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Dubai Metrozone TU Berlin Chair for Urban Design and Architecture Joachim Schultz

Alex Jeffrey Siekierski Segment One Portfolio Master of Architecture Boston Architectural College 07.20.2009 Your Name Your Title


Copyright Š 2009 Alex Jeffrey Siekierski BAC Segment I Portfolio


Acknowledgements I gratefully would like to acknowledge the key influential persons in my life that have helped me get to strive to achieve my goals that led me to where I am today. First and foremost I thank my family for giving me some tough love through the thick and thin. I especially attribute my dedicated work ethic from my father Jeff Siekierski. Eddie Pagliero is another individual who was the grounds supervisor at Springfield College who recommended that I look into pursuing my education in Civil Engineering. I respected his input and cannot thank him enough because if I had not listen to his suggestion I may have never made the switch into Architecture. I knew growing up as a child that I enjoyed art and was please to see the amount of artistic thought is used in design school. My first professor of architecture, Mr. Warren Hall, who was the director of Springfield Technical Community Colleges Architectural Technology program, is another critical person who inspired me to maintain my education in Architecture. Mr. Hall was my mentor for three years and formed my novice skills in the design profession. These years played a critical role in my success at achieving a Bachelor’s of Fine Art from the University of Umass Amherst. Now as a Master’s student at the Boston Architectural College I am grateful for all the education I gained at UMass. Another note to add towards my personal development as well as architectural knowledge, was the opportunity I received from UMass in which I was able to study abroad in Berlin, Germany. This was an excellent experience because during my stay I was able to travel to twenty one countries through Europe and the Middle East. I feel living in such a great city like Berlin greatly influenced my decision to move to Boston and pursue my post graduate degree at the BAC. After only a year of graduate school I can’t fathom the amount of high caliber education I have gained. I truly look forward to the rest of my education here at Boston Architectural College!


X

Acknowledgements

ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN HISTORY A |100-104

RESUME

I

XII IV XIV

II

FOUNDATION DESIGN MASTER’S B1 STUDIO TRANSFER |24-39

III VI

XI

3D DESIGN DRAWING - PERSPECTIVE |105-108

FOUNDATION DESIGN MASTERS A STUDIO |1-23

3DS MAX 9 / MODELING + RENDERING TRANSFER |109-113

V

steel design student competition |71-78

ADDITIONAL studio PROJECTS |79-82

VII

ARCHITECTURE SKETCH PROBLEM #1 |83-85

ARCHITECTURE SKETCH PROBLEM #2 |86-90

VIII

STRUCTURES 2: STATICS & STRENGTH OF MATERIALS |91-92 DESIGN PRINCIPLES |93-99

IX

XIII

FOUNDATION DESIGN MASTER’S B2 STUDIO |40-70

ADDITIONAL TRANSFERRED CLASSES |114-119

Professional Practice |120-153

Professional Experience |154-167

XVI

XV

summer Semester Abroad 2008 |168-170


EDUCATION:

Boston Architectural College, Boston, MA Candidate for Master of Architecture August 2008 - Present

Technical University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany Semester Abroad (Architecture) March – August 2008

University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA Bachelor of Fine Arts in Design (Architecture) Spring of 2008 Springfield Technical Community College, Springfield, MA Associates Degree in Architectural Technology, May 2006 In addition: Completed certificate in Construction Management

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE:

Boston Architectural College, Boston, MA July 9th ’09 - September‘09 Aiding Exhibition Design + Installations Responsible for designing layouts, coordinating with exhibitors, and aiding installations.

Urbanica, Boston, MA Project Coordinator Responsible for compiling all construction documents. Marketing, spreadsheets, product research, cost analysis for the projects.

January 21st ’09 - June 30th ‘09

Boston Architectural College, Boston, MA Teacher’s Assistant for Design Principles Proctor of post-class discussions Responsible for grading quizzes, presentations, and final submittals

January 24th ’09 - May 28th ‘09

Nancy Stracka Interiors, Boston, MA Field Worker Responsible for field measuring existing conditions Translate field information onto paper with use of CAD

September ‘08 – November ‘08

The Dennis Group, LLC, Springfield, MA Intern Responsible for all redline edits on construction docs Preparer of bid packages Researcher of products and companies

January 7th ’08 - April ‘08

Architectural Insights, Palmer, MA Drafter & Fieldwork Redline editor for updating construction documents Legal document preparer Existing fieldwork measurements

June 1st ‘07 - February ’08

Department of Public Works, Ludlow, MA Engineering Department Aide Survey roads and residential existing conditions Office filing of construction docs, parcel papers (hard/digital)

June ‘06 – February ‘07

DESIGN SKILLS:

PC Skills: Revit ’08-09, AutoCAD ’08-09, 3DSMax, Adobe CS3Suite and Sketchup Pro 7 Drafting: Hand and AutoCAD –Plans, Sections, Call-Outs and Elevations Drawing: Perspective, Orthogonal, Observational, and Freehand Modeling: Basswood, Chipboard, Plexy, and Foamcore

EXTRACURRICULAR:

LEED A.P. (Intended to receive on June 30th, 2009), Academic Awards/Activities: VP of UMass Club ‘07 -’08, Pres of STCC Building Club ‘04 – ’05, Student Mentor (STCC) ’05, BAC & UMass Dean’s List (GPA 3.7) ’08 – ’09 College Athletics: UMass Crew ’06, STCC Basketball & Golf ‘04 - ’05 Other Interests: Golf, Fishing, Chess, Photography, Art, Sketching, Digital Design & Graphics

TRAVEL: Dubai, Bilbao, London, Paris, Amsterdam, Brussels, Dublin, Cork, Barcelona, Rome, Florence, Vienna, Zürich,Prague, Istanbul, Majorca, Jerusalem, Oslo, Stockholm, Riga, Krakow.

Alex Jeffrey Siekierski 18 O Street Apartment 1 South Boston, MA 02127 Mobile 413.348.4824 AlexSiekierski@Hotmail.com http://bacweb.the-bac.edu/~alex.siekierski/


I FOUNDATION DESIGN MASTERS A STUDIO Duration: 16 Weeks Fall 2008 Instructors: Kerry Coyne + Jeff Leclair Foundation Design Master’s A studio is the first of three foundation design courses for Masters of Interior Design and Masters of Architecture at the Boston Architectural College. Master’s A teaches an understanding of abstraction and conceptualization through the use of two and three-dimensional exercises. Drawings, models, and collages are emphasized as the primary means for design investigation. Students will quickly get exposure to the basic skills needed for all subsequent design studios at the BAC, and they will put them to use. In Foundation Design Master’s A studio, students will understand the fundamentals of visual thinking: Students have making/drawing skills that are surfacing and that can grow rapidly. Visual thinking is the act of advancing both verbal and visual skills and using them together to develop each assigned design project. Students will also understand the connection between the work of Foundation Design Master’s A studio and the Practice Component. Visual thinking skills, as evidenced by interconnected drawing, making, writing, and speaking are fundamental to meaningful participation in the practice of interior design, landscape architecture, and architecture.


project one: 3 Weeks concept of placement, FigureGround, & phenomenal transparency During this project, I worked at an abstract level to gain understanding and skills dealing with basic architectural elements and their spatial qualities. I also explored properties of basic architectural elements, which included elements created from points, lines, and planes, (right) to create movement and unique spatial conditions. Basic concepts of placement (or ordering principles) were explored primarily through the layering of elements. Figure-Ground was another primary principal of Project One that implies an exercise that notions phenomenal transparency. I learned to recognize the figure-ground and the multiple spatial reading that comes with different perceptions. Lastly, through transforming a 2D composition into a 3D model, I learned to collapse the world around us onto a flat surface, and then re-compose that perception, into a 3D model representation. I again explored the multiple reading of spatial qualities discovered during this trans-

Lines Panel The Panel is divided into half by a sloping right to left line. One the right the lines are zigzagged and staggered toward the upper left until it hit the central core of three black stripes. The upper right consists of solid white lines. As for the left side of the panel there are two black prominent lines dissecting the panel and leaving a small upper left portion for an â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lâ&#x20AC;? shaped arrangement.

Planes Panel

Preliminary Design Sketches

A series of black elliptical spheres are increasing in size from the lower right to the upper left. Using the same pattern for the large ellipses I mirrored the pattern starting from the center of the panel. Around these offset circular pattern I used smaller white circles to overlap the black ellipses. Where these two patterns cover up the original brown background I remove the white colors.

|Masters A Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Kerry Coyne & Jeffrey Leclair Fall 2008|

Points Panel Migration checkerboard from upper right to lower left. Vertical converging points form lines in the bottom half of the panel. Sporadic black points are dispersed through out 70 percent of the panel.

Composition of Points, Lines & Planes I used a similar ellipse pattern from the above Planes panel but reversed the colors to white. From that I used a series of black arrays or lines they emerge out of the lower right corner. These lines are tucked behind a small series of ellipses to create depth. I also removed a series of different sized ovals from the two prominent black rays.

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |2|


Point Revised

Points, Lines & Planes Revised

A series of white ovals emerge from the lower right of the panel and grow into a large arrow pointing to the upper left corner. An exploded section of the white pattern is then inverted and rotated to the right. The new black pattern is oriented over the white pattern to create voids which then are cut out to create the third brown pattern.

After noticing that not much depth was created in the original I decided to keep the white ellipse pattern and to simply bring some of them to the front of the black rays. This overlapping created a little more depth and broke up the pattern as a whole. Lastly I decided to use the negative ovals and place them on top of the ellipses in a scattered formation to indicate the usage of all the black area.

|Masters A Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Kerry Coyne & Jeffrey Leclair Fall 2008|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |3|


FOUR REPRESENTATIONAL MODELS Within a 9” X 9” X 9” boundary based on the ideas and orders put forth in your 2D panels. You shall develop your compositions in three dimensions. I began by using surface modeling materials, such as corrugated cardboard, chipboard, wood, plastic, metal or another appropriate material for the first two models, which should be created in the likeness of two of your favoured panels. for the second two models, use stick materials, such as wire, wood, plastic, etc to create a framework that corresponds to your surface models. The translation of my composition to 3D was very challenging. I could argue that the 2D exercise is an illusion of the third dimension using flat materials. the 3D composition may be the opposite operation as in an extrusion of space from a flat surface.

Preliminary Sketch of Points Model (above) + Zoomed In Structural Models (below)

Also, whereas my flat compositions have one viewpoint with multiple readings, now I may consider multiple viewpoints as well. I considered the models to not have a base, and to not react to gravity, that is why the float in space without a prescribed top, side or bottom.

Points Lines Planes Model + Structural Models (right)

Composition of Points, Lines & Planes Model

|Masters A Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Kerry Coyne & Jeffrey Leclair Fall 2008|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |4|


Points + Structural Model Revised After deciding to move further along with developing my points model, I quickly noticed from the original model that it lacked depth. The planes with the ovals on them were merely a canopy and there was no connection between the cut out ovals and what was reflected on the inner cube as well as the structural model. Therefore I chose to create a similar cube inside of a cube and push the envelope further by carving into these form. If I sliced an edge or a corner away then it would influence the inner cube and the structural model as well. Most importantly I decided to take advantage of the oval cut outs and wrap them around corners and vary them in size, in order to create a dynamic overlap. Also in response to this I choose to offset a similar cut out on the inner cube to create an illusion of a reflection.

|Masters A Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Kerry Coyne & Jeffrey Leclair Fall 2008|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |5|


project two: 4.5 Weeks inhabitable wall - human presence, scale & proportion In this project, I continued to explore the ideas that began in Project One. In addition, the notion of scale was introduced and emphasized through human presence. In Project Two I explored and grasped an understanding of human scale and proportion and its influences in the built environment.

Preliminary Figure Sketches

The Inhabitable wall project was developed into a three stage process. We first began to develop an understanding of the human scale and the physical as well as the invisible space that it occupies. We began position and negative silhouettes of people and an object. For our object I choose an adjustable wrench. We look further into this exploration by casting our objects to get a 3D representation of the negative surface that it forms.

The project began with an exploration of body scale and proportion via observations of people in Harvard Square. Through this exercise, I recorded and analyze the everyday expectancies of the body and kept in mind how I could manipulate it and design something to encapsulate this notion of human scale. I began to establish a system in which the space informs the body and visa verse. Through designing the Inhabitable Wall, I explored the relationship between body and built environment at various scales. I also explored the notion of boundary, threshold, place of rest, and place of arrival (destination). This project also introduced me to the “quality” of space and the notion of “use” at a basic level.

After this I choose the activity of getting a taxi (calling it, opening the door, and sitting down) I observed this movement through diagramming in plan and elevation view at ½ inch scale. Lastly, I overlaid all the movements to create a single composition which reflects the complete range of motion for the activity.

Motions of Flagging a Taxi

|Masters A Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Kerry Coyne & Jeffrey Leclair Fall 2008|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |6|


Sketches for an Installation of Vegetated Stool or Desk

Design Sketches for Pull Down Seating Near the Harvard Square Bus Stop

schematic design The three photos on this page are from my observations of people in Harvard Square. Through these particular photographs I analyze the motions of the human body and sketched out a design that could enhance the current environment that they were occupying. This was my first step towards establishing a system in which the space informs the body and visa verse. Sketches for a Sheltered Kiosk

The three designs I envisioned firstly represented a seating system (above) that would enhance the area around the bus stop. Secondly, I envisioned an installation of square vegetated cubes (upper right) that seemlessly were protruding out of the ground which could be utilized as a space container and fulfill the needs of a desk or a stool. Lastly, I viewed a kiosk with no weather protection and envisioned a foldable almost umbrella like canopy structure (right) which would allow for sales rain or shine.

|Masters A Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Kerry Coyne & Jeffrey Leclair Fall 2008|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |7|


modeling iterations The next step after making observations in Harvard Square and getting a grasp on the scale and motions of the human body, I was given the task of developing four different objects that could be utilized in a multitude of ways through manipulation of the object, such as, rotation of the object itself or a different range of positions and movements dependant of the occupier.

Object One

Object Two

Object Three

The exploration of modeling the four objects gave way to a heightened level of manipulation that the object influenced on the body. Each object is unique to itself but all have at least four possibilities that could either provide a space for shelter, relaxation, solitude, rest, thinking, prayer, etc... The simplicity of the forms gives way to a generalization of the multiple different ways of occupying the objects.

Object Four

|Masters A Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Kerry Coyne & Jeffrey Leclair Fall 2008|

Assemblies of All Objects

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |8|


Iteration Model 2 (Shelter) Iteration Model 4 (Verticals + Circulation)

The above sketch was the preliminary design of the iteration model shown below and was influenced by such vocabulary as shelter, relaxation, solitude, rest, thinking, prayer. The model is representative of certain elements that I pulled from the four objects shown on the previous page. This model was the final iteration in which I decided to move further with to produce a final design. Iteration Model 4 (Rest + Waiting)

Iteration Model 3 (Non-Regularity)

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT Working through models and sketches helped me explore the connection of abstract form and the human body. He four objects gave way to a heightened level of manipulation that the object influenced on the body. The last iteration model above is a unified collage of the respected parts in which I used to encompass different disciplines within the form. The simplicity of the form is now evolved from a 2D design into a simplified object and lastly, into a complex collaborative of all the previous explorations! |Masters A Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Kerry Coyne & Jeffrey Leclair Fall 2008|

Iteration Model 1 (Verticality)

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |9|


Vertical Circulation through an Array of Vertical Elements

Final Model Covered Area with Multiple Areas for Different Positions

the inhabitable wall final Design The overall goal of this project is to gain proportional relationships between all the members of the human body. After developing representational diagrams that indicate different objects and their effects on the human body, we invested spatial relationships through physical models at ½” scale. After analyzing and achieving a certain degree of scale in relation to anatomy, I have chosen to explore the concepts of meditation and rest as these activities would be engaged in an “inhabitable wall.” By using the concepts of rest and meditation, I begin to immediately visualize a huge connection between the two. This being that the atmosphere is very harmonious and the surfaces are comfortable. (Could this be expressed through the usage of planes?) The spatial qualities of a place to rest and a place to meditate can be synonymous. In fact, it is not the things that resemble each other that I want to portray but thing of differences and with this acknowledgement I want to converge these ideas together to blend in the different moods of such similar activities. I can imagine that my “inhabitable wall” would have a predominant cover to create a feeling of protection from the outside world. I also could imagine the fulcrum of the piece to be the backbone which will allow inhabitants to permeate from one end of the form to the other. As the transaction will occur, your environment will change from extreme comfort to abstract formations, which infers the movement from meditation to rest. A change in vertical circulation could also give a sense of floating for the individual. The surface treatment will be smooth and warm with soft tonal values. This creates the harmonious mood of the wall. As you travel through you could move up to an alcove under the shading device or underneath an overhang to feel secure and to rest. The options should be very linear and very distinct to give an immediate gesture to what the space if intended for.

|Masters A Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Kerry Coyne & Jeffrey Leclair Fall 2008|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |10|


The overall goal of this project was to gain proportional relationships between all the members of the human body and an environment to encompass the body. After analyzing and achieving a certain degree of scale in relation to anatomy, I have chosen to explore the concepts of meditation and rest as these activities would be engaged in an â&#x20AC;&#x153;inhabitable wall.â&#x20AC;? I then began to create a vocabulary for these activities such as, peaceful, quite serene, smooth, harmonious, and comfortable. The spatial qualities of a place to rest and a place to meditate can be synonymous. In fact, it is not the things that resemble each other that I want to portray but thing of differences. As my environment changes I intend to create a transaction from comfort to suitable, which infers the transition from meditation to rest. A change in vertical circulation could also give a sense of floating and that a journey upwards might symbolize a need for higher mental awareness in the state of meditation. The options should be very linear and very distinct to give an immediate gesture to what the space was intended for.

|Masters A Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Kerry Coyne & Jeffrey Leclair Fall 2008|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |11|


project three: 6 Weeks newbury street art gallery - final project

Fables of Faubus

During this project, I worked at interpreting six musical â&#x20AC;&#x153;songsâ&#x20AC;? at an abstract in which I was assigned to express in 2D what I was feeling via the musical notes and rhythms. This exploration was appealing to me because I both enjoy music and art. I feel that the both really do go together and have significant influences toward one another. One this page I explored six pieces of music and let my emotions at the time move my hands across the paper. The two works on the bottom and right side of the page are the most expressive pieces that I enjoyed and choose to move forward with them. This project gave me a grasp on interpreting a non tangible element and using that as an inspiration to form something new.

