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Agent Penny Programme in Singapore Schools The Agent Penny is a programme on financial



 literacy



 designed



 for



 primary



 schools.



It



leverages



on



drama



and



comic



 book



 stories



 as



 effective



 pedagogical



 means



 of



 arousing



 students’‛



 interest.







 Financial



 education



 is,



 by



 and



 large,



 an



abstract



subject



for



most



schoolgoing



 children.



 Through



 the



 use



 of



 illustrated



 characters



 that



 children



 can



 identify



 with,



 the



 comic



 book



 breaks



down



their



natural



resistance



 to



 the



 adult



 world



 of



 building



 up



 finances,



 investing



 for



 the



 future,



 and



saving



for



a



rainy



day.



 This



 is



 a



 programme



 that



 has



 evolved



 over



 the



 years



 in



 response



 to



 evidence-based



 research



 where



 more



 than



 800



teachers



and



students



participated



in



focus-group



discussions



 and



 surveys



 to



 provide



 feedback



 and



 invaluable



 information



 to



 the



 design



 and



 implementation



 of



 the



 programme.



 The



 research



 investigated



the



experiences



students



had



from



being



on



the



Agent



 Penny



 programme



 at



 the



 end



 of



 each



 year



 from



 2005



 to



 2010



 and



 how



 these



 relate



 to



 the



 teaching



 and



 learning



 of



 financial



 literacy



 in



Singapore.



Some



useful



research



findings



were



incorporated



into



 the



subsequent



publications



of



Agent



Penny



comics



and



an



example



 is



 the



 request



 by



 students



 to



 have



 manga



 comic



 characters



 portraying



 real-life



 stories



 that



 ignite



 their



 excitement



 and



 curiosity,



 thereby



 enticing



 them



 to



 read



 the



 comic



 book



 over



 and



 over



 again.



 The



 teachers



 and



 students



 involved



 in



 this



 study



 fully



 support



 the



 use



 of



 this



 pedagogy



 to



 deliver



 financial



 literacy



 messages.



A



teacher’‛s



resource



kit



with



lesson



ideas,



activities



and



 worksheets



is



also



available



for



teachers



who



have



been



trained



by



 the



 National



 Institute



 of



 Education



 lecturers



 to



 breathe



 life



 into



 the



Agent



Penny



programme



in



schools.


Financial



 education



 is



 a



 life



 skill.



 It



 is



 necessary



 to



 embark



 on



 a



 concerted



effort



to



raise



awareness



and



equip



teachers



to



better



 educate



students



in



financial



literacy.



Parents,



educators,



students



 and



 stakeholders



 agree



 that



 it



 is



 important



 to



 educate



 students



 about



FL



so



as



to



equip



them



with



a



set



of



essential



life



skills.



We



 are



committed



to



support



and



empower



teachers



to



use



engaging



 pedagogies



to



infuse



financial



education



in



the



day-to-day



lessons



 by



 leveraging



 on



 the



 comic



 books,



 skit



 and



 other



 teacher



 resources. I



 would



 like



 to



 acknowledge



 Citigroup,



 the



 wonderful



 sponsor



 behind



all



these



opportunities



for



schools.



Without



their



generous



 sponsorship



of



the



Agent



Penny



skit,



comics



and



publications



and



 the



work



of



the



regional



project



manager



from



Learning



Society,



 this



 useful



 and



 meaningful



 programme



 reaching



 out



 to



 more



 than



 250,000



 students



 in



 Singapore



 and



 many



 more



 countries



 abroad,



 would



not



have







happened.



Kudos



to



teachers



who



skilfullly



weave



 financial



literacy



into



day-to-day



lessons



so



as



to



give



our



future



 generation



a



head



start



in



this



critical



life



skill.





Dr



Koh



Noi



Keng

PhD Noikeng.koh@nie.edu.sg


Agent Penny 2: Agent Penny And Will Power In Operation Finance 2 Agent Penny

Agent Penny 2 Games:

URL: http://www.finlit.nie.edu.sg/web/games/agent-penny/

iv


Lesson Ideas and Resources


vi


Agent Penny 3: Agent Penny And Will Power In Budget Bootcamp

7


Story



1:



SMART



SHOPPING-



‘Small



Screen



Blues’‛ Synopsis: Will



 Power



 is



 tempted



 by



 a



 cool



 advertisement



 for



 a



 media



 player



 and



 almost



buys



it



on



impulse.



Agent



Penny



and



Kai



encourage



him



to



explore



his



 options



and



make



a



more



informed



decision.



Will



ends



up



spending



less



on



a



 comparable



player



–



and



a



smarter



consumer. Key Learning Points •



 The



 difference



 between



 emotional



 and



 rational



 spending:



 don’‛t



 spend



 impulsively. •



 Do



some



research



on



what



you



want



to



buy



and



how



much



each



option



 costs,



before



making



a



final



–



and



more



informed



–



decision. •



 Smart



spending



saves



you



money



that



can



you



can



use



for



other



things. •



 Don’‛t



be



taken



in



by



manipulative



advertising



and



sales.



Advertised



items



 may



have



their



prices



marked



up



to



pay



for



the



cost



of



advertising. •



 Good



friends



help



one



another.


Story 1: Face The Music Synopsis: Sally



secretly



uses



her



father’‛s



credit



card



to



bid



for



her



favourite



singer’‛s



 new



 CD



 on



 an



 online



 auction.



 In



 the



 end,



 she



 realises



 that



 she



 has



 to



 be



 honest



and



that



stealing



someone



else’‛s



credit



card



is



wrong.



She



also



sees



 the



importance



of



spending



responsibly. Key Learning Points •



 What



an



auction



is



about



and



the



concept



of



bidding •



 Stealing



of



a



credit



card



or



forging



another



person’‛s



signature



is



considered



 fraud



and



a



serious



crime •



 Being



responsible



in



spending:



Understanding



needs



vs



wants •



 The



 credit



card



 is



 not



 just



 a



 piece



 of



 plastic.



 There



 is



 a



 need



 to



 pay



 for



 the



goods



charged •



 The



importance



of



honesty


SUGGESTED CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES Activity 1.1: T-Chart Learning Objectives Students



will



be



able



to: •



 explain



the



importance



of



being



honest •



 learn



that



using



someone



else’‛s



credit



card



or



forging



another



person’‛s



 signature



is



fraud



and



punishable



by



law •



 describe



the



different



types



of



credit



card



fraud



and



the



precautions



 that



card-holders



can



take



to



prevent



credit



card



fraud. Procedure 1.



 Share



with



your



class



a



personal



experience



involving



stealing.



Highlight



 your



thoughts



and



feelings



about



the



incident.











 2.



 Get



them



to



think



about



their



own



experiences.



 3.



 Create



 a



 T-chart



 on



 the



 board.



 The



 heading



 for



 one



 side



 is



 “Thoughts



 and



feelings



of



having



stolen



from



others”,



and



the



other



is



“Thoughts



 and



feelings



of



theft



victims”.



 4.



 Encourage



 students



 to



 share



 their



 experiences.



 As



 they



 do



 so,



 record



 relevant



information



on



the



T-chart.



 5.



 Referring



to



the



T-chart,



highlight:





-







that



stealing



is



wrong



and



punishable



by



law





-







the



importance



of



being



honest

6.



 Get



the



class



to



read



the



story,



Face



the



Music.



 7.



 Explain



that



using



someone



else’‛s



credit



card



or



forging



that



person’‛s



 signature



is



considered



fraudulent



and



is



a



serious



crime.



 8.







 Highlight



 the



 various



 types



 of



 credit



 card



 fraud



 and



 carry



 out



 a



 discussion



on



precautions



that



card



holders



can



take



top



prevent



credit



 card



fraud.


Activity 1.2: Spending Checklist Learning Objectives Students



will



be



able



to: •



 distinguish



between



needs



and



wants



 •



 appreciate



the



importance



of



being



responsible



in



spending



 •



 realise



the



importance



of



not



succumbing



to



peer



pressure. Resources Needed •



 Look



 for



 2



 similar



 items



 for



 children



 -



 one



 must



 be



 fashionable



 like



 a



 branded



 water



 flask



 and



 the



 other



 a



 simple



 one



 such



 as



 a



 plain



 water



 flask.



The



functions



of



both



items



must



be



the



same. •



 Prepare



a



Spending



Checklist



and



make



a



copy



for



each



student.



Some



 questions



to



include



in



the



checklist



are:









-













Do



I



want



this



because



my



friends



also



have



it?









-













Do



I



want



this



because



it



makes



me



look



cool?









-













Do



I



want



this



because



no



one



else



has



it?









-













Do



I



already



have



this?









-













Can



I



give



this



up



for



something



else?









-













Are



there



cheaper



alternatives/substitutes?









-













Can



I



use



the



money



to



do



something



else?









-













Will



I



still



use/like



it



next



week/month?









-













Can



I



wait



till



the



price



drops?





Procedure 1.



 Show



 the



 class



 the



 fashionable



 item



 first



 and



 get



 them



 to



 list



 its



 function(s). 2.



 Do



the



same



for



the



simple



one.



 3.



 Pose



the



question,



“Which



one



would



you



like



to



have



for



your



birthday?”



 and



get



some



students



to



explain



their



choice.



 4.



 Using



their



responses,



highlight



the



difference



between



a



need



and



a



 want.



 5.



 Distribute



 the



 Spending



 Checklist.



 If



 necessary,



 go



 through



 the



 questions



with



the



class.



 6.



 Get



students



to



imagine



themselves



as



Sally



at



the



beginning



of



the






story.



Have



them



answer



the



questions



on



the



checklist



and



elicit



their



 response



as



to



whether:

















-



 the



CD



was



a



need



or



a



want







 -



 they



would



bid



for



the



CD

7.



 Highlight



the



importance



of



responsible



spending



and



encourage



them



 to



 use



 the



 checklist



 to



 help



 them



 spend



 wisely



 on



 what



 they



 need



 rather



than



what



they



want.



 Possible Extension Students



can



be



encouraged



to



give



up



something



that



they



own



but



do



 not



need.



Items



should



be



in



a



good



condition



so



that



they



can



be



used



 in



a



fund-raising



project



such



as



an



auction.



(Please



refer



to



Suggested



 Activity



2



for



Story



4



–



Finding



Funds.)


