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Information is subject to frequent changes, but is current at the time of this book going to print: July 2010

Acknowledgements: Secondary Directorate Department of Education Cover design by: Dusty Ward Graphic design and formatting by Jonathan Durnford and Margaret Clark SIDE Secondary School Decisions 2011 Prepared by SIDE Student Services


Decisions for 2011 Senior Secondary Students

C O N T E N T S

37B

Page

Employment, Training or Education.................................................................... 3 Career Action Plan ............................................................................................ 10 WACE ................................................................................................................ 11 38

What is SIDE offering in 2011? ....................................................................... 13

Course Descriptions .......................................................................................... 14 Endorsed Programs at SIDE ............................................................................. 35 Financial Assistance .......................................................................................... 37 Useful Contacts ................................................................................................. 38

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Decisions for 2011 Senior Secondary Students

Making a choice about employment, training or education All young people in Western Australia - up to the year in which they turn 17 - must be in education, training or employment. You need to remember that whichever option or combination of options you choose must add up to full-time.

What does this mean to you? If you are a Year 10 student in 2010, you are required to participate in one of the following options in 2011: •

Full-time schooling

A full-time training program delivered by a Training WA (TAFE) college or private registered training organisation (RTO)

An apprenticeship or traineeship

Approved alternative learning programs typically delivered by community-based organisations

A combination of part-time school/training and part-time work

Full-time employment.

If you do not enrol in full-time schooling you need to complete a Notice of Arrangement Form available from the Participation Unit at the Department of Education.

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Decisions for 2011 Senior Secondary Students

VISA (Values, Interests, Skills, Abilities) Before you make the decision to stay at school, find another training option or seek employment, you need to think about what jobs or careers you are interested in, and what level of schooling or training they require. You are probably going to spend a long time working, so it will be easier if you start off on the right foot. This means knowing what might suit you. Sometimes we just let things happen and don’t stop to think about what we really like or are good at. It can be hard to think about yourself, so it might help to talk it over with someone. This could be your parents, teachers or family friends.

Values: Remember there is more to a job than the work itself. Think about the conditions under which you would like to work, the hours, the job security, the challenge and where the job may take you. What is important to you?

Abilities:

Interests: Think about what you enjoy doing and what you do well – at school, around the house, in parttime or casual work and your hobbies.

Skills: If you think a job would suit you where some special skills are needed, (such as a carpenter, musician, or journalist) try to talk to someone who does that sort of work.

Abilities: What are your strengths and weaknesses? Look at your school results. What courses do you need to choose for a particular pathway? Are these the courses for you? Choosing courses you are good at will lead to greater success and enjoyment in your senior secondary studies.

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Decisions for 2011 Senior Secondary Students

Where to get career information Student Services (SIDE)

4B

Contact your student coordinator and/or the Career Development Team (92426300). They are a great starting point. The coordinators have a range of career information and can help you to explore programs that provide pathways to university, Training WA (TAFE) and employment.

Resource Centre (SIDE)

5B

SIDE’s Resource Centre has a range of information on careers and further education and training. Phone 9242 6303. Two resources you can access using the Internet are: •

There are links to some excellent websites in the Careers section. Go to www.side.wa.edu.au and select the E-Learning tab then Janison LMS Login from the drop down menu. Use the login details below to enter the site. Rcguest rclib06

(0=zero)

On the left hand side under Your Study Groups choose Resource Centre, then Curriculum then Careers in the drop down menu. Some of these sites are careers related such as Job Guide while others provide broad information to help you select a career such as My Future. •

You can use the online catalogue to search for information about possible careers and further education. Go to www.side.wa.edu.au, select Resource Centre, then Resource Centre Services then Search our online catalogue and then Subject (eg. TAFE) or Keyword (eg. Veterinarian).

Career Centre This centre has a variety of information on almost every career in printed form, handbooks, videos and films. School holidays are a good time to visit the centre located at: City Central Building, Level 2, 166 Murray Street Mall, PERTH Phone: 08 9224 6500 Freecall: 1800 999 167 Open Monday to Friday 8.30am – 4.30pm Visit the website on www.trainingwa.wa.gov.au/careercentre/detcms/portal/ You can access course information, online tools and fact sheets via the CDC website. Trained staff members are available to answer any queries. The centre is open from 8:30 am to 5 pm weekdays for telephone enquiries.

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Decisions for 2011 Senior Secondary Students

Online Services www.getaccess.com.au is designed to help people to access key information. This includes people who are looking for work, planning a career or deciding on a career or training path. www.jobjuice.gov.au helps young Australians who are thinking about their future. Click on the Career Quiz for a good start to career planning.

H

www.myfuture.edu.au is an online career exploration and information service assisting people to make career decisions, plan career pathways and manage work and education transitions. www.skillsone.com.au contains hundreds of videos about getting a trade or skill and links to finding trade skill jobs. www.studentedge.com.au is a unique website which provides a youth friendly one-stop student services resource, delivering valuable information that is fun and relevant to WA students. www.youth.gov.au is an Australian government website providing information for young people.

Universities Each of the five universities in WA has a prospective students’ advisor available for discussion with students on various course requirements. Contact details are on page 38 of this booklet.

Apprenticeships and Traineeships F o r details about apprenticeships and traineeships, th e Department of Education website at www.trainingwa.wa.gov.au/apprenticentre provides comprehensive information.

Relatives and Acquaintances Someone who is currently doing a job is in the best position to tell you what it is really like. Also, they often have some good ideas about careers that you may not have considered.

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Decisions for 2011 Senior Secondary Students

Employment If you want to find employment at the end of this year, it is a good idea to start looking now. The internet is one of the best methods of searching for employment. There are many state and national sites advertising vacant positions (eg: www.seek.com.au, www.mycareer.com, www.jobs.wa.gov.au). There are also many recruitment agencies available on the Internet that assist in job placement. Many large organisations advertise in the ‘Situations Vacant’ columns of newspapers (particularly Wednesday and Saturday editions). There are many people applying for the same job, so you’ll probably need to apply for many positions. The more you apply for, the better your chances of success.

Hot tips •

• Register with Centrelink as soon as you leave school.

• Create a good impression on your first contact (whether you visit or phone).

Up to 50% of job vacancies are never advertised on the Internet, in newspapers or through Centrelink. It is, therefore, a good idea to visit and leave your CV at businesses where you are interested in working.

• Apprenticeships – approach employers or a Group Training scheme directly.

Remember, if you do get a job, and you are in the year in which you turn 16 or 17, you will need to complete and submit a Notice of Arrangement. This form is available from the Participation Unit at the Department of Education.

Centrelink Centrelink can help you look for work. Their offices have computers with touch screen ‘job banks’ to help you find job vacancies across the country, including apprenticeships and traineeships. Ring 13 2850 to find the nearest Centrelink to you or visit the website at www.centrelink.gov.au

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Decisions for 2011 Senior Secondary Students

Training Apprenticeships An apprenticeship is the period of time during which an apprentice is contracted to an employer to learn all about a trade, combining practical experience at work with complementary training at an off-the-job training provider. The aim of an apprenticeship is to train a person to become qualified in a particular trade. There is also a School Apprenticeship Link (SAL) offered through Australian schools. This program allows students to try different jobs in the same industry. It is ideal for students who know what industry they would like to work in but are not sure which job is suitable. Some apprenticeships are approved as School Based Apprenticeships. The Career Development Team at SIDE will help you with any enquiries related to School Based Apprenticeships which are available to eligible students at SIDE. Check out: www.training.wa.gov.au/apprenticentre

Pre-Apprenticeships A pre-apprenticeship course is a one year full-time course of instruction at a Training WA (TAFE) college in a specific trade or a small group or ‘family’ of trades. Pre-apprenticeships prepare people for entry into apprenticeships by providing experience in basic skills associated with the trade through a technical college. The minimum educational level is completion of Year 10. However, entry to all courses is very competitive.