Metamorphisis Five

Music in 12 Parts (right) + Piano Phase (above)

1000 Airplanes

Drumming Part Two

The two pieces above and to the right were chosen due to my liking of the particular musical notes that I was influenced by at the time. For Music in 12 Parts I felt the beat and tone of the notes and tried to mimic some consistency with my hand. As the notes began to change the strokes of my hand began to transform as well. After repeating this pattern throughout the song I went back and implemented color to emphasize specific parts that had a similar tonal value from the music. In the Piano Phase piece my technique was a lot more playful and colorful. The keys of the piano sounded like sparatic small explosions and when I heard this note I scored an oval on the page. I then went back and monitored the scale of the note and applied the star like diameter with respect to the levels of the notes. The colors were chosen to influence fireworks and seemed to go quite well together. The layering and blending of the coloration was the final touch I did to the piece.

|Masters A Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Kerry Coyne & Jeffrey Leclair Fall 2008|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |12|


Music in 12 Parts Revised + Response Model (upper left) The transformation of this piece into a hard lined drawing was a lot more dynamic than the piece below. The usage of three colors was broken down into segments. A more playful analysis of the original piece influenced the predominant background line voids. The model was made of plastic stripes that were arranged onto a backing and reflected the playfulness of the lines three dimensionally in a vertical direction.

Piano Phase Revised + Response Model (bottom right) When beginning to hard line this drawing I took a similar approach and began with my compass and started with the different sizes and placements of the ovals. From there I dissected them into twelve equal parts which began to for the arms of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;star.â&#x20AC;? Lastly, I layered the colored rays to give some depth. As for my model I wanted to reflect this star like explosive quality from multiple view points, in which I used black + white foam core to intertwine and cross the pieces to create a similar chaotic atmosphere.

Moving Onward After deciding to move further with developing the two pieces on the previous page, the next assignment was to transform the pieces into a drafted hard lined artwork. After this we took the 2D interpretation and transformed them into a physical 3D interpretive model. |Masters A Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Kerry Coyne & Jeffrey Leclair Fall 2008|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |13|


Final Model for Art Piece

NEWBURY GALLERY To summarize my point of departure and conceptual integration into the gallery design. I first began to consider what had to remain constant on the existing site. This included the Newbury frontage, lower entry to the adjacent buildings, natural lighting to the adjacent structures interiors, rear circulation and access, and acceptable building heights due to shading. Other considerations included solar gain along the Newbury axis, setbacks for a green space and skewing of the street facing facade. My design became based upon a piece of art that was influenced from Steve Reich’s “Piano Phase.”The vocabulary of the art piece may have been viewed as transition, rigid, migration, diffusion, transparency, void, fluid, defragment, extend, linear and overlap. I choose to explore the transition from fluidity to rigidity.

Initial Diagram Displaying a Transition

Irregularity in the Form

|Masters A Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Kerry Coyne & Jeffrey Leclair Fall 2008|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |14|


newburystreetsiteanalysis

Density and Vegetation Analysis of the Surrounding Areas

Site Plan Showing the Differences in Elevation

Massing Areas of Adjacent Buildings

Site Collage

|Masters A Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Kerry Coyne & Jeffrey Leclair Fall 2008|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |15|


site model The location of our site was directly across from the BAC on Newbury Street. First entering the Masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Program this was one of the most helpful and detailed site models I have crafted. The usage of the model helped me further visualize my designs in a physical pretense. I also, was able to gain a better understanding of the grade changes that was occurring around our site as well as some of the shadows that would be cast by the adjacent structures. Overall the model became a critical part toward presenting my final design model.

Aerial View Including The BAC

Looking Down Newbury Street Toward Fenway Park

Model of Site Including Sonsie Restaurant

Aerial View of the Vacant Site Area

|Masters A Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Kerry Coyne & Jeffrey Leclair Fall 2008|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |16|


study models + iterations design by physical models Just beyond the half way point of the semester I found it easier and quick to explore design ideas through physical models, even if they are not at a scale the proportions gives way to a great perception of what could be. The models on this page were reflective of certain vocabulary that I wanted to explore. My iteration models were a combination of the vocabulary that was conceptually modeled. The final iteration model was a critical breakthrough point in which I based the rest of the studio design from. It also is representative of the site footprint as well as vertical circulation and wall orientations.

Study Model One with an Influence on Cubes

Study Model Four with an Influence on Combining Curves + Linear Qualities

Study Model Two with an Influence on Rigid + Linear

Study Model Three with an Influence on Curves + Ovals

Iteration Model One with a focus on Fluid + Circulation

Final Iteration Model

|Masters A Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Kerry Coyne & Jeffrey Leclair Fall 2008|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |17|


design approach + Developement Stemming from my final iteration model I choose to use the model and convert it to a 2D image. This enabled me to implement various design strategies such as, day lighting, parking, interior circulation, exhibition areas, leveling, skylights, reflectance and exterior elements. The sketches and trace overlays are representative of these conceptual explorations.

Design Footprint Diagrams Leading from the Iteration Model from the Previous Page

|Masters A Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Kerry Coyne & Jeffrey Leclair Fall 2008|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |18|


Hand Drafted Site Plan + Roof Plan

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |19|


final presentation drawings All of my final presentation drawings were all done with ink on mylar. The front + rear elevations show the usage of my final art model as my curtain wall facade. The elevations also helped to distinguish the heights of the surrounding structures in relation to the gallery. As for the floor plans they both display the interior ramping of the irregular circulation paths. All together there are three levels to the interior spaces.

Newbury Street Facing Facade

|Masters A Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Kerry Coyne & Jeffrey Leclair Fall 2008|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |20|


The sections displayed on this page are indicated in the floor plans on the previous page. They both are visually help represent the three levels of the galleries exhibition spaces. Another visual element that is seen in section and not in elevation is the distance that I recessed the structure back from Newbury Street. This added for a small bridge to the main entrance as well as a small lower level garden to allow tress to grow up and through.

|Masters A Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Kerry Coyne & Jeffrey Leclair Fall 2008|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |21|


Zoomed View of Models Interior Displaying the Various Levels (above) Snapshot of the Rear Facade of the Physical Model (below)

final gallery model In the snap shot above, of my final design model. I wanted to capture a great amount of natural light and allowed for this to enter the structure through the glass facade + angled skylights. The three tiers of floors that are accessible from a ADA ramp, were chosen by the amount and type of art work it would exhibit. Another reason for the decreasing levels within the gallery was intended to provide a continuous visual connection from all points of the interior spaces. This would allow for a much more exacerbated openness to the space.

|Masters A Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Kerry Coyne & Jeffrey Leclair Fall 2008|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |22|


Hand Rendered Perspective Looking Toward Gallery From the BAC

Masters A Studio Fall 2008

Doug Reviewing My Design Process

Harvard Reviewer Critiquing My Gallery Design

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |23|


II

FOUNDATION DESIGN MASTER’S B1 STUDIO TRANSFER Duration: 16 Weeks Spring 2007 Instructor: Joseph Krupinski Foundations Studio is a year-long course designed to introduce students to the materials, techniques, language, concepts and processes of making, using and thinking about Art. Unlike many other art courses, Foundations Studio is an experience where learning comes not only from the projects and their results but also from the interaction among the entire group of students - actions, opinions and participation of fellow students becomes an important part of the art experience and learning. The basic premise of Foundations Studio is twofold: First, this course explores art and design as an experimental practice where invention and investigation play essential roles. Instead of considering introductory level art/design merely as a discipline for producing “solutions” to problems, students will engage in a process of rich qualitative research and reflection. Second, the principal context for this course is current practices in contemporary art/design, which is a vast arena of diverse styles, techniques, materials, subjects, forms, purposes, and aesthetic traditions. Thus developing a “foundation” in art and design entails developing an awareness of contemporary art-making practices, which in turn reflects the major changes of thinking in both art and society in recent years. Through rigorous formal experimentation in two and three dimensions and examining the terms and concepts of visual artists, students will be challenged to create imaginative and open responses to the question of how he connects visually to the world at large. The course aims to keep a healthy tension and balance between formal concepts, hands-on skills, imagination, and critical thinking. In addition to the studio practice, lectures, readings, and visits to museums and galleries provides a framework for understanding contemporary practice in art and design.


richard meier the smith house, darien, ct Precedent Studies - Learning from the Masters. An analytical look into Richard Meierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Smith House. Sharpening our hand drafting skills, learning to analyze spaces and relationships in a broad sense.

Richard Meierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first project as an Architect was a private residence designed for his parents in 1963. His second project, the Smith House, was another private residence which was to be located in Darien, Connecticut. Completed in 1967, the Smith House established Meier as a well known Architect. The Design of the residence was driven by the separation of public and private spaces. The private side, where the family slept and cooked, is on the entrance side of the building. An opaque wall interrupted by a few simple windows separates the private from public areas, the rest of which is enclosed entirely by glass. The public side of the home overlooks the Long Island Sound.

Drafted Floor Plans

Site Plan

DESIGN STUDIO + the smith house We first began the studio by getting familiar with the Smith House through replicating the site, floor plans, sections + elevations all by hand drafting them. This was the beginning stages of the building analysis. Beyond the hand drafting I also developed the residence in Autodesk Revit 2008 (left) and was able to see more easily how the heights and structural components of the building all worked as a singular entity! Exploded Axonometric

Revit Model of the Smith House

|Masters B1 Studio Transfer| UMass Amherst B.F.A. Design Joseph Krupinski Spring 2007 16 Weeks|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |25|


PROJECT I found it important to see how each Architect had a different style or graphical expression in terms of presentation drawings. The next step involved was analyzing the inner composition of the residence and how each programmatic element came together. It was purely a decoding exercise of the design thinking process of the Architectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. This was helpful in understanding the spatial attributes and qualities of the interior.

Long Section

Front Facade

Smith House Component Breakdown

DRAFTING the smith house

Short Section

We first began the studio by getting familiar with the first stage focused on the basic drafting skills in architecture. We were asked to copy the architectural drawings for the Meier home. This helped us develop our hand drafting skills as well as, to get an acquainted with the spaces and program layout. It was also quite interesting to observe how other classmates of mine worked out the same types of drawings for different structures. Axanometric Perspective Rear Facade

|Masters B1 Studio Transfer| UMass Amherst B.F.A. Design Joseph Krupinski Spring 2007 16 Weeks|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |26|


FURTHER ANALYSIS + BREAKDOWN We first began the studio by getting familiar with the Smith House through replicating the site, floor plans, sections + elevations all by hand drafting them. This was the beginning stages of the building analysis. Beyond the hand drafting I also developed the residence in Autodesk Revit 2008 (left) and was able to see more easily how the heights and structural components of the building all worked as a singular entity!

First Floor

Second Floor

Sectional Grid

Third Floor

Large Trees and Water Elements

Drive ways, Paths and Structures

All Similar Colors Represent Room Size and Room Symmetry

|Masters B1 Studio Transfer| UMass Amherst B.F.A. Design Joseph Krupinski Spring 2007 16 Weeks|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |27|


Facade + Section Overlay

Floor Plan and Front Elevation Overlay

exhausted analysis continued Continuing further in my analysis I looked deeper and developed the morphology of the floor plan into five stages. Also, The structural breakdown of the buildings members + the revit model aided my understanding of the building envelope. Lastly, the overlay of facades and plans helped display the symmetry of the structure, as well as, where the envelope openings occur.

Horizontal Structural Components Morphology of the Floor Plan

|Masters B1 Studio Transfer| UMass Amherst B.F.A. Design Joseph Krupinski Spring 2007 16 Weeks|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |28|


Symmetry

Site Plan Grid Network

Horizontal Section Overlay

Basically at this stage of the studio, I have simply constructed quite a few gestural diagrams that reveal the notion of the design intent and more accurately reflect the architectural qualities. In other words, I have created maps of the design to be clearly readable by others.

Primary Circulation Circulation Overlay

Entry

Structure

Shifting of the Rectangles

Approach Overlay

Interior Walls Overlay

Mirroring of the Plan

|Masters B1 Studio Transfer| UMass Amherst B.F.A. Design Joseph Krupinski Spring 2007 16 Weeks|

Structural Detail

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |29|


modeling my analysis 3/27/2007 After completing my first extensive analysis of design school, I was instructed to represent the focal points of my analysis through a physical model. The points include: stacking, verticality, translucence, symmetry, circulation and lastly, balance.

|Masters B1 Studio Transfer| UMass Amherst B.F.A. Design Joseph Krupinski Spring 2007 16 Weeks|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |30|


Circulation + Similarity

Verticality

The efforts of getting an in-depth understanding of the Smith House through analysis, aided my further design development of a study center that reflects the qualities of Richard Meierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Smith House. Such instances are highlight on this page through my analysis model.

Symmetrical

Three Level Stacking

Translucence

|Masters B1 Studio Transfer| UMass Amherst B.F.A. Design Joseph Krupinski Spring 2007 16 Weeks|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |31|


final project Program introduction + breakdown To the far right is the programmes of both the intended requirements of the study center, as well as, the Smith House. The analysis of the house and the establishing of a vocabulary from my analysis help to create the study model which gave way to extending the principles of the model into the study center design. The grouping of private and public, shared and non shared spaces, large and small spaces, and indoor and outdoor areas all played a key role in the beginning of designing the study center.

The early design development started with a comparison and grouping of the both my intended program requirements + the program of the Smith House.

To the left are some preliminary design adjacencies in which I choose to develop further. I found this type of design strategy to be a successful way to group all the commonalities of the program in a sufficient way, well before the project even begins to look like a building.

|Masters B1 Studio Transfer| UMass Amherst B.F.A. Design Joseph Krupinski Spring 2007 16 Weeks|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |32|


Preliminary Design Sketch

design iteration one After the establishment of some vocabulary and the breakdown of the programs, this has led to the development of my first massing model, as seen on this page. In plan I have tried to achieve stabilization + balance, which also includes the site plan and the relativity of the built areas. I feel that in this iteration I have not established a great representation of stacking and verticality which were some of the points made from the precedence study. Floor Plan Breakdown

Foamcore Massing Model Circulation Paths

Public/Private Spaces

Views With a waterfront site plan I developed the floor plan to have an â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lâ&#x20AC;? shaped wing which could establish additional views towards the ocean. A relatively low stack for the structure will allow for the ocean breeze to flow up the hill and over the structure. Sketchup Massing Models of First Iteration

|Masters B1 Studio Transfer| UMass Amherst B.F.A. Design Joseph Krupinski Spring 2007 16 Weeks|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |33|


Preliminary Design Iteration Sketch Through Final Design Sketch

design development through iterations As my design process continues, I have begun to develop a variety of changes that have all become an offspring of my previous analysis of the Smith House. My main concerns were to separate the public and private areas while maintaining all views open towards the ocean.

Design Sketches + Model

|Masters B1 Studio Transfer| UMass Amherst B.F.A. Design Joseph Krupinski Spring 2007 16 Weeks|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |34|


richard meier study center 3/26/2007 “The Richard Meier Study Center” Richard Meier is one of the most well known and influential architects of the twentieth century. This study center will be flooding with everything and anything that has to do with Richard Meier. It will be a structure that documents his works throughout his life time up to the present. There will be instructors teaching architecture through Meier’s eyes and historians that will give the history of his life and the work he has created: almost like a summer crash course workshop, only relating to Meier. There will be a fully stocked library of his sketches, models, and other useful documentation, as well as, lecture halls, where Richard Meier can come in on his way to NYC and give a speech. The lecture halls will also host annual architectural design competitions, and might also encourage other famous architects to come and speak about Meier. The study center is going to be located on the exact location, side by side, with Meier’s second design that made him famous, “The Smith House.” This gives a great advantage to the people affiliated with the school because it has an actual historical building designed by Meier on site. The study center, entry drive, and smith house all will be the “complex” of Richard Meier! Google Earth Ariel Site Satellite Photograph

Reformed Analysis My analysis of the Smith House has been reformed and expressed in two different study models. I used a layout that relates to the adjacent structures as well as the site it self having a relation to the lake on one side. I decided to use my own form of circulation and the use of public and private areas, just as I analyzed in the Smith House. The tan pieces display the circulation throughout the areas of each layout. The black areas represent the structures that are below grade. I took the priority points in my Smith House analysis and reformed them into these new configurations that are made up of four main areas!