Activity 1.3: Rewriting History Learning Objectives Students



will



be



able



to: •



 recognise



the



need



to



be



honest •



 realise



that



they



can



avoid



painful



outcomes



by



making



the



right/honest



 decisions. Procedure 1.







 Read



 the



 story



 “Face



 the



 Music”



 again,



 paying



 more



 attention



 to



 pages



 6



to



9.



Students



might



have



to



take



on



a



different



character



each



and



 read



that



character’‛s



part



thoroughly. 2.







 Get



 students



 to



 brainstorm



 the



 “moral



 of



 the



 story”



 that



 they



 have



 learned



from



the



comic



and



record



it



on



a



chart/butcher



paper.



Students



 should



 consider



 Sally’‛s



 father’‛s



 feelings



 and



 the



 reasons



 behind



 him



 scolding



Sally. 3.







 Rewrite



 the



 story



 from



 Page



 6



 onwards,



 but



 with



 Sally



 making



 good



 choices



and



decisions



to



avoid



getting



into



trouble. 4.







 Encourage



 students



 to



 refer



 to



 their



 brainstorming



 chart



 to



 generate



 Idea



on



how



the



story



could



be



different. 5.







 Students



should



create



a



story



outline



before



writing



the



dialogue. 6.







 When



 they



 have



 completed



 the



 story,



 get



 students



 to



 take



 on



 each



 character



 role



 and



 perform



 a



 skit



 for



 the



 class.



 Get



 the



 rest



 of



 the



 class



 to



 comment



 on



 the



 key



 message



 and



 whether



 there



 are



 any



 improvements. Possible extension 1.







 Students



 should



 work



 in



 pairs



 to



 brainstorm







 actions



 that



 they



 could



 have



taken



other



than



‘stealing’‛



credit



card



details



to



purchase



the



CD.



 Encourage



them



to



think



out



of



the



box



and



be



creative. 2.







 Students



 might



 choose



 to



 draw



 one



 or



 more



 of



 the



 comic



 frames



 to



 illustrate



their



new



version



of



the



story.


Activity 1.4: Take the Hot Seat Learning Objectives Students



will



be



able



to: •



 examine



Sally’‛s



motivation



for



using



her



father’‛s



credit



card



 •



 realise



that



‘borrowing’‛



someone



else’‛s



personal



data



without



his/her



 permission



constitutes



theft



and



is



a



serious



crime •



 recognise



that



feelings



of



envy



or



the



desire



to



be



popular



are



not



 wrong.



These



are



‘normal’‛



but



we



should



not



let



these



feelings



lead



us



 to



wrong



actions •



 realise



the



implications



of



betraying



the



trust



of



our



parents •



 reflect



on



ways



in



which



Sally



can



make



amends



for



her



misdeed. Procedure 1.







 After



 students



 have



 read



 the



 story,



 get



 them



 into



 groups



 of



 6.



 Students



 number



 off



 from



 1



 to



 6.



 Numbers



 1-2



 are



 Agent



 Penny,



 Numbers



3-4



are



Will



Power,



Number



5



is



Sally



and



Number



6,



Sally’‛s



 father. 2.







 The



Agent



Penny



will



hot



seat/interview



Sally



to



uncover



why



Sally



 took



her



father’‛s



credit



card.



They



are



to



brainstorm



questions



that



 they



will



be



asking



Sally.



Give



examples



to



help



them



surface



as



much



 information



as



possible



from



Sally.















How



did



you



know



your



father



had



a



credit



card?



















How



did



you



know



where



he



kept



it?















How



were



you



able



to



get



hold



of



it



so



easily?















Why



didn’‛t



you



discuss



the



issue



with



him



first?















Why



didn’‛t



you



seek



your



mother’‛s



counsel?

3.







 At



 the



 same



 time,



 the



 Will



 Powers



 will



 hot



 seat/interview



 Sally’‛s



 father



to



elicit



his



feelings



in



response



to



what



Sally



has



done



to



him



 and



to



find



out



more



about



his



relationship



with



his



daughter.



 4.







 Allow



 for



 3-5



 minutes



 of



 questioning.



 Students



 are



 to



 take



 turns



 to



 ask



questions,



then



in



their



groups,



they



are



to



share



their



findings. 5.







 Teacher



posts



these



questions



for



class



discussion:















Why



do



you



think



Sally



did



what



she



did?















Was



her



action



right



or



wrong?















Was



Sally’‛s



father



justified



in



feeling



the



way



he



did?















What



can



Sally



do



to



show



her



genuine



remorse?


6.







 Teacher



consolidates



discussion



by



highlighting



the



following:











 There



are



different



reasons



why



people



do



what



they



do



and



we







 should



always



find



out



the



real



reasons



behind



their



actions



before







 forming



conclusions



about



a



person.











 While



it



is



normal



to



feel



envy,



to



desire



to



be



popular,



or



to



succumb







 to



 peer



 pressure,



 we



 should



 not



 channel



 our



 feelings



 into



 negative







 actions



 such



 as



 stealing



 personal



 data.



 Stress



 that



 what



 Sally



 did







 was



wrong.















We



should



not



betray



the



trust



of



our



parents



as



trust,



once



lost,



is







 difficult



to



regain.











 Point



out



that



we



can’‛t



run



away



from



the



consequences



of



our



actions.







 Part



 of



 the



 process


��� of



 growing



 up



 is



 in



 taking



 responsibility



 for







 what



we



have



done.

7.







 Have



all



of



them



take



on



the



persona



of



Sally.



Get



them



to



reflect



 on



how,



as



Sally,



they



might



make



amends



for



their



wrongdoing.



They



 could



do



a



diary



entry



or



pen



a



note



to



dad.


WORKSHEET 1

List possible reasons why you think Sally did what she did

Dear Daddy,

Imagine you are Sally. Write a note to your father explaining how you will make up for your wrongdoing.


Agent Penny 3

Story 1 Game: Smart Shopping

URL: http://www.finlit.nie.edu.sg/web/games/agent-penny/

17


Story 2: Bank On It Synopsis: Penny



and



Will



take



Chloe



and



Harry



to



a



bank



to



find



out



about



how



 banks



work.



They



learn



about



the



types



of



services



banks



offer,



and



 the



role



banks



play



in



people’‛s



lives. Key Learning Points •



 How



a



bank



works •



 Types



 of



 products



 and



 financial



 services



banks



offer •



 Remote



 banking



 channels



 and



 other



 access



 points



 to



 their



 bank



accounts •



 Overview



of



the



key



bank



roles

18


SUGGESTED CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES Activity 2.1: Banking Crossword Puzzle Learning Objectives Students



will



be



able



to: •



 describe



the



role



banks



play



in



our



lives •



 list



the



types



of



financial



services



banks



offer. Resources Needed •



 Make



 sufficient



 copies



 of



 the



 Banking



 Crossword



 Puzzle



 and



 3-2-1



 Summary



Sheet



for



the



class. Procedure 1.



 Have



 the



 students



 work



 in



 pairs



 on



 the



 crossword



 puzzle



 as



 they



 read



 the



story,



Bank



On



It.



 2.



 Go



through



the



answers



with



the



class. 3.



 Get



 them



 to



 do



 a



 3-2-1



 Summary



 on



 what



 they



 have



 learnt



 about



 banks:





-



 3



services



that



banks



offer





-



 2



roles



that



banks



play





-



 1



interesting



thing



I



learnt



about



banks

4.



 Have



some



students



share



their



ideas



with



the



class.






Banking Crossword Puzzle 1

2

4

3

5

6 7 8

9

10

11

Across 1.







 Customers



open



_______



at



banks. 4.







 When



we



take



out



money



from



our



bank



accounts,



we



are



making



 _______. 6.







 Banks



are



a



_______



place



for



us



to



place



our



money. 8.







 Our



deposits



grow



because



banks



pay



us



________. 11.







_______



banking



enables



us



to



do



our



banking



without



having



to



 visit



the



bank. Down 1.







 ATM



stands



for



_______



Teller



Machine. 2.







 We



can



get



________



from



banks



for



our



university



education. 3.







 We



can



check



our



account



balances



and



pay



_______



through



 Internet



banking. 5.







 Banks



help



us



to



________



money



to



our



relatives



overseas. 7.







 A



______



is



needed



when



using



phone



banking. 9.







 Banks



provide



up-to-date



information



on



foreign



_______



rates. 10.



Bank



________



are



convenient



when



making



big



payments.


3 2 1 Worksheet

3 SERVICES that banks offer •



 ______________________________ •



 ______________________________ •



 ______________________________

2 ROLES that banks play •



 ______________________________ •



 ______________________________

1 INTERESTING thing I have learnt about banks is



 ______________________________


Activity 2.2: How Can the Bank Help Me? Learning Objectives Students



will



be



able



to: •



 identify



the



main



types



of



services



banks



offer •



 explain



how



the



banks



can



help



consumers. Resources Needed Make



sufficient



sets



of



the



scenarios



for



the



class.



Each



student



in



a



group



 of



five



will



get



one



scenario.



Cut



out



the



five



scenarios,



fold



the



slips



of



 paper



and



put



them



in



an



envelope



for



each



group.















 Procedure 1.



 Get



the



class



into



groups



of



five.



Have



them



number



themselves



from



1



 to



5.



 2.



 Explain



that



each



group



will



receive



an



envelope



containing



five



slips



of



 paper.



 3.



 Student



No.



1



will



draw



one



slip



of



paper



from



the



envelope



and



read



 out



the



scenario.



Student



No.



2



will



answer



but



if



he



gives



an



incorrect



 answer,



the



next



student



has



to



answer.



 4.



 Once



a



correct



answer



has



been



given,



Student



No.



2



draws



from



the



 envelope



and



reads



the



scenario.



 5.



 The



process



is



repeated



until



all



five



scenarios



have



been



covered. 6.



 Get



 students



 to



 think



 about



 which



 service



 is



 the



 most



 important



 to



 them



now.



Have



some



students



share



their



ideas. 7.



 Have



them



think



about



which



service



would



be



the



most



important



to



 them



in



10



years’‛



time.







Get



some



other



students



share



their



ideas. 8.



 Sum



up



by



highlighting



that



banks



offer



important



financial



services. Possible Extension 1.