Traineeships In a traineeship you gain hands-on skills and work experience, and improve your employment prospects, while earning a wage. On successful completion you will gain a nationally recognised qualification which can lead to rewarding career options. A traineeship can be either a full-time or part-time employment-based training arrangement, usually for a nominal duration of 12 months or more, generally in a trade related area. Some traineeships are approved as School Based Traineeships (SBT). The Career Development Team at SIDE will help you with any enquiries related to School Based Traineeships offered at SIDE. Group training organisations are another contact to assist you to find a traineeship. You can find the contact details of a local group training organisation at: www.grouptraining.com.au

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Decisions for 2011 Senior Secondary Students

Private Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) Private Registered Training Organisations offer nationally recognised training. RTOs may be business or secretarial colleges, industry-based training or computer training centres. For more information visit the National Training Information Service at www.ntis.gov.au

Training WA (TAFE) Training WA (TAFE) offers courses for vocational education and training, apprenticeships and traineeships, support for workplace learning and courses for business and industry.

Entrance requirements To gain entry into Training WA (TAFE), applicants need to meet the entrance requirements for the chosen course. Where a course is deemed to be competitive, applicants are required to meet both the entrance requirements and selection criteria. Selection criteria focus on secondary education achievement, skill development, previous qualifications and workplace learning (paid and unpaid). Students who are interested in applying to Training WA (TAFE) courses should check out the latest information from: www.trainingwa.wa.gov.au or contact: The Career Centre 166 Murray Street Perth City (Second floor, above Woolworths) Phone: 132398 or 1800999167 Email: career.centre@trainingwa.wa.gov.au

There are Training WA TAFE colleges, campuses and centres throughout Western Australia. So whether you live in the city or in the country, Training WA (TAFE) can be an option for you. If you are not able to attend your nearest Training WA (TAFE) you may be able to study externally. Contact them to find out what courses they offer externally. Check out Training WA TAFE information at: www.trainingwa.wa.gov.au/trainingwa/detcms/portal/ Training WA (TAFE) offers various levels of qualifications. These are:

CERTIFICATE (Level I, II III or IV)

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DIPLOMA

ADVANCED DIPLOMA


Decisions for 2011 Senior Secondary Students

Education If you are considering further study there are many alternatives available to you next year. These include: •

Year 11 at SIDE (if eligible) or another school

WA College of Agriculture (see page 39 of this booklet)

Private providers or colleges

School Based Traineeships, School Apprenticeship Link

Training WA (TAFE) Colleges.

Enrolling in Year 11 Eligible students deciding to enrol in Year 11 at SIDE may select:

A range of courses developed by the Curriculum Council

A Vocational and Education Training (VET) package

A School Based Traineeship or Apprenticeship

A range of endorsed programs

A combination of options to suit your circumstances.

Study at Year 11 level is generally more difficult and complex than lower secondary school studies. You will need to have developed consistent study habits, be organised and be prepared for more study time to successfully complete assessments and exams. Consider all alternatives and discuss your plans with as many people as possible to ensure that you choose the best pathway for your future. Select courses you will enjoy, as well as need, for a career or further study.

University study after Year 12 If you are planning on studying at a university after completing Year 12, you will need to carefully research the selection of your Year 11 and 12 courses. Many degrees offered at university have specific pre-requisite courses. It is important to make yourself familiar with the TISC website: www.tisc.edu.au and university websites (see page 38, Useful Contacts) You must also ensure that you have an ATAR (Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank) that makes you competitive for selection to the degree that you wish to study. Most universities have alternative entry programs that you should find out about if it is likely that you may not reach the standard entry criteria.

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Decisions for 2011 Senior Secondary Students

MY CAREER ACTION PLAN

2B

Student coordinators will contact fulltime students regarding this action plan.

3B

Student Coordinator:

Name:

In 2011 I intend to: † † † † †

Continue schooling at Get a job Apply to Training WA (TAFE) Get an apprenticeship/traineeship Other:

If this doesn’t work out, my back-up plan will be:

My future study plans are to complete: † † † † †

Year 11 Year 12 Training WA (TAFE) University Other:

Three career options that I am considering are: 1. 2. 3.

I have investigated the following sources of information about the above careers: † † † † † † †

Career Development Centre Online services SIDE Resource Centre Training WA (TAFE) course information University handbooks (circle) Curtin | ECU | Murdoch | Notre Dame | UWA Work experience Other:

ACTION: Student

Student Coordinator

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Decisions for 2011 Senior Secondary Students

Western Australian Certificate of Education (WACE) The Western Australian Certificate of Education (WACE) is awarded to secondary school students who satisfy prescribed requirements. The WACE is a requirement for entry to universities in Western Australia.

WACE Requirements for 2011-2012 In order for students to be eligible for a WACE at the end of 2012, they must satisfy the following requirements: Breadth and depth of study: • Complete a minimum of 20 course units or the equivalent. Up to 10 unit equivalents may comprise endorsed programs, including VET credit transfer (stand alone units). • The 20 course units must include at least: o Four course units from English, Literature and/or English as an Additional Language/Dialect, studied during Year 11 and Year 12 (at least two of these units must be completed in Year 12). o One pair of course units from each of List A and List B completed in Year 12. (See table on the next page). Achievement standard requirement: • Achieve a C grade or better across the best 16 course units of which at least 8 must be completed in Year 12. • Endorsed programs and/or VET credit transfer (stand alone) can reduce the required number of course units by up to 6 units. English language competence: • Students must achieve a C grade or better in any Stage 1 or higher course unit from English, Literature and/or English as an Additional Language/Dialect (except 1A and 1B for English as an Additional Language/Dialect). • For students who have not achieved a C grade in one of their English, Literature and/or English as an Additional Language/Dialect course units, schools will need to compare a selection of the students’ work with the work samples to verify the student has demonstrated the required standard.

All WACE courses consist of units, each with their own syllabus. Students are encouraged to study units appropriate to their level of development. Typically: • University-bound students study a program containing Stage 2 and Stage 3 units over their senior secondary years. In their final year, all or most of the units studied would be at Stage 3. • Students, who are planning on going into training through Training WA (TAFE) or at a private Registered Training Organisation, or directly into the workforce, study a mixture of Stage 1 and 2 units, or Stage 1 units in years 11 and 12. • Students requiring practical and supported learning to develop the skills required to be successful upon leaving school or in the transition to Stage 1 will typically study Preliminary Stage units and possibly some Stage 1 units. Preliminary Stage units are available in 19 courses.

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LIST A and LIST B Courses offered at SIDE, 2011 Students must choose at least one course from each of the lists.

LIST A BME CAE CFC ECO ENG FRE GEO HEA

Business Management & Enterprise IND Career and Enterprise Children, Family and Community Economics English French Geography Health Studies

ITA JAP LIT HIM PAL VAR WPL

Indonesian: Second Language Italian Japanese: Second Language Literature Modern History Politics and Law Visual Arts Workplace Learning

HBS ISC MDT MAT MAS PHY VTO

Human Biological Science Integrated Science Materials, Design & Technology Mathematics Mathematics Specialist Physics Tourism

LIST B ACF AIT AET BIO CHE DES EES

Accounting and Finance Applied Information Technology Automotive Engineering & Technology Biological Sciences Chemistry Design Earth and Environmental Science

Endorsed Programs Senior secondary programs developed by schools may be endorsed by Curriculum Council. Endorsed programs offer students the opportunity to use Workplace Learning (WL), Vocational Education and Training (VET) stand-alone programs and Personal Development programs to meet 50% of the requirements of the WACE. Students can be involved in any of these types of learning during or outside of school time through a variety of strategies. SIDE offers: • Personal Development programs which recognises the significant learning some students undertake outside school (eg Work Skills) • VET stand-alone packages (eg Business) and general vocational (eg CGEA) • Workplace Learning. For more information on WACE requirements go to the Curriculum Council website: www.curriculum.wa.edu.au

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Decisions for 2011 Senior Secondary Students

What is SIDE offering in 2011? SIDE Senior Secondary Courses and Endorsed Programs - 2011 Learning Area