Perspective from Patio into the Central Core

|Masters B1 Studio Transfer| UMass Amherst B.F.A. Design Joseph Krupinski Spring 2007 16 Weeks|

Final Stage Gestural Sketches

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |35|


Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |36


|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |38|


|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |39|


FOUNDATION DESIGN MASTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S B2 STUDIO Duration: 16 Weeks Spring 2009 Instructors: Shonali Rajani + Luis Riobueno Foundation Design B-2 builds on the lessons of B-1 by providing students with the opportunity to engage in two complete design projects that differ from the boathouse project in small but significant ways. The first project involves the design of a small news stand in the middle of a dense urban setting (Harvard Square, Cambridge), while the second involves a more complex program for an aviary and visitorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; center located in a wooded, ex-urban site (the Arnold Arboretum in the Jamaica Plain neighborhood of Boston). In these projects, students are encouraged to carefully consider the varying site conditions through a rigorous site analysis, but additional emphasis is placed on considering issues such as building structure & enclosure, historical & cultural contexts, and theoretical frameworks which students have not yet engaged in a substantive manner. By the end of this course, students are expected to have developed the critical thinking and making skills required to translate these generative ideas

III


PROJECT 0: TECTONIC STRATEGIES (WEEK 1)

FOCUS

As this is a design studio, the focus on the relationship between structure, material and scale with conceptual ideas and the language of design.

Through my defined Unit I am exploring the actions of sliding, layering (stacking) and wrapping of the Joint. I plan to explore these verbs on a micro and macro level of interaction. My Unit (building block) consists of four unique components that slide together to create the form.

I will seek to uncover how engaging in the design process through the lens of tectonic concepts can yield innovative implications for form, space, and design in your architectural proposals. Focusing on both conceptual and representational issues, I will be expected to exhibit rigorous and well crafted graphic output in a necessarily iterative process to discover concepts, ideas and explicate my design proposals.

Goals

My Unit as stated is a building block and this block does not become modified. It simply remains untouched and only begins to create space through the massing of it onto different systems. As an aggregated assembly I used my unit in multiple ways to achieve different assemblies that could be applied to different functions and programs.

1 Develop an understanding of how a constructive assembly expresses a tectonic idea. 2 Further grasp how a tectonic idea can be abstracted and how it can operate as strategy across multiple scales.

Materiality The quality or state of being physical; the elements, constituent parts, or substances of which something is composed or can be made; matter that has qualities which give it individuality and by which it may be categorized; something that may be worked into a more finished form; relating to or concerned with the physical.

|Masters B2 Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Shonali Rajani + Luis Riobueno Spring 2009|

Tectonics The poetics of construction; the logic of forces involved and the relationship between elements that produce an organized system of structure, suggesting an architectural design.

Preliminary Detail Analysis Diagrams

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |41|


Unit One at the Human Scale

Unit Scale An indication of the relationships between things; a proportion between two sets of dimensions; a distinctive relative size, extent, or degree.

Unit One at the Building Scale

|Masters B2 Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Shonali Rajani + Luis Riobueno Spring 2009|

One of the individuals or groups that together constitute a whole. One of the parts or elements into which a whole may be divided or analyzed.

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |42|


EXPLORATION: CONSTRUCTIONAL APPROACHES, UNIT TO ASSEMBLY (WEEK 2)

Assembly Unit One Model

Assembly Unit One Model

I developed two specific iterations of my earlier work in order to form a clearer logic of construction / assembly. I have chosen one of my detail interpretations and investigated itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s potential as a component or unit, capable of participating within, or directly engaging similar units in, a larger, composite assembly. To further manipulate my exploration I will try and clarify, transform, develop, reinvent, redesign, edit, abstract, etc. For this next iteration I have aimed to first clarify your central tectonic idea, and then to speculate (through making and drawing) on how the idea can be further articulated, tested, or challenged by its expanded role as part of a larger assembly.

Unit One at the Wall Scale

|Masters B2 Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Shonali Rajani + Luis Riobueno Spring 2009|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |43|


Module B

Exploration B Extruded Circularly

Module A separable component, frequently one that is interchangeable with others, for assembly into units of differing size, complexity, or function. Through my exploration of the new module B I investigated how the module would connect to each other and then work as an assembly. I found that a few of the components shapes create some limitations for a dynamic assembly.

Multiplication of Exploration B

Assembly The act of constructing something, involving the deliberate agency of a designer. A group of parts (units or modules) that are constructed together via an explicit logic (a series of operations) to form a selfcontained apparatus. |Masters B2 Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Shonali Rajani + Luis Riobueno Spring 2009|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |44|


Module A Multiplication of Exploration A

Apparatus An integrated group of materials or devices used for a particular purpose. A group or system of units, modules &/or assemblies that collectively perform a specific function or process.

|Masters B2 Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Shonali Rajani + Luis Riobueno Spring 2009|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |45|


Form A at the Floor and Wall Joint

Final Assembly of Module A

In addition, explore how my tectonic idea might start to engage or define threedimensional space. I began to test + transform my assembly by â&#x20AC;&#x153;turning corners.â&#x20AC;? - the joint between a horizontal and vertical plane (e.g. floor to wall) - the joint between 2 vertical planes (inside or outside corner) - the joint between a vertical and horizontal plane (e.g. wall to ceiling/roof )

Form A at the Floor and Wall Joint

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |46|


PROJECT 0: TECTONIC STRATEGIES WEEK 3 APPLICATION: AN APPARATUS Once again I explored + speculated how my assembly system might be employed at various scales. My tectonic strategy was manipulated to operate at three different scales – building, human, joint detail. The next step of the project was to create an apparatus with a specific function or purpose, this assignment focuses on developing the relational implications of your project. In other words, instead of a “window”, create an “apparatus for viewing” or instead of a “bridge”, invent an “apparatus enabling crossing or spanning.” This assignment also suggests an opportunity for the designer to imagine what the construction could be at multiple levels. Lastly, this will lead toward exploring how my tectonic idea can start to define “program,” and also participate in space at a human scale. Some concepts investigations of my apparatus may include: entry, threshold, inside/outside, transition, boundaries, passing through, pausing, interaction, separation, bringing together, etc. With this exploration, my apparatus must define space at the human scale. In essence, in this exercise I have begun to “program” my assembly, and also to engage with issues of human habitation. For some final considerations of the assignments I will now begin imbuing the elements of my apparatus with material qualities. The materials should behave in a way that reflects the bending, folding, building, supporting the constituent parts of your units, modules, assemblies. Moderately Modified Apparatus + Component Breakdown

New Apparatus

Exploded Axanometric of Apparatus

|Masters B2 Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Shonali Rajani + Luis Riobueno Spring 2009|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |47|


The Apparatus at the Wall Scale (Structural Column)

The Apparatus as a Satchel Buckle

While exploring different assemblies and purposes with my new apparatus I found that Scale had become a large factor in determining my usages at the wall, building, and human level. This was a also, largely due to the rigidity of the apparatus’s components which in a way dictated it’s amount of flexibility and manipulation capacity. The arrival of the new modified unit was driven from my previous exploration of the apparatus. I found it extremely difficult to connect the “joints” into a structurally sound assembly. Therefore this led to my manipulation of the components in order to establish a better module for “connection.” My long tapered linear element transformed into a smaller rigid rectangle which was more suitable for connecting to other elements. The Apparatus as a Floatable Path

|Masters B2 Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Shonali Rajani + Luis Riobueno Spring 2009|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |48|


Overlapping and Cross Assembly of Unit

When further exploring the concepts of layering and stacking along with sliding. I imagined each individual unit at the scale of an apartment. The advantage of the rectangular component allowed for the structural support and connectedness of three other units, which formulated an apparatus for living. When all was said an done I imagined my apparatus as part of the old Corbusian City. Stacking of the Module at the Building Scale

The Origional Corbusian City (above) + The Corbusian City Modified (Right)

|Masters B2 Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Shonali Rajani + Luis Riobueno Spring 2009|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |49|


The Unit as a Tectonic System Creates the Structure as well as the Skin

PROJECT 1: final tectonic system

Tectonic System at the Building Scale (section)

Turning the Corner Creating a Joint

Arriving at my final iteration of my Tectonic System I was driven to establish a unit that was focused around the concept of “buckle”. Other key words that relate include: overlap and sliding. I kept pushing these action words in my designs because I felt they could lead me to an apparatus that had “no limitations.” In other words, I wanted to establish a system that was multifaceted. The result was another manipulation of scale which lead to using the unit at an apartment scale as well as a wall scale. This page shows the layering of these two scales which then become the structure and the skin.

|Masters B2 Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Shonali Rajani + Luis Riobueno Spring 2009|

Concept Study Model

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |50|


Interior Perspective from an Apartment Looking Through the Tectonic Skin

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |51|


PROJECT 1: ARNOLD ARBORETUM PAVILLION Week 4: Site Documentation + Analysis of peter’s hill The Arboretum is set apart from the city’s dense urban fabric – a naturalistic refuge not too far from the urban center. It is bordered by multiple Boston neighborhoods, close to downtown, and accessible by car and public transit. 1. Walking the Arboretum: As an introduction to the Arboretum, I visited the site and explored the Hunnewell Visitor Center at the Arborway Gate, and the Pavilion on Linden Path. I observed how these facilities behave in terms of their scale, interaction with visitor, interaction with the ground plane and the way they physically engaging the entry points and the path. All of this observation was documented in my sketchbook in which you will see some examples. 2. Documenting the Site: For the studio we will be working with the portion of Boston’s Arnold Arboretum known as Peter’s Hill, the area south of Bussey Street. Based on my tectonic concept from Project 0, choose the site that helps further define your investigation. After observing both sites, I choose site #1 because of its relatively low elevation change and the amount of area that was not vegetated. Another reasoning I found was that the primary circulation of visitors goes along the path counter clockwise which runs parallel to site one. After establishing my site area I began site documentation through mapping, isolating and recording major conditions impacting the site. While also, considering my tectonic concepts and how they could relate to the present site.

Introducing the apparatus To jump start the design process I choose one notable ‘moment’ within the site and tried to understand the relationships that created a compelling spatial condition. I used many ideas and design iterations to try and establish a “kits of parts.” For example, the interplay of: pattern of trees + gentle slope + water = unique threshold condition. Lastly, through physical models I began to introduce my concept of “buckling” onto the site.

Sketchbook Content Showing Sites 1 + 2

Sketchbook Content Showing Site Conditions + Arboretum Location

Peter’s Hill + Site One Are in Yellow

Documentation The organized collection of records; any communicable material (such as text, video, audio, etc., or combination thereof ) used to explain some attributes of an object or system

Site Photographs Displaying Elevation Changes

|Masters B2 Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Shonali Rajani + Luis Riobueno Spring 2009|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |52|


Sketchbook Diagram Site Documentation Including: Project Boundary Vehicular Circulation Pedestrian Circulation Water Elements Sun Paths

Circulation

Wind Strengths

Site Steepness

Densities of Forestry

Analysis An investigation of the component parts of a whole and their relations in making up the whole; the abstract separation of a whole into its constituent parts in order to study the parts and their relations.


The first implementation I applied onto the site began with a re-evaluation of my unit from Project O. This resulted in a simplification of the original four components into just two. The next step was to continue the original path + circulation by allowing it to cut the corner and flow between the new structure. This resulted in a separation of spaces to allow minimal damage to the existing site conditions.

Existing Site Materiality

Two Component Unit

Leventritt Open Pavilion Sketch

PROJECT 1: ARNOLD ARBORETUM (Week 5) NEW FACILITIES FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION Last year, the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University submitted its proposed 10-year Institutional Master Plan (IMP) to the Boston Redevelopment Authority. The Arboretum has categorized its programmatic and facility needs into three core areas: Research, Horticulture, and Public Education. You are asked to submit a design proposal for three or more small-scale facilities under the Public Education component of the Arboretum’s long-range plan. Since the main visitor’s services center will remain at the Hunnewell Building at the main gate, you might consider these new facilities on Peter’s Hill as ‘satellite’ components serving the southern portion of the Arboretum grounds. My next task was to develop a site strategy and design proposal for the deployment of these facilities across the Peter’s Hill site. Additionally, the client has stipulated that no single structure exceed 1,500 sf net area as they want to keep the scale of the project down, and to minimize the buildings’ impact on the site. It will be up to you to determine the distribution of program across the different facilities or structures.

|Masters B2 Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Shonali Rajani + Luis Riobueno Spring 2009|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |54|


Tectonic Idea Sketches Reflecting the “Track + Buckle” Concept model iterations (1-6) were all based upon my origional concept of “buckle” with consideration of visual connectivity, circulation + path, as well as, sheltered and nonsheltered. These models could fit in the palm of my hand and were very helpful in selecting a system/layout that could reflect a suitable design for my tectonic strategy.

Tectonic Strategy My tectonic idea will undoubtedly evolve based upon your explorations from Project 0, the goals of the IMP, and my analysis of the site. Similarly, how might my approach to the program result from the lens of my tectonic strategy? Assignment 1. Transformation / development of apparatus to define and engage program.What is the role of your apparatus? Does it create relationships or boundaries between different programs, highlight adjacencies or emphasize containment, define interior vs. exterior, etc? What activities do your apparatus encourage or make possible, both inside and outside? |Masters B2 Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Shonali Rajani + Luis Riobueno Spring 2009|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |55|


To the right is the chosen conceptual iteration model that I wanted to implement my tectonic ideas further with. The qualities of the model that I enjoyed, which relate to my “track + buckle “concept would be the slender elongated feel. Also the division of massing (space) where program can begin to fill in (buckle). Lastly, would be the track/ path which has a nice curved form that moves through both interior and exterior.

Final Preliminary Conceptual Model

All starting from my origional force diagram to the upper left. I went through a series of trace overlays in order to develop the spacial proportions and circulation qualities that I wanted to schieve. Lastly, I began to lay the final force diagram/ 2D massing (bottom left) onto the site, being able to analyze the topography as well as providing a new transition.

Preliminary force diagram of Concept Model + a Section Diagram Representing the “Buckle”

Program - Entry area/reception: 110 sf - Exhibit space: 1,500 sf total - Permanent - Temporary - Two small toilets, 1 HC - Classrooms: - Large 800 sf - Small 500 sf - Offices for staff - Single/director’s 150 sf - Shared/staff (2) 200 sf - Meeting area/conference 250 sf - Storage 150 sf - Circulation: as required

PROJECT 1: ARNOLD ARBORETUM (Week 7) TRANSLATION & SYNTHESIS: FULL ITERATION The purpose is to synthesize the tectonic strategy, site documentation, conceptual diagrams, and program analysis in order to translate them into a physical form. All this leads to a heightened understanding if you take the time to do some detailed program investigations. I began to research, analyze and document your interpretation of the program. Formulate a way to understand the project’s proposed uses, their relationship to each other, and how the sloped site can be used as an advantage to this end. The organizational diagrams show the programmatic relationships that I established within each massing and through the voids between the structures themselves. The sectional diagram is used to show the programmatic distribution, overlap, adjacencies, etc, and relationship to the ground plane.

|Masters B2 Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Shonali Rajani + Luis Riobueno Spring 2009|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |56|


This page displays a more definitive site analysis + representation of the project site. The sections shown above were very helpful in the decision making of picking a site. Below is a top view of my physical site model of Peter’s Hill.

Site Model Including Peter’s Hill at 1/32”

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |57|


As for my final floor plans I decided to incoporate the usage of low emmiting materials and colors. The pathe changes from a pervious exterior paver to a stone interior which is surrounded by bamboo for the interior of the gallery. The roof displayed in green, is made of steel metal seam. As you can see from the plan above I wanted to eliminate the idea of a large central structure and decided to use two smaller areas as my anchor points of the path. They both create balance and symmetry while still allowing a visual line through all three structures. This line is represented by the Section Line A, which is displayed on the next page.

|Masters B2 Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Shonali Rajani + Luis Riobueno Spring 2009|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |58|


PROJECT 1: ARNOLD ARBORETUM (Week 8) INTERIOR STUDY: INSIDE TO OUTSIDE The final issue I considered forthe arboretum project was itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interior space â&#x20AC;&#x201C; as it relates to my tectonicstrategy, ideas about program, and the landscape outside. The surrounding site was a key element that I wanted to leave unharmed and if not add to through my design. The breaking of the program into three masses, information center, gallery + offices, and lastly an open pavilion, all aided the opportunity to improve and incoporate the surrounding vegetation. Lastly, the implementation of a visual connection as well as the continuation of path were other primary driving factors in my design process.

|Masters B2 Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Shonali Rajani + Luis Riobueno Spring 2009|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |59|


Visual Connectivity Via Glazing

Rear Elevation + Topography (below)

Rear Elevation

final model My final model both at 1/8” (above) and 1/16” (right) were the most helpful in regards to understanding the interior of the spaces. I give special thanks to Seth Coleman for his technical craft and for aiding me in building these models. The both are made of plexi, bass wood, and chipboard. Another design element that has internal and external meaning was the sloped room which goes from 9’ to 14’ in the rear side of the gallery structure. This was to allow for snow to fall of on the level area of the site and to allow an opening of the interior space as you enter, which leads you down the primary circulation path.

|Masters B2 Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Shonali Rajani + Luis Riobueno Spring 2009|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |60|


PROJECT 2: ARTERY CULTURAL CENTER, CHINATOWN (Week 10) SITE: Observation, Documentation, and Analysis The site for Project 2 is situated at the edges or convergence

of Boston’s Chinatown, Leather District, Downtown and the Central Artery (the “Big Dig”, Interstate 90, the “Surface Artery”). In contrast to the arboretum, this site is located right within the city’s urban fabric. It is both intimate (small in area and situated within a dynamic Boston neighborhood) as well as expansive (exposed to the surface artery, visually linked to downtown, close to transit, and only a few dozen feet above and away from Boston’s “Central Artery” - the submerged highway of Interstate 90). Its borders comprise many different conditions: a party wall with Ginza on one side, a ‘pocket park’ with a highway vent stack on another with a new urban plaza under construction, an intimate neighborhood street with a variety of commercial and residential uses, and a sidewalk exposed to fast moving traffic on a five-lane boulevard that feeds into the highway.