Higher-ability



 students



 may



 be



 tasked



 to



 carry



 out



 research



 on



 the



 origins



of



banks. 2.



 Banks



in



the



neighbourhood



-



Data



gathering,



collation



and



interpretation.























Students



list



the



banks



and



ATM



machines



they



can



find



in



their























neighbourhood.



They



then



compare



and



contrast



the



banks



in



terms



of



 location,



convenience,



accessibility



and



extensiveness



of



network.


Scenarios



for



the



‘How



Can



the



Bank



Help



Me?’‛

✄ My



son



is



studying



abroad.



 He



needs



money



to



pay



for



his



rented



 apartment.



How



can



the



bank



help



me?

I



am



going



on



an



overseas



holiday



with



my



 family.







I



have



to



pay



the



travel



agent



about



 $3000



but



I



don’‛t



want



to



carry



so



much



 cash



around.



How



can



the



bank



help



me?

I



am



getting



married



and



I



need



money



to



set



 up



my



new



home.



How



can



the



bank



help



me?

I



need



some



money



to



buy



groceries



but



I



 have



no



time



to



go



to



the



bank.



How



can



the



 bank



help



me?

I



need



to



pay



my



utilities



bill



but



I



am



 overseas.



How



can



the



bank



help



me?


Scenarios



for



the



‘How



Can



the



Bank



Help



Me?’‛

My



son



is



studying



abroad.



 He



needs



money



to



pay



for



his



rented



 apartment.



How



can



the



bank



help



me? [by transferring the money overseas] I



am



going



on



an



overseas



holiday



with



my



 family.







I



have



to



pay



the



travel



agent



about



 $3000



but



I



don’‛t



want



to



carry



so



much



 cash



around.



How



can



the



bank



help



me? [I can pay with a cheque from the bank / pay



by



Nets



using



the



bank’‛s



ATM



card



/



 pay



with



the



bank’‛s



debit



card



 or credit card]

I



am



getting



married



and



I



need



money



to



set



 up



my



new



home.



How



can



the



bank



help



me? [by giving me a loan / by using money from my savings account with the bank] I



need



some



money



to



buy



groceries



but



I



 have



no



time



to



go



to



the



bank.



How



can



the



 bank



help



me? [I can use its ATM to withdraw some cash] I



need



to



pay



my



utilities



bill



but



I



am



 overseas.



How



can



the



bank



help



me? [I can use Internet banking to pay the bill]


Activity 2.3: The Right Match Learning Objectives Students



will



be



able



to: •



 identify



some



of



the



common



items/facilities/personnel



associated



with



 financial



transactions



and



state



their



functions/uses •



 explain



each



item/facilities/personnel. Resources Needed •



 Picture



cards



of



items/facilities/personnel



associated



with



financial



 transactions •



 Name



cards



associated



with



the



pictures •



 Worksheet Procedure 1.







 Divide



the



class



into



4



groups



-



A1,



A2,



B1



and



B2. 2.







 Hand



out



picture



cards



to



groups



A1



and



B1



and



word



cards



to



groups



A2



 and



B2. 3.







 Students



 from



 group



 1



 will



 have



 to



 match



 their



 cards



 with



 the



 word



 cards



held



by



students



in



group



2.



 4.







 Once



they



have



found



the



correct



match,



they



are



to



sit



down



with



their



 partner



and



define



the



function



or



use



of



the



object



or



item



they



have



 identified.



 5.







 Pairs



share



their



definitions



with



the



rest



of



their



group



(Gp



A



or



B),



 with



the



teacher



checking



for



accuracy. 6.







 Students



then



fill



in



the



K-W-L



worksheet. 7.







 Extend



knowledge



by



getting



students



to



pose



questions



on



what



else



 they



 want



 to



 know



 about



 the



 bank.



 Discuss



 the



 answers



 in



 class



 or



 get



 them



to



find



out



the



answers



using



the



internet.


‘THE



RIGHT



MATCH’‛


Credit



Card

Security



Guard

ATM



Machine

Savings



Book

Cheque

Bank



Teller

Bank



Vault

Coin



Sorting



 Machine

Monthly



Bank



 Statement

Safe



Deposit



Box


KWL What I

What I

Know

A



bank



teller



is…

A



security



guard



is…

A



bank



vault



is…

A



coin



sorting



machine



 is... A



credit



card



is…

A



savings



account



is…

A



monthly



bank



 statement



is… A



safe



deposit



box



is…

A



cheque



is…

An



Automated



Teller



 Machine



(ATM)



is…

Want

Know

to

What I Have

Learnt


GLOSSARY OF TERMS Term

Definition

Bank



teller

A



person



who



receives



and



pays



out



money



in



a



bank.

Security



 guard

A



person



whose



duty



is



to



guard



or



protect



an



establishment



 from



danger



or



attack.

Bank



vault

A



room



in



a



bank,



protected



by



locks,



alarms,



thick



walls,



 etc,



used



for



keeping



currency



and



valuable



items



safe.

Coin



sorting



 machine





A



machine



that



sorts



coins



according



to



their



denominations



 and



counts



the



total



value



of



coins



deposited.

Credit



card

Any



 card



 that



 may



 be



 used



 repeatedly



 to



 borrow



 money



 or



 buy



products



and



services



on



credit.



Issued



by



banks,



retail



 stores



and



other



businesses.

Savings



 account





An



 account



 in



 which



 you



 can



 make



 deposits



 or



 withdrawals,



 but



usually



can’‛t



write



a



cheque.



Interest



which



is



paid



on



 your



 savings



 or



 deposits



 serves



 as



 an



 incentive



 for



 you



 to



 save.

Monthly



bank



 statement

A



monthly



record



of



transactions



listing



debits



and



credits



 that



took



place



over



the



time



period.

Safe



deposit



 box





A



locked



box



in



which



a



customer



places



important



documents,



 jewellery



and



other



items



for



the



bank



to



keep



in



its



storage



 vault.



The



customer



pays



a



fee



to



the



bank



for



this



service.

Cheque

A



form



on



which



one



writes



an



order



to



a



bank



to



pay



a



sum



 of



money



from



one’‛s



account



to



another



person.

A



machine



at



a



bank



branch



or



other



location



which



enables



 Automated



 a



 customer



 to



 perform



 basic



 banking



 activities



 (checking



 Teller



Machine



 one’‛s



balance,



withdrawing



or



transferring



funds)



even



when



 (ATM) the



bank



is



closed.


Advantages and Disadvantages of Different



Payment



Modes CREDIT CARDS Advantages

Disadvantages

30


GROUP WORKSHEETS To



keep



my



money



safe



and



 secure,



I



should…

If



I



lose



my



money,



 I



should…

If



I



lose



my



ATM/NETS



card,



 I



should…

To



keep



my



ATM



/NETS



card



 safe



and



secure,



I



should…

To



keep



my



credit



card



safe



 and



secure,



I



should…

If



I



lose



my



credit



card,



 I



should…

31


Activity 2.3: Cash or Card?

All



Messed



Up! Learning objectives: Students will be able to: •



 recognise



common



financial



vocabulary Materials needed: Activity



sheet Procedure: 1.



 In



 groups



 of



 four,



 using



 Round



 Robin,



 students



 work



 out



 the



 anagrams



 to



derive



the



common



financial



vocabulary. 2.



 The



fastest



and



most



accurate



group



wins



the



competition. 3.



 For



 students



 to



 gain



 extra



 points,



 students



 may



 create



 their



 own



 anagrams



for



the



other



groups



to



solve.



10



points



will



be



awarded



for



 each



anagram. 4.



 After



 students



 have



 unscrambled



 the



 words,



 these



 are



 teaching



 moments



 where



 these



 financial



 terms



 could



 be



 explained



 and



 put



 in



 context



through



stories



or



life



experiences



relating



to



each



term.

32


All



Messed



Up! In



your



groups,



solve



the



anagrams



as



quickly



and



as



accurately



as



you



can. Anagram E.g.



 RAYSAL

Meaning A



fixed



amount



of



money



paid



 to



an



employee



for



each



pay



 period.

NIP

A



private



access



code



or



 password.

2.

EASTS

Any



items



of



value



that



 people



own,



including



 cash,



property,



personal



 possessions,



and



investments.





3.

DENSE

The



essentials



or



basics



of



life.

4.

SKI



 KARTING

Willingness



to



accept



risk



to



 pursue



greater



returns.

5.

ENTIRE



 MISSPELT

The



interest



calculated



on



a



 principal



sum,



not



compounded



 on



earned



interest.

6.

DIRECT



 DARC

A



plastic



card



that



can



be



 used



by



the



holder



to



make



 purchases



or



obtain



cash



 advances



using



a



line



of



 credit



made



available



by



 the



card-issuing



financial



 institution.

7.

BUMPILY



 GENIUS

Purchasing



items



on



the



spur



 of



the



moment.

8.

Interest



which



is



calculated



 IMPOUNDER



 not



only



on



the



initial



principal



 CONTEST but



also



the



accumulated



 interest



of



prior



periods.

9.

FETIDITY



 TENTH

Someone



wrongfully



acquires



 and



uses



a



consumer’‛s



 personal



identification,



credit,



 or



account



information.

REPRESS



 PUREE

The



strong



influence



of



a



 group



on



members



of



that



 group



to



behave



as



everyone



 else does. 33

1.

10.

Word(s)


All



Messed



Up! (Answer Key) In



your



groups,



solve



the



anagrams



as



quickly



and



as



accurately



as



you



can. Anagram E.g.



 RAYSAL

Meaning

Word(s)

A



fixed



amount



of



money



paid



 to



an



employee



for



each



pay



 SALARY period.

NIP

A



private



access



code



or



 password.

2.

EASTS

Any



items



of



value



that



 people



own,



including



 ASSET cash,



property,



personal



 possessions,



and



investments.





3.

DENSE

The



essentials



or



basics



of



life.

NEEDS

4.

SKI



 KARTING

Willingness



to



accept



risk



to



 pursue



greater



returns.

RISK TAKING

5.

ENTIRE



 MISSPELT

The



interest



calculated



on



a



 SIMPLE principal



sum,



not



compounded



 INTEREST on



earned



interest.

6.

