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Published by SNEWS THURSDAY, JanUARY 26, 2012

Official Publication of the 2012 SIA Snow show

Mile-High Mood Prevails Welcome to the 2012 SIA Snow Show, where innovation, resilience and recent snowfall have created optimism rather than angst (p. 4).

Young Bucks

The secret to snow sports growth? Hook ‘em early and watch the cash flow (p. 30).

Apparel Innovation Cool tech, sustainability and eye-popping colors set the stage (p. 10)

Rocker Roars

New snowboards (p. 14) and skis (p. 16) share a lot in common.

Heard in the Aisles > “We’re not jumping off the Quechee Gorge Bridge.”

—Bill Langlands, Darkside Snowboards (p. 64) SIA Snow Show App

*Who are they?

See page 3

Also available on the iTunes App Store or at www.SIAshowapp.com.


Introducing technology, it’s the glove with the built-in APP. A thumb zipper system allowing you to use your touch sensitive smartphone without exposing your entire hand to the elements. • Bonded Seams • Water resistant zipper with storm flap Patent pending.

ALL NEW TECHNOLOGY FROM GORDINI® FOR 2012 -2013

Introducing new goggles featuring Optics by Carl Zeiss Vision

ALL NEW MODELS & NEW TECHNOLOGY FOR 2011 / 2012 FROM GORDINI® GORDINI.COM

Carl Zeiss Vision Ri-Pel technology is an outstanding transparent coating, which enables dirt, water, oil and dust to slip off the surface of the lens. • 100% UV protection • Optical quality • Sharp vision • Scratch resistance

FEATURING: MAD GRIP® SPORT TECHNOLOGY “WE WON’T LET GO UNLESS YOU DO” OR BOOTH #34091 SIA BOOTH #2834 GLC E model featuring Memory Face Foam. Patent pending.

PATENTS PENDING

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BOOTH #34091


Welcome to the Show

/ SIA President’s Letter

Here’s to a great Show!

Photo by ben fullerton (far right)

Now and then: Cutting it tight in 1969 at Wachusett Mountain in Massachusetts.

Welcome to the 2012 SIA Snow Show and On-Snow Demo/Ski-Ride Fest. The Show is our industry’s yearly chance to get together, get inspired, conduct business face-to-face and re-connect with industry friends. As I traveled throughout the country this fall, something struck me—there seemed to be a renewed energy at all levels—from shop staff to sales reps to company presidents—this season started with a level of excitement I haven’t seen for quite some time. So far, Mother Nature has not been as kind to us as she was last year, yet our industry remains strong and vibrant, one I’ve been proud to be a part of for over 30 years. The 2012 Snow Show will be over 330,000 net square feet with 11,000 more square feet of exhibit space and include the Snow Fashion + Trends Show, a solid seminar line-up, plus more than 900 brands and 105 new exhibitors showcasing their full lines. Be sure to pick up a copy of the Snow Show Daily for a complete overview of all Snow Show happenings, parties and events. With some of the world’s best snow country just out the back door, I know I’m not alone in looking forward to the On-Snow Demo/Ski-Ride Fest on January 30-31 at Winter Park Resort and Devil’s Thumb Ranch. And this year’s Nordic portion of the On-Snow will feature more equipment, brands, models and sizes than any other

Bienvenue au SIA Snow Show, à la démo On-Snow et au festival Ski-Ride. Le SIA Snow Show est le rendezvous annuel de notre industrie où il nous est possible de nous réunir, de faire le plein d’inspiration, de faire des affaires en personne et de reprendre contact avec nos amis de l’industrie. La démo On-Snow et le festival Ski-Ride se déroulant dans l’une des plus belles régions enneigées du monde, je sais que je ne suis pas le seul à y avoir hâte. Ces évènements se tiendront le 30 et 31 janvier aux Winter Park Resort et Devil’s Thumb Ranch. Cette année, la portion nordique de la démo se distinguera par la présentation de plus d’équipement, de marques, de modèles et de grandeurs que toute autre démo nordique au pays. La force et la vitalité se construisent sur un fond de collaboration, d’innovation et de passion incontestable que nous partageons tous. Par sa formule, le SIA Snow Show appartient vraiment aux membres. Il vous appartient. SIA ne pourrait organiser le salon avec succès sans le soutien de toute l’industrie, et cette collaboration propulse le SIA Show au rang du plus grand et du meilleur salon des sports de neige en Amérique du Nord. Je souhaite à tous une montagne de neige et un super salon!

Nordic demo in the country. Strength and vitality are built on collaboration, innovation and the undeniable passion we all share. As a member-owned trade show, the SIA Snow Show is truly Your Show. SIA would not be able to put on a successful Show without support from the entire industry– making the SIA Show the biggest and best snow sports trade show in North America. Here’s to more SNOW and a great Show!

David Ingemie SIA President

Willkommen zur SIA Snow Show 2012, zur On-Snow Demo und zum Ski-Ride Fest! Die Show ist die jährliche Chance für unsere Branche, um zusammen zu kommen, sich inspirieren zu lassen, Geschäfte von Angesicht zu Angesicht zu betreiben und Freunde aus der Branche wiederzutreffen. Mit einem der besten Schneegebiete der Welt direkt hinterm Haus bin ich sicherlich nicht der Einzige, der sich auf die On-Snow Demo und das Ski-Ride Fest freut im Winter Park Resort und auf der Devil’s Thumb Ranch vom 30.-31. Januar. Und der diesjährige Anteil an Nordic-Produkten bei der On-Snow wird mehr Ausrüstung, Marken, Modelle und Größen bieten als jede andere Nordic-Ausstellung des Landes. Stärke und Lebensfreude stützen sich auf Zusammenarbeit, Innovation und die unbestreitbaren Leidenschaft, die uns alle verbindet. Als eine mitgliedereigene Handelsausstellung ist die SIA Snow Show ganz und gar Ihre Show. SIA könnte ohne die Unterstützung der gesamten Branche keine erfolgreiche Show ausrichten – und diese Unterstützung macht die SIA Show zur größten und besten Wintersporthandelsausstellung in Nordamerika. Hier geht es zur SNOW und zu einer großartigen Show!

More than 900 brands and 105 new exhibitors.

2012年 SIA スノーショーとオンスノーデモ/スキー ライド・フェストへようこそこのショーは、年に一度この 業界に関わる人たちが一同に集まり、 お互いに刺激し 合い、業界の友達と交流する機会であり、 また、実際に 顔を合わせてのビジネスチャンスの場でもあります。 世界最高の中の一つとも言えるスノーカントリーが ドアを出ればすぐそこです。 ウインターパーク・リゾート とデビルズサム・ランチで開かれる1月30~31日のオン スノーデモ/スキーライド・フェストを皆さんは楽しみに していることでしょう。 オンスノーの今年のノルディック 部門では、 どの全国のノルディック・デモよりも豊富なス ノースポーツ用具、各種ブランド、 モデル、 サイズを取り 揃えています。 強さと活力は、私たちが共有するコラボレーション、 革新性、 否定しがたい情熱の上に構築されます。 .この展 示会はメンバーの所有するものであり、SIAスノーショ ーはあなたのショーなのです。SIAが、SIAショーをアメ リカ合衆国で最大で最高のスノースポーツ展示会にす るためには、業界全体のサポートなくしては成し遂げら れません。 たくさんの雪が降りますように、 そして素晴らしい充 実した展示会をお楽しみください!

snewsnet.com SNOW SHOW Daily | Day 1

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TOC

/ Day 1

Contents 16 Transworld Business Snowboard news, notes from the floor. 22 Ski Boots Is hybrid the all-mountain future? 26 Helmets Fusion of safety, style, lighter weights. 34 Dining Your walk-to cuisine guide. 38 & 40 Supplier Q&A Burton’s Greg Dacyshyn, K2’s Anthony DeRocco. 48 Retailers, reps honored

Cole Sports, Ed Green earn SIA accolades.