TECTONIC STRATEGY: Exploration /Follow-up/Next Iteration Similar to my assignment for project 1, I first began to analyze and document the present site condition and secondly, re-evaluate how my tectonic idea sonic idea might participate in the site at the same three scales from Project 0. 1) a building 2) an entryway 3) an urban façade strategy. These evaluations then become my proposal for where you want

Chinatown Park

Site Photograph Boston Chinatown Project Site

Below are a few studies that I did after I first visited the site. I used a sketch-up model of Chinatown and cut sections through the surrounding urban context. This was very helpful in determining the heights of the adjacencies and as to what scale my building might want to aim for.

Chinatown

Site

Leather District

to take my tectonic ideas from Project 1, and how I want to pursue them. This is like a clean slate, which leaves room for new iterations/ideas to be explored.

|Masters B2 Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Shonali Rajani + Luis Riobueno Spring 2009|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |61|


The image to the left reflects the density of the surrounding structures and establishes the (yellow) primary vehicular circulation and the (orange) secondary. The gold area represents South Station. Lastly, the above diagram gives us direction and understanding of all the surrounding places with a polulation of person. |Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |62|


Noon

9am

4pm 9am

4pm Noon

Because the site is located close to Downtown Boston, I felt it was critical to get an understanding of how people currently move about the site. Another key factor when it come to designing in a city, is the amount of shade that is cast down by the structures.

Urban Fabric + Artery

Entries to the Site

Maintaing Primary Views

|Masters B2 Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Shonali Rajani + Luis Riobueno Spring 2009|

Vehicular + Pedestrian Circulation Paths

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |63|


Concept Diagram Sketches

To the left side of the page is a diagram that represents the assigned program for the design of the cultural center. I color coded the list into a few categories that all relate to function. Next I broke all of the categories down into private and public sectors. This was a very similar process to my Design Studio B1 Transfer program analysis. The above sketches utilize the colors I applied to the program and used them to create some spatial arrangements by level. Below is the massing models done with sketchup.

Axanometric of the Urban Fabric

Boston Chinatown Project Site

Short Section of Massing Iteration 1

Concept Model Long Section of Massing Iteration 1

|Masters B2 Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Shonali Rajani + Luis Riobueno Spring 2009|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |64|


My site plan displaying the first floor was used to convey my idea of the artery continuation. The design idea I wanted to use was that of creating the cultural center as an anchor point to the artery. As you can see in the plan above, I have oriented the entries of the building to allow for the flow of people to enter and continue through the structure. The green space from the Chinatown park was then extended around my design to emphasis this continuation.

|Masters B2 Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Shonali Rajani + Luis Riobueno Spring 2009|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |65|


Third Floor

Second Floor

Component Diagram

First Floor

Basement

Program

Roof Deck Area

- Entry vestibule - Lobby/Reception/Tickets - Gallery/Exhibit space - Bathrooms - Storage 250 sf - Mechanical room 300 sf - Entry area 100 sf - Performance space 1,500 sf - ‘Backstage’ area 300 sf - Projection room 200 sf - Director’s office 200 sf - Small office 150 sf - Shared office for 2 200 sf - Conference room 250 sf - Kitchenette - Visiting artist lofts (3)x600 sf - Two means of egress - Additional rest rooms as required

PROJECT 2: ARTERY CULTURAL CENTER, CHINATOWN (Week 11) My final task for Project 2 this semester was to design a performance space affiliated with the Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center. The organization currently provides facilities for adult education, childcare, family services, youth programs, and recreation, among others. This new performance space is meant to expand the arts-related component of their programs by providing suitable spaces for performing arts, visual arts, along with artist housing. However, this small institution and building will also consider its audience, users and visitors to be from the greater Boston area reaching out beyond the immediate Chinatown neighborhood and community. The site’s location at an ‘edge’ condition makes it well-suited to support investigation of issues such as scale and boundary, which should be addressed in conjunction with ongoing explorations of my tectonic strategy.

|Masters B2 Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Shonali Rajani + Luis Riobueno Spring 2009|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |66|


Rear Elevation (Hudson Street)

Front Elevation (Albany Street)

Invisible Wall Rendering

Aerial Perspective with Detail on Guest Lofts

Longitudinal Section Emphasizing the Central Ramp

|Masters B2 Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Shonali Rajani + Luis Riobueno Spring 2009|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |67|


South Facing Elevation

North Facing Elevation

PROJECT 2: ARTERY CULTURAL CENTER, CHINATOWN Synthesis: Concept, Program, Site Concept & Tectonic Strategy: next iteration Continuing my investigations from last week by building a large-scale site model to use as a tool to deepen my understanding of the project. Considering my material choices carefully (in actuality and in its abstraction in the model), guided by clear tectonic logic. Other considerations include, the human interaction, tectonic expression, scale, light, materiality, views, access, etc.

Street Perspective from Artery

Front Facade Rendering

|Masters B2 Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Shonali Rajani + Luis Riobueno Spring 2009|

Green Roof Perspective

B2 Studio Spring 2009

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |68|


Renderings: Interior Second Floor (above), Main Entry (right), Perspective Towards the Artery (below)

|Alex Jeffrey Siekiersk |P|


final model The models shown on this sheet are of the highest caliber that I have been able to produce. I learned how to master the laser cutter and used it to my advantage. The accuracy and quality of the models made them very appealing. My overall site model was at 1/32” and the smaller zoomed in model was at 1/8.” I did an additional Artery model that emphasized my two anchor points: one being my cultural center and the other was the Zakim Bridge.

Final Building Model at 1/8”

Zakim Bridge Model

Larger Site Model at 1/32”

|Masters B2 Studio| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Shonali Rajani + Luis Riobueno Spring 2009|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |70|


IV

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text <style: cont text> Cum dolute do ero dignim zzrit pratuercil utet, conulla

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text <style: cont text> Cum dolute do ero dignim zzrit pratuercil utet, conulla ortismodio et wisi. Duis non henibh steel design student exerilit prat, quisl inim iure ea faccumcompetition acip ero odionsenibh et praestio exer sustie dui tetum nummodo lorper si onulla Duration: 13 weeks ortismodio et wisi. Duis non henibh exerilit prat, quisl inim iure

Spring 2009 Instructors: David Eccelston + Glen Hoffman

Category I â&#x20AC;&#x201C; LIFE CYCLE OF A SCHOOL will challenge architecture students to design a school for the 21st century that critically examines life cycle and proposes an innovative solution in steel. The problem of urban growth and decay is larger than an individual building. Therefore, architects should consider a total life cycle assessment approach to designing buildings so that they may be adaptable, flexible, and accommodate change. This project will allow students to explore many varied functional and aesthetic uses for steel as a building material. Steel is an ideal material for schools because it offers the a high strength to weight ratio and can be designed systematically as a kit of parts or prefabricated to allow for quicker construction times and less labor, thus reducing the cost of construction. Schools constructed in steel are more flexible and adaptable to allow for diversity of uses over the life of the facility.


Elementary School PROGRAM requirements

2009 life cycle of a school

Number of Children = 400-450 Recommended Site Size = 5-10 acres Front Office Entry Lobby = 500 s.f. Administrative Offices 2 @ 120 s.f. each = 240 s.f. Nurses Office = 150 s.f. Teacher’s Lounge = 500 s.f. Teacher’s Restrooms 2 @ 20 s.f. each = 40 s.f. PTA / Volunteer Room = 200 s.f Public Restrooms 2 @ 200 s.f. each = 400 s.f. Gathering Facilities Gym 50 x 84 = 4200 s.f. Cafeteria = 2000 s.f. Kitchen = 1000 s.f. Music = 500 s.f. Art = 500 s.f. Media = 500 s.f. Science = 500 s.f. Library = 2000 s.f. Classrooms 3 per grade @ 500 s.f. each = 10,500 s.f. Total Gross = 23,730 s.f. Total Net Square Feet Plus 10% Allowance For mechanical areas, circulation, structure, etc. 26,000 square feet CODE INFORMATION Refer to the International Building Code and the local zoning ordinance for information on parking requirements, height restrictions, set backs, easements, flood, egress, and fire containment. ADA is applicable for this competition. CONSTRUCTION TYPE The design project must be conceived in structural steel construction. A strategy should be considered that evaluates a method for taking advantage of steel’s properties and characteristics in order to conceptualize and propose a critical evaluation of the life cycle of an elementary school.

personal experience Overall I felt that working in a team orientated atmosphere was a great benefit to my education as a young professional. I was able to coordinate amongst my peers accordingly to get work completed on time. Everyone was excepting of ideas from a collective stand point. Most importantly, this was my first international competition and I felt it was a great overall experiences can’t wait for the next competition.

Circulatory Arteries + The Heart The dynamics of a Life Cycle may be interpreted in a multitude of ways. Our translation will focus towards a centralized plan encouraging all points to revert inwards representing a cycle. Theoretically this becomes a metaphor referring to the cycle, as a progression through a series of different stages of development. With this, the architecture is intended to express the idea of development and progression, with a focus on using structural steel. The proposed site is located on Western Avenue in Allston, which is a suburb of Boston, Massachusetts. Community was a focal point for connecting the life cycle of a school. The community involvement that we would like to attract is primarily attributed to the large population of Harvard University which is in close proximity of our site and has promoted constant community growth geared towards younger families and young professionals. The site and the demographics of the area influenced our design towards a clustering of communal spaces such as the cafeteria, library, gymnasium, and music room as a focal point to create an environment that will promotes positive interaction and healthy living conditions so that the occupants would want to make a pilgrimage later in life. Programmatically the cafetorium, also known as the “Heart”, gave way to expressing the internal connection towards nature. One may witness this while passing by the school and immediately become drawn toward the center because of the expressiveness of the steel materials and the type of glazing systems that allow a visual connection through the building. This connection extends over the large setback of the structure which creates a stress-free zone for vehicular circulation. This also allows for a south facing front, in order to harness solar gain by means of glazing on the front entry/ classrooms, trombe walls and green roofs. The second part of the building, “Artery” flows through the heart, allows for the interaction between children, faculty, and community to become seamless. The east and west wings of the school, consist of typical building construction systems that include columns and beams. The desire to create an open interactive space at the heart of the build introduced many design challenges. Different techniques were employed throughout this space, in order to create an effective dynamic environment. A large steel joist system allows for the opening of the double height mix used area. A tubular steel truss is vertically used as the main supports for the grand stair. The cafetorium space also utilizes cantilevered beams in order to support the surrounding pathways of the balcony. The roof cover over the space consists of a morphing truss system that decreases in size. Moving beyond the core, an opportunity was exploited to expose the structural steel members of the school through the exteriors of the building in order to express the guts through the architecture.

|Professional Practice| ACSA/AISC Competition Boston Architectural College David Eccelston + Glen Hoffman Spring 2009|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |72|


SITE The site for the competition is the choice of the student or Faculty Sponsor. The locations of the ACSA member institutions are diverse; however the program of a school facility is ubiquitous. It is recommended that students and faculty select sites that will foster a dialogue in their respective communities regarding the current state and future of school design and construction. Sites for schools should have access from a myriad of transportation options, be accessible on foot, and be safe. In addition, outdoor recreation, access to natural air and sunlight is important for children and should be considered in the development of the project. First Adjacency Diagram

Second Iteration Process Diagram + Plans

Final Conceptual Iteration Sketch (above) + Structural System Diagram (below)

COMPETITION timeline December 5, 2008 Registration Begins, Online February 9, 2009 Registrations Deadline May 6, 2009 Submission Deadline May 2009 Prize winners chosen Summer 2009 Competition Publication

STRUCTURAL STEEL

Overall Surrounding Urban Context of the Site

Steel should be used as the primary structural material with special emphasis placed on innovation in steel design. Structural steel offers a number of strengths in building design including high resiliency and performance under harsh and difficult conditions, (e.g., earthquakes and hurricanes) and offers the ability to span great distances with slenderness and grace. Steel can be shaped to achieve curved forms and can be erected quickly to meet tough construction schedules under almost any weather condition. Steel can be easily modified to satisfy the life cycle of a building including changing occupant requirements. Steel is the most recycled material in the world. Today structural steel is 97% recycled with the primary source of material being automobiles. It is the environmentally sound choice for a building material.

|Professional Practice| ACSA/AISC Competition Boston Architectural College David Eccelston + Glen Hoffman Spring 2009|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |73|


Orchard Gardens k-8 School Visit - Dorechester, MA I organized a site visit to a local school early in the design phase. The school visit was a great insider scoop on what the pros and cons are in some of the newer school buildings. This school also had a good amount of steel design which was great for reference and implementation into our own design process.

Second Floor Plan + Primary Circulation

Floor Plan Sketch of Kindergarten Classroom

Rear View of Cafeteria

Team 1 Speaking with the Principal Norman Townsend

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |74|


board one Focus was on setting up the design concepts and process. We briefly described the site and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s existing conditions. Included is both our parti diagram + life cycle diagram. Lastly, we included a finalized rendering along with the roof plan.

Alex Jeffrey Siekiersk |P


2

Legend

board two

THE “HEART”

Displays the majority of our 2D presentation drawings including: floor plans, sections, and elevations, as well as, concept sketches.

PRELIMINARY DESIGN SKETCH

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

1/32”:1’-0”

1/32”:1’-0”

LONGITUDENAL SECTION

REAR ELEVATION

1/32”:1’-0”

|Professional Practice| ACSA/AISC Competition Boston Architectural College David Eccelston + Glen1/32”:1’-0” Hoffman Spring 2009| FRONT ELEVATION

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |76|


board three This board out of all four has the most detail which was focused on conveying our structural system, hvac systems and steel exposure. All being displayed through sections and details.


board four The final board was intended to grab the judges attention with a lot of detailed rendering of our structure. There is an overall building section displaying all of the steel elements along with interior renderings.

|Professional Practice| ACSA/AISC Competition Boston Architectural College David Eccelston + Glen Hoffman Spring 2009|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |78|


V

ADDITIONAL STUDIO PROJECTS Final Boards Undergraduate Work


|Additional Studio Projects| UMass Amherst Design 5 Undergraduate B.F.A. Design Fall 2007|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |80|


|Additional Studio Projects| UMass Amherst Design 5 Undergraduate B.F.A. Design Fall 2007|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |81|


Restaurant Design This was the final design studio one project. It was an open program and the only restraints were the location and footprint of the structures. The footprint was a volume that was two floors high. This photographs display the suburban context of the surrounding environment. The sketches start to implement programmatic features that are required for a restaurant, such as, rest rooms, kitchens, seating, etc... The sketch on the bottom right is a rendering of what the exterior could possibly look like.

Ground Level Floor Plan

Basement Level

|Additional Studio Projects| UMass Amherst Design 1 Undergraduate B.F.A. Design Fall 2006|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |82|


VI ARCHITECTURE SKETCH PROBLEM #1 11.02.2008 Instructor: Ian F. Taberner The Architecture Sketch Problem is a one-day design exercise intended to introduce students to alternative and/or fundamental methods of approaching the work of design. The work of the Sketch Problem is completed in a communal studio setting, where students work under the direct supervision of a group of critics, and will sometimes involve collaboration as a means of encouraging students to learn from one another in an interactive design process. The Sketch Problem is graded on a Pass/ No Credit basis, with each student receiving an individualized written evaluation of his/her work.


DESIGN APPROACH My overall approach for the poet’s retreat as the preliminary design develops, would be focused around capturing the natural beauties of the site and to achieve a great degree of solar gain.

the client We are to design a space for a Poet as a retreat in a garden away from a primary residence. Design a room for contemplation and writing with another space for a restroom.

ADA Friendly

programme Include a raised floor/area/room for the poet’s space and bathroom. Provide a natural lighting solution for these spaces. All habitable spaces must be a minimum of three feet above the ground plane. Provide both stair and ramp accessibility to all spaces. The design of the bathroom must also be barrier free in configuration. the site The project is located in the region of Boston, Massachusetts on a level site. It is located on a flood plane and therefore all living areas must be a minimum of 3’-0” above grade.