DIRECT



 DARC

A



plastic



card



that



can



be



 used



by



the



holder



to



make



 purchases



or



obtain



cash



 advances



using



a



line



of



 credit



made



available



by



 the



card-issuing



financial



 institution.

CREDIT CARD

7.

BUMPILY



 GENIUS

Purchasing



items



on



the



spur



 of



the



moment.

IMPULSE BUYING

8.

Interest



which



is



calculated



 IMPOUNDER



 not



only



on



the



initial



principal



 COMPOUND CONTEST but



also



the



accumulated



 INTEREST interest



of



prior



periods.

1.

9.

10.

PIN

FETIDITY



 TENTH

Someone



wrongfully



acquires



 and



uses



a



consumer’‛s



 IDENTITY personal



identification,



credit,



 THEFT or



account



information.

REPRESS



 PUREE

The



strong



influence



of



a



 group



on



members



of



that



 group



to



behave



as



everyone



 34 else does.

PEER PRESSURE


Activity



2.4:



Let’‛s



go



shopping!

Let’s



go



shopping! Learning objective: Students will be able to: •



 recognise



the



advantages



and



disadvantages



 of



different



payment



options •



 recognise



that



planning



and



information



 gathering



is



preferred



before



purchasing



 wants. Materials needed: •



 Activity



sheet •



 Wallet



consisting



of



cut-outs



of:







 1



credit



card















 1



ATM



card























 1



$10-note,



2



$5-note,



15



$2-note

Procedure: 1.



 Teacher



 asks



 students:



 What



 do



 you



 do



 when



 you



 go



 shopping?



 How



 do



you



usually



pay



for



the



items



you



buy?



Students



to



respond



to



the



 statements. 2.



 In



groups



of



fours,



using



Round



Robin,



students



discuss



the



best



way



to



 pay



for



the



different



items



and



complete



the



table. 3.



 A



 representative



 from



 each



 group



 presents



 the



 decision



 made



 and



 justifications.



Teacher



facilitates



discussion



by



questioning



students



on



 the



soundness



of



the



decisions



made. 4.



 After



 that,



 students



 discuss



 if



 the



 items



 listed



 are



 needs



 or



 wants.



 Students



 brainstorm



 on



 different



 ways



 to



 obtain



 the



 items



 listed.



 Students



 then



 discuss



 and



 debate



 on



 the



 best



 way



 to



 obtain



 the



 items



 listed. 5.



 Another



representative



from



each



group



presents



the



decision



made



and



 justifications.



Teacher



facilitates



discussion



by



questioning



students



on



 the



soundness



of



the



decisions



made. 6.



 Teacher



 helps



 to



 consolidate



 the



 various



 responses



 and



 leads



 students



 to



recognise



the



need



to



plan



and



gather



information



before



purchasing



 wants. 35


Let’s



go



shopping! You



are



out



shopping



with



your



friends.



You



 want



to



buy



some



items.



Decide



the



best



way



 (cash,



ATM



card,



credit



card)



to



pay



for



each



 item.



Explain



your



choice.

Item

Price $4



















































Lunch



 at



























Food































Court



































































































Harry



Potter







































































































Book

$48

School



bag

































$29

Watch

$125

36

Mode of payment

Reason(s)


Discuss



if



each



item



listed



is



a



need



or



a



 want.



Brainstorm



if



there



are



better



ways



 of



getting



each



of



these



items.



Would



you



 just



go



and



buy



it



when



you



see



them?



Or



 do



you



need



to



do



some



planning



and



some



 information



gathering



first



before



making



 that



purchase.



Discuss



and



debate.

Harry Potter Book

Decision and reasons

Disadvantages

Advantages

How can you obtain the item?

Lunch at food court

37

School Bag

Watch


Story 3: All Star Interest Synopsis: When



 Will



 was



 younger,



 his



 Grandma



 told



 him



 a



 story



 about



 two



 young



 football



 players.



 The



 story



 highlights



 the



 importance



 of



 cultivating



 the



 habits



of



saving



and



responsible



spending. Key Learning Points •



 The



need



to



save



for



the



future •



 Working



towards



a



long-term



savings



goal •



 Concept



of



compound



interest •



 Time



value



of



money •



 Spending



responsibly



and



within



your



means •



 Sacrificing



immediate



gratification



for



future



(long



term)



gains

38


Activity 3.2: Compound Interest Graph Learning Objectives Students



will



be



able



to: •



 explain



the



concept



of



compound



interest •



 appreciate



that



working



towards



a



long-term



savings



goal



requires



discipline



 and



commitment •



 describe



how



they



can



start



on



a



long-term



savings



plan. Preparation •



 Find



out



the



average



interest



rate



offered



by



banks



for



savings



accounts.



 •



 Have



ready



different



coloured



markers



to



draw



the



graph







 (see



sample



on



page



13).



 Procedure 1.



 Using



the



example



on



p.35



of



the



story,



All-Star



Interest,



illustrate



the



 concept



of



compound



interest



for



the



first



two



years



with



a



calculation



 table



 and



 a



 graph.



 If



 necessary,



 explain



 terms



 such



 as



 ‘principal’‛



 and



 ‘interest



rate’‛. 2.



 Explain



 that



 to



 illustrate



 the



 concept



 clearly,



 there



 is



 a



 need



 to



 fix



 the



 interest



 rate



 at



 10%



 (this



 figure



 is



 used



 for



 ease



 of



 calculation.



 Enlighten



students



that



real



interest



rates



are



much



lower



and



subject



 to



 fluctuations)



 and



 assume



 that



 no



 withdrawals



 or



 additional



 deposits



 are



made



throughout



the



five



years. 3.



 Get



 students



 to



 work



 on



 the



 other



 three



 years



 and



 calculate



 the



 total



 amount



of



compound



interest



earned



for



Years



2



to



5.



 4.







Emphasize



the



increase



from



Year



1



to



Year



5.



 5.











Highlight



 that



 working



 towards



 a



 long-term



 savings



 goal



 requires



 discipline



 and



 commitment.



 Encourage



 them



 to



 have



 the



 discipline



 to



 spend



 responsibly



 and



 not



 make



 unnecessary



 withdrawals,



 and



 to



 have



 the



commitment



to



save



regularly



so



that



their



bank



accounts



will



grow.



 6.











Carry



out



a



discussion



on



how



they



can



start



on



a



long-term



savings



plan



eg.



 saving



their



hong



bao



money



and



doing



part-time



jobs



when



they



are



older. Possible Extension 1.



 Get



students



to



make



a



commitment



or



even



sign



a



contract



to



save



a



certain



 amount



of



their



allowance



each



week



for



one



month.



At



the



end



of



the



month,



 get



 them



 to



 share



 their



 thoughts



 and



 feelings



 about



 their



 experience,



 especially



 what



 motivates



 them



 to



 continue



 to



 save.



 Encourage



 them



 to



 inspire



their



family



and



friends



to



do



the



same.



 2.











Have



students



set



a



long-term



savings



goal



and



draw



up



a



plan



to



achieve



their



 goal.



Encourage



them



to



share



their



plan



with



their



family



and



friends



so



that



 they



can



have



their



support



to



reach



their



personal



targets.


Sample Calculation Table

Initial principal = $1,000 Rate of interest = 10% p.a.

Principal



 amount Interest



 earned



(10%



 per



annum) Total



in



 savings



 account

Year 1

Year 2

$1000

$1100

Year 3

Year 4

$1464.10 0.1



x



 $1464.1



=



 $146.41

0.1



x



$1000



 0.1



x



$1100



 = $100 = $110 $1100

Year 5

$1210

$1610.51

Sample Compound Interest Graph $ $146.41

$1000

$100

Year 1

$1464.10

Interest

Year 5

+

Principal

= Total savings


Activity 3.3: Keeping Track (Wise Spending) Learning Objectives Students



will



be



able



to: •



 explain



the



importance



of



spending



money



wisely •



 reflect



on



their



current



spending



habits



 •



 decide



how



they



can



utilize



their



pocket



money



more



wisely. Procedure 1.











Emphasize



the



importance



of



tracking



how



money



is



spent.



 2.



 Ask



 the



 class



 the



 following



 questions:



 How



 can



 people



 track



 their



 spending?



 Why



 would



 this



 be



 an



 important



 aspect



 of



 financial



 responsibility? 3.



 Get



students



to



prepare



a



financial



log



(leave



the



layout



and



presentation



 of



 the



 financial



 log



 to



 them



 to



 allow



 for



 creativity).



 Have



 them



 reflect



 their



spending



in



the



log



for



a



week



including



money



spent



electronically



 such



as



cash



cards,



NETS,



e-z



link



cards,



etc.



 4.











Have



 the



 students



 review



 their



 own



 financial



 records



 using



 the



 following



questions:



How



was



your



money



spent?



What



was



the



biggest



 single



expense?



In



which



area



did



you



spend



most



of



your



money



(i.e.



 transportation,



 food,



 etc.)?



 Can



 you



 identify



 how



 much



 you



 spent



 on



 your



wants,



versus



the



money



spent



on



your



needs? 5.











Get



them



into



small



groups



to



share



their



findings. 6.











Ask



students



to



make



a



realistic



budget



for



themselves



for



the



following



 week



based



on



what



they



have



discovered



about



their



spending. 7.







 Highlight



 that



 it



 is



 important



 to



 be



 aware



 of



 how



 we



 spend



 our



 money.



 Remind



them



that



one



way



of



doing



so



is



to



check



the



account



activities



 of



 their

���
 bank



 statements



 or



 bank



 books.



 Provide



 students



 with



 some



 independent



reflection



time



to



complete



a



reflection



in



their



journals.



 Their



reflection



journals



could



be



a



simple



worksheet



or



on



a



blog.


Tracking General Income And Expenditure SOURCES OF INCOME List



all



your



possible



sources



of



 income,



including



your



regular



 allowance



and



state



how



often



 you



receive



it



(eg



Chinese



New



 Year



hongbao



–



once



a



year)

EXPENDITURE List



all



the



things/items



you



 spend



money



on



and



how



often



 you



spend



on



these



items



(eg.



 going



to



the



movies



 –



once



a



month)


Tracking Daily Income And Expenditure List



 your



 daily



 income



 and



 expenditure



 in



 the



 table



 provided.



 Begin



 by



 writing



 the



 amount



 of



 money



 you



 had



 for



 the



 day



 in



 the



 first



 row.