50 & 52 New Exhibitors Sommeregger, Madshus, Hookease and adidas, Voile, Helmet Band-its. ON THE COVER: Front row, Annelise Loevlie of Icelantic Skis, Kim Miller of Scarpa. Back row: Joel Gomez of Sessions, Josh Reid of Rome Snowboards, Tim Petrick of Rossignol Group, Yeti of Sessions, Cindi Busenhart of Sessions, Mike Noonan of Marker Völkl USA Photo by Ben Fullerton

Published by SNEWS and snewsnet.com Editor & Publisher Andy Bigford managing editor Peter Kray Art Director Jacqueline McCaffrey On-Floor Writers Eugene Buchanan, Cindy Hirschfeld, Courtney Holden, Mike Horn, Doug Schnitzpahn Contributor Krista Crabtree Photographers Ben Fullerton, Morgan Varon Advertising Sales Sharon Burson, Andy Bigford Group Production Director Barb Van Sickle Production Hillary Kerrick Distribution Jarrod Gustin Read the digital version of the Snow Show Daily at snewsnet.com or snowsports.org Snow Show Daily is part of Active Interest Media’s Outdoor Group Jon Dorn, Vice President, Outdoor Group Michael Hodgson, President, SNEWS Matthew Bates, Design Director, Outdoor Group Active Interest Media 2520 55th St, Suite 210, Boulder, CO 80301 303.625.1600 Chairman & CeO Efrem Zimbalist III Group Publisher & COO Andrew W. Clurman Senior Vice President & CFO Brian J. Sellstrom Senior Vice President, Operations Patricia B. Fox Copyright 2012 by Snow Show Daily

snewsnet.com SNOW SHOW Daily | Day 1

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At the show

/ Top news

Don’t Miss Must-see events and exhibits at the Show TODAY SIA Snow Fashion + Trends Show Kick off your first day of the Show in style at SIA’s Snow Fashion + Trends Show tonight at the Mile High Ballroom. Doors open at 6 p.m., and the show starts at 6:30 p.m. Immediately following the show, the Outdoor Industries Women’s Coalition (OIWC) presents RAMP IT UP, daring the men to put on lipstick and high heels and work the ramp to raise funds for OIWC’s educational programs. The RECLAIM Project Presented by SIA, 686 and Malakye.com, the RECLAIM Project gives three handpicked designers a dream challenge to create a “Reclaimed” garment here at the Show. Swing by booth #3317 and watch these up-and-comers sew.

Fresh snow has industry optimistic, ready to do business at Snow Show Sales numbers holding despite challenging weather. La Niña finally woke up from her mid-winter slumber, delivering fresh snow from Tahoe to the Rockies and providing a much-needed injection of optimism to open the SIA Snow Show. With SIA reporting that sales through December reached $2.2 billion, 2 percent below last season’s record, there are signs that the industry is continuing to hold steady despite what has so far been a historically bad year for snow. Kelly Davis, SIA director of research, says the mood coming into the show is, “Better than expected. People are more up, because it’s snowing. That’s a lot better than we were doing on about Jan. 10.” And she adds that despite the slight drop in sales figures, last year “we had record sales with record snow. This season we may be able to match that even though we had six weeks in hell.” According to SIA’s latest RetailTRAK numbers, sales between August and December were down 10 percent overall in units, especially in accessories such as goggles, wax and gloves. Equipment and apparel sales fared better, with increased sales in major categories including alpine and AT/Randonee equipment. Also, insulated parka sales were up 18 percent in Internet sales, and 4 percent in units overall. At the SMC and SSL buying group trade shows taking place before the Show, SSL president and CEO Steve Rogers says the “lack of a perfect storm” has many of the group’s members “looking very realistically at the past five weeks, where they were dramatically impacted by the weather.” Roger says industry innovation continues to drive consumer interest, “But it needs to keep snowing from here on out.” SMC president Tom Gately says he is also happy to report an upbeat mood among his group’s members, adding that the group has 223 buyers at the Show. “It’s the kind of year where everyone really needs to be here, so they can pay special attention to planning out their buy for next year,” he says. —Peter Kray

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SNOW SHOW Daily | Day 1 snewsnet.com

Stylesight seminar Get a first look at the future of fashion with Jeanine Pesce, as she presents two separate Stylesight seminars on Color and Megatrends at noon and 5 p.m. at Room 103.

FRIDAY How Can Snow Sports Tap into the Powerful Influence of Women? SIA director of Research Kelly Davis moderates an all-star panel of snow sports professionals on Friday, January 27th from 7:30 to 9 a.m. in Colorado Convention Center’s Mile High Ballroom as they focus on women in the marketplace and their influence on friends, colleagues and family members.

And In This Corner... Industry execs punch it out for charity.

Put up your Dukes. No, not your Marker Dukes, but your fisticuffs. That’s what snowboard company 686 is touting tonight at Casselman’s (2620 Walnut St.), pitting industry stalwarts against one another in the ring in a benefit for SOS Outreach. Hosted by action sports announcer Danny Cass and the Dingo, industry execs go manoa-mano for three two-minute rounds with headgear and 16-oz. gloves, all in the name of jousting for a cause. “A few people are pretty gung-ho about it,” says 686 marketing director Kristin Cusic. “Some companies did it back when SIA was in Vegas, so we thought we’d bring it back to help celebrate our 20th anniversary. It should be pretty fun, and a great way to support a great charity.” Slated to come out swinging at 9 p.m. are Vestal president Johnny Gehris taking on Electric Visual president Bruce Beach, and TransWorld Media editorial director Rob Campbell vs. Grenade’s Sean Lake, with four other bouts to be announced. And you thought the snow sports retail world was a battle... —Eugene Buchanan

Photo by ben fullerton

From the boardroom to big air, they’re ready for business at the Oakley booth.


Š 2012 adidas AG. adidas, the 3-Bars logo and the 3-Stripes mark are registered trademarks of the adidas Group.

all outdoor

Booth 1166

Visit us to see the complete line of adidas Outdoor footwear and apparel

adidas.com/outdoor


The Guide The staff at Joe’s Sporting Goods in St. Paul, Minn., used to make two trips west each season, one for the SIA Snow Show in Las Vegas and another to attend a WWSRA On-Snow. Now, it’s just a scenic post-show drive over Berthoud Pass to arrive in Winter Park and test all the new gear. “It works out very well for us,”

/ powered by the end of four days spent navigating.

What Retailers Want By Michael Sudmeier Specialty retailer seeks a partner with commitment, empathy, and a record of favorable dating. Rather than serving as a catchphrase on Match.com, these words summarize what retailers desire most from the brands they back.

Record Number A record number of attendees who

Disciplined Growth and Distribution A brand’s growth has often solidified or soured its retail relationships. “Brands need to be careful how they grow and recognize that the specialty retail channel is vital to their future,” explains Jeff Ryner of B.C. Surf and Sport. “The number one thing brands need to realize is how important it is to keep their products special and unique. I feel the biggest draw for a consumer to shop at specialty retail is to find things they cannot find elsewhere.” Region-specific Solutions Brands can benefit from better understanding the

unique needs of each region, explains Michael Theines, co-owner of The Youth Shelter Supply in Minnesota. “Brands are flooding markets with too much product for the skateboarders and snowboarders in each territory,” he notes. “A lot of brands don’t look out their SoCal window to understand each territory properly.”