Entry Ramp (Model: 1/2” = 1’-0” )

Day Lighting Into the Structure

|Alex Jeffrey Siekiersk |84|


Vaulted Roof

MODELING + Design ideas

Window Configurations

The design of my retreat was very intuitive exercise due to the codes that I learned and applied to the design of an ADA friendly structure. I never understood the details of wheelchair accessibility until I had to design with those requirements. The floor plan below was intended to be focus on an open plan. A large vaulted ceiling could help the interior become more accepting of light. The counters, desks, bathroom size and even window heights all were design in accordance to ADA. The open plan was also another way for the occupant to have full visual connections to the surrounding environments.

Bathroom

Deck

Wheelchair Ramp

Planters Open Study

Kitchen Floor Plan Roof Plan

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |85|


ARCHITECTURAL SKETCH PROBLEM 2 02.21.2009 Instructor: Ian F. Taberner The Architecture Sketch Problem is a one-day design exercise intended to introduce students to alternative and/ or fundamental methods of approaching the work of design. The work of the Sketch Problem is completed in a communal studio setting, where students work under the direct supervision of a group of critics, and will sometimes involve collaboration as a means of encouraging students to learn from one another in an interactive design process. The Sketch Problem is graded on a Pass/No Credit basis, with each student receiving an individualized written evaluation of his/her work. Students are required to pass three Sketch Problems.

I I V


Group Members

DESIGN APPROACH + CONCEPTS

Alex Siekierski Jeff Estes Danielle Haley Jeff Siegel Meryl Lissack Rodney Cudmore

Stemming from Sketch Problem #1, this project has the same client, program, and site. The twist was that instead of working on the design individually, we now were assigned into groups of six. This was the first time that Sketch Problem #2 has incorporated a group setting. The other difference was that we first had to get familiar with Buckminster Fuller as a person of innovative design, and spacifically his D4 house. The overall goal was to translate Fuller’s futuristic concepts and iterate them toward the present. Our design focus was then based on the cargo container and the possibility of creating portable, low budget house. Sort of like an RV we intended the container to be atacked with retractable areas to allow for an increase in square footage.

Cargo “Container“ Concept

Retractable Restroom

the client D4 House

We are to design a space for a Poet as a retreat in a garden away from a primary residence. Design a room for contemplation and writing with another space for a restroom.

programme Include a raised floor/area/room for the poet’s space and bathroom. Provide a natural lighting solution for these spaces. All habitable spaces must be a minimum of three feet above the ground plane. Provide both stair and ramp accessibility to all spaces. The design of the bathroom must also be barrier free in configuration.

the site The project is located in the region of Boston, Massachusetts on a level site. It is located on a flood plane and therefore all living areas must be a minimum of 3’-0” above grade.

Rear Side of “Container“

|Sketch Problem 2| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Ian F. Taberner 02.21.2009|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |87|


|Sketch Problem 2| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Ian F. Taberner 02.21.2009|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |88|


|Sketch Problem 2| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Ian F. Taberner 02.21.2009|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |89|


|Sketch Problem 2| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Ian F. Taberner 02.21.2009|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |90|


VIII

STRUCTURES II: STATICS & STRENGTH OF MATERIALS Duration: 12 weeks Spring 2009 Instructor: Garrick Goldenberg

The course develops a fundamental understanding of the manner in which structures carry load. Students will be guided through the analysis of structural systems, subsystems, and components which compose the structural framework. The course will introduce the static behavior of structures, equilibrium, and reactions; Truss Analysis; Shear and Moment Diagrams and Deflections of Beams and Frames. It will examine the fundamentals of strength of materials and the distribution of tensile, compressive, bending, shear and torsional stresses. It will study the characteristics of gravity, wind and seismic loads and explore the behavior of floor systems; plates and grid systems; vertical stability systems; cables and arches; folded plates and shells.


|Structures 2| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Garrick Goldenberg Spring 2009|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |92|


DESIGN PRINCIPLES Duration: 16 Weeks Fall 2008 Instructor: Ariel Fernando Brain

IX

This introductory course focuses on design principles and theory. The themes of discussion are based on issues presented in readings and lectures and range from ancient civilizations to contemporary culture. The course stresses the importance of developing the ability to observe, analyze and critique historic and contemporary models. Following the lecture, students may break into small groups with seminar instructors. Masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s students are expected to conduct more independent research and draw upon a broader cultural perspective in their work. Different assignments and grading criteria are established by the faculty.


adolf loos + Villa Mueller Villa analysis The first objective of the course was to analyze the design elements of our assigned villas. The Mueller house of 1930, located in Prague was based on the developing principles of the Raumplan or “container concept”. Designed by Adolf Loos who based the design around an understanding of functionality and economy. The “container” pertains to the weaving and intertwining of the space plan, living plan, and material plan, which creates a circuitous, none static path for the inhabitant.

Circulation

Street Facade of the Villa Mueller in Prague

Villa Mueller’s Dining Room

Villa Mueller’s Living Room

Axanometric Drawing

Ground Level Floor Plan Enclosure Diagram

|Design Principles| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Ariel Brain Fall 2008 16 Weeks|

Villa Mueller’s Site Plan

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |94|


CARPENTER CENTER VISIT Located at Harvard University, the Carpenter Center is the only piece of architecture in the United States that was designed by Le Corbusier. To coincide with the article in class which spoke about this academic facility I took a trip to see it for myself. Visually the structure does not fit the typical brick structures that Harvard is filled with. I was pleased by the smooth texture of the concrete and how it forms the complex geometric shape of the building. I also enjoyed the “S” ramp which could be used as a path from one street to the other because it is completely open to nature and cuts through the center of the structure.

Window cavities in the concrete structure

View of the central “S” ramp

Geometry from the ground

Approach up the central exterior ramp

|Design Principles| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Ariel Brain Fall 2008 16 Weeks|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |95|


Main Entry View of Villa

Rear Side of the Villa Dis-assembly of Model

villa mueller model The assignment was to make a 3D representation of our assigned villa. This model was entirely complex to create because the Villa Mueller was six levels high and within those levels were staircases which broke down the slabs and created multi heights within the interior spaces. Thankful enough we did not have to construct the site on which the Villa was built. The structure appears to be very rectilinear from the exterior, and if it was for building this model I would have never truly understood how complex and astonishing the interior of this residence was planned. The class film analysis for the semester (spring 2009) while I was a teacherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s assistant was the movie 8-1/2.

|Design Principles| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Ariel Brain Fall 2008 16 Weeks|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |96|


The Palace of Minos was a 21,000 sq. meter site. This large scale palace is a 3,408 year old and is a prime example of the Loosian exploration in the Villa Müeller of “compactness” through the usage of isolating spaces within the densities of a build mass.

|Design Principles| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Ariel Brain Fall 2008 16 Weeks|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |97|


The villa mueller (1936) & the palace of minos (1790ca.)

Both structures have a similar way of manipulating the facades in a very playful way. The palace is more horizontal, while the villa plays more vertical. The areas shown in red that Western Façade of the Inner Courtyard17 are on both images, display elements that similarly can relate to program which have been used in an additive or subtractive fashion. If we look deeper into the western façade of the palace,

In addition to the connection of exterior entries and the creation of outside spaces, the Cretans utilize the compact footprint of the interior by the “pushing and pulling” of the facades, windows, floor slabs just as Adolf Loos did with the Villa Mueller.

the geometry begins to be broken on many levels and this starts to become derived through the design. The geometric shapes begin to immerse themselves out of the “block.”Squares and rectangles become visual planes that are shifted and layered one in front of the other. It then reads as a composition of geometry which serves as function. The ground level stays static and the central mass of the structure is recessed backwards.

Entry to the Throne Room of the Palace

Reconstruction drawing of the Palace of King Minos at Knossos

Living Room Entry of Villa

|Design Principles| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Ariel Brain Fall 2008 16 Weeks|

A similar approach is detailed in the both structures through the drop in floor heights. The path between two spaces is very much connected by a visual break. This creates a physiological impression towards the arrival at a new space.

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |98|


Break Down of the Painting Below

Picture of a City (Red + Green Accents) 1921

|Design Principles| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Ariel Brain Fall 2008 16 Weeks|

I can only infer that for the time period that this was painted, Klee was envisioning the aerial view of a metropolitan city. If we were to break apart the layers of the painting and see them individually (shown above), we can then see the negative space surrounding the patterns of colors. If we look beyond the four colors we can begin to see a fifth layer of pattern where the colors do not overlap. The figure ground plan begins to pop when we eliminate the entire composition and focus on one element of it.

Paul Klee

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |99|


ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN HISTORY A Duration: 18 Weeks Spring 2009 Instructor: Jaime Wilson This class is a one-semester introduction to the history of architecture from pre-history through the Late Baroque / Early Rococo period (c. 1750). The course aims not only to teach a set of important monuments, but also to develop a set of tools for perceiving, analyzing, and responding to the visual world. We will examine architecture in its historical context, focusing specifically on the ways that physical expression reflects and shapes social, religious, and political experience. This course challenges you to ask and answer a single critical question: What does history have to do with me? It is critical to understand that design does not develop (and never has) in isolation. Rather, architecture reflects an eternal dialogue about how people choose to define and respond to personal experience. As students of design, it is critical to understand how our contemporary landscape reflects the past and asserts specific ideas about the future. This course will equip you with the tools to begin this process, and will serve as a foundation for more advanced studies in architectural history and design. Good research and communication skills are integral components of both architectural history and professional practice. This class will help students hone these skills in two key ways. Firstly, you will become familiar with the language of architecture, learning how to â&#x20AC;&#x153;readâ&#x20AC;? architecture as historical and cultural documents. This will include mastering basic vocabulary and learning formal analytical skills. Secondly, you will apply these skills to the written components of the class: a semester research paper (broken down into four components) and two exams, primarily essay in format. |History A| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Jaime Wilson Spring 2009 17 Weeks|

X |Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |100|


After acquiring the basics in class from referencing the Francis Ching books. I was able to grasp an overall knowledge that allowed for the understanding of floor plan and elevation and there importance for developing a perspective.

Old St. Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Floor Plan Sketch

Class Sketches of the Hypostyle Design Element

Forum - Center of the Roman City

|History A| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Jaime Wilson Spring 2009 18 Weeks|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |101|


Comparison - palace of minos + temple complex at karnak In Knossos and Karnak, their geographical location in close proximity to fresh waterways, which were trade routes, became a large factor in the flourishment of the cultures and therfore becoming an axis mundi. The city of Knossos dates between 1600 and 1200 B.C.E. and is located off the continent of modern day Greece on the island of Crete., Flanked by the Mediterranean Sea. It is five kilo-meters to the west, and south-east of Herakleion, which paralels the Kairatos River (present day Katasambas), and was the central hub between the Peloponnesus and Asia Minor, between Cyprus and Sicily, midway between Egypt and Greece.

An Axis Mundi in Knossos & Karnak To quickly summarize the contents of my final paper, I choose to focus on the Minoan and Egyptian cultures. My paper compares these cultures through different time frames and relates them by such explorations and studies of their economies, developing languages + communication, regional materials + trading routes, rulers + power, religious beliefs, geological locations, and politics. All of these topics are vital support when analyzing the Palace of Minos and the Temple Complex at Karnak. Both structures represent the “center of the world” for there respective cultures and all the supporting historical context gives meaning to the existance of the structures , as well as , there commonalities.

thesis statement

Palace of Minos (Knossos) + Temple Complex at (Karnak)

An axis mundi is formed in both Knossos and Karnak,by means of the clients intentions, evolution of written language, discovered materials, religious belief’s, social reformation, fortification, political power, geographical location of the structures, economics, trading and export, as well as, technological breakthroughs.

Knossos was founded by the first Neolithic settlers and the advantages they saw in the site pertain primarily to security, which was placed into the hill of Kephala that was close enough to the sea, but far enough away to escape from pirates/invaders; the city had convenient supplies of fresh water from the Kairatos and food from the surrounding rich farming land; it also was in close proximity to high ground in case refuge was needed14. The site was a focal point in the Aegean’s cultural advancements due to its location between the trade routes of Egypt and Greece. There were four points of entry into the palace, each placed strategically due to their surroundings and duties to those surroundings. The north entrance (from the port, for commerce), south entrance (service entrance), east entrance (goes to the river), and the west entrance (the official entrance). This strategic localization of the “city” played a large role in the survival and growth of the Minoans.

Sety I Presenting the Building to Amun Re, with Mut, and Marginal Decoration (Right) + Restoration of the Queen’s Megaron Including Fresco’s (Above)

|History A| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Jaime Wilson Spring 2009 17 Weeks|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |102|


With a new central government in Egypt, ethnic diversity in began to rise in the population and may have been a direct result of migration of “seminomadic peoples from both the Levant and Libya, which paralleled the incorporation of Nubians into the Egyptian society.”10A result to the unification of the Egyptian Kingdom and the restructuring of the cultures, political and religious orders makes way for new architectural expressions that reflects such great changes. The monumental scale and fine detail of all the funerary architecture in the Temple Complex can be a direct result of the achievements mentioned above because the site serves as a dedication monument toward the Pharaohs of the Old and Middle Kingdoms (which enacted such great change) as well as, a dedication site for the god’s (Amun), see plan in figure 7. Not only does the architecture begin to change, but also the social change begins to develop after the global reorganization of the Egyptian bureaucracy. An inferred result of this deliberate governmental leveling of the elite (due to the excessive greed of hierarchy), explains the birth of the “middle class” in the Middle Kingdom.11 Scholars also attribute this towards the suppression of nobility when seen on private mortuary monuments and administrative documents. The most notable achievements of the thirteenth dynasty were primarily in the Egyptians literature and connection with Middle Eastern cultures. Also, during the Middle Kingdom, the religious culture of Egypt began to transition from a supernatural worshiping of the gods towards a humanization of the gods as a result of the Egyptian consciousness. This ultimately, directly influenced the power of the Pharaoh as a god on earth. The Egyptians were no longer idolizing a higher being, but worshiping a “humanized figure.”

Temple Complex at Karnak

West Facade Facing the Courtyard

Section Through the Hypostyle Hall

Architecturally in the Palace of Minos, three of the royal villa’s are located beyond the exterior fortified walls of the main palace and also include a small theater structure. The palace itself has a large central courtyard that’s focuses as the central space for congregation and activity. The courtyard allows for all the functions of the Palace to radiate towards. The palaces large program as stated in the introduction, was to house large magazines for storage, workshops for production of trade objects, shrines, priests’ quarter’s, royal apartments, reception rooms and areas for communal interaction.17 These requirements given by King Minos become a large element in the design of the structure. In about 1900, we begin to see major changes in the Minoan economy and politics, due to the technical advancements in metal making, plumbing and column usage which heightened the building’s performance and quality. The vast amount of spaces required for the palace, could not have been built planar and therefore advancements in design allowed for the first multi-leveled structure with stairs and an open double height space. A section through the main courtyard and grand stair displays the Cretan usage of the column in order to allow a clearstory space that can be open on the upper level to the outside providing natural light to filter in and air circulation. Similarly in the Temple of Amun at Karnak the same design principal was used in the Hypostyle Hall, except that the center row of palm columns were taller than the surrounding ones, to allow shelter overhead while still providing light and air to filter inward.

Egyptian Hieroglyphics |History A| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Jaime Wilson Spring 2009 17 Weeks|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |103|


frank sear lecture Harvard University Humanities Center, Barker Center, Room 133, 12 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA

Grand Designs: Building a Roman Theater

A Typical Roman Theater Floor Plan

Mr. Sear begins his presentation with a geographical map of Italy and the surrounding areas. The main focus of the lecture is surrounding the architectural elements of the theaters and how they function (the focus is not on what occurred at these theaters). He touched upon all of the theaters in which he had visited and had been doing research on. Such areas shown were in Orange, Butrint, Jerash, Leptis Magna, Pompeii, Cales, Farento, Valterra, Gubbia, Benevento, Taormina, Pergamon, and Bosra. The countries involved included Syria, Jordan, Turkey, Sibia, Lythia, and Italy. Going into a little more detail Sear displays the two different types of ancient Roman theaters. The first utilizes the side of a mountain of hill for the structural support of the seating areas in the theater. The second does not use earth for a structural system and is completely freestanding. Going beyond this difference the overall components of the theater they all share specific architectural elements. It seemed as if Mr. Sear’s thesis was derived around finding a pattern/ purpose in the designs of all these theaters. He does mention that the Roman Theater had stemmed from the Greeks theater. This was displayed through his geometrical explorations of the orchestra. His final assumptions were that in all the theaters there had become a pattern of hierarchy in the ancient societies. He supported this assumption through the exploration of the internal circulation and how they all had specific purposes. In the theater of Pompeii, Sear displays the three main arteries which lead directly into the orchestra area. He implies that this was for the royalty class of the time. In some instances the primary paths could have possibly been used by the knights (secondary class) as well. Beyond these main entries are sub entries which sprawl out into the middle seating areas of the theaters. This was for the white toga peoples and the knights. Lastly, were the third class of entry ways which were almost completely on the exterior of the building and switch back from the theater vertically to the upper levels of seating. This was for the lower class which included the plebeians and slaves. Architecturally Mr. Sears focused on the primary components of the typical theater: Pulpitum (the stage), Scaenae (stage building), Orchestra (Lowest Level), Aditus Maximus (Middle Level), Praecincto (passageways), Vomitoria (exits), Cavea (upper level), Porticus (colonnade roof assembly), and lastly the stage roof. The stage roof is an element that Sear’s speculated upon, and concluded that in the Roman theater’s they were used for acoustical purposes and not for shelter. This idea was supported because of the massive heights behind the stage which in some cases rose up to about 60 feet. Another element I was un aware of is that the curtain system for the stage rose out of three holes, and came up on poles about 12 feet high or so. Overall the presentation was very quick but honed in on the focal points very well. I was pleased to get the chance to hear this lecture at Harvard and I felt that I gained some good knowledge from it. I now would like to know more about the Greek theater’s because they were the benchmark for the Roman theater and they also have great acoustics. |History A| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Jaime Wilson Spring 2009 17 Weeks|

Perspective of a Roman Theater

Frank Sear

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |104|


3D DESIGN DRAWING - PERSPECTIVE Duration: 8 Weeks Fall 2008 Instructor: Dren Luci This course introduces students to both freehand and mechanically generated perspectives. The initial sessions will discuss historical concepts before engaging in plan, elevation and section perspectives. The course will end with the study of alternate vanishing points, and the development of rendered shades and shadows. Students will develop interior and exterior views, one and two-point perspectives, and entourage.