 Then



 record



every



expenditure



incurred



for



the



day



as



well



as



any



extra



money



 coming



in



(eg.



Granny



gave



$2).



Total



the



balance



for



the



day.



 •



 Did



you



manage



to



save



anything



at



the



end



of



the



day? •



 Based



on



the



amount



saved



per



day,



how



much



would



you



be



able



to



save



 in



1



week/1



month? Day/Date

Description Pocket



money



for



the



day Savings Recess



-



food Recess



-



drinks

$ In

$ Out

Balance


Story 3: INSURANCE- ‘Crisis Control‘ Synopsis: When



Samantha’‛s



uncle



loses



his



bicycle



shop



to



a



fire,



Agent



Penny,



Will



 Power



and



Samantha



visit



him.



They



learn



about



how



insurance



safeguards



 against



losses



and



how



there



are



different



types



of



insurance



products



 for



different



needs. Key Learning Points



•



 What



insurance



policies



are



for



and



how



they



work,



including



the



claim















 process.



•



 Insurance



provides



protection



(to



some



extent)



against



future



loss.



•



 There



are



different



types



of



insurance



policies



for



different



needs.

44


SUGGESTED CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES Activity



3.1:



I’‛ve



got



a



new



computer!

I’ve



got



a



new



computer!























 Learning objectives: Students will be able to: •



 recognise



the



need



for



insurance. Materials needed: 1.



Activity



sheet 2.



Writing



materials Procedure: 1.



 Teacher



presents



the



following



scenario:



If



you



have



$2000



to



spend



on



 a



new



computer,



how



would



you



spend



it?



Teacher



facilitates



discussion



 by



getting



students



to



brainstorm



on



different



possibilities. 2.



 Teacher



 introduces



 the



 concept



 of



 insurance.



 (E.g.,



 What



 is



 insurance?



 What



types



of



insurance



are



there?)



 3.



 In



pairs,



students



do



a



“Think-Pair-Share”



to



compare



the



three



options



 by



discussing



the



advantages



and



disadvantages



of



each



option. 4.



 After



 that,



 students



 do



 a



 “Think-Pair-Square”



 to



 compare



 the



 decision



 made



 and



 justifications.



 As



 a



 group,



 students



 decide



 on



 an



 option



 and



 provide



justifications



for



the



decision



made. 5.



 A



 representative



 from



 each



 group



 presents



 the



 decision



 made



 and



 justifications.



 Teacher



 facilitates



 discussion



 by



 questioning



 students



 on



 the



soundness



of



the



decisions



made. 6.



 After



 all



 groups



 have



 presented



 their



 decision-making



 process,



 teacher



 asks



 students



to



vote



to



find



out



which



option



 they



 would



 take.



 Teacher



 will



 then



 reiterate



 the



 need



 for



 insurance



 and



 the



 need



to



choose



an



insurance



plan



to



suit



 one’‛s



needs.

45


I’ve got a new computer!























 You



need



a



new



computer



and



you



have



 $2000



to



spend



on



it.







 Do



 a



 “Think-Pair-Share”



 to



 make



 a



 decision



 and



 a



 “Think-Pair-Square”



 to



 compare



 your



 process



 of



 decision



 –making



 and



 your



 justification



 for



 the



 choice



your



group



has



made.

Option A

Option B

Option C

Computer











 $1800

Computer











 $1800

Computer











 $1800

Computer



games $100

Insurance



Plan



1 $100

Insurance



Plan



2 $150

Total $1900

Total $1900

Total $1950







 Insurance



Plan



1



 provides



insurance



for



theft.

46







 Insurance



Plan



2



 provides



insurance



 for



theft



and



 accidental



damage



 (e.g.



water



 spillage



and



hard



 disk



crash).


Option B

Option C

Disadvantages

Advantages

Option A

We



have



decided



to



take



Option



__________



because…

47


Story 4: Finding Funds Synopsis: The



members



of



a



band



need



to



raise



funds



for



an



overseas



trip.



With



some



 guidance



 from



 Penny



 and



 Will,



 they



 succeed



 in



 planning



 and



 carrying



 out



 their



fund-raising



project. Key Learning Points •



 Importance



of



having



a



budget



when



setting



up



a



business •



 Understanding



the



basic



concept



of



cost,



revenue



stream



and



profit/loss •



 Setting



up



a



business



is



not



an



easy



task



and



one



won’‛t



get



rich



overnight •



 Purpose,



passion



and



perseverance



in



successful



entrepreneurship •



 Project



Management



skills

48


SUGGESTED CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES Activity 4.1: Getting Started - Generating Ideas for Fund Raising Learning Objectives Students



will



be



able



to: •



 think



out



of



the



box



to



generate



ideas



on



how



to



raise



funds



from



what



 little



resources



they



might



have •



 realise



 that



 one



 can



 raise



 money



 from



 next



 to



 nothing,



 but



 that



 one



 needs



to



have



a



purpose,



passion



and



perseverance



in



order



to



succeed •



 appreciate



 that



 raising



 money



 is



 not



 an



 easy



 task.



 One



 needs



 to



 plan



 carefully



and



to



set



realistic



targets. Resources Needed •



 A



newspaper •



 A



stack



of



coloured



construction



paper •



 A



packet



of



uncooked



popping



corn •



 A



music



CD



or



DVD •



 A



teen



magazine •



 Comic



books •



 Any



other



item



you



can



find



which



you



think



will



trigger



off



a



response Procedure 1.







 Students



 get



 into



 groups



 of



 4-5.



 Tell



 them



 that



 they



 have



 to



 think



 of



 ideas



to



raise



funds



for



a



class



camp



at



the



end



of



the



year. 2.







 Give



 each



 group



 one



 of



 the



 items



 from



 the



 list



 above



 and



 get



 them



 to



 brainstorm



 ideas



 on



 how



 to



 raise



 funds.



 The



 purpose



 of



 the



 item



 is



 to



 trigger



 off



 responses,



 so



 accept



 even



 the



 most



 bizarre



 answers.



 Allow



 5



minutes



for



them



to



generate



ideas. 3.







 Groups



share



their



ideas



with



the



class.



Other



groups



then



add



on



to



 their



ideas. 4.







 Look



 at



 the



 lists



 drawn



 up



 and



 think



 of



 the



 pros



 and



 cons



 of



 each



 suggestion.



(Consider



the



time



investment,



organization,



scale



of



project



 and



any



additional



expenditure) 5.







 Groups



 decide



 which



 suggestions



 are



 viable



 and



 strike



 off



 the



 ones



 which



are



not. 6.







 The



class



then



votes



for



the



most



creative



fund



raising



idea. 7.











Emphasise



that



having



good



ideas



alone



is



not



enough



to



ensure



success.



 Having



 a



 worthy



 cause



 which



 one



 passionately



 believes



 provides



 the



 extra



drive



to



push



on



with



the



project



till



one’‛s



goals



are



met.



Point



out



 that



 ideas



 also



 need



 to



 be



 translated



 into



 practical



 steps



 before



 they



 can



 be



 executed.



 (Refer



 to



 other



 activities



 provided



 in



 Agent



 Penny



 lesson



plans)


Generating Ideas For Fund Raising Instructions: Your



class



wants



to



hold



a



year-end



camp



and



needs



to



raise



funds



so



that



 every



 member



 of



 the



 class



 can



 attend.



 Generate



 ideas



 on



 how



 to



 raise



 funds



based



on



the



item



your



group



has



been



given.



After



you



have



filled



in



 the



first



column,



list



all



the



pros



and



cons



for



each



activity



before



deciding



 which



 would



 be



 the



 most



 viable



 project.



 Consider



 factors



 such



 as



 time,



 capital



investment,



practicality,



manpower



and



other



considerations. Item

Pros

Cons


Activity 4.2: Before & After Learning Objectives Students



will



be



able



to: •



 demonstrate



an



understanding



of



the



concept



of



cost,



revenue



stream



 and



profit/loss •



 appreciate



that



setting



up



a



business



is



not



an



easy



task



and



one



won’‛t



 get



rich



overnight. Procedure 1.



 Get



the



class



into



groups.



 2.



 Have



them



imagine



themselves



as



a



business



owner,



e.g.



a



canteen



stall



 vendor



or



the



school



bookshop



owner.



Get



them



to



discuss



how



they



 will



go



about



deciding



on



the



prices



of



their



products



and



what



factors



 might



affect



what



they



earn. 3.



 Have



the



class



read



the



story,



Finding



Funds. 4.



 Get



 the



 groups



 to



 look



 at



 their



 ideas



 again



 and



 modify



 them



 if



 necessary.



 5.



 Have



the



groups



share



their



ideas



with



the



class.



 6.



 Highlight



that



setting



up



a



business



is



not



an



easy



task



and



one



won’‛t



get



 rich



overnight.



 Possible Extension Get



students



to



find



out



more



about



running



a



business



by



talking



to



real



 business



owners



such



as



canteen



stall



vendors,



the



school



bookshop



owner



 or



 their



 relatives



 who



 own



 businesses.



 Have



 them



 share



 their



 findings



 with



the



class.


Activity 4.3: Mini Fund-Raising Projects Learning Objective Students



will



be



able



to: •



 appreciate



that



starting



a



business



is



not



an



easy



task •



 learn



 that



 purpose,



 passion



 and



 perseverance



 are



 key



 components



 to



 succeeding



in



a



business



venture. Resources Needed •



 Inform



 students



 to



 bring



 an



 item



 that



 they



 own



 but



 which



 they



 are



 willing



to



give



up



as



they



no



longer



need



them.



The



items



must



be



in



a



 good



condition. •



 Have



ready



materials



such



as



adhesive



note



pads



(as



price



tags),



vanguard



 sheets



and



colourful



marker



pens.



Set



a



price



for



these



items. Procedure 1.











Explain



that



the



class



will



be



divided



into



groups



to



raise



funds



for



a



 charitable



cause



of



their



choice



or



for



their



class



fund.



Inform



them



 that



they



are



to



sell



the



items



within



the



class.



 2.



 Get



the



groups



to



refer



to



pp.



60



–



61



of



the



comic



book



and



discuss



their



 business



ideas,



e.g.



what



prices



to



set



and



how



to



attract



customers. 3.