Courses

Pge

The Arts

Visual Arts

14

Design – Dimensional Design

15

Career Development English

Design - Graphics

15

Career & Enterprise

16

Workplace Learning

17

English

16

Literature

16

Health & Physical Ed

Health Studies

17

Languages

French

18

Indonesian: Background Speaker

18

Indonesian: Second Language

18

Italian

18

PA

PB

9

9

9

9

1B

1C

1D

9

9 9 9 9 9

9 9 9 9

9

9 9 9 9

9 9 9 9 9

9

9 9

9 9

9

9

9 9 9 9

9 9 9 9

9

9

9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9

9

9

Japanese

18

Mathematics

Mathematics Mathematics Specialist

19 21

Science

Biological Sciences

21

Chemistry

22

Earth & Environmental Science

22

9

9

Human Biological Science Integrated Science

23 24

9

9

9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9

9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9

Physics

24

Society &

Economics

25

Environment

Geography

26

Modern History

27

Politics & Law

29

Technology &

Accounting & Finance

31

Enterprise

Applied Information Tech

32

Automotive Engineering & Tech

32

Business Management & Enterprise Children Family & Community

32

Design - Photography

33

33

Design – Technical Graphics

34

Materials, Design & Tech: Wood

334

Aspects of the Tourism Industry Part A and Part B

34

Endorsed programs Workplace Learning Mode 1: On-the-job Training Workplace Learning Mode 2: Employability Skills School Based Apprenticeship School Based Traineeship Aboriginal School Based Training Work Education : Certificate I Work Skills Business Services: Certificates I and II Certificate of General Education for Adults Keys for Life Working on Wheels Life Skills Succeeding As an Independent Learner (SAIL)

9

9

9

9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 D943 and D944

Page 35 35 35 35 35 35 35 36 36 36 36 36 36

9

9

9

9

9

9 9 9

9 9 9

1E

2A 2B

1A

2C 2D

3A 3B

3C 3D

9

9

9

9

9 9 9 9 9 9 9

9

9 9

9 9 9 9

9

9

9 9 9 9 9 9 9

9 9 9 9 9 9 9

9

Type of endorsed program Workplace Learning Workplace Learning VET VET VET VET Personal Development VET VET Personal Development Personal Development Personal Development Personal Development

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Snapshots of SIDE’s courses for WACE The Arts Learning Area Visual Arts 1A/B The focus for Unit 1A is experiences. Students develop artworks primarily concerned with experiences of the self and observations of the immediate environment. They discover ways to compile and record their experiences through a range of art activities and projects that promote a fundamental understanding of art language and appreciation of the visual arts in their everyday life. The focus for Unit 1B is explorations. In developing subject matter for artworks, students explore ways to express personal beliefs, opinions and feelings. They explore a variety of media and materials in a range of art forms when generating and extending ideas.

Visual Arts 1C/D The focus for Unit 1C is inspirations. Students will explore the concept of graphic illustration using creative art production methods in the art making process and will embark on an exciting journey to create an original illustration in Unit 1C. They will investigate other illustrators’ work which will promote an understanding of art language and appreciation. The focus for Unit 1D is investigations. The student will develop a print using a variety of print making techniques and processes in Unit 1D. They will create an original artwork and record their experiences through a range of art activities and projects in the printmaking context that will promote a fundamental understanding of art language and art appreciation. These courses will be 80% art making (practical) and 20% art interpretation and are nonexaminable.

Visual Arts 2A/2B The focus for these units is differences and identities. Students will be building art skills and historical knowledge to produce a contemporary studio piece in each semester (for each course). Students will be encouraged to develop personal expression through drawing, photography, painting, multi media, textiles or a variety of new and exciting variations. These courses will be 50% art making (practical) and 50% art interpretation which includes examinations. The Visual Arts courses aim to enable students to make connections to relevant fields of study and to prepare them for creative thinking and problem solving in future work and life.

Visual Arts 3A/3B The focus for Unit 3A is commentaries. Students have the opportunity to engage with the social, political and cultural purposes of art making and art interpretation. They have flexibility to select learning contexts that reflect their own cultural milieu and promote the production of a unique and cohesive body of work. Broad and innovative inquiry includes the conceptualisation and documentation of experiences within contemporary society. They research issues, events, and ideologies and examine their own beliefs, considering how the visual arts have reflected and shaped society and values. The focus for Unit 3B is points of view. Students have the opportunity to identify and explore concepts or issues of personal significance in the presentation of a sustained, articulate and authentic body of work. They research and analyse factors affecting points of view such as Page 14


Decisions for 2011 Senior Secondary Students

time, place, culture, religion and politics, synthesising this knowledge to express and communicate their personal viewpoint or position. In the critical analysis and interpretation of their own work and the work of others, they reflect on the relationships between artworks, audiences and contextual factors, considering how these contribute to the development of different perspectives.

Design – Dimensional Design 1C/D Dimensional Design gives students the opportunity to apply their initiative, creative abilities and practical skills through designing in three dimensions (textiles, jewellery and sculpture). Students will immerse themselves in 3-D designs and apply their knowledge to each project to create innovative solutions to each given aim. These courses are project-based activities aimed at developing design processes that involve current and future needs of creative industries. Students will develop their understanding and application of designing products and express their learning through a 70% practical component and a 30% written component.

Design – Graphics 1A/B, 1C/D, 2A/B Graphic design is the process of creating a visual image with or without text to endorse or strengthen a client's message. Design Graphics introduces students to the field of visual problem solving, specialising in corporate and brand identities, stationery, retail and boutique packaging, labels, environmental graphics and signage. It is hoped that students studying this course will research the trends and functionality of each product before applying their own creativity, initiative and individual rationale to each project- based activity. These courses aim to develop student understanding of how design works; and how ideas, beliefs, values, attitudes, messages and information are effectively communicated. Students will look at contemporary graphic design, advertising, popular culture and illustration and learn to develop, plan and produce functionally effective pieces for the world of today and for the future. Students will explore the world of design through the use of design skills, digital photography and contemporary computer software packages. These courses will be 70% practical and 30% written.

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English Learning Area English English courses attempt to engage students with a wide range of texts, both print and non-print. The purpose of each course is to lead students to an understanding of how language is used to shape the way each of us perceives and represents ourselves and our world. Students will analyse print and non-print texts. With all of these texts they will also consider their own responses and those of others.

Literature Literature presents a wide range of perspectives on life; students will explore and comment on these perspectives through creative writing, oral presentations and essays. They will engage in close textual analysis of literary texts and develop an understanding of how writers craft their writing and are influenced by the context in which they write. Students will also consider how their own attitudes and values affect their response to a text. This course also offers visual texts for consideration in order to enhance further knowledge and understanding. To successfully undertake this course a student needs to be interested in reading, have good writing skills and have the ability to think analytically.

Career Development Learning Area Career and Enterprise PA/B The focus for Unit PA is understanding the concept of work. Students are provided with opportunities to develop an understanding of the concept of a career and the fundamental knowledge and skills required to manage it successfully. The focus for Unit PB is exploring work in my community. Students are provided with opportunities to increase their knowledge of career choices through an awareness of their local community.

Career and Enterprise 1A/B The focus of Unit 1A is exploring my world and its connections. Students recognise themselves as part of a network of people and organisations and identify who can help with school-to-work transitions. The focus of Unit 1B is entry-level work readiness. Basic skills and entry-level jobs are put under the microscope and links are drawn between the two as they broaden their understanding of work roles within specific industry areas.

Career and Enterprise 1C/D The focus of Unit 1C is personal career management. The unit explores career competencies, knowledge, values and attitudes, combining these with work search tools and techniques to start planning career development options. The focus of Unit 1D is personal independent career development. Opportunities are provided to develop career competencies in preparation for becoming employees.

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Workplace Learning The Workplace Learning course aims to provide all students with the knowledge, workplace skills and attitudes valued within work environments, as a preparation for employment. As well as demonstrating skills listed for the course students need to collect and record evidence of these skills. They need to determine how to progress their skills and undertake assessment tasks in order to further develop them.

Workplace Learning 1A/B The focus of Unit 1A is to introduce structured workplace learning. Students prepare for, and are placed in, a suitable workplace. While in the work placement, students are assessed on work related skills by the workplace supervisor. Students reflect on the skills assessed. The focus of Unit 1B is to build on structured workplace learning and follows on from Unit 1A. Students prepare for, and are placed in, a suitable workplace. The workplace could be in the same or a different industry area. Skills are selected to complement the skills from Unit 1AWPL. While in the work placement, students are assessed on work related skills by the workplace supervisor. Students reflect on the skills assessed.

Health and Physical Education Learning Area Health Studies The health industry is a growing area of employability for students and the potential pathways are extensive. There are also possibilities for apprenticeships and positive job outcomes. This course will prepare students for career pathways in a range of health and community service industries. Students will have the opportunity to develop key employability and life skills including communication, enterprise and leadership. Health Studies focuses on the study of health as an essential ingredient for the quality of human life. The scope of units allows students to engage in studies ranging from personal health concepts and issues, community health, the impact of popular culture on health, technology, the environment and community health and finally the health of specific populations and global health challenges.

