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SIERRA SINCLAIR SUMMERS SELECTED WORKS


CONTENTS 01-04: QUASI*CHROMA

13-16: ROW HOME

17-18: CREEK STUDY

05-08: CROSSING POINT

19-20: TIDAL LAMP

09-12: LIGHTBOX

21-24: (SUB)TERRAQUARIUM

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QUASI*CHROMA M.ARCH Studio I (Fall 2017) Critic: Danielle Willems 8 Weeks Challenging traditional museum configurations, this project, an addition to the Penn Museum, explores quasicrystalline forms and their impact on space. Quasiperiocity displays regularity and irregularity within the same system, creating local order and anomaly. This generates spaces that proposes new relationships and reject monotony. Unlike regular crystals, quasi crystals are generated from more than one component, creating more irregularity. Quasicrystals are capable of creating object and field conditions. The aggregation of small components, creates a series of intimate spaces that allow people to have a more personal interaction with the museum display. This rejects the large, open , white, box as a gallery and proposes something more intimate.


This project began with model making and the exploration of pattern and color.

Top Row: These “triptych� models propose new ground conditions for the site. They explore color and pattern which later influence the skin of the project. The triptychs are made of poured plaster.

Bottom Row: These 2 conceptual models describe the skin and form of the project. The patterning and coloration of these models become 3 dimensional in the project.

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LEVEL 148'

LEVEL 40'

GROUND

Front Elevation 501 Design Studio - Fall 2017 - Instructor : Danielle Willems

Student : Sierra Summers

University of Pennsylvania - PennDesign

Student : Sierra Summers

University of Pennsylvania - PennDesign

LEVEL 40'

LEVEL 7'

501Section Design Studio Longitudinal

- Fall 2017 - Instructor : Danielle Willems


# board 5.0

quasi * chroma

description: The mass sits within a new ground condition that also deals with quasiperiocity but in a different way. The new site will deal with tiling and how this tiling interacts with the existing context.

# board 6.0

quasi * chroma

site plan + elevation

description: The multiple shells of the skin work to “blur” the hardh edge of the quasicrystals. with form and color. The coloration is heavily inspired by the physical models and their material intelligence. The interior contrasts the exterior and reveals the formal logic behind the mass.

section + plan

Top View

Plan

The mass sits within a new ground condition that also deals with quasiperiocity but in a different way. The new site will deal with tiling and how this tiling interacts with the existing context.

The multiple shells of the skin work to “blur” the hard edge of the quasicrystals with form and color. The coloration is heavily inspired by the physical models and their material intelligence. The interior contrasts the exterior and reveals the formal logic behind the mass. The addition offers small reading rooms, large classrooms, and open exhibition space.

LEVEL 148'

LEVEL 40'

LEVEL 40'

GROUND

LEVEL 7'

501 Design Studio - Fall 2017 - Instructor : Danielle Willems

Student : Sierra Summers

University of Pennsylvania - PennDesign

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CROSSING POINT Senior Studio (Spring 2017): Designing for the Dead Critic: Chris McAdams 8 Weeks Historically, cemeteries were public gathering spaces, but today the word “cemetery” carries a more horrific and somber connotation. This project rejuvenates the cemetery by inviting all people to gather for all reasons. This is more than a cemetery; there is a runner’s trail, community garden, volunteer center, apiary, small chapel and walking paths. This project celebrates all parts of life, including death. The walking trails weave through the burial plots and the columbarium wall is a featured site along the path to the chapel (shown to the left). This project occupies the untouched portions of the Woodlands, in West Philadelphia.


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Perspective Section of Chapel LONGITUDINAL SECTION: 1/16

CEREMONY SPACE

APIARY

OPEN SPACE

COLUMBARIUM WALL

PRE-CEREMONY SPACE

REFLECTION SPACE

Section Through Cemetery

The long path culminates in a small gathering space and chapel to be used for burial ceremonies or even weddings. The chapel is made of simple white stone, which makes it shining beacon against the earthy tones of the cemetery. The light filters in from above, making it a heavenly space. The path behind the chapel connects to the underground path which offers private mourning space. The underground path is lit by windows to the surface that are symbolically placed where a burial plot would be. From death and darknes, there is also light.

Page 2 Left: Site Map Page 2 Top Right: View inside of Chapel Page 2 Bottom Right: Perspective Section inside underground columbarium wall


CROSSING POINT

THE CONVERGING PATHS OF LIFE AND DEATH BY SIERRA SUMMERS

ADMINISTRATION WELCOME CENTER

APIARY

COMMUNITY GARDEN OPEN SPACE

REFLECTIVE SPACE

UNDERGROUND COLUMBARIUM

BURIAL PLOTS COLUMBARIUM WALL

PRE-CEREMONY SPACE CEREMONY SPACE

RESTROOM

REFLECTIVE SPACE

MAINTENENCE

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Handcrafted Model Images

LIGHTBOX

Junior Studio (Spring 2016): Music Institute Critic: Clifton Fordham 8 Weeks This project is set on the Avenue of the Arts on South Broad Street, Philadelphia. This Musical Institute houses spaces for practicing music as well as performing. Many large institutional buildings and performance spaces already dominate South Broad Street, so my project differentiates from the site through scale and material. Despite its small stature, this building uses material and texture to command presence. Three materials dominate the space; weathering steel, wood and glass. The lobby, made of glass, is a floating ribbon, around the first floor spaces. The central performance space, made of weathering steel, acts as a beacon that glitters at night. The wooden rectangular spaces are the most utilitarian spaces: practice rooms, offices and various storage rooms.


