our undergraduate brothers did a tremendous job of showcasing what the Sigma Pi experience is all about to potential new members. They have learned so much about our brotherhood from the educational programs and leadership conferences of Sigma Pi, and it’s important that future members benefit from those same opportunities. The Educational Foundation is a recognized 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization under the U.S. Internal Revenue Code, so all gifts are tax deductible to the fullest extent permitted by law. A donation to the Educational Foundation will go a long way toward securing our fraternity’s future. Whether it be financial struggles because of the suffering economy, having a personal experience with or knowing someone who has contracted COVID-19, or having the typical college experience taken away, the mental health of Sigma Pi’s collegians has been put to the test like never before. We’ve all been fortunate to have Sigma Pi brothers by our side during our highest of highs and lowest of lows. Now is the time to join the educational foundation and the fraternity in advocating for the Sigma Pi experience so our Sigma Pi brothers can thrive in all their endeavors. Winter 2021


Adytum On High "Our Ancient Sage firmly believed in the persistence of the soul beyond the grave, and although we mourn our brother’s passing from this world, we take comfort in sharing this belief that life is not ended, but changed, and that he now enjoys the reward for a life well-lived and guided by the ideals of our Fraternity." Accurate as of January 31, 2021 ARIZONA STATE (BETA-KAPPA) Lonnie Wallace ('58) AUBURN (ALPHA-DELTA) Rayford Prichard ('53) Thomas Walton ('58) CAL STATE LONG BEACH (BETA-OMICRON) Deo Fran ('72) James Pearson ('57) WILLIAM & MARY (ALPHA-ETA) Robert Smith ('50) CORNELL (MU) Bert Harrop III ('60) Herbert Mishler ('51) EASTERN ILLINOIS (BETA-GAMMA) Gordon Gebhart ('54) Fredrick Hayes ('62) Don Myers ('50) Ronald Pennell ('61) GEORGIA SOUTHERN (GAMMA-TAU) Michael Austin ('75) INDIANA STATE (GAMMA-PI) Chris Hassfurder ('67) INDIANA (BETA) Eugene Pinkie ('66) Roy Wright ('70) KENYON (LAMBDA) Allan Meyer ('54) LOUISIANA TECH (DELTA-LAMBDA) Brian Lawrence ('79) MISSISSIPPI STATE (ALPHA-LAMBDA) James McCarthy ('46) MISSOURI S&T (ALPHA-IOTA) Glenn Borgard ('51) Thomas Johnson ('62)

sigmapi.org

MURRAY STATE (GAMMA-UPSILON) Paul Gatewood II ('88) James Manning ('79) NORTH CAROLINA STATE (RHO) William Hollowell Jr. ('49) OHIO NORTHERN (ZETA) Robert Anania ('59) Robert Baird ('49) William Billing ('37) Ned Booher ('51) Donald Bowman ('46) Russell Bunger ('49) Robert Coleman ('39) Donald Currie ('27) Kenneth Day ('56) James Flenner ('60) Laurence Fligor ('65) Philip Gray ('55) Elmo Hagelberger ('36) Thomas Hardin ('75) William Hawk ('52) James Hejduk ('66) Charles Keith ('64) Janfrey Knisely ('66) Rollin Marti ('47) James Maurer ('63) William Needle ('67) Carl Price ('49) Michael Roberson ('74) Charles Thobaben ('41) Frederick Warner Jr. ('37)

COLORADO (ZETA-DELTA) Eugene Nicholas ('84) ILLINOIS (PHI) Bob Buckles Jr. ('52) IOWA (XI) Nicholas Fraizer ('16) UMSL (DELTA-ZETA) Lawrence Kennedy ('73) Brian Silverman ('93) PITTSBURGH (CHI) Nick Nicholas ('54) TEXAS (GAMMA-THETA) James Smith ('70) VIRGINIA (BETA-PI) Raeburn Llewellyn Jr. ('72) WISCONSIN-OSHKOSH (GAMMA-MU) Scott Hetherington ('66) VINCENNES (ALPHA) Joshua Auxier ('00) Matthew Conrad ('85) Charles DeMartin ('65) Michael McCormack ('78) Calvin Neace ('84) Stephen Pieper ('72) Brian Striegel ('77) Lance Yoder ('94)

PENN STATE (THETA) Harold Walz ('55) SIU-CARBONDALE (BETA-NU) Thomas McClintock ('52) BUFFALO (EPSILON-OMICRON) Jared Getzel ('10)

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Photo Finish For this issue, we wanted to showcase our chapters who are adhering to the guidelines in place due to the pandemic, while also excelling through an unexpected journey. To submit your own photos for consideration as the Photo Finish, please email them to emerald@sigmapi.org or tag @sigmapi on your social media accounts.

Alpha-Iota Chapter at Missouri S&T

Zeta-Epsilon Chapter at Michigan Tech 28

Winter 2021


Theta-Mu Chapter at Cal State Chico

Eta Chapter at Purdue

Beta-Tau Chapter at Valparaiso sigmapi.org

Alpha-Mu Chapter at NJIT


Sigma Pi Fraternity 1101 Kermit Dr., Suite 730 Nashville, TN 37217

This academic year has been a unique experience for everyone, especially our volunteers and undergraduate members across North America. Join us for the 10 Stars Campaign and help ensure their continued success.

give.sigmapi.org/10stars

As a recognized 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization under the United States Internal Revenue Code, gifts to the Educational Foundation are tax-deductible to the fullest extent permitted by law.

Profile for Sigma Pi Fraternity

The Emerald - Winter 2021  

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