XI


Paul Rudolph Perspective Reference + Visual Study

Floor Plan Sketch of My Bedroom

One Point Perspective of My Bedroom Developed from the Floorplan

After acquiring the basics in class from referencing the Francis Ching books. I was able to grasp an overall knowledge that allowed for the understanding of floor plan and elevation and there importance for developing a perspective.

Drafted Plan of My Bedroom

Transferring a Grid onto the Floor and Wall with a Single Vanishing Point

|3D Design Drawing| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Dren Luci Fall 2008 8 Weeks|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |106|


Creating a Perspective From the Plan and Elevation

One Point Perspective with Cube Geometry

perspective drafting The one and two point perspectives on this page were completed during my academics at Springfield Technical Community College. We began the class at the BAC exploring similar exercises and by using multiple geometries I was able to get a grasp on the effectiveness and outcome via my vanishing points and horizon lines. Overall the exercises seemed redundant but as I look back, they have become fruitful toward my academic career. Years later I still refer back to the principles used in the class. Lastly, the technique of filling the page for the exercise was helpful in creating depth to the page as well as creating multiple views of objects. Two Point Perspective with Cube Geometry

|3D Design Drawing| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Dren Luci Fall 2008 8 Weeks|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |107|


final perspectives and renderings As my final rendering I choose to draft in perspective a villa by Adolf Loos entitled the Mueller House located in Prague. I picked this villa because of my familiarity of it from my Design Principles class that I was taking along side this perspective class.

The Early Stages of Setting Up the Final Perspective

A Cleaner Version of My Final Perspective With Added

By then end of the class I had developed a great appreciation for hand rendering due to the amount of knowledge and precision needed to create a final product. Another angle of approach that I gained from the class is taking the drawing in phases as well as layers. This was a great way to change and apply different entourage to my perspectives. Most of all, the importance of hand drafting was something that I had forgotten about years ago. Because of the dependency on technology in the field of Architecture I completely had lost memory toward the simple drafting techniques. It was very beneficial for me to go back and revisit some of the lesson I once learned.

This is a Sectional Perspective that I Finished Beyond the Class and Touched Up in Photoshop CS3 Final Perspective of Adolf Loos Mueller House in Prague

|3D Design Drawing| Boston Architectural College Master of Architecture Dren Luci Fall 2008 8 Weeks|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |108|


XII 3DS MAX 9 / MODELING + RENDERING TRANSFER Duration: 12 weeks Spring/Summer 2008 Instructor: Max Freq This software system generates photo-realistic architectural renderings and simulated walkthroughs and is widely used for motion picture special effects. Techniques of lighting, creating atmospheric effects, placing cameras, choosing materials and material properties for photo-realistic rendering will be covered, as will aspects of model and camera motion. The theme of the course is based on this student competition, The Venice Architecture Biennale has advertised. The requirements for The competition is ultimately lower than those for the course, so that The whole principle of the necessary material in the course prepared anyway. The main difference are two English explanatory texts Ă  maximum 1000 Characters that the two to create image files are attached. The levy The competition is open until 15 July 2008 by e-mail is possible and requires a Admission fee of 10 per participant. The exact tasks and the conditions are available online.


Course Objectives + tasks We first began the studio by getting familiar with the Smith House through replicating the site, floor plans, sections + elevations all by hand drafting them. This was the beginning stages of the building analysis. Beyond the hand drafting I also developed the residence in Autodesk Revit 2008 (left) and was able to see more easily how the heights and structural components of the building all worked as a singular entity!

Preliminary Design Sketches of Sculpture

Back View of City Scape

|3DS Max 9 Transfer| Technical University of Berlin Diploma of Architecture Max Freq Spring/Summer 2008|

Zoom In of Site on Edge of the Shore

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |110|


anchored balance

Front View of Project Site in Context

My primary aim when creating this ground anchored sculpture was simply to keep all the parts very basic but interesting as a whole. As you can see I modified four objects that create this assembly! I used a darker and much more heavy piece along the ground plane to provide some what of a weight distributor. As the anchor point I placed my sphere half way inside of the elongated base. From within these two shapes I have two branching shapes that flow out of the lower ones. The two branching tubes bend in such a way that they almost mirror each other! The smooth texture and gentile curves of the different shapes provide a harmonious composition that form this proposed sculpture.

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |111|


the protruding box The primary focus of this structure is labeled as a Mosque. My aim when creating this was to make is visually appealing in a modern way! This structure reflects the ideas of my sculpture by having a solid anchoring point at the base. The parts are very basic but interesting as a whole. As you can see I modified three elements, and when placed together they create this assembly! As you enter the Mosque your eyes immediately follow the pointed walls aimed toward Mecca. The usage of a modified grid creates some continuity along the walls, along with a unique pattern of windows. All four sides of the box were manipulated and extruded in a way that none of them are identical. One side is very cubic, while others are more jagged and extruded. From within these four walls, I have two of them branching out in the prayer direction. The two branching walls also create a very interesting entry into the Mosque that cantilevers over the stairs!

Front View of Project Site in Context

|Alex Jeffrey Siekiersk |P|


The overall objective of this structure is to create a shelter for prayer! This shelter should be used with the fewest amount of materials. We have paver stones on the walkway and stairs, with enlarges â&#x20AC;&#x153; at rocks on the interior. All four sides are made out of a concrete grid pattern! In the image above of the interior view you can see that the structure is placed on the edge of a river. The main â&#x20AC;&#x153; or area in which the individuals will pray on came out rather nicely. It displays its non uniformity and looks very realistic with the views of cement.

Sunset

Entry Canopy

Mosque

|3DS Max 9 Transfer| Technical University of Berlin Diploma of Architecture Max Freq Spring/Summer 2008|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |113|


ADDITIONAL TRANSFERRED CLASSES Taken Between: 2006-2008 University of Massachusetts Amherst + Springfield Technical Community College

XIII


DM2A 2D DESIGN DRAWING Duration: 15 Weeks Spring 2005 Instructor: Margaret Corbeil This course introduces the basic conventions of straight-line architectural drawing: plan, section, elevation and paraline. Emphasis is on acquiring basic freehand and hard-line drafting skills, but study will include introduction to theories of representation and the power of basic drawing to inform the design process. The course integrates analog and digital media through Sketchup exercises and an introduction to CAD-2D.

Observational Sketch of Golf Equipment (Fine Point Pen & Ink Wash) Observational Sketch of cosmetics (Fine Point Pen & Ink Wash) |Additional Transferred Classes|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |115|


DM1 INTEGRATED FREEHAND DRAWING Duration: 15 Weeks Spring 2006 Instructor: Elise Howell Varying approaches to freehand drawing are offered to enhance awareness of the world and gain visual confidence. The course includes exercises in still life, figure drawing, and perspective sketching to expose the students to various ways of seeing. Students learn to draw form, objects, and objects in space. The course explores positive and negative space, edges and contours, and the effects of light and shadow. Students are expected to maintain and develop a sketchbook by drawing at least once a day. The course integrates analog and digital media through computer exercises. Media used include: pencil, pen and ink, charcoal, and conte crayon, pastels, colored pencil.

Observational Charcoal Sketch

Line Exercise With Pencils

Painting of Assorted Bottles

Charcoal Drawing of an Open Pavilion

Charcoal Sketch of Plants

|Additional Transferred Classes|

Cardboard Chair Design

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |116|


Self Portraits

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |117|


Close-Up Perspective of Wall Pattern Installation

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Complete Final Perspective of Installation

fluidity + space the installation As a part of my art class we had to select an area of the building in which I could implement a physical 3-D installation of some sort. I selected the end of a corridor that was completely unused the majority of the time. I want to take this space and create a 3-D illusion from the 3 flat surfaces. I choose to continue the checkerboard pattern from the black and white tile floor and continue it up both side of the walls completely creating an illusion of a dead end space. I would have enjoyed seeing this space filled around including the ceiling.

Corner View of Pattern Progression from Floor |Additional Transferred Classes|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |118|


DM3A AutoCAD I/2D DRAFTING Duration: 15 Weeks Spring 2007 Instructor: Gustavo Pardo This course in computer-aided drafting introduces the basic concepts and operation of AutoCAD, emphasizing twodimensional computer-aided drafting concepts, conventions and documentation production. The course provides handson instruction in AutoCAD. Students will have to complete weekly assignments, which will require approximately three hours of work to be completed outside of class, plus short readings. This requirement may also be fulfilled by taking VS630 Revit or VS664 ArchiCAD.

AutoCAD Site Plan

AutoCAD First Floor Plan

Logo Design (Siekierski Design)

AutoCAD Plan Reproduction |Additional Transferred Classes|

AutoCAD 2007 Zoomed In Detail

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |119|


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PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE

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Practice is a required component of every BAC studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s education and comprises approximately one-third of the credits needed for graduation for first professional degree programs. With more than a century of experience with the concurrent model of Practice and Academics, one thing is clear: the students who succeed at the BAC are the students who strive for achievement both in the classroom and at work. The key to success at the BAC is for a student has to be fully engaged in both Academics and Practice. This concurrent model is designed to foster critical thinking and learning in both the classroom and the office. Students are required to be in compliance with both Academics and Practice. Good-standing in Practice is a requirement for access to the Laboratory Listings and milestones such as Segment I and Segment II Portfolio Review and graduation.

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|Professional Practice| Urbanica Design + Developement|

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|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |120|


firm information

work study spring 2009

Urbanica Design + Development 142 Berkeley Street No. 402 Boston, MA 02116

MY RESPONSIBILITIES AT URBANICA! Beginning at Urbanica at the end of February 2009, I wasn’t aware of the duties and responsibilities that I would be fulfilling. Surprisingly, the internship has given the opportunity to be follow the project (URBANICA 693) from conceptual design, all the way through the construction process. I have been appointed the project coordinator: the tasks I have been doing involve coordinating all construction documents (CD’s) so that a full set of drawings will be able to be reviewed by our outsourced Architect. Currently the project is still going through slight design iterations, which are displayed in the images below, that will strengthen the buildings impact on the local community as well as sustain ability and functionality. As a young designer, the principal (Kamran Zahedi) has asked for my insight on numerous programmatic ideas in which he has implemented some of my responses into the current layout. I am extremely happy that this project is going to be a physical entity and that I can look back at it and reflect upon my large affiliation with the project.

T 617.654.8900 F 617.654.8901 UrbanicaBoston.com Principal: Kamran Zahedi

Kamran Zahedi is the founder and President of Urbanica. He is one of Boston’s most innovative design-focused real estate developers in Boston. His most recent project has received critical acclaim for it’s sophisticated design concepts and high quality execution. Urbanica is largely credited as the force behind bringing loft living and modern design to Boston’s South End. Currently, Urbanica has been making a large shift from the design-build practice and has branched out its strengths in providing clients with design consulting. Amongst this extension of the already multifaceted options that Urbanica can provide. Stainability as well as functionality still remains the focus of the group in order to provide a healthier way of living.

Currently I have been learning a lot because of the increasing progress of the project. I have gained knowledge and continue to, by referencing past projects by Urbanica for visual aid (mainly for graphical standards and structural details). I have been further introduced to code requirements from the state building codes, as well as, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) in which I have been updating our current CD’s to these requirements. Extending beyond red-lining the current construction documents and setting up cost estimates and scheduling. I have started coordinating between the inhouse drafters, which includes myself, and the external sources, such as, the mechanical/electrical/structural engineer, exterior designer, owner, contractor, and developer, in order to push the project moving forward.

|Professional Practice| Urbanica Design + Developement|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |121|


BU Medical Center

U693

693 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston, MA 02118

URBANICA 693 The site of the project is located on Massachusetts Avenue, just a few yards northwest from Boston Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Medical Center. It was once Brownstone apartments that were comprised of six parcels. As you can see in the image above it is now a vacant lot. |Professional Practice| Urbanica Design + Developement|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |122|


Facade Example

What I Started My Internship Working From: The plan above was from the end of February and it was initially intended to mix the existing Brownstone consistency that Massachusetts Avenue has, along with a modern ribbon up the from left of the facade and across the penthouse area.

|Professional Practice| Urbanica Design + Developement|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |123|


Blending of the Brownstone Appearance

Flat Faced Modern Design for the Entry and Penthouse

Tradition with a Hint of Modern: These renderings were generated by an outside firm and they display the proposed structure and how it potentially can blend in to the current urban fabric. This was primarily a facade aesthetic for presentation to the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA). |Professional Practice| Urbanica Design + Developement|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |124|


Proposed Building Square Footages 1 101 1+Study 870 2 102 1 740 3 103 1 630 4 104 Studio + 554 5 105 1+Study 760 6 106 1+Study 758 7 107 1 746 8 201 1+Study 872 9 202 1 670 10 203 1+Study 784 11 204 1+Study 816 12 205 2 998 13 206 1+Study 818 14 207 2 1028 15 301 1+Study 872 16 302 1 670 17 303 1+Study 784 18 304 1+Study 816 19 305 2 998 20 306 1+Study 818 21 307 2 1028 22 401 1+Study 872 23 402 1 670 24 403 1+Study 784 25 404 1+Study 816 26 405 2 998 27 406 1+Study 818 28 407 2 1028 29 501 1+Study 872 30 502 1 670 31 503 1+Study 784 32 504 1+Study 816 33 505 2 998 34 506 1+Study 818 35 507 2 1028 36 601 1 37 602 2 # 0f Units

776 1070 30848

As the project developed we were under the impression that the BRA was pushing toward a higher modernist feel for the site and the floor plan above shows the front and rear facade as being flat faced. This front facade would match the current frontage line of the adjacent buildings. By keeping a straight vertical front it gave us the opportunity to experiment with materiality, the blending of the structural grid toward the street side and the organization of windows. These design opportunities were restricted from the Brownstone plan. |Professional Practice| Urbanica Design + Developement|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |125|


Copy and Array: The second through the fifth levels are spaces identically. This was an economic solution for creating structural consistency for the â&#x20AC;&#x153;meatâ&#x20AC;? of the building. Even though the overall layouts of these levels are identical, the interiors are no two alike. In the past Urbanica has taken interior details and finishings, and developed them in a unique and lavishing order. |Professional Practice| Urbanica Design + Developement|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |126|


Rising High: The Penthouse of the building is on the sixth level and has two exclusive units with private green roof space. There is also vertical circulation to a common roof-top terrace for any of the occupants. The sixth level is recessed from the street facade to provide for the green spacs and also decrease some of the shading of the street below. |Professional Practice| Urbanica Design + Developement|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |127|


Currently we have been studying code requirements and unit square footages to see if a the ground level apartments could be proposed work-live spaces. This would provide a great opportunity to brighten up the surrounding community. It would give young professionals a space to support various types of businesses.

|Professional Practice| Urbanica Design + Developement|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |128|


URBANICA 693

|Professional Practice| Urbanica Design + Developement|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |129|


This first iteration of the front facade displays how the grid reflects the adjacent buildings, horizontal and vertical scales.

|Professional Practice| Urbanica Design + Developement|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |130|


The two images above are great representations of the quality of the interior spaces that will be seen in URBANICA 693. These graphics were from a recent condo project completed by Urbanica. They both display the use of lowering the walls from the ceiling to provide a feeling of openness, while maintaining privacy for the inhabitant. The usage of materials and colors all play a cohesive role in creating a stunning environment that promotes healthy living.

Iteration #2 of the Front Facade

|Professional Practice| Urbanica Design + Developement|

Iteration #2 of the Rear Facade

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |131|


Rear Facade Rendering

Front Facade Rendering

Front Facade Entry Detail

Where We Are Now: These are the most recent renderings (Iteration #2) of the building that are waiting to be approved by the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA).

|Professional Practice| Urbanica Design + Developement|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |132|


NANCY STRACKA INTERIORS

FIRM INFORMATION Nancy Stracka Interiors 75 Arlington Street Suite 500 Boston, MA 02116

T 617.273.8438 StrackaInteriors.com

Principal: Nancy Stracka

COMPANY PROFILE Nancy Stracka, Principal Interior Designer, is a second generation Interior Designer following in the footsteps of her mother who ran a successful interior design business in the 1970’s and 1980’s. She was a Fine Art major at Indiana University and graduated from Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City with a degree fabric design.