Health Studies 1A The focus for Unit 1A is an introduction to health. The unit provides opportunities for students to identify challenges and responsibilities surrounding their own health. It focuses on basic concepts, models and frameworks. There is the opportunity to identify healthy behaviour in relation to a number of different contexts including alcohol, road safety, depression and stress, road rage and decision making.

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Health Studies 1B The focus for Unit 1B is on personal health. This unit explores personal health influences, factors and approaches to improving health. There is the opportunity to identify healthy behaviour in relation to a number of different contexts including exercise programs, healthy eating, lifestyle diseases and basic life skills.

Health Studies 1C The focus for Unit 1C is on personal, peer and family health. There is the opportunity to identify healthy behaviour in relation to a number of different contexts including stress, fast food, community health, physical activity, and exercise and diet programs.

Health Studies 1D The focus for Unit 1D is on the health of groups and communities. There is the opportunity to identify healthy behaviour in relation to a number of different contexts including health promotion, decision making, injury prevention and leadership.

Health Studies 2A The focus for Unit 2A is on popular culture and its impact on the health of individuals and communities. There is the opportunity to identify healthy behaviour in relation to a number of different contexts including health issues of your choice, time management, what determines health, health promotion, and the media.

Health Studies 2B The focus for Unit 2B is on technology, the environment and its impact on community health. There is the opportunity to identify healthy behaviour in relation to a number of different contexts including road safety, mental health, decision making, technology, disease prevention and health improvement.

Health Studies 3A The focus for Unit 3A is on health of specific populations. A number of principles, frameworks and models are explored. There is the opportunity to identify healthy behaviour in relation to a number of different contexts including indigenous health, youth health, rural and remote health and factors that contribute to inequities and inequalities.

Health Studies 3B The focus for Unit 3B is on global, local and regional challenges to health. There is the opportunity to identify healthy behaviour in relation to a number of different contexts including healthy populations, responsibilities for global health priorities and policies for the future.

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Languages Learning Area Open more doors by taking the language pathway to TAFE, University or employment. Enrich your WACE success by selecting French, Indonesian or Italian or Japanese language units in Year 11. Beginning students enrol in Unit 1A. Students who have studied the language in Years 8-10 enrol in Unit 2A. By completing a technology based modern language course, students can learn many new skills, widen their horizons and have the opportunity to interact with people from other cultures through a second language. Think globally, act now! Live a richer life, learn a language! Please note that enrolment in Japanese in 2011 is conditional on the student’s computer having appropriate and SIDE compatible software installed. You may contact the SIDE Language Department for further information.

Mathematics Learning Area In all mathematics courses students calculate using mental strategies, written methods, and calculators and use computer technologies where appropriate.

Mathematics 1A Students develop understanding of multiplication and division. They use whole numbers and the four operations for practical purposes, including financial matters useful to them personally and in employment. Students measure length and mass of objects and calculate perimeters. They interpret timetables. They explore three-dimensional shapes and use informal maps. Students recognise and describe chance in familiar activities and produce data using probability devices. They collect and describe categorical and time-series data.

Mathematics 1B Students use decimals, fractions and percentages for practical purposes. They apply mathematics for personal budgeting, banking and shopping. They estimate and measure length and mass of objects using a variety of instruments, and derive and use methods for calculating perimeter and basic areas. They translate, reflect and rotate shapes in design. Students use repeated measurement to collect data relevant to them, display data in tables and graphs and interpret the displays.

Mathematics 1C Students use decimals, fractions, percentages and ratios for practical purposes. They apply mathematics to financial matters in the workplace. They write and use algebraic rules for number patterns. They measure volume and other attributes of objects, and derive and use formulas for area and volume. They read and draw maps with scales, describe and draw shapes in three dimensions. Students describe likelihood for chance events, and design and test simple probability devices. They collect time-series data relevant to them, display data in tables and graphs and interpret the displays.

Mathematics 1D Students use integers, decimals, fractions, percentages and ratios for practical purposes. They apply mathematics in making financial decisions. They write word sentences algebraically and solve simple algebraic equations. They calculate area and perimeters of circles and use the Pythagoras’ theorem for calculating the length of the sides of right triangles. They describe the effects of reflecting, rotating and translating shapes in design, and enlarge, reduce and distort Page 19


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figures. They interpret detailed maps. Students collect measurement data from fair samples, display data in tables and graphs, calculate averages and describe spread of data, and compare datasets.

Mathematics 1E Students use positive and negative numbers and numbers with powers for practical purposes. They calculate interest and repayments for loans. They draw graphs to represent real situations, and use them to describe how quantities are related. They use trigonometry to calculate measurements in right triangles, and calculate volume and surface area of shapes. They analyse networks. Students simulate everyday chance events, calculate probabilities and predict using probabilities. They collect bivariate data relevant to them, display the data in tables and graphs, and describe trends.

Mathematics 2A Students apply ratios, rates and direct proportion in practical situations. They calculate profit, loss, discount and commission in financial contexts. They study introductory algebra and linear relationships in numeric, algebraic and graphical forms. They use Pythagoras’s theorem for the sides of triangles and analyse the reflection, rotation and translation of shapes in design. Students collect data from fair samples, and represent and interpret the data.

Mathematics 2B Students study and apply exponential relationships. They develop skills for solving equations algebraically and graphically, and investigate and generalise number patterns. They use coordinate geometry in two dimensions. They use formulas directly and inversely for calculations involving shapes three-dimensional. They apply trigonometry in right triangles. They represent information using network diagrams. Students simulate everyday chance events, calculate and interpret probabilities, and collect and analyse bivariate and time-series data.

Mathematics 2C Students calculate interest and repayments in order to make decisions about savings and loans, and they interpret information on financial statements that are part of everyday living. They study and apply quadratic relationships. They extend their knowledge of coordinate geometry, and represent information in networks and interpret network diagrams. Students calculate and interpret probabilities for events with more than one chance component. They analyse and compare datasets, determine trends in data and use trend lines for prediction.

Mathematics 2D In this unit, students study functions and their graphs. They formulate recursion rules and apply recursion in practical situations. They explore patterns, making conjectures and testing them. They use trigonometry for the solution of right and acute triangles. Students simulate chance events on technologies, and calculate and interpret probabilities for chance events that occur in two- or three- stages. They plan random samples, collect, and analyse data from them, and infer results for populations.

Mathematics 3A Students explore and analyse the properties of functions and their graphs. They develop and use algebraic skills for solving equations. They apply recursion in practical situations, including for finance. They use trigonometry for the solution of triangles. Students use counting principles to calculate probabilities and analyse normally-distributed data. They plan sampling methods, analyse data from samples and infer results for populations.

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Mathematics 3B Students study differential and integral calculus of polynomial functions and use calculus in optimisation problems. They develop algebraic skills for solving equations and apply them in linear programming. They analyse and construct project networks. They reason deductively in algebra and geometry. Students analyse bivariate data, and argue to support or contest conclusions about data.

Mathematics Specialist 3A The focus for this unit is on representation and students use a variety of forms. A strong distinction is drawn between exact and approximate results and their practical applications in particular contexts when solving problems. Students use mathematical models to understand situations defined in terms of change. Mathematical reasoning is introduced and used to establish laws and investigate functions.

Mathematics Specialist 3B Students explore new ways of expressing and analysing change, including limiting behaviour and continuity. Students establish and use properties to develop deductive proofs. By building strong algebraic skills to support mathematical arguments, supplemented by the use of appropriate technology, students investigate more complex models to solve practical problems.

Mathematics Specialist 3C The focus for this unit is on the abstract development of a range of sophisticated relationships. Spatial contexts are extended from two dimensions to three. This unit develops abstraction as an increasingly powerful way of expressing and analysing change. It introduces exhaustion and contradiction as methods of proof to be explored.

Mathematics Specialist 3D The focus for this unit is on the use of differential and integral calculus to understand a range of phenomena. By increasing familiarity with transformation and the use of matrices, students can extend their theoretical understanding of growth and decay models. This unit introduces mathematical induction to complete the suite of proof processes developed in mathematical reasoning, to a satisfactory, pre-tertiary level.