 Sell



the



materials



such



as



price



tags



and



vanguard



sheets



to



the



groups.



 Remind



 them



 that



 these



 constitute



 their



 costs.



 Get



 them



 to



 set



 up



 their



stalls.



 4.



 Set



a



time



limit



and



let



the



selling



begin. 5.



 Have



 the



 groups



 total



 up



 their



 earnings.



 Get



 them



 to



 share



 their



 thoughts



and



feelings



about



their



experience



as



a



business



owner.



 6.



 Highlight



that



starting



a



business



project



is



not



an



easy



task.



Purpose,



 passion



 and



 perseverance



 are



 key



 components



 to



 succeeding



 in



 a



 business



endeavour. 7.



 Remind



students



to



donate



their



funds



accordingly



and



encourage



them



 to



try



out



their



business



ideas



when



the



opportunity



arises.



 Possible Extension The



 scale



of



the



fund-raising



can



be



expanded



to



selling



to



other



classes



 or



 the



 whole



 school.



 It



 can



 also



 be



 carried



 out



 as



 an



 auction



 (this



 concept



 is



covered



in



Story



1).


Activity 4.4: The Need for a Budget Learning Objective Students



will



be



able



to: •



 appreciate



how



people



and



businesses



use



budgets



to



keep



track



of



their



 finances. Additional Requirement •



 Students



should



have



some



experience



with



collecting,



organising



and



 presenting



data. Procedure 1.











Explain



the



concept



of



a



budget



and



ask



students



to



brainstorm



what



a



 budget



is



used



for



and



the



benefits



of



preparing



a



budget. 2.



 Pose



the



question:



DO



MOST



PEOPLE



CREATE



BUDGETS?



Allow



time



 for



students



to



consider



this



and



present



their



ideas



orally. 3.







Have



them



explore



this



question



further



through



research.



Students



 may



 find



 out



 more



 from



 their



 parents,



 friends,



 neighbours,



 relatives



 or



even



businesses,



or



charitable



organizations.



They



can



also



surf



the



 Internet.



 4.











Have



students



work



in



groups



to



design



questions



to



ask



in



their



individual



 polls.



 The



 number



 of



 questions



 should



 not



 exceed



 five



 and



 they



 should



 address



both







how



many



people



have



a



budget



and



how



many



people



use



 a







budget. 5.



 Get



 students



 to



 present



 their



 findings



 to



 their



 peers.



 Have



 them



 compare



 the



 results



 and



 consider



 the



 factors



 that



 could



 account



 for



 the



similarities



or



differences. 6.











Have



 them



 re-read



 the



 story



 and



 think



 about



 the



 following:



 How



 could



 have



 things



 worked



 out



 differently



 if



 they



 had



 a



 budget?



 Could



 they



 have



been



proactive



in



their



finances?



How



could



a



budget



help



them



in



 planning? Possible Extension Students



 may



 use



 computer



 applications,



 such



 as



 Microsoft



 Excel,



 to



 present



their



data



more



effectively.



(or



the



teacher



could



give



the



students



 a



template



in



this



kit)


Story



4:



MONETARY



SYSTEM-



‘Printing



Error’‛ Synopsis: Venice



 is



 caught



 scanning



 and



 printing



 money



 to



 help



 raise



 funds



 for



 a



 charit



event.



Although



her



intentions



were



good,



counterfeiting



is



a



serious



 crime.



Trainer



Lee



suspends



her



from



school



and



she



is



in



danger



of



not



 graduating



with



her



friends.

Key Learning Points •



 Counterfeiting



is



a



serious



crime. •



 Only



governments



are



allowed



to



print



money. •



 Consider



your



actions



and



their



consequences



before



you



do



them. •



 Report



crimes.

54


SUGGESTED CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES Activity 4.1: The Singapore Dollar

The



Singapore



Dollar Learning objective: Students will be able to: •



 recognise



the



differences



between



a



genuine



and







 counterfeit



currency



note •



 discuss



the



repercussions



of



making



or



using



counterfeit



notes. Materials needed: A



computer



with



internet



connection



 Activity



sheet Drawing



materials Procedure: 1.



 Teacher



 shows



 students



 a



 fake



 note



 and



 elicits



 response



 by



 saying



 something



like



“I



found



this



note



in



my



drawer



and



I



am



going



to



use



it



 to



buy



something.” 2.



 Teacher



 leads



 students



 to



 think



 about



 the



 possibility



 of



 producing



 counterfeit



notes



by



asking,



“Do



you



think



we



can



reproduce



a



currency



 note



easily?



Why



or



why



not?”.



 3.



 In



pairs,



students



complete



the



first



activity



of



spotting



the



differences



 between



 the



 two



 specimen



 notes.



 After



 that,



 using



 Think-Pair-Share,



 students



discuss



and



label



the



security



features



of



a



genuine



Singapore



 currency



note. 4.



 Students



 share



 their



 answers



 while



 teacher



 notes



 them



 down



 on



 the



 whiteboard.



Teacher



adds



on



to



the



list



by



showing



the



following



website:



 http://www.mas.gov.sg/currency/currency_info/notes/Singapore_ Circulation_Notes_Distinguishing_Counterfeit_Notes.html 5.



 Get



 the



 class



 to



 line



 up



 in



 2



 rows



 facing



 one



 another,



 forming



 an



 ‘alley’‛.



 Students



on



one



side



are



to



think



of



a



reason



each



why



it’‛s



okay



to



use



 or



make



a



counterfeit



note,



while



students



on



the



other



side



are



to



think



 of



reasons



against



counterfeiting.



 6.



 Teacher



will



walk



down



the



alley.



As



s/he



does



so,



the



students



forming



 the



‘alley’‛



are



to



alternate



in



saying



out



loud



their



reasons



for



or



against



 counterfeiting.



 Having



 heard



 all



 the



 reasons,



 students



 now



 decide



 whether



or



not



they



should



be



involved



in



making



or



using



counterfeit



 notes



by



penning



down



their



thoughts



and



arguments



on



paper. 55


The



Singapore



Dollar Spot



5



differences



between



the



two



currency



notes.

Study



the



currency



notes



above,



do



a



“Think-Pair-Share”



to



discuss



and



 label



the



security



features



of



a



genuine



Singapore



currency



note. I



think



that



making



or



using



counterfeit



currency



notes



is



okay/wrong



because…

56


Activity 4.2: Creative Currency

Creative Currency Learning objective: Students will be able to: •



 identify



 similarities



 and



 differences



 in



 the



 design



 of



 currency



 notes



 from



 various



 countries



 and



 reflect



 on



 the



 significance



of



these



features •



 design



 a



 currency



 note



 for



 their



 school



 incorporating



symbols



that



reflect



who



 they



are



and



what



their



school



is



about. Materials needed: •



 computers



with



internet



connection



OR •



 art



materials



and



art



paper Procedure: 1.



 After



 the



 lesson



 on



 counterfeit



 currency,



 show



 students



 samples



 of



 currency



 notes



 from



 different



 countries.



 Students



 identify



 similarities



 and



 differences



 in



 the



 currency



 notes



 –



 value



 of



 the



 currency,



serial



number,



signature



of



currency



commissioner,



security



 features,



symbols,



etc. 2.



 Discuss



the



differences



in



the



symbols



used.





a.



What



do



the



symbols



denote?





b.



What



might



influence



the



design



of



a



nation’‛s



currency?

3.



 Get



 students



 to



 brainstorm



 features



 and



 symbols



 they



 would



 incorporate



 into



 a



 currency



 note



 for



 their



 school



 and



 be



 prepared



 to



 explain



their



design



features. 4.



 Students



work



in



pairs



at



their



computers



or



on



art



paper



to



produce



a



 currency



 note.



 Remind



 them



 to



 incorporate



 security



 features.



 They



 should



 include



 annotations



 to



 explain



 the



 features



 and



 symbols



 they



 have



chosen



for



their



design. 5.



 Display



the



 completed



 currencies



 on



 a



 board



 and



 allow



 the



 students



 to



 vote



for



the



best



designed



currency.

57


Activity



4.3:



Let’‛s



Go



on



A



Vacation!

Let’s Go on A Vacation! Learning objective: Students will be able to : •



 calculate



 the



 value



 of



 the



 Singapore



 dollar



 against



 the



 currency



 of



 other



countries



 •



 be



 aware



 of



 the



 fluctuations



 in



 the



 rate



of



different



currencies. Materials needed: •



 Currencies



of



different



countries •



 Foreign



currency



exchange



rates •



 Quiz



questions Procedure: 1.



 Show



 the



 class



 pictures



 of



 the



 foreign



 currencies



 of



 the



 different countries,



 then



 get



 them



 to



 do



 a



 matching



 exercise



 on



 the



 names



 of the



different



currencies



and



the



countries



they



are



used



in. 2.



 Lead



 students



 into



 a



 discussion



 on



 foreign



 currency



 exchange



 by presenting



them



with



the



following



scenario:



You



have



been



selected



to



 go



on



a



foreign



student



exchange



programme



to



another



country.











 Can



you



bring



along



your



Singapore



money



for



spending?



Why



or



why











 not?



(not



always



accepted



by



the



host



country



because



of



differences







 in



value)







 Where



can



you



purchase



the



relevant



foreign



currency



for



your



trip?







 (money



changers,



banks)







 How



 do



 you



 calculate



the



 value



 of



 your



 Singapore



 dollars



 against



 the







 foreign



currency?



 (check



the



foreign



currency



exchange



rates)











 When



 should



 you



 buy



 your



 foreign



 currency?



 (When



 the



 exchange







 rates



drop



in



favour



of



the



Singapore



dollar)

3.



 Provide



students



with



a



copy



of



the



foreign



currency



exchange



rates and



conduct



a



group



quiz



in



which



they



calculate



the



value



of



Singapore



 dollars



against



the



other



foreign



currencies.



Demonstrate



by



modelling



 one



example



first. 4.







 Change



 the



 exchange



 rates



 to



 make



 the



 quiz



 more



 exciting



 and



 to



 illustrate



 the



 significance



 of



 a



 ‘strong’‛



 dollar



 as



 opposed



 to



 a



 ‘weak’‛



 dollar.