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Above: Front Elevation Below: Longitudinal Section

Above: Side Elevation Below: Latitudinal Section

There are two performance spaces in the institute . The first floor performance space, although smaller, draws attention from the street, with its perforations. It is more casual and features simple seating. The underground performance space, is much larger, but slightly hidden, to give a mysterious, jazz club feel. It is raised up three feet above ground to hint that something is happening underground, but you cannot tell what until you enter.


Above: Underground Rendering Below: Top View

Above: Rendering looking into performance space Below: First Floor Plan

Above: Hallway Rendering Below: Basement Floor Plan

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Front Elevation

Latitudinal Section

HIP HOP HOUSE

Junior Studio (Fall 2015): Rethinking the Row Home Critic: Eric Oskey 8 Weeks East Kensington is a up and coming neighborhood of Philadelphia and is projected to see great growth in the next 20 years. However, the community now faces great struggles. This project intends to bring vibrancy and fun to the community. Row houses are the most common typology of housing in Philadelphia and this project pays tribute to that. The task was to design a row home that accommodated a family and a work space for an artist. My artist is a hip hop dancer and choreographer. Hip hop dance is one of the most accessible types of dance; it is an integral part of pop culture that almost anyone can relate to. Historically, hip hop dance requires little to no formal training, making it accessible to the everyday person.


Longitudinal Section

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Top Row: Renderings depicting the public level, inside of the home and the dance studio.

Bottom Row: Images of a hand made model describing the topographic openings.

The resident artist opens up their studio to the public for small or private dance classes, engaging their neighbors and becoming a member of the community. The dance studio is in the basement and the home is lifted up allowing public space at ground level. I wanted to spread the infectious vibrancy and energy of a hip hop dancer to the public; there are various operable portals providing views into the dance studio and allowing music to float up from underground.


Basement: Dance Studio

Ground: Public Level

1st Floor: Private Living Space

2nd Floor: Private Living Space

The topographic floor evolved as a way to provide portals for sight and sound into the studio. As the floor recedes into the studio, it creates a small hole for music to flow through or a larger window to see through. As the floor builds up it creates seating for the public. This topography not only affects the ground floor but the house walls as well.

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WISSAHICKON CREEK STUDY Sophomore Studio (Fall 2014) Critic: Dennis Playdon 4 Weeks Wissahickon Creek runs 23 miles through the city and suburbs of Philadelphia. The diversity and beauty of nature is amplified in this dense park. As I explored the landscape of the Wisahickon, I was immediately drawn in by the texture of the forest- the smooth leaves, the rough tree bark, the eroded rock, and the layers of the forest floor. I wanted to capture this in my project. I was particularly interested in the light filtration through the tree canopy. I wanted to capture these qualities in my model and plan drawing. Immediate Right: 2 foot combined elevation and plan drawing of the forest. Top Right: Forest Image Bottom Right: Forest Site Sketch


Rendered image using hand fabricated model

Hand drawn elevation of project

Experiential vignette

In the next phase of the project, I deepened my preliminary analysis of the Wisahickon site. I created a new space that was inspired by the original site. I created a module inspired by the light filtration of the tree canopy. It is made of one modular element with slits to allow for connection in various ways (no glue was allowed). As I built up the layers of the paper model, it began to filter light in a way similar to the forest made of trees of varying heights. The modules attach together to create a skin. The dowels were added to provide structure. The resulting form, mimics a forest. The forest of dowels leads you through the form and the paper skin protects you, like a tree canopy. The vignette depicts an experience through the space. The elvation focuses on capturing the contrast of light and shadow in the model. 18


Tidal Lamp

Senior Studio (Fall 2016): Scan-Fab Lamp Critic: Gabriel Kaprielian 1.5 Weeks Calm, limitless, mesmerizing, crushing, cruel, shimmering. The ocean takes on many forms, but never holds its shape for long. The Tidal Lamp attempts to capture the elegance of an ocean wave at its most kinetic moment. This lamp was made through the Scan Fab Workshop. The workshop utilizes new software technology in Reality Computing that integrates analog and digital design. This project began with a hand molded clay model that was later digitized using 123D Catch. The digital model was sliced, then laser cut to become a lamp.


COMPUTE MESHMIXER

Top Row: Fabricated lamp images

CREATE 123D MAKE

Bottom Row: Clay model, Meshmixer Model and Slicer Model for fabrication

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(SUB)TERRAQUARIUM Senior Studio (Fall 2016) Critic: Gabriel Kaprielian 7 Weeks The (SUB)TERRAQUARIUM aims to fully submerge visitors in the San Francisco Bay. The aquarium is located on a pier. Just as the building descends into the Bay, visitors descend and enter the space through a large 30ft fish tank. The aquarium overtly makes a connection between the water of the bay and the water of the aquarium. The ground floor is not the true entrance to the space, but the gift shop, open to the public. Here, you get a hint of what is below with views into the 30ft tank. To enter the aquarium, you purchase tickets and move downstairs into a grand atrium and circulation space.


Images of Hand-crafted Model

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Longitudinal Section 1

Longitudinal Section 2

One the negative first floor are touch pools to get people engaged and the entrance to the auditorium. Half of the second floor is dedicated to research and teaching facilities. Here, scientists focus on researching the ecology of the Bay, its species and how to keep it healthy. The aquarium also features a window wall, meant to further connect people to the water. At times, the windows become spheres to accommodate seating or pop out into the Bay. In the (SUB)TERRAQUARIUM, visitors are always aware of their of their place in the water.


Ground Plan

Front Elevation

-1st Plan

-2nd Plan

Latitudinal Section 24


THANK YOU

Sierra Summers Porfolio 2018  
Sierra Summers Porfolio 2018  
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