Photograph of the Residence at 4 Polaris Circle

Professional Experiance: Nancy Stracka Interiors 75 Arlington Street Suite 500 Boston, MA 02116 (617) 273-8438 Contract Employee Sept ‘08 - Nov ‘08 |Professional Practice| Nancy Stracka Interiors|

The firm’s design team includes staff interior designers, kitchen designers and project managers who focus on technical design, product sourcing and installations. The design team has the ability to create highly technical design plans, elevations and photorealistic 3D renderings of client projects using the latest software such as Auto-CAD. This makes it easy for clients to visualize their interiors prior to execution and implementation.

AlexSiekierski Jeffrey Siekierski |Alex Jeffrey |133|


|Professional Practice| Nancy Stracka Interiors|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |134|


|Professional Practice| Nancy Stracka Interiors|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |135|


the dennis group, llc company profile Formed in 1987, The Dennis Group offers complete planning, architectural, process engineering and construction management services exclusively to the food and beverage industries. The Dennis Group has excelled in providing innovative and cost effective services to clients in North America, Central America, and Europe. We are a full-service firm deeply experienced in delivering total project solutions from conception through start-up. Our staff includes all the disciplines required for single source total project delivery. Established: 1987 Employees: 120 Locations:Springfield,Massachusetts,SaltLakeCity,Utah,SanDiego, California, Toronto, Canada

1391 Main Street Springfield, Massachusetts

Construction Volume: $150 - 200 MM per year Fee Volume: $15 - $20 MM per year Ownership: Privately held by active employees Customer satisfaction is the touchstone of our business. Over 70% of our business was from repeat clients; this is perhaps the greatest indicator of our performance. We build relationships through successful projects. 50% of the TOP 50 Food Manufacturers in the U.S. and Canada are our clients. Work description Alex will be working as a full-time employee before he leaves for school in Berlin, Germany! Alexâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s primary duties while at the Dennis Group will be drafting architectural construction documents using Autocad. He will be mainly working with the project architects updating plans and details. He will also be researching products and processing transmittals, and preparing bid package documents.

|Professional Practice| The Dennis Group, LLC|

Alex Jeffrey Siekierski (The First Day)

Second Floor Plan of DGL with Desk Location

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |136|


Detailed Construction Documents As an intern at the Dennis Group, I was amazed at the operations and coordination of the 200+ person firm. At this point in my career I have been introduced to construction documents before but at a much smaller scale. The detail of the example above is something I have never seen before. The example page above is just one page out of a 1000 page CD package. I had to learn to X-ref red lines into these large drawings that everyone in the firm needed to use as well (Architects, Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing, Structural, Civil Engineers). I was amazed at the level of detail need to go into an industrial food production building that is around 1,000,000 square feet. |Professional Practice| The Dennis Group, LLC|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |137|


Detailing/Callouts/Change Orders Similarly after picking up red lines and modifying the current drawings. I also would be assigned to edit the plans for bid packages in which I had to photoshop the plans so that they visually indicate to the bidders what we were looking for and for the amount and variety of that product we needed. Above is an example of a seven page bid package that highlights the different types of column protection that is needed on this floor level. Along with the plans I also had to evaluate the types of materials needed and then search for about six manufacturers that were located near Asheboro North Carolina. |Professional Practice| The Dennis Group, LLC|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |138|


Stair Details Developed in AutoCAD

All Plans Were Developed in AutoCAD and Edited in Photoshop

detailing The majority of my duties at the Dennis Group involved small detailing of various areas of the structures we had been developing. Even though the firm had all necessary professionals inhouse and in the field for the projects, it was labelled as a design build firm. Due to the vast scale of the projects we considered ourselves a build design firm. The clients were extremely needy for progress to be expedited. This was reflective in the office because of the amount of detailing and updating of plans that were different on a daily basis. Primarily all the detailing that I did was a custom assemblies that pertained to a specific project with a specific characteristic. All details and call outs were done in AutoCAD and were mainly needed for the construction documents as well as for presentation to the client for changes made in the CDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. The examples on this page display the plan in which an opening needed to be cut in order for mechanical units to go through. The elevations and perspectives detail all the materials and locations of the railings as well as the insulation. |Professional Practice| The Dennis Group, LLC|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |139|


Example of More Detailing of Slab Cut-Outs

company stardards and procedures After working with the Dennis Group I had learned that a company of such a larger scale had to formulate a lot of there own protocol. They had developed there own architectural standards, pen/ line weight settings, AutoCAD sheet templates, on site construction administration protocols, the list is endless. I took a lot of these standards and company ways and embedded them into my mind so that I may remember them when I have a firm of my own. Company Standards + Codes Example

|Professional Practice| The Dennis Group, LLC|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |140|


Site Plan

Front + Rear Elevations

small projects + extension The client for this project was a cake company who wanted to submit plans to an attorney. The plans were to be used to compare zoning laws with the town for the companies potential expansion. All plans were done in AUTOCAD and were traced at the appropriate scale. The project was assigned to me by someone I have never met before (200+ firm) and I had the opportunity to basically draft and communicate with the attorney on my own. My supervisor was amazed at the level of accuracy that I had produced from his hard copies. I found it beneficial that I used new AutoCAD functions in order to readily produce some accurate physical drawing that could immediately be used by the client.

Side Elevations

|Professional Practice| The Dennis Group, LLC|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |141|


ARCHITECTURAL INSIGHTS company profile

firm information Architectural Insights 3 Converse STreet Suite 201 Palmer, MA 01069

Architectural Insights is a highly innovative professional design firm that serves both public and private sectors throughout New England. Founded on the principle of complete client satisfaction, Architectural Insights’ driving commitment is to provide hands-on, personal service to its clients throughout the entire process. This philosophy is reflected in our ability to tailor solutions to the unique needs of each project while respecting economic, environmental, and sociological constraints.

T 413.283.2553 admin@architectural-insights.com Principal: Robert Haveles

Architectural Insights’ design process begins by defining the scope of the project, during which it is incumbent upon the designer to effectively assess the client’s needs and desires. The end result is a product that delights the client and enriches the environment around it. Architectural Insights has maintained a general practice since its inception in 1988, and has undertaken projects for clients in both the public and private sectors, including: Public - State and Municipalities* Recreational projects * Town hall renovations * Library renovations and capital improvements* Roof replacements and repairs * Housing renovations * Elevator installations * Senior center renovations * Fire department additions and renovations * Public safety complex * Office renovations and space planning Public - Federal Agencies * Healthcare o VA Medical Center* o VA Manchester Medical Center* HUD housing renovations* Private - New and Renovations * Commercial/offices * Light industrial * Healthcare * Recreational * Elderly assisted care and congregate living * Hospitality * Summer Camp * ADA handicap accessibility studies and improvements * Residential (single and multi-family) * Religious * Educational * Financial* Historic Renovations and Preservation * Fire department* Town hall renovations.

Work description Alex will be working as an Intern during the academic semester’s and a full-time employee during the winter/summer breaks. I will be expected to do CAD drafting using multiple software, such as, Autocad, Softplan and CADvance, which will be instrumental in preparing preliminary design documents and construction documents. Product research and contacting of manufacturer representatives for specified products and materials to be used in various projects. Site visits to client locations to field measure and document existing conditions. Provide schematic design and 3D illustrations using SketchUp. Prepare legal condo unit plans to be recorded with the Registrar of Deeds.

Haymarket Square Storefront Design Springfield, MAss (AutoCAD + Sketchup)

|Professional Practice| Architectural Insights, Inc.|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |142|


Ywca project

Pavillion Perspective

Roof Plan

This project was another that the principal handed to me due to itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s low energy. I found that even though it was a small simplistic structure I still pulled great value out of this experience. Collages displaying the proposed open air pavilion for the YWCA (Site photos were taken and photoshoped with the sketchup model)

The experience I gained on the project included site analysis which entailed visiting the site and measuring the current conditions. This was reflective towards the orientation of the structure. The materiality of the pavilion came from the current building which consisted of green metal seam roofing and tan pavers. This was translated into the aesthetics of the pavilion.

Side Elevation

The site analysis and material studies were beneficial to my learning as a young designer.

Street Facing Elevation

Existing Conditions + Ground Material

|Professional Practice| Architectural Insights, Inc.|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |143|


OLDE TYME FOODS EXTENSION My influences and participation towards this project came to me as an experimental design solution. The Architect that was supervising me ask for some three dimensional renderings for a proposed dance studio that would be on the rear side of an existing commercial food supplier building. I was presently learning the in and outs of Google Sketchup and the firm was looking into purchasing the program as a design tool, therefore it was a great way for me to show the capabilities of the program to the principles as well as, display some of my potential as a designer.

Existing Conditions + Proposed Site Area

My design process for the project was primarily focused around the entries of the dance studio, with a concern on finances for the client. I began with matching the materiality slightly beyond the existing structure and then blended in the same CMU pattern into the stucco. This was consistent throughout all the design iterations. Moving throughout the iterations I began with an economical bareminimum facade and as I moved forward I wanted to have multiple proposals that might suit the clients needs. The materiality of the facade was all implemented to emphasize the entries of the studio. Windows and openings to the exterior were not largely needed due to the program of the interiors.

Iteration One

The last iteration number four was the most successful because of the slight changes in material which matched a domed room which was implemented to standout beyond the existing roof line and also aided the acoustics.

Existing Floor Plan with Proposed Extension

Iteration Two

Iteration Three

|Professional Practice| Architectural Insights, Inc.|

Iteration Four

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |144|


CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS A large part of my duties at Architectural Insights involved constant updating of our construction documents via redlines from the principal. This was one of the firm times I have been assigned such tasks and felt very happy learning about the various types of projects and the amount of work it takes to formulate a set of drawings. The media on this page was primarily created by myself with the usage of AutoCAD. Other programs such as CADvance 200 and Chief Architect. A great thing about my experience was that I learned how to setup a new project and begin getting the designs into a formal drawing. Therefore I had the opportunity to see the architect sketch out his ideas and pass them along so I could put them to scale and then see the project develop. It was lastly, a hug advantage when I witnessed and aided the design and construction of a project all the way through.

Plans for Four Large Upscale Multistory Condo Units

Interior Elevations for the Remodeling of Reception + Lobby Area (AutoCAD)

|Professional Practice| Architectural Insights, Inc.|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |145|


When setting up such detailed drawings I found it crucial to have communication with the principal, contractors, and manufacturers as well as attorneys. I was in constant communication with all of these individuals getting information and passing information to keep all drawing current and accurate.

Sample Cover Sheet

Fieldwork was required from me when units were needed to be measured for an attorney who has a client that is selling. These drawings then become legally binding and have to bee 100% current.

Sample Door + Frame Schedule Sample Deed Floor Plan Drafted for Attorneys

These are a few sample pages of construction documents that I created in AutoCAD for various projects with architectural insights.

|Professional Practice| Architectural Insights, Inc.|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |146|


Larry Tuttle, Peter, Alex Siekierski at a Job Site

Sample Evacuation Plan for Springfield College Drafted with AutoCAD + Photoshop

The evacuation plan above is an example of extensive fieldwork done in order to verify the current plans that Springfield College has on file. The amount of plans I did for SC through Architectural Insights lasted an entire month. This amount of time consisted of visiting the college daily and searching through blueprints that facilities had and bringing them to the building I need to create plans for. So basically I took there old plans and drafted them in AutoCAD and them did all the field measurements on a particular facility to verify the plans. After this was done for about twenty-two building or so the plans were photoshoped into the example above. The main cafeteria plan above (Cheney Hall) was the first place I ever worked at the age of fifteen in food service. The experience I gained fully introduced me to the design and program of various academic structures as well as dorm housing facilities.

|Professional Practice| Architectural Insights, Inc.|

Structural Steel Framing

Steel Cross Brace Connection

The photographs above came from a site visit that I went on with the architects and it was for a multistory office building on a predominantly travelled road. I found this visit interesting because I have never seen the rough stages of steel construction and by being introduced to it by the architects I was able to ask a lot of questions about the design and construction.

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |147|


ludlow department of public works

firm information Town of Ludlow DPW Civil Engineering Department 198 Sportsmen’s Road Ludlow, MA 01056

Work description

T 413.583.5625 DPW@ludlow.ma.us

I worked on a wide variety of projects while at the DPW and was able to work independently and with little supervision. One major task I completed was to observe and document the condition of several components of the Towns drainage system. During my employment, I spent half of my conducting field investigations, and the other half completing administrative duties in the office. Such office duties consisted of editing AutoCAD files, completing record sewer connection cards, and revising the Town Street Map, as well as, the town’s construction standards.

Town Engineer: Paul Dzubek Supervisor: Matt Christy

ADA Accessible Ramp Detail

Side Walk Detail for the Town‘s Standards Complete with AutoCAD DPW of Ludlow Massachusetts

Accessible Ramp Section

|Professional Practice| Ludlow Department of Public Works|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |148|


town construction standards + details

Precast Sewer Manhole Section

Most of the work I did at the Ludlow Department of Public Works, was the detailing of the townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s construction standards. I worked in there civil engineering department and also had to opportunity to aid the engineerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s with surveying and construction processes. All details and callouts were done in AutoCAD and were mainly needed as a basis for the town codes. The overall book that I developed totaled over 80 pages of notes and details.

Tree Planting Detail

|Professional Practice| Ludlow Department of Public Works|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |149|


home renaissance, inc. company profile Home Renaissance, Inc. is in the Real Estate Agents and Managers industry in Indian Orchard, MA. The company currently has approximately 1 to 5 employees and annual sales of Under $500,000. This was one of my first architecturally related jobs. I began working for Home Renaissance during the summer of my junior year in high school. I was very fortunate to have this job at such a young age because of the versatile experience I received. One being that I learned how to draft and then after I drafted up a couple plans I had the opportunity to work in the field under the builder and learn valuable hands on experience about building procedures and standards. To the right is my proposal for our office facade renovation!

|Professional Practice| Home Renaissance, Inc.|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |150|


Fiberon Buff Cedar Description Price Per Unit # of Units Flooring: 12’ Deck Boards $24.00 42 $1,008.00 16’ Deck Boards $31.00 30 $930.00 20’ Deck Boards $39.00 32 $1,248.00 $3,186.00 Hand Rail System: 8’ Interchangeable Top/ Bottom Rail $42.00 32” Square Baluster (24 PC Min.) $77.00 6 Post Sleeve 4.5”x4.5” $24.00 11 $264.00 $1,314.00 Hardware Kits: Post Cap, New England $8.00 11 Line Sec Hdw Kit $19.00 5 $95.00 $183.00 Total: $4,683.00 Fiberon Slate Grey Description Price Per Unit # of Units Flooring: 12’ Deck Boards $23.00 42 $966.00 16’ Deck Boards $30.00 30 $900.00 20’ Deck Boards $39.00 32 $1,248.00 $3,114.00 Hand Rail System: 8’ Interchangeable Top/ Bottom Rail $42.00 32” Square Baluster (24 PC Min.) $77.00 6 Post Sleeve 4.5”x4.5” $24.00 11 $264.00 $1,314.00 Hardware Kits: Post Cap, New England $8.00 11 Line Sec Hdw Kit $19.00 5 $95.00 $183.00 Total: $4,611.00 Eon Cedar Description Price Per Unit # of Units Flooring: 12’ Deck Boards $28.00 42 $1,176.00 16’ Deck Boards $38.00 30 $1,140.00 20’ Deck Boards $47.00 32 $1,504.00 $3,820.00 36” Traditional Hand Rail Kit: $113.00 12 2 Posts for Every 6’ Section 4- 33” Spacers 15 Balusters Post Sleeves Kit: $29.00 9 $261.00 4x4 Post Sleeves Copper Post Cap, Base Cover 100 Count Box of Clips $18.00 14 $5,689.00

Total Price

eastlongmeadow deck project 14 $462.00

$588.00

The redeveloped deck was to be cost estimated to see the different costs with different fiber deck boards. Also the design was to have one for built in seating and plantings and one without.

$88.00

Total Price

14 $462.00

$588.00

$88.00

Total Price

$1,356.00

$252.00

Proposed Deck Cost Estimate Plan of the Proposed Deck

|Professional Practice| Home Renaissance, Inc.|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |151|


Bobcat

Timber Frame Construction

Propane Tank

Stone Wall Construction

Rear Lower Level of Unfinished Unit

BONDSVILLE CONDOS The condominium project was a development plan that was on going for many years. I enjoyed the project tremendously because I was able to draft all the plans for the units prior to the construction. Afterwards I had the opportunity to join the field supervisor and physically construct such things as installing the siding, insulation, bathroom tile floor, sheetrock and rear french doors. It was a great learning experiance that went from design through the built structure.