More Favorable Dating “The snow selling window has contracted with a greater percentage of those sales taking place after the holidays, and therefore at a lower margin,” explains Scott Oreschnick, owner

The staff at Joe’s Sporting Goods in St. Paul, Minn., used to make two trips west each season, one for the SIA Snow Show in Las Vegas and another to attend a WWSRA On-Snow. Now, it’s just a scenic post-show drive over Berthoud Pass to arrive in Winter Park and test all the new gear. “It works out very well for us,”

Four on the Floor Getting the Most Out of SIA

of Minneapolis, Minnesota’s Cal Surf. “We need dating and pricing that reflects these facts.” Costa Mesa, California’s Surfside Sports Owner Duke Edukas, elaborates, “Our invoices are generally due 12/1 at best. On a good year that’s hard. We don’t even start selling most of our products until then. However, the brands help us out a ton with just about everything else.”

Scheduling longer times for meetings gives brands a better ability to learn what market trends are developing at each retailer, so the brand and retailer can collaborate on a unique order focused on success instead of just a onesize-fits-all solution. —Erich Dummer, Media Director, Academy Snowboards The best way [for retailers] to maximize their time is to do sell through reports before they head out to SIA, then they can order exactly the right numbers of gear that their store needs. I suggest retailers look through discounts to do proper orders of gear they can sell, taking into account possible carry over. —Michael Thienes, Co-owner, The Youth Shelter Supply, Waite Park, Minnesota Brands need to focus on their retailers’ needs. Retailers have a hard time selling product and a brand that is not unique. Make your brand stand out from the crowd. —Dustin Morrell, Owner, Niche Snowboards The show provides a great opportunity to meet not only with local sales reps, but also marketing staff, sales managers and credit folks. Just one productive face-to-face meeting can potentially cover the traveling expense for the whole show! —Missy Samiee, Proprietress, Exit Real World, Salem, Oregon

Fortunately, many brands are working to address these needs and they don’t need to read Cosmo to understand that communication and adaption are essential to successful relationships.

SIA’s 2012 Rookie Line Up

Gigi Rüf enjoying the fruits of his new brand, Slash. Photo: Tanon

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In grade school, being the new kid brings attention. If lucky, you’re deemed worthy of acceptance and embraced by friends. If things don’t work out, however, you’re liable to suffer. For brands debuting at SIA, the stakes are equally high. “SIA provides the opportunity for us to formally introduce ourselves,” explains

Bon Hiver Cofounder Brendan Walker. The brand is unveiling its Freebase Binding System at SIA. Bon Hiver and other new brands view the on-snow demo as equally important. According to Oz Owner Adam Browning, it “allows potential retail partners to take our boards out on the slopes and experience for

SNOW SHOW Daily | Day 1 For additional show coverage visit twsbiz.com

themselves all of the technology that has gone into our designs.” For a number of folks, SIA isn’t their first rodeo. Dinosaurs Will Die, for example, has gained significant momentum since its inception in 2005. “We want to secure our presence as a brand that is here to stay,” explains Cofounder

Sean Genovese. Other new brands have a team of industry veterans behind them. NOW’s experienced team aims to reinvent the binding with technology inspired by skate trucks. Gigi Rüf’s new company, Slash, will reveal its boards at SIA—a year ahead of its initial schedule. Naklin, the brainchild of Kevin Jones

and Mission Six Founder Abe Gilreath, will debut i ts collection of Merino wool base layers at the show. According to Gilreath, “SIA gathers all the key players in the industry together at one time and if you use this time effectively, SIA is a great way to strengthen relationships and build new ones.” —By Michael Sudmeier


ULTIMATE WARMTH FOR THE GREAT OUTDOORS. Subject: C. Reid Photo: G. L’Heureux


Burton outerwear powered by 3M™ Thinsulate™ Insulation offers the ultimate in efficient and effective warmth.

BURTON OUTERWEAR COLLECTION

MOUNTAIN GENTRY ONE OF THREE BURTON MEN’S OUTERWEAR COLLECTIONS. SEE MORE AT:

BOOTH #1913 3M and Thinsulate are trademarks of 3M.


Top Trends

/ Apparel

Pace of apparel innovation accelerates at SIA Snow Show New technology, sustainable building, eye-popping colors set the stage. The start of the SIA Snow Show coincides with the beginning of the year of the dragon, a powerful symbol in Chinese astrology, and with any luck, a good omen for the outdoor apparel industry. The booths here are full of high-tech fabrics, lightweight insulation and silhouettes that focus on freedom of movement. Color palettes of neutral earth tones have accents of bright colors, like fireworks, and echo the overall mood of the industry, which can be described as cautiously optimistic. Last season’s high snowfall totals, low temps and record resort visits helped create less carryover and longer fullprice selling windows for retailers, who then had to battle through the snow-scarce holidays. The early show-stealers, according to SIA market research, are insulated jackets, a hot category that saw 32 percent higher sales over last year, with preseason retail sales (August through October 2011) of down jackets and sweaters up 30 percent. Manufacturers are murmuring about rising production prices and many forecast that increases in raw materials, transportation and labor will result in unit sales going down but dollars going up. Prices are currently up as a reflection of production price increases in every category except adult snowboard apparel, which, according to SIA, is less expensive to buy than last season. Adult snowboard apparel sales were down last season, possibly due to the fact that a fifth of all snowboarders live in California, which was hit hard by the economic downturn. Preseason sales, however, showed steady growth in kid’s snowboard apparel. SIA says the entire youth apparel market experienced growth this fall, and companies such as Eider are launching a new kid’s line, while youth-driven pieces are enhanced with athlete stardom such as O’Neill’s Jeremy Jones and Oakley’s Tanner Hall and Simon Dumont. As a response to rising production costs, many companies are simplifying their business plans and product design for 2012-13. “If you make a pure statement, simplify raw material commitments and reduce operation costs amidst a globally-challenged supply chain, the result is a product line that is tight and literally devoid of wasted time and resources,” says J.J. Collier, vice president of design and merchandising for Spyder. As part of a trend in streamlining, many manufacturers are cutting down on waste and focusing on sustainable practices. In the case of Burton, a new partnership with PepsiCo means Mountain Dew provides plastic bottles that are used to make recycled fabric, allowing Burton to forgo an upcharge on the garments in that line—a boon to consumers. Companies such as Obermeyer, Homeschool Snowboarding, NILS and new exhibitor adidas Outdoor are utilizing other recycled fabrics such as Cocona, made from recycled coconut shells, and TENCEL, made from wood pulp. Salomon and Patagonia are incorporating fabrics into their lines that meet rigorous BLUESIGN standards, an organization that scrutinizes the entire textile production process. And even technologies like Descente’s Heat Navi use recycled polyester fibers mixed with carbon to absorb infrared rays and convert them into heat. There’s still a buzz around the backcountry and sidecountry category, which continues to grow at a rapid rate. As a result, performance-oriented brands such as Arc’teryx, Eider, Outdoor Research, The North Face, Rab and new SIA apparel exhibitor, Dynafit, are developing outerwear to accommodate the needs of skiers and riders who head out-of-bounds and require clothes that can handle harsh weather conditions and also offer pack compatibility and

“Fabrics are so superior now, you don’t need the bulk and the weight to stay warm.”