Science Learning Area Biological Sciences Biology is the study of living organisms and their interrelationships with each other and with the physical world. Studying Biological Sciences will provide students with an appreciation of life and a better understanding of the living world around them.

Biological Sciences 1A In this unit students will observe the fauna and flora of their local ecosystems to gain an appreciation of the huge diversity of organisms and consider why this diversity occurs. Students will also learn about the relationships that can occur between organisms and identify those occurring in their local environment.

Biological Sciences 1B In this unit students will look at local ecosystems and factors that affect these ecosystems. Students will also learn about how organisms reproduce and how humans have controlled reproduction for commercial purposes. Page 21


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Biological Sciences 2A The focus for this unit is adaptations for survival. Students will learn how organisms are classified and are able to survive in places where their needs can be met. Students will also explore cell processes and the role of organisms in cycling matter.

Biological Sciences 2B The focus for this unit is patterns of change. Students will learn about the interrelationships between organisms and their effects on population dynamics. Students will also find out about the reproductive processes that are required to produce new individuals and how genetic information is passed from one generation to the next.

Biological Sciences 3A The focus for this unit is maintaining balance. Students will learn how survival depends upon an organism’s ability to respond to changes in external and internal environments. Students will also explore different types of ecosystems and the causes and consequences of a range of environmental issues.

Biological Sciences 3B The focus for this unit is evolution. Students will learn that the biodiversity that currently exists on the earth is a result of the evolutionary processes over time and that natural selection is the main mechanism of evolution. Students will also find out that human survival and qualify of life depend on the effective conservation of biodiversity to maintain biodiversity, supply food and recycle resources as well as preserve the aesthetic value of the natural environment.

Chemistry Chemistry is the study of matter and its interactions. Studying Chemistry will equip students with a knowledge and understanding of chemistry to enable them to appreciate the natural and built environment, its materials, and interactions between them. It is recommended that students studying Chemistry 3A and 3B should have completed Chemistry 2A and 2B, or equivalent.

Chemistry 2A The focus for this unit is chemistry in and around the home. Students will study the chemical information relating to materials and their uses in their surroundings. Students will learn to use chemical concepts and language to better equip themselves to use chemical information appropriately and to make responsible decisions on the use of materials.

Chemistry 2B The focus for this unit is chemistry and the environment. Students will gain an understanding of how chemistry plays a vital role in addressing environmental problems in their community. The responsibilities of people associated with the sustainable development of environments and the use and disposal of related products and by-products are highlighted.

Chemistry 3A The focus for this unit is chemical processes. Students will examine relationships between concepts, models and principles, and sustainable chemical practices where industry endeavours to achieve a maximum yield at the lowest possible cost.

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Chemistry 3B The focus for this unit is chemistry and modern lifestyles. Students will gain an understanding of the complex models that underlie the study of medicines, biochemistry, fuel cells and plastics through further study of equilibrium, oxidation and reduction, and organic chemistry.

Earth and Environmental Science The Earth’s resources play a major role in Australia’s economy. The mining industry in Western Australia alone employs one in six people. Given that most of the Earth’s resources are finite, their sustainable use and management will play a major role in the quality of life for Australian citizens. The Earth and Environmental Science course draws on a wide variety of science disciplines to develop an understanding of the earth and the environment to enable students to make balanced and informed decisions about personal, community and global impacts on the environment.

Earth and Environmental Science 1A The focus for this unit is our earth and environments. Students will gain an understanding of several different local environments by examining the processes involved in the creation or modification of resources such as water and soil. Students will also gain an understanding of natural processes and human interaction in local environments that lead to issues concerning our use of resources, conservation and sustainability.

Earth and Environmental Science 1B The focus for this unit is changing earth and environments. The earth’s surface is continually changing by both natural forces and human influences. Students will have the opportunity to examine changing environments and conduct their own investigations to answer questions about these environments.

Human Biological Science Human Biological Science covers a wide range of ideas relating to the functioning human. Students will learn about themselves and how their body allows them to survive in a changing environment. Students will also get the opportunity to research new discoveries that are increasing our understanding of the causes of dysfunction, which can lead to new treatments and preventative measures.

Human Biological Science 2A The focus for this unit is functioning humans. Students will learn how human structure and function supports cellular metabolism; how genetic variations in offspring can be predicted and how lifestyle choices impact body functioning.

Human Biological Science 2B The focus for this unit is human survival. Students will explore in more depth, the mechanisms of transmission of genetic materials to the next generation, the role of males and females in reproduction and how interactions between genetics and the environment influence early development.

Human Biological Science 3A The focus for this unit is human regulation. Students will learn how the body works to maintain a constant internal environment despite changes in the external environment. They will also learn that the range of variation seen in humans today is not always the result of Page 23


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simple genetics but may involve more complicated models of inheritance. Natural selection leading to evolution and the evidence that supports this will also be studied.

Human Biological Science 3B The focus for this unit is future humans. Students will discover that the role of DNA is vitally important and recent advances in knowledge and biotechniques have led to new ways of diagnosing and treating disease. They will explore how the malfunction of body systems can occur through trauma, disease and/or aging. Students will also discover that the origin of humans can be traced back millions of years to the first primates and learn about the trends in primate and hominid features.

Integrated Science The course is based on an integrated view of scientific knowledge that draws on the traditional disciplines of science and new scientific technology to enable students to investigate issues that are interesting and relevant in a modern world.

Integrated Science 1A and 1B The focus of these units is on everyday science with an emphasis on materials. Students will investigate the products sold at the Total Warehouse, by investigating the materials they are made of and their uses.

Physics Physics is the study of the properties of, and interrelationships between energy and matter. Physics helps to construct models and explain physical phenomena. Studying Physics will give students a deeper understanding of the world around them.

Physics 2A The focus for this unit is motion and forces and nuclear physics. This unit will explore motion in one dimension to solve both qualitative and quantitative problems. Through the study of nuclear physics, students will learn about atomic structure and subatomic particles to understand and appreciate phenomena such as those that lead to the emission of nuclear radiation, and nuclear energy.

Physics 2B The focus for this unit is heating and cooling and electrical fundamentals. Whilst studying this unit students will gain understandings about how energy is transferred through different types of materials and examine the thermal properties of substances. Students will also learn about electricity, and the relationship between electricity and magnetism.

Physics 3A The focus for this unit is motion and forces in a gravitational field and electricity and magnetism. This unit will explore motion of objects in gravitational fields, including the motion of projectiles, orbiting satellites, planets and moons, and ways in which forces may affect the stability of extended objects. Through the study of electricity and magnetism, students will learn about magnetic fields and how they interact with moving charges in situations involving current electricity, the motor effect and electromagnetic induction.

Physics 3B

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The focus for this unit is particles, waves and quanta and motion and forces in electric and magnetic fields. Whilst studying this unit, students will gain further understandings about mechanical and electromagnetic waves and how waves are used in a variety of technologies, such as in musical instruments, communication systems or sensing systems. Students will also have the opportunity to extend your knowledge of atomic physics and explain a range of physical phenomena such as fluorescence and X-ray emission. This unit also enables students to learn about some aspects of modern physics such as relativity and cosmology.

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Society and Environment Learning Area Economics Economics Stage 1 Stage 1 Economics is offered as two independent units. Students may select to do one or both units in a year. Results are reported to the Curriculum Council at the completion of each unit.

Economics Stage 1A Personal Economics and Finance “Cashed Up and Debt Free!” Personal Economics and Finance is a semester course aimed at developing students’ financial literacy skills. This unit is to be completed in Semester 1. The topics covered in this course are: • Consumer rights • Credit cards and credit card scams • The different types of loans and the costs associated with these loans • Buying a used car – finding the best deal and ensuring that the car is not being used as security for a loan or is stolen or ‘rebirthed’. Personal Economics and Finance is a practical “hands on” course that will give students the skills to budget, save, invest and spend wisely.