Interior Perspective of Timber Framing

Installation of Siding

|Professional Practice| Home Renaissance, Inc.|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |152|


My primary tasks while in the office consisted of editing plans using AutoCAD 2005. The above plans are an example of the condominium units that I aided in physically constructing (see construction images on the next page). The amazing thing about the plans above is that they are the first CAD drawings that I was able to produce for a client. This was basically before any type of formal classes were on my part.

|Professional Practice| Home Renaissance, Inc.|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |153|


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PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE This portion of my segment one portfolio is dedicated to certain portions of the profession that I have encountered which would not be directly considered at practice. This includes design work that I have done independently and not under the supervision of an Architect. Additional information may include travel experience and architectural visits as well as, important speeches and lectures that I have attended outside of the classroom.

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|Professional Experience| Guggenheim Frank Lloyd Wright From Within Outward 6hrs|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski| |154|


Frank lloyd wright 2009 EXHIBITION

from within outward

Being an architecture student and a fan of Frank Lloyd Wright, myself and two other BAC friend’s of mine decided to gather some funds and make a day trip to NYC to see FLW’s 50th anniversary exhibition “From Within Outward”. The experience and knowledge that I gained from observing the exhibit was of great importance to myself. I have never been so intrigued and fascinated before. This was the most time I have ever spent in a museum before and I spend it mostly staring 3 inches away from the drawings, in amazement. Me and my friends looked at every single piece of work that was displayed in the exhibit. I was personally astonished at not only the number of works that was built but that FLW had almost more works/projects that were never built. The level of accuracy in the drawings was something that I appreciated to an extreme amount because in his time all of the drawing were done by hand. I was also shocked by some of the intricate drawing that were done on trace paper and how well they were preserved. Rendering was one of the main things that I enjoyed out of the exhibit. Hand rendering and coloring of architectural scenes is one of my weak areas and I overlooked many of his works and sketched while taking notes on FLW’s techniques that he used.

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum 1071 Fifth Avenue (at 89th Street) New York, NY 10128-0173

Sketch of the Cafe Doors at the Guggenheim.

guggenheim.org/ June 2nd, 2009 |Professional Experience| Guggenheim Frank Lloyd Wright From Within Outward 6hrs|

|AlexMessina, Jeffrey Siekierski| |155| Alex Siekierski, Frank Seth Coleman


From Within Outward Book Cover

Overall Perspective of the Museum

Central Spiral Ramp of the Exhibition Galleries

Lastly, I want to mention that it was an honor seeing the personal works of Frank Lloyd Wright due to the large international impact he has had on the profession of Architecture! It was of great pleasure to be in a room filled with his sketches and hand drafted designs. I feel that this day trip will leave an ever lasting imprint in my mind which I will not know until I am further along my path as a practicing professional. I also took the liberty of purchasing the exhibitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book that outlines all the projects and drawings from the exhibit. It will be nice to have a reference of what I witnessed in person and then could reflect back upon it.

Atrium Dome Skylight of the Central Space

Our first sight of the NYC Guggenheim Sketch of FLWâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;s North Arrow

|Professional Experience| Guggenheim Frank Lloyd Wright From Within Outward 6hrs|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski| |156|


BRIAN HEALY 2009 BAC EXHIBITION

firm information Brian Healy Architects 374 Somerville Avenue Second Floor

The overall experience I gained from helping erect the Brian Healy “Common Spaces” exhibition became a valuable learning aid towards my education. Foremost I was able to become closely tied to the overall members of Brian Healy’s firm, including Brian himself. So in general it was great to meet a local architect in the greator Boston area and learn about some the projects and design strategies involved.

Somerville, MA 02143 T 617.628.2717 F 617.628.2775 brianhealyarchitects.com/ Principal: Brian Healy

Throughout the assembly process of erecting the exhibit many structural hardships occurred. I found this valuable to my education because I was able to see the result of a design “failure.” I was currently taking structures 2 while this occurred and I could analyze the forces of the large vertical wall that was stressed. After this took place I found it intriguing how Brian Healy modified his design on the spot, in order to accommodate the failure that took place. Major alterations were made to the initial design and the show met its opening day goal. Overall it was a great opportunity for me to help out with this exhibit installation because it lastly, gave me hands on experience toward the amount of effort needed to put up the exhibition, the amount of quality in the display, as well as the connections the architect made through the affiliated lecture that took place. The lecture given by Mr. Healy involved a collection of his recent works in which he discussed some of his design concepts and theories. I was pleased to be presented with the material shown during the presentation because of the quality of the work and the diverseness of the projects that were spoken upon. Most importantly, I had a close encounter with the Healy exhibit and it gave me a great example of how professionals exhibit and present their work to the public. I found this to be the most valuable experience because it is something that I currently can apply to sudio and it is something I will be doing the rest of my life.

Preliminary Model of Intended Exhibition Space

|Professional Experience| Brian Healy Exhibit Spring 2009|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |157|


Floor Plan of the Exhibition Space

Korean Church of Boston Model Display

Large Vertical Member of the Exhibition

Large Model of the Greenway Boston

Ariel View of Exhibition

|Professional Experience| Brian Healy Exhibit Spring 2009|

Common Spaces Entry Wall

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |158|


Aias t-shirt design architectural design competition 10.24.2008 This open competition had minimal guidelines due to the expectation of the creativity of the students. I particularly had been influenced by the architectural firm Kuhn Riddle. The concepts and humor were a great influence. I intended to depict architects not only in the professional atmosphere but also a personal perspective. I choose different silhouettes of persons crossing the road. It is intended to be a composition of poses across a street. Below this composition the words “Why did the Architects cross the road.” This was to be the design for the front of the shirt. On the flip side I intended to finish the question on the front side with “...to get a better perspective.” The connection goes back to “why did the chicken cross the road.” To sum up my design intent I wanted to place some structure that would resemble a perspective. I went through many variations of structure but did not want something that someone could directly connect to. This was also why I choose to render everything in an obscured black and white. Lastly, I ended up choosing a photograph of my model that I had made in Design Five.

Front Design

|Professional Experience| Boston Architectural College AIAS T-Shirt Design Competition - October 24th 2008|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |159|


Black T Frontside

White T Frontside

Black T Backside

White T Backside

text for image <style: images> Back Design

|Professional Experience| Boston Architectural College AIAS T-Shirt Design Competition - October 24th 2008|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |160|


Ciao bella salone

extension design Company Information 128 Shaker Rd East Longmeadow, MA 01028-2759 (413) 525-4856â&#x20AC;&#x17D; Owner: Christine Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connell

Existing Salon Interior + Proposed Opening for Extension Preliminary Design Sketch

This project was primarily an interior design. I was a close family friend of the owner and she approached me with some ideas in which I translated into AutoCAD after measuring the site. Existing Conditions Rendering

Iterations of Design/ Spatial Arrangement Proposals

|Professional Practice| Ciao Bella Salone|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |161|


Exterior Entry overhang for the New Addition

There wasn’t much “design” involved per say. This was a matter of fitting the program into a fix volume. Therefore I design multiple spatial arrangement plans which involved a lot of thought on functionality as well as considerations of the building costs and existing conditions. The majority of the color and materiality selections were based upon matching that of the existing salon, therefore not much thought was needed.

The above image displays the entire addition. The image directly above is the entrance to the office just beyond the make-up bar.

|Professional Practice| Ciao Bella Salone|

Central Partition Which Houses Two Work Stations

Adjacent Unit Before Remodeling

Make-up and Jewelry Station

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |162|


The Jankins Residence was a project that come to me from my cousin Amy Clemens. Her and her husband were going to be expecting a second baby and they wanted to have a large area for the children. The home is located in Sutton Massachusetts, in a suburban neighborhood. The idea they had was to convert the existing garage into a den/ second living room and add new garage. The boards shown above display the existing conditions and some of my design thoughts.

|Professional Experience| Jankins Residence|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |163|


The third board is a continuation of multiple options that I foresaw as potential that could be explored for there new home extension. I wanted to provide them with realistic visual representation of different possible options that would match the existing language of the home. The last board is a collection of references in which I took inspiration from. |Professional Experience| Jankins Residence|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |164|


The Smotrich Residence was a project that I did for my friend Irinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parents. They had just purchased a parcel of land in Salem, CT and some blueprints of an scale residence. They then had the builder/contractor make slight alterations to the layout of the plan. They approached me by wanting to liven-up the exterior facade of the proposed home. They were unhappy by the complete whiteness of the current proposal and wanted to add some color as well as some play with multiple materials. The two panels above represent the proposed existing conditions. |Professional Experience| Smotrich Residence|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |165|


The last two panels are representative of multiple options that I foresaw as potential that could be explored. I decided to do a small solar study of the proposed building location in order to see what areas will be getting the most sunlight. This was helpful in choosing heavier facade materials in those areas. I particularly like the grid that the windows built and the strong vertical elements between the garage and the front entry. I decided to dress these elements in a different material and propose that around the oval stairwell. Other design option I thought were applicable Included an exterior open fireplace, extensions of all ridges and material usage on similar gestures of the facade. |Professional Experience| Smotrich Residence|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |166|


Before Photograph of Residence from online Catalog

the before and after I decided to emphasize the front circular stairwell and incorporate the oval into the exterior by choosing the rose (circular) windows over the front entry and a slightly small one over the center of the garage. This element becomes the first aspect of the home as you approach by vehicle. The material I choose was a stone veneer in order to lessen the weight load on the home and to also more easily be able to wrap the facade when needed. This greyish element became the distinction of the interior parts within the home reflected on the exterior.

Final proposal for the New Facade and Windows

|Professional Experience| Smotrich Residence|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |167|


summer Semester Abroad 2008 Fortunately during my undergraduate studies I had the opportunity to represent the UMass Amherst Architecture Department through a study abroad semester for a duration of about seven month (March â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;08 - Aug â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;08) in Berlin, Germany. It would be extremely hard to make a narrative that summarizes the life long impact that this excursion will have on me as a growing individual and a design professional. Throughout my seven month occupancy in Berlin, I was able to explore twenty-one countries while maintaining a g.p.a. of 3.4. This took a tremendous amount of coordination and timing. During my travels through 21 countries and 29 cities I was overwhelmed with many different cultures and there way life. I explored architectural spaces from all the historical ages from the 1st century AD up to the present modern forms. It was an excellent adventure for myself to physically experience all of the structures that I have been studying in art history and design studio. Lastly, I appreciated the overall cultures, including there unique foods and beer!

XVI

Oslo Opera House Sketch

|Travel Experience| Umass Amherst Semester Abroad Spring/Summer 2008 Berlin Germany|

Burj Dubai - Dubai, United Arab Emerites

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |168|


Hallocaust Memorial by Peter Eisenmen - Berlin, Germany

Dancing House by Frank Gehry Prague, Czech Republic

Guggenheim Bilbao - Bilbao, Spain

Sheikh Zayed Road Dubai, United Arab Emerites

Colosseum - Rome, Italy

Guggenheim Bilbao Sketch

Reichstag - Berlin, Germany Arlen Stawasz + Alex Siekierski

From an academic point of view, I was able to take a normal semesterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth of courses. The courses I explored were slightly different than the average American university. I was able to receive additional aid for the two classes I had in German due to the language barrier. Overall the content of the classes focuses on stainability in design around Europe as well as urban design + community redevelopment. The urban design seminar studio I participate in granted the class an opportunity to visit our urban site. The site was located along the Sheikh Zayed road in Dubai. The exploration and contacts that I created in Dubai will last me for a life time. The architecture that I was indulged in there was exquisite. |Travel Experience| Umass Amherst Semester Abroad Spring/Summer 2008 Berlin Germany|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |169|


Oslo Opera House - Oslo, Norway

Sagrada Familia by Antoni Gaudi Barcelona, Spain

MusĂŠe du Louvre - Paris, France

Dome of the Rock - Jerusalem, Israel

Rialto Bridge - Venice, Italy

Centre Le Corbusier - Zurich, Switzerland

Berlin Urban Design Studio Hagia Sophia - Istanbul, Turkey

|Travel Experience| Umass Amherst Semester Abroad Spring/Summer 2008 Berlin Germany|

Centre Georges Pompidou - Paris, France

Cathedrale Notre Dame - Paris, France

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |170|


10-12 weeks before 5-6 months before PR PR __ Schedule appointment for aisreview with director—bring one of your more advan Ensure that all prior work scanned anda program photographed __ Assemble self study work Develop page design and document layout. Create first table of contents __ Attend Portfolio Workshop work in progress Meet with Practice for Skill with Levelyour Update _ Attend Portfolio Forum if you need a refresher _ Meet with Advising—review GPA, STGPA and clearance checklist Portfolio Forum

October 17, 2007

810-12 weeks before PR PR weeks before __ Assemble practice material Schedule appointment for a review with a program director—bring one of your more adva Recommended Timeline: Preparation of a Segment I Portfolio (Arch.) __ Craft (or re-craft) design Assemble self study workconnection essay (LRC can help) __ Review edit resume Attend and Portfolio Workshop with your work in progress At conclusion of your first semester of design studio you should: _ Attend Portfolio Forum if you need a refresher _ Save all studio work Two weeks before PR _ Develop a résumé _ Check 8 weeks beforespelling PR and grammar for everything already completed _ Establish a budget for your portfolio process __ Find a proofreader Assemble practice material _ Gather your beginning work in an Itoya binder __ Review tore-craft) ensure that textconnection and imagesessay match Craft (or design (LRC can help) __ Print everything already completed Review and edit resume Two semesters before PR—beginning of B-1 Studio _ Auto-pagination is not necessary. Consider other methods for numbering pages _ Determine consistent storage media and location Two weeks before PR _ Save all A-2/Master’s A work At least week before _ one Check spelling andPR grammar for everything already completed _ Download and read portfolio construction guidelines and evaluation criteria http://www.the-bac.edu/x398.xml __ Print everything Find a proofreader _ Attend Portfolio Forum __ Verify and sequence Revieworder to ensure that text and images match _ Review successful portfolios in Library __ Bind portfolio—use a method that allows last-week changes Print everything already completed _ Confer with Learning Resource Center (LRC) for assistance in communicating concepts and developing __ Have portfolio completed at least daysother beforemethods it is duefor numbering pages Auto-pagination is not necessary. three Consider portfolio text _ Consider submitting portfolio earlier than deadline date _ Select and learn layout software _ Assess schedule (work At least one week before PR deadlines, child-care, available transportation, weather) and plan time _ Gather course names, instructor names and project titles _ Print everything _ Meet with Practice for Skill Level Update PLEASE SUBMITTAL DEADLINE IS FIRM AND IS NOT NEGOTIABLE _ VerifyNOTE: order and sequence _ Meet with Advising—review GPA, STGPA and clearance checklist _ Bind portfolio—use a method that allows last-week changes _ Sit for Segment I Progress Review _ Have portfolio completed at least three days before it is due _ Think about self-study and what you would like to share _ Consider submitting portfolio earlier than deadline date _ Assess schedule (work deadlines, child-care, available transportation, weather) and plan tim 5-6 months before PR _ Ensure that all prior work is scanned and photographed PLEASE NOTE: SUBMITTAL DEADLINE IS FIRM AND IS NOT NEGOTIABLE _ Develop page design and document layout. Create first table of contents _ Meet with Practice for Skill Level Update _ Meet with Advising—review GPA, STGPA and clearance checklist 10-12 weeks before PR _ Schedule appointment for a review with a program director—bring one of your more advanced projects _ Assemble self study work _ Attend Portfolio Workshop with your work in progress _ Attend Portfolio Forum if you need a refresher 8 weeks before PR _ Assemble practice material _ Craft (or re-craft) design connection essay (LRC can help) _ Review and edit resume Two weeks before PR _ Check spelling and grammar for everything already completed _ Find a proofreader _ Review to ensure that text and images match

Alex Jeffrey Siekierski Segment One Portfolio Grading Master of Architecture Boston Architectural College 07.20.2009


Segment I: ARCHITECTURE Unnacceptable

to

Unsatisfactory

to

Satisfactory

Excellent

STUDENT________________________________ DATE__________________ REVIEWER _______________________

Concept and Analysis Concept Concepts, spirit, or motivating ideas drawn from within and outside the design disciplines; clearly explored and creatively expressed.

Site and Contexts â&#x20AC;˘ Analysis and documentation of environmental factors of site.

â&#x20AC;˘ Research and documentation of qualitative, cultural, or historical issues in the context of the site.

Analysis Clear analysis, research and investigation of issues preliminary to, and informing design.

Concept and Analysis overall evaluation Design Development


Translation Rigorous exploration leading to successful translation of concepts, site and context issues, and analysis into built form.

Program Ability to organize small building programs of modest complexity and resolve them within a clear architectural framework.

Use Evidence of design thinking at human scale. Design of appropriate spaces for movement and other activities. Inquisitive exploration of design for human purposes and aspirations.

Form and Space Ability to develop and communicate three-dimensional space and form.

Materials and Structures â&#x20AC;˘ Explorations of the qualitative aspects of materials.

â&#x20AC;˘ Awareness of basic structural elements and their impact on a design.

Design Development overall evaluation


|Signatures + Comments|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |176|


|Signatures + Comments|

|Alex Jeffrey Siekierski |177|


Alex Jeffrey Siekierski 18 O Street Apartment 1 South Boston, MA 02127 Mobile 413.348.4824 AlexSiekierski@Hotmail.com http://bacweb.the-bac.edu/~alex.siekierski/

|Summer 2009|


BAC Segment One Portfolio