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▲ Arc’Teryx Modon

▲ Salomon Cadabra

▼ Patagonia Rubicon Down Jacket and Insulated Snowbelle Pants

▲ Spyder Pinnacle

▲ adidas Ice Feather

▲ The North Face Cymbiant

▲ White Sierra Back Country Insulated Jacket.


mobility. To that end, Gore-Tex continues to dominate as the must-have ingredient in many top-of-the-line jackets and pants for both hard and soft shells, and in addition to longstanding partnerships with Arc’teryx, Burton, Oakley, Mammut, Marmot, Outdoor Research, Patagonia, Quiksilver, Scott, The North Face and Volcom, have aligned with emerging apparel companies such as Armada to reach the growing younger market. Many companies like Flylow and Mountain Hardwear use proprietary waterproof/breathable technologies in their apparel, or in the case of The North Face, along with Oakley and Marmot, use Polartec’s waterproof/breathable NeoShell. As the leader of the pack in terms of sales, insulated jackets provide a good story to share with consumers. “Fabrics are so superior now, you don’t need the bulk and the weight to stay warm,” says Michaela Beitzel, co-owner and softgoods buyer for Hickory and Tweed in Armonk, N.Y. “People are finally understanding after a lot of education that the lightest insulation pieces can keep you warm. They try it, then they come back and buy another piece.” Not only do insulated jackets and pants get more compact and lightweight this season, but some companies such as Spyder and Powderhorn add waterproof/breathable to down’s hangtag. This stems from the combination of down or synthetic fill with Gore-Tex, a proprietary waterproof/breathable membrane, or a DWR treatment such as Quix Down, a new technology used by companies like Powderhorn and KJUS. Other insulation technologies abound: Helly Hansen and Sunice use PrimaLoft insulation, known for its high warmth-to-weight ratio, and Rossignol Apparel partners with lightweight Thinsulate. Freedom of movement, whether it be with 4-way stretch material in high-end resort wear, carefully articulated high-tech shells or snowboard jackets, remains the focus across the board. For sidecountry-friendly apparel, this means a looser-fitting take on ▼ Marmot Geomix

▼ Armada Shifter

▼ Dakine Clutch

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mountaineering styles, and for snowboard outerwear, 2012-13 means a move away from the boxy, baggy look, replaced instead by slimmer pants and longer-lengths for jackets, according to Roxy designer, Natalie Murphy. Military influences are huge in snowboarding apparel, but surprisingly also in high-end ski lines from companies such as NILS and Spyder. Fresh bright colors will dominate the racks and the slopes next season, paired with neutral hues and earth tones. Retailers across the country have remarked upon good preseason sales of statement-making pants. “Pants in bright colors are hot, particularly green, blue and purple with women,” says Kim Walker, president and founder of Outdoor Divas in Boulder and Denver. “We’re seeing people mix together untraditional combinations this season.” Underlayers garner more attention in 2012-13 with new prints, styles and whimsical designs by companies like Airblaster, Hot Chillys and tattoo-inspired Yellowman. Natural fibers continue to grow more technical. Polarmax introduces a proprietary performance wicking cotton called Xtrdry. And companies that use wool add materials or yarn treatments such as SmartWool’s PhD Smartloft, which combines Merino wool with quilted nylon, Icebreaker’s Realfleece 320, an ecologically clean and water resistant finish, and Dale of Norway’s water and stain repellent yarn. Sweaters are a popular slope-to-street look next season and companies like Icelandic Design and Neve capitalize on bold patterns and vintage looks. Technical lifestyle pieces will dominate the apparel booths at the show, while snowboard and ski companies increase their offerings of technical flannel shirts, pullovers and hoodies, which according to SIA market research, enjoyed very strong preseason sales. —Krista Crabtree ▼ Scott Drexler


Top Trends

/ Snowboards

As rocker sales continue to rise, manufacturers add more camber for pop

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rocker tip and tail. With so many shapes available, consumers are getting their pick of the litter when it comes to specialized styles and sizes. According to Scott Barbieri, Burton Vice President of Hardgoods, “If you can call ‘choice’ a trend, I would say giving every type of rider a full-range of hardgoods options is what is really shaping the hardgoods market. When it comes to snowboards, this means offering a huge selection of different board shapes.” Barbieri points to Burton’s new Family Tree line, and the five board models featuring new freeride shapes (see Cheetah, Spliff) geared towards different riding styles. Likewise, Burton’s new Restricted: Parkitect is built around a park rider’s stance. Women are having their way as well. Gnu adds two high-power sticks to its line—the Ladies Choice and B Pro Pendleton. And K2’s new Lite collection features

six new models including the High Lite with All-Terrain Rocker and BC Shaping for all-mountain shred performance. Voilé introduces a women’s-specific splitboard at the show as well, while Jones Snowboards adds two new women’s specific models within the Flagship and Mountain Twin lines, aptly named the Mothership and Twin Sister, as well as two women’s versions in the Solution splitboard. Several other manufacturers debut new splitboards at SIA, including Burton’s Spliff, Rome’s Double Agent, Arbor’s Abacus, and Venture’s Euphoria. Voilé is launching a new splitboard line altogether, featuring four models ranging from twin shapes to a women’s-specific model to a revamped directional freerider. Also focused on fresh lines, K2 brings three new powder-shaped decks to SIA, including the Peace Keeper and Ultra Dream. —Mike Horn

▲ DC Ilkka

▲ Never Summer Cobra

▲ Venture Euphoria

▲ Academy Icon

Rocker snowboards made up 55 percent of all boards sold a year ago, a number that has risen to 70 percent today, according to SIA research. The boards you’ll see at the SIA Snow Show are rarely just rockered, though. Manufacturers are making rocker/camber soup, mixing the float and loose ride of rocker and the edge bite and pop of positive camber. For everyday shredding especially, riders are looking for boards that do it all. All-terrain versatility remains a strong focus, and Flow’s new Rush features A.B.T. tech designed to adapt on the fly to all snow conditions. DC drops the Mega Torstein and revamped IIkka Pro for 2013, while Forum says their Kitchen Sink is the most versatile freestyle board they’ve ever made. Academy’s new Icon Series schools riders in the latest rocker tech, while Rossignol’s new Templar Magtek is another multitasking stick designed to do it all. Never Summer’s all-terrain freestyle Proto CT was in such high demand the company is introducing another new all-terrain model, the Cobra, for 2012-13 as part of the Carbonium Series. CAPiTA collaborated with Volcom and team rider Dan Brisse to launch the new DBX pro model for 2013, resulting in the first co-branded product from either company. Retailers like Dave White, owner of the Colorado Boarder in Crested Butte, are stocking up on hybrid rocker/camber boards to meet increasing consumer demand. White says, “Boards are trending towards a rocker/camber mix—they account for 80 percent of the boards I carry.” Manufacturers are backing that trend by continuing to refine the hybrid technology to provide diverse shapes for all types of riders, in some cases adding a third layer to the rocker/camber profile. “We are going to proliferate the use of our No Hang-up’s camber in our collection next year—this is another camber story that not only incorporates positive and reverse camber, but also includes a lateral base camber story,” says Rome Snowboard’s head of sales Dan Sullivan, adding that the new Crossrocket features this “3D” camber technology. Also counting its cambers in threes, Lib Tech introduces a new Banana Technology called C3 (in the new Phoenix Classic). Lib co-founder Pete Saari explains: “C3 stands for three cambers: A camber in front of your foot, mild banana reverse camber between your feet, camber behind your foot—and an overall tip to tail camber.” Other notable new hybrid rocker shapes include Ride’s Hybrid LowRise (Machete GT), Burton’s Flat Top, as seen in the women’s Lip-Stick LTD, and Salomon’s new all-terrain freestyle Villain, which also goes three ways with camber underfoot, flat between the bindings and

▲ Lib Tech Phoenix Classic

Hybrid designs offer versatility on the slopes, and in the shops.