Economics Stage 1B Business Economics “Have You Got What It Takes?” There are over a million small businesses operating in Australia. Some students once they have left school will want to set up their own small business. This course aims to give students an understanding of the role of businesses in the Australian economy and introduce the skills and knowledge needed by students to operate their own business successfully. Students will develop an idea for a business, write a business plan, identify their target audience, design marketing strategies and learn about government regulations. This unit to be completed in Semester 2

Economics Stage 2A/B Stage 2 Economics is offered as a year long concurrent course. Both 2A and 2B units will be assessed as one course and reported on at the end of the year. The final examination will contain content from both units. Markets and the Australian Economy This is a year long course that introduces students to markets and macroeconomic issues. Students will learn why prices of goods and services change and will investigate either an environmental issue or the share market. In the macroeconomics part of the course, students will learn about inflation, unemployment and economic growth in the Australian economy. In addition, students will be introduced to the role of government in providing economic stability and improving the living standards of Australians.

Economics Stage 3A/B Australia in the Global Economy. This is a year long course that explores Australia’s growing economic relationships with other countries and global economic events and issues of significance to Australia. It examines the importance of foreign trade and foreign investment to the Australian economy. It is strongly recommended that Stage 2 Economics is successfully completed before attempting this course. It includes topics such as: • Australia’s growing trade links with China and India • Free trade and protection • Arguments for and against globalisation. Page 26


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Students will learn about Australia’s current macroeconomic performance and policy stance in the last ten years and compare these indicators to other economies in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. (The OECD is an international organisation helping governments tackle the economic, social and political challenges of a globalised economy).

Geography Stage 1 Geography Stage 1 Geography is offered as two independent units. Students may select to do one or both units. Results will be reported to the Curriculum Council at the completion of each unit.

Geography 1A The Geography of environments at risk. In this unit you will look at the geography of ecosystems and world biomes. This unit is to be completed in Semester 1. This course will cover: • Major natural environments of the world • The Jarrah forest of Western Australia • Daintree forest in Northern Queensland • The impact of human activity • Mapping, internet and research skills.

Geography Unit 1B The Geography of people and places. In this unit students will study the geography of South East Asia. This unit is to be completed in Semester 2. This course will cover: • The physical and cultural landscapes of South East Asia • The characteristics of the different countries that make up the South East Asia region • Climate, landforms, vegetation, population, cultures and settlement of the South East Asia region • Mapping, internet and research skills.

Geography Stage 2A/B Stage 2 Geography is offered as a year long concurrent course. The course investigates the geography of natural hazards and sustainable resource use. This course will cover: • The study geomorphic and atmospheric hazards, their impacts and how people respond to them • Volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and tsunamis associated with geomorphic hazards • Storms, floods, droughts and bushfires associated with atmospheric conditions • How people respond to these hazards and how they plan to minimise the effects • How people use renewable and non renewable resources • The sustainable use of resources in Australia in comparison to a less developed country • Case studies of renewable resources such as agriculture, forestry or fishing and non renewable resources such as minerals or fossil fuels • A range of mapping, internet and research skills are also covered.

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Geography Stage 3A/B Stage 3 Geography is offered as a year long concurrent course. It is strongly recommended that Stage 2 Geography has been successfully completed. This course investigates the planning of cities and climate change. This course will cover: • Designing cities • Urban planning • Comparing Perth with a mega city such as New York and London • The greenhouse effect • The human response to climate change • Future action to address climate change.

Modern History A study of Modern History enables students to become critical thinkers. Stage 1 units are designed for students who are unsure of their pathway. Stage 2 and Stage 3 units suit students who enjoy reading and want to develop the skills associated with historical inquiry.

Modern History Stage 1 Stage 1 units offer students flexibility in their learning program. Students can choose to study Stage 1A and 1B as single or paired units. Further flexibility is available to students with the choice of two Stage 1A units.

Modern History 1A (Option one) The focus for this unit is people, place and time. Through a study of Australia’s involvement in the Vietnam War students will learn that there are problems associated with primary evidence and that there is more than one version (point of view) about past events. Australia’s involvement in the war addresses the theme of people, place and time. The unit is called Battlefronts: Vietnam.

Modern History 1A (Option two) The focus for this unit is people, place and time. Students will use an investigative approach to discover some background about Australia engagement in World War Two. Australia’s involvement in the war addresses the theme of people, place and time. Students will learn about the siege of Tobruk, the sinking of HMAS Sydney, and the bombing of Darwin.

Modern History 1B The focus for this unit is power and authority. Through a study of Tokugawa and Meiji Japan students will learn that there are various types of power and authority institutions (structures) within which individuals interact and are organised or controlled. They will develop an understanding of the difficulties of creating a fair, just and equal society. The unit is called Power and Authority: The Path to Power.

Modern History Stage 2 (Year 11 only) Stage 2 Modern History is offered as a year long concurrent course. Both 2A and 2B units will be assessed as one course and reported on at the end of the year. The final examination will contain content from both units.

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Modern History 2A The focus for this unit is societies and change. Students become aware of the evolving nature of societies and the various forces for continuity and change that exist. They will discover that in any period of change there are those individuals and institutions that support change, but others that oppose it; and that there are different interpretations of the society. They will study the most significant period of change in ‘modern’ time; the Industrial Revolution 1760-1900 and its impacts by an analysis of the economic, political and social conditions at the time. The unit is called Societies and Change: Investigating the Industrial Revolution.

Modern History 2B The focus for this unit is historical trends and movements. Through a study of Nazism in Germany 1918–1945 students will understand that throughout history there have been events, ideas, beliefs and values that have contributed to underlying historical trends and movements. Some have had a fleeting impact on society, and these trends and movements have met with varying degrees of support and opposition, sometimes causing conflict. They will be able to note cause, impact and consequence, action and reaction and trends of continuity and change. The unit is called Historical Trends and Movements: Nazism in Germany 1918–1945.

Modern History Stage 2 (Year 12 only) Students sitting the Stage 2 WACE exam in their final year must study 2A in the following contexts.

Modern History 2A The focus for this unit is societies and change. In this unit students will become aware of the evolving nature of societies and the various forces for continuity and change that exist. They will discover that in any period of change there are those individuals and institutions that support change, but others that oppose it; and that there are different interpretations of the society. The unit is called Societies and Change: Australia 1920s-1950s

Modern History 2B The focus for this unit is historical trends and movements. Through a study of Nazism in Germany 1918–1945 students will understand that throughout history there have been events, ideas, beliefs and values that have contributed to underlying historical trends and movements. Some have had a fleeting impact on society, and these trends and movements have met with varying degrees of support and opposition, sometimes causing conflict. They will be able to note cause, impact and consequence, action and reaction and trends of continuity and change. The unit is called Historical Trends and Movements: Nazism in Germany 1918–1945.

Modern History Stage 3 Stage 3 Modern History is offered as a year long concurrent course. Both 3A and 3B units will be assessed as one course and reported on at the end of the year. The final examination will contain content from both units. This subject is to be completed as a pair of units and cannot be separated.

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Modern History 3A The focus for this unit is cohesion and division. Students learn that there are internal and external forces that result in cohesion and/or division within societies and these have consequences for continuity and change. Students assess how the structures of power and authority were used, how different groups and individuals responded and whether there was the potential for greater cohesion or division. Within the broad focus of cohesion and division, students will study the unit called Cohesion and Division: Australia 1920s-1950s

Modern History 3B The focus for this unit is ideas that shaped history. The object of this unit is to explore the power of ideas and ideologies as forces for change and/or their use to reinforce dominant elements in society. Knowledge about the evolution and spread of significant ideas assists students to understand the beliefs and values of a society and to what extent these ideas have been cohesive or divisive. They are also able to determine which ideas were dominant at a given time and how and why this dominance may have changed. Students are able to identify and evaluate sources that contain a range of viewpoints and interpretations of the ideas being studied and be able to discuss how changing perspectives about past events, people and ideas challenge explanations and representations of the past. To achieve these understandings students will study the unit called Ideas That Shaped History: the Chinese Revolution—from Nationalism to Maoism (1930s–1980s).

Politics and Law Politics and Law 1A The focus for this unit is political and legal decision-making. Students critically examine the role of rules and law in society, differing value systems and the relationship between systems of law and government. The course will enable the student to gain a general understanding of Australia's political and legal system. The course also contains units which will give the student credit points towards Training WA (TAFE) entry and will expose students to Training WA TAFE Units of Competency. The course is designed for students who wish to pursue an academic program but are not necessarily aiming towards a university course. This unit is only available in Semester 1.