 Alternatively,



 get



 the



 groups



 to



 come



 up



 with



 problem



 sums



 based



on



the



foreign



currency



exchange



rates



given. 58


Find the equivalent Singapore dollars for each of the foreign currency below: FOREIGN CURRENCY NOTE RATES One unit of foreign currency

Singapore dollars

Australian



dollar Euro



dollar Malaysian



ringgit Sterling



pound US



dollar 100 units of foreign currency

Singapore dollars

China



renminbi HK



dollar Indian



rupee Indonesian



rupiah Japanese



yen Philippine



peso Thai



baht 1. How many Malaysian ringgit will I get in exchange for SGD$1?

2. How many Euro dollars will I get in exchange for SGD$1?

3. How many US dollars will I get in exchange for SGD$1?

4. How many US dollars will I get in exchange for SGD$120?

5. How many Philippine pesos will I get in exchange for SGD$10? 59


Find the equivalent Singapore dollars for each of the foreign currency below: FOREIGN CURRENCY NOTE RATES (Sample Answer) One unit of foreign currency

Singapore dollars

Australian



dollar

$



1.32

Euro



dollar

$



2.15

Malaysian



ringgit

$



0.42cts

Sterling



pound

$



2.74

US



dollar

$



1.37

100 units of foreign currency

Singapore dollars

China



renminbi

$



20.40

HK



dollar

$



17.60

Indian



rupee

$











3.40

Indonesian



rupiah

$











0.015

Japanese



yen

$











1.27

Philippine



peso

$











3.14

Thai



baht

$











4.14

1. How many Malaysian ringgit will I get in exchange for SGD$1?



 42















Singapore



cents



=



MR



1.00



 100







Singapore



cents



=



1.00



/



42



x



100



=



MR 2.38 2. How many Euro dollars will I get in exchange for SGD$1?



 SGD



$2.15



=



Euro



$1



 SGD



$1























=







1



/



2.15



x



1



=



Euro 47 cents 3. How many US dollars will I get in exchange for SGD$1?



 SGD



$1.37







=



US



$



1.00



 SGD



$



1.00



=



1.00



/



1.37



x



1.00



=



US 72 cents 4. How many US dollars will I get in exchange for SGD$120?



 SGD



$1.00



=



US



$



0.72



cts



 SGD



$120







=







0.72



/



1.00



x



120



=



US $86 5. How many Philippine pesos will I get in exchange for SGD$10?



 SGD



$3.14



=



100



Philippine



pesos



 SGD



$10















=



100



/



3.14



x



10



=60



318 pesos


A Matter Of Insurance URL: http://www.finlit.nie.edu.sg/web/games/agent-penny/

61


Story



5:



Spree



In



‘Paree’‛ Synopsis: A



family



goes



into



debt



after



an



expensive



overseas



holiday



using



their



new



 credit



cards.



Penny



and



Will



help



them



realise



that



they



cannot



avoid



paying



 the



credit



card



charges



and



that



they



should



spend



within



their



means.



 Key Learning Points •



 What



is



a



credit



card?



How



does



it



work? •



 It



is



a



payment



tool



and



not



a



borrowing



tool •



 Disadvantages



of



using



it



as



a



borrowing



tool •



 Spend



what



you



can



afford

62


SUGGESTED CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES Activity 5.1: Read the Statement Learning Objectives Students



will



be



able



to: •



 identify



 the



 main



 information



 on



 a



 credit



 card



 and



 a



 credit



 card



 statement •



 explain



what



a



credit



card



is



and



how



it



works •



 recognise



 that



 there



 is



 a



 need



 to



 pay



 for



 the



 goods



 and



 services



 charged •



 compare



the



various



modes



of



payment



–



cash,



cheque,



Nets,



debit



card,



 credit



card. Resources Needed •



 A



real



credit



card •

���
 Make



 sufficient



 copies



 of



 a



 real



 credit



 card



 statement



 for



 each



 pair



 of



 students.



 Alter



 personal



 details



 such



 as



 name,



 address



 and



 card



 number. Procedure 1.



 Show



the



class



a



credit



card



and



elicit



response



as



to



what



they



think



a



 credit



card



is.



Note



their



responses



on



the



board.



 2.



 Highlight



the



main



information



on



a



credit



card



eg.



the



issuing



bank’‛s



 name,



the



card



number,



the



card



holder’‛s



name



and



the



card’‛s



expiry



 date.



 3.



 Get



the



class



into



pairs



to



study



the



credit



card



statement



and



identify



 the







 following



information:



 -



 the



statement



date



 -



 the



payment



due



date



 -



 the



amount



payable



 -



 the



minimum



payment



due



 -



 charges



for



late



payment



 -



 charges



for



payment



not



made



in



full 4.











Refer



 them



 to



 p.30



 of



 the



 comic



 book



 for



 an



 explanation



 of



 what



 a



 credit



card



is.



Use



the



statement



as



a



real



example



to



illustrate



how



a



 credit



card



works.







 5.











Have



the



class



read



the



story,



Spree



In



‘Paree’‛. 6.



 Highlight



 that



 there



 is



 a



 need



 to



 pay



 for



 the



 goods



 and



 services



 charged. 7.



 Carry



 out



 a



 discussion



 on



 the



 various



 modes



 of



 payment



 and



 the



 advantages



and



disadvantages



of



each.


Activity 5.2: Pros & Cons Learning Objectives Students



will



be



able



to: •



 describe



some



advantages



and



disadvantages



of



using



a



credit



card •



 explain



that



a



credit



card



is



a



payment



tool



and



not



a



borrowing



tool •



 recognise



the



importance



of



spending



within



one’‛s



means. Procedure 1.



 Divide



 the



 class



 into



 two



 groups



 to



 brainstorm



 the



 advantages



 and



 disadvantages



of



using



a



credit



card. 2.



 Have



the



group



share



their



ideas.



 3.



 Highlight



the



following:





-



 although



there



are



advantages



to



using



a



credit



card,



the



charges







 incurred



must



be



paid





-



 a



credit



card



is



a



payment



tool



and



not



a



borrowing



tool -



 the



importance



of



spending



what



we



can



afford



so



as



to



avoid



paying



 more



in



terms



of



late



charges



and



interest



on



unpaid



balances





Possible Extension A



debate



may



be



carried



out.



An



example



of



a



motion



is



‘Credit



cards



are



 a



necessity’‛.


Activity 5.3: Savvy Shopper Learning Objectives Students



will



be



able



to: •



 recognise



 the



 sales



 and



 marketing



 techniques



 used



 by



 companies



 and



 sales



personnel



to



encourage



spending •



 discern



 how



 to



 be



 a



 savvy



 shopper



 and



 make



 smart



 choices



 when



 shopping. Procedure 1.







 Have



 a



 class



 discussion



 about



 the



 experiences



 that



 students



 have



 had



 while







shopping.



Ask



them



if



they



ever



felt



pressured



to



purchase



an



 item.



 2.



 Encourage



them



to



talk



about



the



different



techniques



used



by



sales



 people



to



get



customers



to



make



purchases. 3.



 Get



 them



 to



 work



 in



 groups



 to



 decide



 on



 a



 situation



 in



 which



 a



 sales



 person



 might



 be



 aggressively



 pursuing



 a



 sale



 and



 to



 brainstorm



 on



 different



 ways



 that



 a



 customer



 might



 handle



 the



 aggressive



 sales



 tactics



used. 4.











Explain



that



they



are



to



prepare



two



different



dramatic



performances,



 one



 outlining



 how



 a



 savvy



 shopper



 would



 handle



 the



 situation



 and



 the



 other



with



a



more



gullible



shopper. 5.



 Have



 them



 perform



 their



 skits



 in



 front



 of



 their



 peers



 (class



 or



 school



 [see



Extension]).



Have



the



rest



of



the



class



take



note



of



body



language,



 words



and



tone



used



by



the



sales



personnel. 6.



 Sum



 up



 by



 reminding



 them



 to



 take



 time



 to



 consider



 how



 they



 will



 approach



aggressive



 sales



people



in



 the



 future.



 They



can



 write



 a



 short



 reflection



piece



that



outlines



their



plan



and



execution. Possible Extension •



 Get



the



class



to



vote



for



the



best



performance.



You



may



also



consider



 extending



 this



 performance



 to



 the



 rest



 of



 the



 school



 during



 assembly



 to



drive



home



the



subtle



message. •



 Get



 students



 to



 base



 their



 skits



 on



 online



 purchases



 and



 online



 auctions.


BE AWARE! Give



 examples



 of



 enticing



 signs



 (whether



 in



 the



 papers,



 magazines,



 on



 brochures



 or



 store



 fronts)



 that



 draw



 customers’‛



 attention.



 (One



 has



 already



been



done



for



you)

What does a persuasive/pushy sales(wo)man Sound like?

Look like?


Activity 5.4: To Buy or Not to Buy? Learning Objectives Students



will



be



able



to: •



 evaluate



the



impact



of



advertisements



in



newspapers



and



magazines



on



 consumer



spending •



 reflect



 on



 how



 they



 responded



 to



 advertisments



 or



 were



 influenced



 by



 them •



 realise



 the



 importance



 of



 being



 able



 to



 tell



 the



 discern



 between



 facts



 and



opinions



and



not



be



easily



swayed



by



such



advertisements. Resources Needed •



 Inform



students



to



bring



newspapers



or



magazines



 Procedure 1.











Have



students



brainstorm



examples



of



how



they



purchase



items



–



what



 process



do



they



use



in



making



their



selection?



Have



the



students



share



 opinions



if



they



feel



their



decision



making



process



is



effective. 2.







Have



a



discussion



after



the



class



has



shared



their



ideas



on



how



they



 might



have



done



a



better



job. 3.



 Get



students



into



groups



to



look



through



the



newspapers



or



magazines



 for



advertisements,



and



ask



themselves



the



following



questions:



Would



 they



 purchase



 the



 item



 shown?



 Is



 it



 a



 good



 deal?



 What



 are



 other



 (better)



sources



of



information? 4.



 Discuss



 the



 impact



 advertising



 has



 on



 themselves



 and



 consumers



 in



 general.



 5.











Have



students



write



a



reflection



about



how



their



shopping



habits



might



 change



to



allow



for



better



decision



making.



(see



worksheet). 6.