Top Trends

/ Skis

Rocker Renaissance continues to drive ski design breakthroughs

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“It’s the Petri dish of the sport in the way all of the bacteria or cultures are growing in different designs.”

▲ Line Influence

▲ Elan Amphibio Waveflex

▲ Dynastar Cham 107

Two years ago, much of the rocker discussion was based on how to explain the technology at retail. Apparently, it can speak for itself. Not only does it look different, and ski more efficiently, it’s now incorporated into everything from frontside skis to rentals. On the high-end it has helped create a name-brand buzz that helped several models start to sell out this year before the snow even began to fall. According to SIA, reverse and mixed camber ski sales doubled in the preseason compared to the year before, which continues to ignite a new level of energy and invention in ski design here on the SIA Snow Show floor. “I look at it like it’s the Petri dish of the sport in the way all of the bacteria or cultures are growing in different designs,” says Mike Aicher of Salomon. “Of course, as with any introductions, the proof will always be in what we’re still talking about five years from now.” Want to see the breadth of rocker’s impact? While Salomon is expanding its full-figured, rockered BBR ski from last season, adding beefier versions like the BBR 10.0 (145/97/110) with a full wood core and “Metal Backbone,” and the women’s BBR Sunlite (133/79/98), rocker pioneer K2 offers up the technology with a decidedly hardpack feel. The new Bolt (125/72/99), part of the All-Mountain Performance (A.M.P.) line, mixes a stiff Carbon Web placement and K2’s groomfriendly Speed Rocker in the brand’s new RoX Technology. This provides a level of turn initiation that, according to Mike Gutt, K2 global marketing manager, “wouldn’t otherwise be possible” on a ski this torsionally rigid. Atomic mixes rocker and increased torsional stiffness in its new “Backbone Technology,” featuring an integrated titanium backbone built into the core which debuts in the Vantage Series of all-mountain skis. Blizzard, whose Flipcore rocker design helped supercharge sales of its Free Mountain collection this season, will expand that technology into its women’s big terrain collection, and, according to Tecnica Blizzard product director Jed Duke, “will also be launching two new pinnacle models in our all-mountain, Magnum series, the widest at 85mm in the waist and the other at 80mm in the waist, both of which will feature Flipcore.” Nordica also debuts a frontside focus with is new Transfire line, which features four new skis with waists widths from 74 to 78mm in the Transfire 78Ti, as well as six new skis in its adventure line. Perhaps the most interactive rocker design arrives in Denver courtesy of Fischer, which is unveiling its “Hybrid” project, which actually allows skiers to fine tune the level of rocker they want by raising their tips as they tighten an aluminum band. HEAD’s big story is the new Rev line, built to cover the needs of skiers across the country with waist widths from 70 to 105 mm. According to product

▲ Atomic Alibi

“Wow!” factor drives design, sales and broader applications.


▲ Fischer Hybrid 9.0

▲ HEAD Rev 105

▲ Salomon BBR 10.0

▲ Nordica Transfire

▲ Blizzard Magnum 8.0

▲ Kastle Colby

manager Andrew Couperthwait, the skis feature HEAD’s ERA 3.0 technology, incorporating Allride Rocker, Progressive Radius and Intellirise Rebound to “deliver the ease of turning and better flotation of rocker, but add in full tipto-tail edge contact and decreased vibrations.” Elan’s Amphibio line, which mixes rocker and camber in the shovel of the ski, gets three new men’s models with waist widths from 78 to 88mm in the stiffer 88XTi, as well as a new women’s model in the Inspire with a 78mm waist. Dynastar also has something new for women in the Exclusive line with an almost 20 percent lighter binding system in the Xpress, as well as a new line of big mountain Cham skis with a long rocker shovel highlighted in the Cham 107 (137/107/121). Rossignol also ratchets up its big mountain rocker cred with a redesigned Super 7 (146/117/127), and according to Rossi’s Nick Castagnoli, the brand now offers four iterations of rocker in Auto Turn for recreational skiers, Powder Turn, Spin Turn and Power Turn, which features 90 percent camber underfoot. Volkl covers big mountain skiers with a titanal added update of its super wide Kuro (164/132/139), and hits the hardpack market with the new V-Werks RTM 84, a lighter version of this year’s model with a mix of a the brand’s Xtra-Light Wood Core and Metal-Tex hybrid carbon and titanal construction. Also unveiling new collections, Black Diamond debuts nine new skis, including the lighter Carbon Megawatt, Kastle offers three new Colby James West pro models, and Line redesigns its All-Terrain Freestyle skis and the Influence 115. —Peter Kray

GORE WELCOMES ARMADA Gore would like to welcome Armada as a new garments partner. Together as leaders in the mountain sports industry we look forward to building high performing products that deliver comfortable protection. Trusted brands choose GORE-TEX ® product technology, and we thank Armada for choosing the GORE-TEX ® brand for Fall 2012. Experience more DURABLY WATERPROOF, WINDPROOF, BREATHABLE COMFORT & PROTECTION

© 2012 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. GORE-TEX®, GORE®, GUARANTEED TO KEEP YOU DRY® and designs are trademarks of W. L. Gore & Associates. All other trademarks and designs are property of their respective owners.

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“In our partnership with Gore we share a strong commitment to environmental responsibility and sustainable manufacturing.” Casey Sheahan CEO Patagonia

David Clifford Photography

This fall's Patagonia offering will be the finest in its 35+ year history of innovating and improving on clothing and footwear for moving through the mountains in changeable weather.

Trusted brands choose GORE-TEX® product technology. © 2012 W. L. Gore & Associates Inc. GORE-TEX, GUARANTEED TO KEEP YOU DRY, GORE and designs are trademarks of W. L. Gore & Associates


The All New

S.I.A. Booth #3607

Key Features ANTI-FOG

NO-BS (No Blind Spot) TECHNOLOGY

FIT / COMFORT

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• Triple-Layer Combo-Plate face foam with moisture-wicking polar fleece

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• Semi-flush lens geometry for better downward visibility

• Designed for helmet compatibility


Global Snow Team Devun Walsh - BC, Canada Zac Marben - Minneapolis, MN Dustin Craven - Vancouver, Canada Sage Kotsenburg - Park City, UT Ethan Deiss - Osceola, WI Nick Visconti – Truckee, CA Kevin Jones – El Dorado Hills, CA

National Snow Team Andrew Brewer - Monument, CO Alek Oestreng - Rykkinn, Norway Johnny Lazz - North Lake Tahoe, CA Tim Eddy - Truckee, CA Niko Cioffi - Rutland, VT Red Gerard - Frisco, CO Alex Tank – Allgäu, Germany Arnette Dealer Service 888 708 8856 ©2012 Luxottica Group. All rights reserved.