Politics and Law 1B The focus for this is civil and political rights. Students critically examine the key features, application, enforcement and impact of laws on individuals. They also examine the processes that allow for individual participation in political and legal systems. Students will examine the Western Australian political and legal system and another political and legal system specifically referred to eg America or Britain. Students also have the opportunity to obtain a VET unit of competency in the course. The course is only available in Semester 2.

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Politics and Law Stage 2A/B This is a year long course in which students develop an understanding of Australia’s political and legal systems. The course will give students an excellent background to a wide variety of topics such as: • The development of our political system • Recognise key features of a democratic system such as Australia • Describe the structure of government in Australia • Look at aspects of our political system such as political parties, voting systems and election analysis • Look at contemporary political issues • Understand the different types of laws in Australia • Look at case studies of law • Understand the process in creating laws • Explain the court system and how it operates • Examine criminal and civil law cases. Student wishing to go on to tertiary education in areas such as Social Science, Commerce and Law will benefit from doing this unit. The unit will give students an excellent foundation for further studies at a tertiary level.

Politics and Law Stage 3A/B The Stage 3 unit is a full year course aimed at developing and extending knowledge in Politics and Law. Students who have achieved pass grades or better in the Stage 2 course are encouraged to continue their studies by completing the Stage 3 units. Students can attempt the Stage 3 unit if they have not completed Stage 2 only if their level of literacy is of a satisfactory standard. The course will cover the following areas: • The Australian constitution • The development of Australia’s political system • The roles of key sections of government eg the Prime Minister • Functions of government • Current political issues • The court system in Australia • Equal rights issues and democratic principles • Common law development and examples of common law. The study of Politics and Law can be a valuable background to careers such as law, political advocacy, public administration, business, banking, community development, teaching, journalism, government and commerce. The subject will appeal to students who enjoy research, using the Internet and analysing modern day issues.

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Technology and Enterprise Learning Area Accounting and Finance 1A The focus for this unit is personal finance. Students are introduced to financial decisionmaking and management on a personal basis. Students learn about: • The services provided by financial institutions, eg banking, insurance • Managing personal finances, eg budgeting, bank reconciliation, checking statements • Personal taxation - maintaining records (including allowable deductions), calculating tax payable • Types of investments eg superannuation, shares, property. Students will also learn about the implications of youth debt by researching mobile phones and motor vehicles.

Accounting and Finance 1B The focus for this unit is accounting for small cash businesses and clubs. Students learn how to prepare: • Business documents (manually and/or electronically), eg order forms, cheques, bank deposits, pay slips • Cash books, petty cash book, payroll records, bank reconciliation statements • Simple reports eg statement of receipts and payments, income statement, balance sheet. Students will also learn about the costs associated with setting up a small cash business and the impact of governments on the operations of small businesses eg regulations.

Accounting and Finance 2A The focus for this unit is double entry accounting for small businesses. Students apply their understanding of financial principles, systems and institutions to manage financial information and make decisions in a variety of small businesses. Students learn about: • Using manual double-entry accounting • Selecting and using financial and non-financial information to suggest strategies that will improve business performance • Identifying legislation to do with establishing a variety of small businesses and identify the financial costs of good business practice.

Accounting and Finance 2B The focus of this unit is accrual accounting. Students apply financial systems and principles to operations of businesses and distinguish between cash and accrual methods of accounting. Students learn about: • Preparing and analysing financial reports • The main aspects of electronic processing of financial data • The role and functions of the professional accounting and financial associations. • Formulating strategies that will improve business performance.

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Applied Information Technology Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) are rapidly changing the way we live and work. The emphasis of the course is on developing an understanding of computer technology and the design of information solutions to meet challenges. Students build their understanding, experience and skills by investigating, designing, constructing and evaluating ICT. Students access their courses online so therefore students must have internet access. Each unit is dealt with in a different context. Stage 1 units (A, B, C and D) develop skills and ICT knowledge. Stage 2 units (A and B) provide opportunities to focus on academic learning in the media and business contexts.

Automotive Engineering and Technology 1A The focus for this unit is automotive systems. Students understand automotive vehicles and the basic principles and system around which an automotive vehicle is constructed and assembled as well as considering the outer shell. Under guidance, they maintain the automotive vehicle using safe workshop practices and the correct use of tools. They follow basic rules associated with automotive workshops as well as the safe operation of the automotive vehicle.

Automotive Engineering and Technology 1B The focus for this unit is automotive servicing. Students develop knowledge and skills involved with servicing automotive vehicles for purposes of maintenance and repair. They are made aware of socioeconomic and environmental issues and the range of occupations in this area. The diagnostic testing of automotive systems is investigated. They use Occupational Safety and Health (OHS) rules and regulations to plan and manage safe working practices.

Business Management and Enterprise 1A In this unit, the focus is on the role of business in Australia. Most people have had consumer experiences, whether it is using a mobile phone, watching TV or paying for and using other goods and services. Therefore, learning contexts are selected that tap into these interests and build upon this informal understanding. Different perspectives on the contribution of business to society are considered.

Business Management and Enterprise 1B In this unit, the focus is on contexts related to initiative and inspiration, which are the values of the dynamic and imaginative entrepreneur or business manager. Opportunities are provided to explore business start-ups and to recognise the factors that contribute to business success. Entrepreneurship and innovative thinking are introduced, generating ideas and proposals that may be suitable for business ventures. These proposals are then developed into a business plan.

Business Management and Enterprise 1C In this unit, the focus is on business management and administration in Australia. All businesses need to be managed and administered effectively in order to prosper. This unit explores, in a practical way, the role of business and office administration in facilitating business success and considers the importance of communication methods and technologies in business information management. The legislation that affects the internal running of a business in a range of business contexts is also considered.

Business Management and Enterprise 1D In this unit, the focus is on implementing business policies and procedures which facilitate effective business management and administration. The emphasis is on developing administrative and personal management skills. Students are encouraged to evaluate systems and procedures in terms of their effective contribution to the success of a business organisation and to make or recommend improvements to these systems and procedures. Page 33


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Children Family and Community The Children Family and Community course provides opportunities for students to develop the understandings and skills necessary for parenting and for future careers that involve working with children. Students are required to demonstrate achievement through field research, oral presentations, portfolios and designing and trialling activities with children.

Children Family and Community PA The focus for this unit is changing needs. The unit examines how basic needs for food, clothing and shelter are met as young families form and grow. Students recognise that roles are learnt and identify the roles of family members and others in their community. Students construct products/services that meet basic needs and use communication and selfmanagement skills.

Children Family and Community PB The focus for this unit is needs versus wants. Students learn about the physical, social and emotional needs of family members. Rules and sanctions relating to the safety of family members are identified along with the support available to assist individuals and families. Students use the technology process to make products and services that meet needs. They communicate, make choices and use self-management skills.

Children Family and Community 1A The focus for this unit is me, my family and my community. The unit considers opportunities for students to effectively care for others, especially young children, through examination of development and development needs, social belief systems, the family, values and resources that support daily living.

Children Family and Community 1B The focus of this unit is family uniqueness. The unit examines family types, roles of family members, different stages in the family life cycle, support services available to the family and issues arising from family interactions. Students learn about growth and development and the behaviours that promote growth and development.

Children Family and Community 1C The focus of this unit is living and working together. The unit explores the factors that influence growth and development of children through observing and working with children in a child care environment. The roles and responsibilities of care providers are also studied.

Children Family and Community 1D The focus of this unit is getting more out of life. The principles of child growth and development, the factors that affect these and community child health issues are studied. The role of paid and unpaid work in sustaining young families is investigated along with the impact of the management and use of available resources and the rules and laws applicable to this work.

Design: Photography Design: Photography equips students with the knowledge and skills to understand and interpret the principles of design through photographic means. Students learn a range of camera techniques and then demonstrate their skills in the design and production of photographic images. Student will work with digital photography systems and need access to a digital camera and a computer with digital imaging software e.g. Photoshop. Page 34


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Design: Technical Graphics Design: Technical Graphics is a practical course that provides students with opportunities to develop their ideas and communicate them clearly to others. Students will develop drawing skills and be introduced to various drawing styles that relate to the design and drafting industries. Students will use CAD (computer aided design) programs to assist them developing and communicating their ideas.