Lead



students



to



draw



up



a



decisions-making



flow



chart



to



show



their



 decision-making



 process



 considering



 the



 factors



 impacting



 the



 other



 smaller



decisions



in



the



process.



They



may



want



to



use



a



mind-map. Possible Extension •



 Students



may



do



a



show-and-tell



on



the



decision



making



flow



chart



they



 have



come



up



with



for



buying



a



specific



item. •



 They



 may



 also



 want



 to



 share



 how



 their



 family



 makes



 decision



 on



 a



 vacation



trip



or



when



buying



grocery



items



or



a



big



ticket



item.


Purchasing Power Decision making Matrix Very Important

Important

Necessary

Usefulness (what do you intend to do with the product) Quality of product Value for money Reliability of product After-sales support Exclusivity (whether the product is widely sold in the market) Maintenance (costs of repair) Features (what it can do)

Note: Rate



the



product



without



bias/



objectively. Do



remember



that



the



matrix



is



only



a



guide



 and



can



be



subjective.



So



be



a



rational



consumer!

Not necessary


SUGGESTED CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES Activity 1.1: I want it! But do I really need it...?

I Want It!!!...but do I really need it? Learning objective: Students will be able to: •



 differentiate



between



‘Needs’‛



and



‘Wants’‛ •



 appreciate



that



what



constitutes



a



Want



for



some



may



be



perceived



as



 a



Need



for



others •



 define



‘Need’‛



and



‘Want’‛ Resources needed: •



 Picture



Cards



 •



 Blu



tack •



 Worksheet Procedure: 1.



 Group



students



4



to



a



table.



Give



out



2



picture



cards



per



table. 2.



 Groups



are



to



decide



whether



the



items



on



their



picture



cards



are



Need



 or



Wants. 3.



 Draw



3



columns



on



the



whiteboard



as



shown



below: Needs

Not Sure

Wants

4.



 Groups



 send



 their



 representatives



 to



 stick



 up



 their



 cards



 in



 the



 appropriate



columns. 5.



 Teacher



runs



through



the



items



under



each



column



to



see



if



there



is



 consensus



 in



 the



 class.



 Groups



 are



 to



 justify



 their



 classification.



 If



 there



is



no



consensus,



remove



the



picture



and



place



it



in



the



‘Not



Sure’‛



 column. 6.



 Discuss



:



‘What



makes



an



item



a



‘Need’‛



or



a



‘Want’‛?



 7.



 Consolidation



:



Worksheet



activity.



Students



are



to



pick



any



item



from



 the



‘Not



Sure’‛



list



and



reflect



on



whether



they



now



consider



that



item



 a



‘Need’‛



or



a



‘Want’‛.



They



are



to



give



reasons



for



their



classification.


Need or Want? Item:

To



me,



the



above



item



is



a



……………………………………



because……………………………

























Name



:



________________________

























Class



:







________________________


Needs or Wants? (Picture Cards)


Story



5:



SAVING-



‘Double



Trouble’‛ Synopsis: Venice



must



score



an



‘A’‛



 on



her



final



project



in



order



to



graduate.



She



is



 assigned



 to



 teach



 a



 pair



 of



 twins,



 Mason



 and



 Macy,



 about



 good



 financial



 habits.



She



innovates



and



uses



one



of



their



computer



games



to



bring



the



 learning



points



across.

Key Learning Points •



 Cultivating



good



financial



habits



from



a



young



age



will



result



in



fewer



 money



problems



later



on. •



 Long-term



saving



vs



short-term



gratification. •



 Budget



your



allowance. •



 Prioritize



your



spending. •



 Earn



your



own



money. •



 Save



for



the



future. •



 Financial



education



need



not



be



boring;;



there



are



creative



and



fun



ways



 to



learn

72


SUGGESTED CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES Activity 5.1: Bingo!

Bingo! Learning objectives: Students will be able to: •



 perform



simple



financial



calculations. Materials needed: •



 Bingo



cue



cards



(Teacher’‛s



copy) •



 Kitchen



Timer •



 Bingo



play



cards



(Students’‛



copy) •



 Writing



materials •



 Teacher



may



print



a



set



of



the



bingo



cue



cards



and



bingo



play



cards,



 and



cut



them



out



before



the



start



of



the



lesson Procedure: 1.



 Teacher



 gets



 students



 into



 groups



 of



 four.



 Using



 Numbered



 Heads



 Together,



teacher



gives



instructions



for



students



to



take



turns



to



solve



 the



problems



given. 2.



 At



 the



 beginning



 of



 each



 turn,



 teacher



 draws



 a



 cue



 card.



 Teacher



 flashes



 the



 cue



 card



 on



 the



 visualiser



 and



 students



 will



 solve



 the



 problem.



 Students



 are



 given



 2



 minutes



 to



 solve



 each



 problem.



 After



 which,



students



shade



the



box



with



the



answer



in



the



bingo



play



card. 3.



 At



 the



 next



 turn,



 teacher



 draws



 another



 cue



 card



 and



 repeats



 the



 procedure. 4.



 The



game



continues



until



a



group



has



successfully



obtained



BINGO!

73


Bingo! B

I N G O

B

I N G O

20

250

69

123

10

11

35

18

20

10

256

144

48

180

41

150

50

210

30

12

15

240

90

77

210

16

21

19

38

90

30

69

96

16

60

60

47

41

15

250

150

50

44

58

12

28

144

72

80

26

B

I N G O

B

I N G O

20

250

69

3

10

144

48

180

69

50

144

72

48

180

41

16

44

58

20

18

16

21

90

38

210

15

240

150

69

96

30

47

96

15

60

77

41

60

123

10

150

50

34

102

12

12

30

25

210

90

✄

74


Bingo Cue Cards (Teacher’s



Copy) I



have



$400



in



my



savings



account.



 The



bank



pays



customers



a



 compound



interest



of



5%.



What



 is



the



total



interest



earned



in



2



 years?

I



have



$400



in



my



savings



account.



 The



bank



pays



customers



a



simple



 interest



of



5%.



What



is



the



total



 interest



earned



in



1



year? (Ans: $20)

(Ans: $41) I



have



$1000



in



my



savings



 account.



The



bank



pays



customers



 a



compound



interest



of



10%.



What



 is



the



total



interest



earned



in



2



 years?

I



have



$1000



in



my



savings



account.



 The



bank



pays



customers



a



simple



 interest



of



3%.



What



is



the



total



 interest



earned



in



3



years? (Ans: $90)

(Ans: $210)

Sumei



bought



a



pair



of



shoes



at



a



 sale



at/with



a



20%



discount.



The



 original



price



of



the



shoes



was



$80.



 How



much



did



she



save?

Mrs



Muthu



received



a



total



revenue



 of



$500



for



her



cookies



this



month.



 The



ingredients



cost



HK$350.



How



 much



was



her



profit?

(Ans: $16)

(Ans: $150)

Benson



bought



a



collector’‛s



item



 trading



card



for



$120.



He



wants



to



 sell



the



card



at



a



20%



profit.



How



 much



is



the



new



selling



price



of



the



 trading



card?

Gordon



bought



a



game



console



at



 a



sale



at/with



a



10%



discount.



The



 original



price



of



the



game



console



 was



$300.



How



much



did



he



save? (Ans: $30)

(Ans: $144) Sharon



earns



$1200



each



month.



 She



saves



20%



of



her



salary



in



 a



savings



account



which



pays



5%



 simple



interest



per



month.



What



is



 the



monthly



interest



earned? (Ans: $12)

Ali







receives



a



monthly



allowance



of



 $250



from



his



parents.



He



saves



 20%



of



his



allowance



each



month.



 How



much



does



he



save



per



month? (Ans: $50)

75


Bingo Play Cards (Answer Key)

B

I N G O

B

I N G O

20

250

69

123

10

20

250

69

3

10

256

144

48

180

41

144

72

48

180

41

15

240

90

77

210

16

21

90

38

210

30

69

96

16

60

30

47

96

15

60

150

50

44

58

12

150

50

34

102

12

B

I N G O

B

I N G O

144

48

180

69

50

11

35

18

20

10

16

44

58

20

18

150

50

210

30

12

15

240

150

69

96

16

21

19

38

90

77

41

60

123

10

60

47

41

15

250

12

30

25

210

90

28

144

72

80

26

76


Activity 5.2: A Friend in Need

A Friend in Need Learning objectives: Students will be able to: •



 solve



problems



based



on



their



financial



literacy



knowledge. Materials needed: Activity



sheet Procedure: 1.



 Students



read



story



–



“Life



Savings” 2.



 Teacher



 presents



 scenario



 to



 students:



 You



 have



 a



 friend,



 Sue.



 Her



 father



just



lost



his



job



as



a



sales



manager.



He



is



the



sole



breadwinner.



 Sue



is



very



troubled.



Knowing



that



you



have



some



knowledge



of



financial



 literacy,



Sue



has



asked



you



for



your



help. 3.



 In



groups



of



four,



students



brainstorm



on



possible



solutions



to



help



Sue



 and



her



family



to



tide



over



the



financial



difficulties



faced.



To



scaffold



 the



problem



solving



process,



teacher



may



provide



the



following



hints:







 How



can



Sue’‛s



family



reduce



their



monthly



expenses?







 How



can



Sue’‛s



family



increase



the



family



income?

4.



 Students



 share



 answers



 with



 their



 classmates.



 Teacher



 may



 facilitate



 discussion



by



questioning



the



soundness



of



decisions



made



and



eliciting



 responses



from



other



students. 5.



 After



 all



 the



 presentations,



 Teacher



 consolidates



 ideas



 and



 asks



 students:



 How



 do



 you



 think



 we



 can



 avoid



 the



 situation



 Sue



 and



 her



 family



faced? 6.



 Teacher



leads



students



to



realise



the



importance



of



saving



and



proper



 budgeting.

77


Sue’‛s



 father



 has



 just



 lost



 his



 job



 as



 a



 sales



 manager.



 He



 is



 the



 sole



 breadwinner.



 Sue



 is



 very



 troubled



 as



 the



 family



 is



 facing



 some



 financial



 difficulties.



She



has



asked



you



for



some



advice



on



what



to



do.



What



would



 you



tell



her?

MOTHER

FATHER

Age: 45

Age: 48

Occupation:



Housewife

Occupation:



Sales



Manager

Education:



Diploma



in