Top Trends

/ Ski Boots

Bootmakers investing in new molds, models Will hike-ski become the all-mountain boot of the future? There’s a reason the explosion of startup niche skimakers hasn’t been matched on the boot side of the business: Money. Developing and producing a complete size run of boot molds can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars and up, yet for 2012-13 boot companies have not held back on investing in R&D. That appeared to be a particularly fortuitous outlay back in the fall, when boots were walking out of stores at a healthy pace, suppliers and retailers were reporting scarce inventories, and the table was set for an aggressive sell-in. Weather challenges across the country over the holidays put a damper on the early momentum and will now loom in the background of retailersupplier conversations on the SIA Snow Show floor this week. “It will not be a great season, but it can still be a good season if we get snow and cold,” says Matt Titus, vice president of marketing for Dalbello. “It’s going to be tougher, but thank goodness retailers and suppliers went into (the holidays) light.” Retailers still have plenty of reason to get excited over next season’s new technologies. Boots are picking up the pace to match new ski technology, with increased emphasis on lateral rather than fore-aft stiffness plus a more upright, natural stance. Clever new shells are designed to increase power on demand and incorporate additional fit options, while top performing models now come in wider lasts. And while it isn’t spreading as rapidly as rocker did across the ski design landscape, the single most significant trend is a shift toward SUV-like hike-ski designs that emphasize performance first. So what if only a small percentage of customers will use the hike mode to actually hike? This easeof-use, along with other standard features such as rubber soles, is attractive, especially if the boots don’t compromise on the performance side (a topic that is sure to be debated). “Who wants to walk from the parking lot to the lift, or anywhere, in regular ski boots?” asks Salomon alpine product manager Jake Fuller, whose company launched the hike-ski Quest two seasons ago. For 2012-13, Salomon unveils the new Quest Max, which incorporates its new Twin Frame and Custom Shell 360° technologies, features also adorning the new X Max 130 and Ghost Max models. “Once people get in the boots and ski on them, they will see what a difference it makes,” says Fuller of the new technology. Twin Frame features a rigid lower chassis and an Oversized Pivot that increases the flex axis from 8mm to 25mm, spreading power transmission across the entire boot sole while highlighting the importance of lateral support over fore-aft stiffness. Custom Shell 360° expands the fit concept beyond the metatarsal, with moldable material now extending up the cuff for enhanced wrapping. The new boots offer a straighter and flatter position to complement new ski technology. The expanded hike-ski models offered for 2012-13 in the Tecnica Free Mountain Collection don’t compromise on performance but do represent the future of all-mountain boots, the company says. “These are performance ski boots first and foremost,” Tecnica product development manager Bart Tuttle stresses. The metal-to-metal connection in Tecnica’s Cuff Mobility System promotes strong flex resistance when in ski mode, and the Power Lock System, a wide cuff buckle cum Velcro strap, provides a secure wrap. From its single but successful Cochise model, Tecnica expands to offer six men’s models (Cochise 130 Pro, Cochise 120, Cochise 110, Cochise 100 and Cochise 90, and the backcountryspecific Cochise Pro Light) and two for women, Cochise W100 and Cochise W90. Nordica says the reception to this season’s FireArrow (and its hike-ski sibling, Hell & Back) far exceeded expectations, and the company makes minor tweaks for 2012-13, adding an F2W for women. Instead it focuses on taking the FireArrow concept down the price point ladder with the all-new Transfire, which utilizes a similar lateral shell de-

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▲ Fischer Vacuum Ranger 12

▲ Tecnica Cochise 130 Pro

▲ Nordica Patron Pro

▲ Salomon Quest Max 120

▲ Lange XT 100 W

▲ Atomic Redster Pro 130

“It’s going to be tougher, but thank goodness retailers and suppliers went into (the holidays) light.” sign and Nordica’s Dynamic Performance Code, which measures three boot parameters (stiffness, progression, rebound). To promote a neutral stance for all calf sizes, Nordica incorporates an Adjustable Cup Profile into the spoiler, then adds a Stability/Control Hinge designed to provide a relaxed experience for the target skier. Nordica rightly bills itself as “a company of skiers” and the crew is excited about the new black-on-black Patron Pro, based on the Dobermann and aimed at the elite of big mountain chargers. Lange’s impressive rebirth continued with strong sell-through across its line this winter, but particularly in the RX 130. The company applies its own unique hike-ski twist to launch the new XT 130 and XT 100 W, positioned as powerful, hard-charging boots than can also go uphill. The XT’s Power V-Lock is a V-shaped insert in the back of the lower shell that moves backward for hike mode but locks securely for ski-mode, resulting in no lower shell void. The XT also comes with Ultragrip Soles and Archpads. At sister company Rossignol, the Experience Sensor 120 gets a makeover for better fit and power and a sibling in the new Pursuit Sensor 100, while the new Electra Sensor 90 is launched for women. Dalbello invested in new molds to bolster the technical topside of its Krypton line,


You lookin’ at me

or my new MSRP?

The World’s Most Advanced ski boots.

with five all-new models in the KR2 Series (Krypton Pro I.D., Krypton Fusion & I.D. and Krypton Core for men, and the Krypton Kryzma I.D. and Chakra I.D. for women), featuring a bi-injected Power Frame construction, new modern stance geometry and a new 98mm last using Contour 4 Fit Technlogy. “We wanted to get it all in, and the only way to do that was to build new molds,” says Dalbello’s Titus. While the new KR2s will up the ante for Dalbello’s big mountain skiers, from Sean Pettit to Kim Reichhelm, the original Kryptons return with upgrades to suit the park and pipe crowd. Dalbello also tweaks the top of its Viper line, adding a new model, and brings bi-injection design to its Aerro and Aspire series. “Phenomenal” is how Erik Anderson, Fischer’s alpine division vice president, describes retailer and customer reaction to its new moldable shell Vacuum Fit Technology. Beyond the fit on the floor is retailers’ ability to handle more feet with fewer SKUs, driving sell-through and simplifying inventory, Anderson says. For 2012-13, Fischer adds seven Vacuum Fit models, along with plans to increase the dealer base by about fivefold. The new entries come with a hike-ski flavor, including the Hybrid, with two models each for men and women, and the Ranger 12, which replaces the X Series. Healthy retailer orders come with the $6,000 Vacuum Technology oven at no cost. Atomic has reinvented itself as a freeride company in the U.S., but returns to its race roots with the new Redster, likely to win even more World Cup races while also appealing to the strongest all-mountain skiers with its Redster Pro 130 and Pro 110 iterations. Developed in collaboration with Atomic’s athletes, the Redster incorporates a stiff carbon-reinforced spine that dramatically increases power without sacrificing feel; a customizable cuff that rotates 5mm in each direction; a doubling of cuff alignment; a new sole profile that improves balance and reduces weight; plus three customized bootboards. Atomic has also upgraded its hike-ski Tracker boots as well as Burner. Elsewhere on the Show floor, Full Tilt earns applause by bringing interchangeable rubber soles, and an updated toe box, to its Seth Morrison and Tom Wallisch pro models and to its First Chair. “People have been asking for this since the beginning,” Full Tilt’s Jason Levinthal says. HEAD looks to build on the success of its returning AdaptEdge, featuring a forefoot width that goes from 104mm to 102mm at the turn of the switch. And APEX enters a new era by launching two injection-molded models in the all new M Series, with price points coming down to $795 MSRP. “It’s a new beginning for us,” says APEX founder and president Denny Hanson. Looking ahead to next year’s show, there will be at least one new bootmaker: K2 recently announced plans to unveil a comprehensive boot collection for 2013-14. While it remains mum on specifics, the company says it’s been working on the boots for the past two years and that K2 athletes will be testing them this winter. —Andy Bigford Full Tilt FS Soul

The

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SNOW SHOW Daily | Day 1 snewsnet.com