Materials, Design and Technology: Wood 1A The focus for this unit is production fundamentals. It is an introductory unit for those students who have limited experiences in the manufacturing of products. Students are introduced to principles and practices of design; fundamentals of design to manufacture products for themselves. They learn to communicate various aspects of the design process within the structure of making their product.

Materials, Design and Technology: Wood 1B The focus for this unit is design fundamentals. It is for students who have informal experiences interacting with a variety of items designed to meet certain needs. Students apply the fundamentals of design and concepts related to designing for self, considering beliefs and values. They learn to communicate various aspects of the design process within the structure of making what they design.

Aspects of the Tourism Industry (Part A) In this 60 hour course (equivalent to one course unit) students will develop an understanding of a range of tourist activities, services and facilities, both in the local community and in Western Australia generally.

Aspects of the Tourism Industry (Part B) In this 60 hour course (one course unit equivalent) students will develop an understanding of a range of tourist activities, services and facilities in the local community and at state and national levels.

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Snapshots of SIDE’s Endorsed Programs Workplace Learning (WL) Workplace Learning provides opportunities for students to develop skills in the workplace and obtain credit towards the WACE. Students are placed in an appropriate work situation and are required to maintain a formal record of workplace learning. Students have the option to undertake WL as a course or as an endorsed program. The two endorsed programs for Workplace Learning at SIDE are: • Workplace Learning Mode 1: On-the-job-Training • Workplace Learning Mode 2: Employability Skills

School Based Apprenticeship (SBA) A School Based Apprenticeship allows students to commence an apprenticeship while still at school. An apprenticeship leads to a trade qualification and combines employment and training at work with complimentary off the job training. Upon successful completion of the apprenticeship, students will receive credit toward the WACE from the Curriculum Council and may then continue working on a full-time or half time basis. Apprenticeships are offered in many fields including automotive, building and construction, metals and engineering, horticulture and agriculture.

School Based Traineeship (SBT) A School Based Traineeship is a part-time training program, undertaken with an employer that combines school studies with on and off the job training and paid employment. Upon successful completion of the traineeship, students will receive credit toward the WACE from the Curriculum Council and a Traineeship Certificate II. School Based Traineeships are offered in a wide variety of careers such as automotive, retail, business and information technology.

Aboriginal School Based Training (ASBT) Aboriginal School Based Training is a program that helps indigenous students start on an apprenticeship or traineeship in school. The program gives students an option of a preparatory course in either Year 10, 11 or 12. Once the students are ready, they then can start on either an apprenticeship or traineeship.

Work Education (Certificate I) Work Education (Certificate I) is a program which equips students with the general knowledge and skills required to obtain a job in any workplace. Students complete seven units of competency over a minimum of 110 hours. Forty hours must be completed as on the job training in Structured Workplace Learning.

Work Skills Work Skills provides students with opportunities to demonstrate achievement of a set of employability skills through paid or unpaid work. This could be through a part-time job, regular volunteer or community work or involvement in a family business. The work undertaken must be separate from a school managed workplace learning program.

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Business Services (Certificate I and II) The SIDE VET Business program consists of three subject equivalents that contain Units of Competency from the Certificate I and II in Business Services. Students who successfully complete the competencies will achieve TAFE Certificate I or II, nationally recognised qualifications, and three WACE subject equivalents. This program prepares students for a variety of careers in the clerical and business field.

Certificate of General Education for Adults Introductory, Certificate I, Certificate II The Certificate of General Education (CGEA) is a pathway for students whose goal is to improve literacy and numeracy. SIDE will offer the CGEA at several levels in 2011. This program is a recognised entrance course for further Training WA (TAFE) qualifications.

Keys for Life Keys for Life is a pre-driver education program. This road awareness program is designed to develop skills and attitudes that lead young people to a lifetime of safe driving. On successful completion of the program students may be able to sit their written driver’s licence as part of their studies. They also receive a discount on their L Plate fee.

Life Skills This program explores the practical life skills young adults need to handle core issues of sexuality, fitness, drugs, friendships, and self-empowerment. SIDE will offer two modules from this program. Each module will be worth two points towards WACE.

Working on Wheels Working on Wheels is a program developed to follow on from and complement the Keys for Life Pre-driver Education program. The program is based on three modules, The Wheels I Need, Buying my Wheels and Safe, Smart Wheels which are supported by online learning resources and student work books.

Succeeding As an Independent Learner (SAIL) SAIL has been developed to assist students to develop skills for working as an independent learner at SIDE. Some of the topics covered include personal organisation, managing contact with SIDE teachers, online learning, study skills, researching and note making, and preparing for exams. The course is completed in 36 hours, 17 of which will be in a Centra class so Internet access is essential.

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Financial assistance while studying There are several allowances for students who continue study past Year 10.

Secondary Assistance Scheme This scheme provides financial assistance to children in secondary school, whose parents are holders of one of the following: • Centrelink Pensioner Concession card • Centrelink Family Health Care card • Department of Veterans’ Affairs Pensioner Concession card. Allowance is paid up to and including the year the student turns 17 years of age.

Centrelink www.centrelink.gov.au Due to changes from year to year, it is important that you obtain the necessary information from Centrelink to determine your eligibility. Telephone 13 2850 Some of the most common allowances are:

ABSTUDY ABSTUDY is the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Study Assistance Scheme. ABSTUDY is paid to assist Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to stay at school or go on to further studies. Telephone: 13 2317

Assistance for Isolated Children This allowance is available to eligible home based students studying full time. Telephone: 13 2318

Youth Allowance Youth Allowance can assist young people who are studying, undertaking training or an Australian apprenticeship, looking for work, or are sick. Telephone 13 2490

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Useful Contacts and Resources Apprenticeships, Traineeships, TAFE Australian Apprenticeships

Group Training

Training in Schools

TRAINING WA

www.aajobpathways.com.au

www.grouptraining.com.au

www.det.wa.edu.au/apprenticentre/detcms/portal/

http://www.trainingwa.wa.gov.au/trainingwa

WA Universities Curtin University

Edith Cowan University

Murdoch University

The University of Notre Dame

The University of Western Australia

www.curtin.edu.au

phone: 9266 3339 www.ecu.edu.au

phone: 13 4328 or 6304 6304 www.murdoch.edu.au

phone: 9360 6538 or 1800 358 009 www.nd.edu.au

phone: 9433 0533 www.uwa.edu.au phone: 6488 2477 or 1800 653 050

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Western Australia College of Agriculture Website: www.det.wa.edu.au/education/wacoa/

Cunderdin Campus

PO Box 132 Phone: Email: Website:

CUNDERDIN WA 6407 9635 1302 Cunderdin.AC@det.wa.edu.au www.cunderdinag.wa.edu.au

Denmark Campus

PO Box 350 Phone: Email: Website:

DENMARK WA 6333 9848 0200 Denmark.AC@det.wa.edu.au www.denmarkag.wa.edu.au

Esperance Campus

PO Box 465 Phone: Email:

ESPERANCE WA 6450 9078 2064 Esperance.ftc@det.wa.edu.au

Harvey Campus

PO Box 496 Phone: Email: Website:

HARVEY WA 6220 9729 0500 Harvey.AC@det.wa.edu.au www.harveyag.wa.edu.au

Morawa Campus

PO Box 15 Phone: Email: Website:

MORAWA WA 6623 9971 1158 Morawa.AC@det.wa.edu.au www.Morawaag.wa.edu.au

Narrogin Campus

PO Box 38 Phone: Email: Website:

NARROGIN WA 6312 9881 1255 Narrogin.AC@det.wa.edu.au www.narroginag.wa.edu.au

22

26B

28B

29B

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General Information Career Development Centre

http://www.trainingwa.wa.gov.au/careercentre/detcms/ portal/ phone: 9224 6500; freecall: 1800 999 167

Centrelink

www.centrelink.gov.au phone: 13 2850

Career Information Centre (Centrelink)

phone: 9464 1305 email: cic.per@centrelink.gov.au

Curriculum Council of WA

www.curriculum.wa.edu.au phone: 9273 6300

Defence Forces (Army, Navy, Air Force)

www.defencejobs.gov.au phone: 13 1901

SIDE Contacts include: Career Development Team Resource Centre

www.side.wa.edu.au phone: 9242 6300 for all departments

School Psychologists Student Coordinators

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2011 Decisions Booklet