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Top Trends

/ HELMETS

Safety and style top off hot-selling helmet category Lighter, sleeker profiles highlight protective, stylish intros. With concussions at the forefront of conversation, manufacturers are working overtime to ensure skiers and riders are protected. That, as well as statewide mandates and new regulations at resorts, has resulted in the helmet category becoming even bigger business in snow sports. Shop the SIA Snow Show floor and you’ll find that manufacturers are continuing to embrace the trend with better protection, lighter materials, custom fit and enhanced plugin capabilities. You’ll also see some newcomers to the snow sports market on the show floor, including Lazer Sport, which has been making bike and other helmets since 1911. Bern (bernunlimited.com) gets philanthropic this year with its new Seth Wescott ProModel ($119.95) and its Claws for a Cause program. Under the program, Bern will donate 5 percent of all helmet sale proceeds to the Maine Lobsterman’s Alliance on behalf of Maineraised Wescott for its educational programs supporting the lobster industry. “It’s a unique program for us–it’s the Mainer giving back to his community,” says Bern’s Josh Walker. With new distributor Dalbello Sports, Carrera (dalbellosports.com) is back in the U.S. market for the first time in three years, introducing the top-of-the-line, ABS/In-mold Enigma and Paradox ($160), lightweight, hybrid-construction lids with a concealed center panel that can be raised for ventilation and the Venturi System of three vacuum-creating air channels. K2 (k2skis.com) combines fit and flow with phonics with three new hard-shell designs— the Phase, Emphasis and Entity—each made from lightweight EPS foam bonded to an injected molded ABS shell, as well as an adjustable Dialed Fit System, Active Matrix and Passive Channel venting systems, and three levels of Baseline Audio systems. Lazer’s Mozo ($180) features the company’s patented Rollsys fit system, which is fully integrated into the helmet and surrounds the head. It also debuts the latest in ventilation research with Adapt² Vents and IN|OUT Design, which lets you open and close each vent to match weather and exertion levels and pairs each with an inlet, channel and outlet for continual air flow. OSBE (osbeusa.com) combines goggles and helmets into one package with its new Proton SR ($249), made from impact resistant Thermoplastic resin. Its DAF ventilation system (Direct Air Flux) enables cold air to enter the helmet, mix with warm air inside and flow out again. It also comes with a new visor available in smoke (for sunny days) and orange (for fog). POC’s (pocsports.com) 18.4-oz. Skull Light WO ($150) is designed specifically to fit women, and features a multiple-impact EPS core and EPP liner. POC also unveils a new lightweight Aramid bridge shell helmet, the Fornix ($160), with the weave added under the outer shell and molded with the foam liner for enhanced structural stability. PRO-TEC’s (pro-tec.net) Commander ($160) is the newest addition to its snow line, delivering a new Active Venting System that allows you to incrementally adjust airflow and internal vents to help prevent goggle fog. Fit comes via a BOA fit system, and users can also wear their goggle strap inside their helmet thanks to an Internal Goggle Channel. RED Protection (redprotection.com) showcases the new Commander ($99.95), a lowprofile hard-shell construction with an injected, vented ABS Shell, removable ear pads and goggle clip, and REDphones audio accessory compatibility. For Ride (ridesnowboards.com), it’s all about such technical fit features such as ZoneFlex, RideDial fit systems and stitched liners. It can all be found on the new Duster ($100), a snowboard-centric headpiece that also comes with removable earpads, an audio kit, passive venting and tool-less goggle clip removal. Salomon (salomonsports.com) introduces a lightweight helmet family with a new shell and oval fit, including the Prophet ($180-$195), whose Impact Custom Air system is adapted to the new shell shape, and the men’s Phantom and women’s Aura ($140-$160), which

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▲ K2 Entity

▲ Carrera Mauna

OSBE


carry the same shell shape minus the brim and big mountain cosmetics. Scott’s (scott-sports.com) new Rove MIPS ($175) is a high-end freeride helmet featuring MIPS (Multi Directional Impact Protection System), which adds a low friction layer inside the shell allowing it to rotate relative to one’s head. “It mimics the safety system the human skull uses,” says Scott marketing manager Adam Greene. The helmet comes with PC inmold with an EPS liner and PC bottom wrap. For Smith (smithoptics.com), it’s all about compatibility—both with goggles, and other sports. Says senior product manager Ben Flandro, “There’s a growing interest for multi-sport helmets, as consumers look to streamline their gear closets.” Smith’s Gage ($80) is a minimalist lid made from injection-molded ABS, AirEvac Ventilation that siphons out warm air, and self-adjusting Lifestyle Fit System for customization. The Gage Jr. ($80) has the same features but is sized for smaller heads. Taking care to match its goggle offerings with its helmets, Uvex (swixsport.com) unveils three new designs, including the Hlmt 5 Pro ($159.99) and the Hypersonic helmet ($159.99), which feature new color schemes and Uvex’s advanced, three-dimensional adjustable fit system. The new FP 2 Carbon ($300) is a top-of-the-line race helmet meeting all FIS requirements in a 15-oz. package. —Eugene Buchanan

▲ PRO-TEC Commander

Meet Olympic skier, National Champion and television commentator Kaylin Richardson Booth 773

Come see the new 2012 collection of beautiful Nordic sweaters, weatherproof jackets, classic ski hats and skinsoft baselayer. Authentic quality from Norway Since 1879 SIA Booth: 773 www.daleofnorway.com Customer service: (800) 441-3253

▲ Bern Seth Wescott

▲ Uvex Hypersonic


Rollsys Fit System

Booth # 4516

Come try on the best fitting helmets and see the difference Rollsys makes. Only at Booth #4516

We’re located in far right corner of the tradeshow floor.

LazerSport

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The best stuff is always the hardest to reach. Just look for the big inflatable wall.

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Cover Story

/ Growing the Sport

Growing snow sports builds better business model for all SIA research says earlier kids start, more active they are as consumers. The snow sports market could provide a compelling case study in support of the butterfly effect—that phenomena where seemingly minor acts can set major events in motion. That’s because according to SnowSports Industries America research, every skier or snowboarder who starts riding at the age of 10 will result in an average annual influx of $2,079 being spent on lift tickets, lodging and snow sports equipment. Furthermore, out of that small start, SIA says that every one of those 10-year-olds will also spend an average of $72,758 at retail and resorts over a lifetime enjoying the sport. Start riding at the age of 25, and the results are not nearly as dramatic. According to SIA, later-starting consumers will only spend an average of $989 on the sport each season, with a value of $19,772 over the course of their snow sliding life. That’s a difference of nearly $55,000 per person. But what makes those findings even more relevant is that according to the U.S. Census Bureau, right now there are more than 40 million kids 10-years-old and younger in the U.S. “The numbers are extremely compelling, especially when you look at the size of the potential market,” says SIA Director of Research Kelly Davis. “And while we do continue to see growth in the number of snow sports par-

ticipants each year, at a rate of about 3 to 5 percent, it has not matched what the country is seeing in terms of the growth of the overall population.” Apparently, we aren’t filling the slopes as fast as we’re filling the cities and suburbs in America, where from 2000 to 2010 population grew at a rate of about 9.7 percent. Which is why along with snowfall, many people in the snow sports industry think creating new skiers and snowboarders—especially among kids—is the most critical ingredient in our long-term health. Exactly how to go about doing that has been a focus of long-term snow sports participation studies. They include the National Ski Areas Association’s Model for Growth, which emphasizes ways to increase the conversion rate among people trying skiing and snowboarding for the first time, and SIA’s own Revisiting Growing the Snow Sports Industry, an update

“Businesses should utilize children as motivating factors in families; make participation of kids more convenient and less costly for parents.”

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Photos by (from let) Casey day (2); courtesy; casey day

With more kids on the slopes, the future for skiing and snowboarding looks bright.


Kids who start young stick with it...

of a study first written in 2000. It concluded, among other findings, that “Businesses should utilize children as motivating factors in families; make participation of kids more convenient and less costly for parents.” It’s also why SIA hosted a “Growing the Sport” meeting here in Denver on Aug. 17, so that, according to SIA President David Ingemie, “We could get everyone together in the same room and talk about what we have all found that really works.” Including NSAA President Michael Berry, Professional Ski Instructors Association and American Association of Snowboard Instructors President and CEO Mark Dorsey, as well as members of the National Ski Patrol, the National Ski and Snowboard Retailers Association, rep groups and the SSL and SMC retail buying groups, the meeting was a kind of think tank where everything from the advent of rocker technology to how to market to lapsed skiers was discussed. If a touchstone emerged, particularly in the kind of “Got Milk” campaign that the whole industry can rally around, then Learn to Ski and Snowboard Month (LSSM) is it. Barely a blip on the radar in 2007 when it was launched, the initiative, which offers everything from free to heavily discounted lift tickets, equipment rentals and lessons through the month of January, has caught fire in the past three seasons. From 2010 to 2011, participation jumped from 30,000 to 75,000, and more than 30 states and a dozen exhibiting brands now support the event. This year’s goal was to inspire 150,000 participants (look to Snow Show Daily for preliminary participation numbers of the 2012 LSSM program as they become available, including whether the slow-starting weather had any impact). Regardless, LSSM Executive Director Mary Jo Tarallo says the initiative has been especially successful in uniting the various manufacturing, retail and resort sectors around working towards a common benefit. “Everyone who was involved last year came back, and we have probably had three times as many resorts take advantage of the marketing materials,” Tarallo says. “But I still think it’s going to take a couple of years before the industry sees any substantial growth. It isn’t going to just happen overnight where we suddenly dramatically grow our customer base.” On a winter-long basis, 4th and 5th grade Passport or Snowpass programs, which offer kids free riding in their state, continue to draw more youth to the slopes, as well as older family members who want to ride with them. In a study SIA conducted last summer looking specifically at Pennsylvania’s Snowpass program, the findings were extremely encouraging. Of 9,000 kids enrolled in Snowpass, 1,900 parents responded to the SIA survey, and 30 percent said their kids wouldn’t be riding if the program wasn’t available to them. Also, 60 percent of the adults said they wouldn’t be on snow if their kids weren’t involved in Snowpass, and 50 percent said that three or more family members were going riding with the child who is in the program. Tapping into that idea of utilizing children as motivating factors in families, more retailers are finding success with leasing programs, which allow parents to basically rent equipment for the year, and often exchange it if their kid outgrows it during the season. Christy Sports and Specialty Sports Venture are going gangbusters with the business here in Colorado, while SMC President Tom Gately says that for many of his retail members

on the East Coast, “The amount of lease business that they’re doing is just mind-boggling. I’m getting calls every year that they’re sold out of equipment, which just says to me how many more young people are getting involved earlier in the sport. That can only pay off in the long run.” On the frontlines of conversion, at the areas themselves, ski and snowboard instructors see a daily if not hourly result of their efforts to increase participation. Rockered beginner’s skis are certainly helping to accelerate the learning curve, as are efforts like Burton’s Riglet Parks, with mini features and boards designed to introduce kids as young as 3 to the sport. But according to Dorsey, even the radical improvements in equipment can only do so much. To continue to create more snow sports participants, “We can’t lose sight of what’s really important to our consumer—which is how simple and how accessible can we make it.” Along with Internet reservation systems that make it easy for guests to book lessons, new investments in rental centers to speed prospective students to the slopes, and especially more focus on who is teaching the lessons (resorts such as Jiminy Peak in Massachusetts and Utah’s Park City are putting some of their most effective instructors in charge of beginner lessons), Dorsey says he is seeing innovation from coast to coast. He still cautions though, when you look around the Snow Show floor and see all the people who have made this industry their lives, there’s a lot more than just sales figures at work. “If you walk into an area and feel like a commodity, you’re probably not going to want to come back,” Dorsey says. “From what I’ve seen in the sport, it’s the people who focus on treating this as a service, and building relationships who have the most success.” — Peter Kray And lessons speed their growth.

Snowshoe, Nordic growth focuses on outreach

Growing snow sports doesn’t just take place on the slopes. Crosscountry skiing and snowshoe growth can also start on nearby trails and in city parks. Which is exactly the idea behind the annual Winter Trails Day event, which celebrated its 17th season at nearly 75 venues on Saturday, Jan. 7 this year. SIA Nordic director Reese Brown says, “there was strong support for the event series and great media coverage,” even though organizers at a few venues were talking about the skis and snowshoes they had on hand rather than using them because of the lack of snow. Brown says that because of the national reach of Winter Trails Day, and the support of more than one dozen snowshoe and cross-country ski partners, he still hopes, “the interest generated because of the event will continue to drive people to try the activities over the next several weeks.” —Peter Kray

snewsnet.com SNOW SHOW Daily | Day 1

31


By the Numbers

/ Fountain of Youth

Growing the Sport “Start ‘em young” is industry mantra for increasing participation.

Alpine Ski Age Diversity Number of Participants

2500 2000 1500 1000 500 0

Attracting youth and keeping them active is the key to success, according to SIA’s Revisiting Growing the Snow Sports Industry report. than participants who start at age 25. ›› The consumer who starts at age 10 has an average yearly value of $2,079 and a lifetime value of $72,758. ›› The consumer who starts at age 25 has an average yearly value of $989 and a lifetime value of $19,772.

Snowboarder Participation in Other Activities 50

45-54

55-64

Over 65

1045

1143

432

231

Female

1213

640

774

773

585

199

74

All

2417

1522

1926

1818

1728

631

305

2500 2000 1500 1000 500 0

30 20

Under 17

18-24

25-34

35-44

45-54

55-64

Over 65

Male

1683

1317

1198

499

230

67

22

Female

583

689

600

136

106

28

0

All

2266

2006

1798

635

336

95

22

10 Bowling

Running/ Walking Jogging for fitness

48.3%

43.9%

42.6%

Billard/ Pool

Free Weights

Weight Machines

Bicycling (Road)

Skiing (Alpine)

Treadmill

39.9%

35.4%

35.3%

33.8%

33.8%

33.0%

Year-to-Year Change in Ethnicity, Snowboarding 80 % of Snowboarders

35-44

1152

40

0

70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Caucasian/White, non-Hispanic

Asian/Pacific Islander

Hispanic

African American/ Black

Black

2010

77%

2011

64%

12%

7%

3%

2%

16%

10%

7%

3%

Source for graphs: 2011 SIA Participation Study, data produced by the Physical Activity Council (SIA is a founding member)

32

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SNOW SHOW Daily | Day 1 snewsnet.com

Free Ticket to Paradise

Almost 200,000 families have participated in Colorado Ski Country USA’s 5th Grade Passport Program over the past 15 years. It provides three free lift tickets at each of its 21 member resorts. Other states offer similar programs, including Utah, Idaho, Washington, Michigan, Vermont, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania and New York. A 2011 SIA study of the Pennsylvania Snowpass program for 4th and 5th graders indicated that 85 percent of the particpants had visited a snow sports specialty store, 40 percent owned their own equipment and 14 percent were enrolled in seasonal leasing programs, which have become standard fare for hundreds of retailers across the country. Here in Colorado, Colorado Ski & Golf’s Junior Trade In program has been offered for 28 seasons: the initial cost is $99.99 for a ski or snowboard package, dropping to $49.99 for the following seasons (plus a mandatory binding check). Kids can trade-in for larger sizes as needed.

PHoto by Jack Affleck/Vail Resorts

% of Snowboarders Participating

60

18-24

1204

Snowboard Age Diversity Number of Participants

›› A participant who starts at age 10 eventually spends more at retail and resorts

Under 17

Male


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At the show

/ Dining

Work hard, eat well From casual to upscale, walk-to dining options are diverse and delicious.

Denver may be best known to SIA Snow Show attendees as the gateway to the country’s best 12. Avenue Grill skiing and riding. No longer just a steakhouse town, Denver’s re-energized dining scene offers 630 E. 17th Ave. diverse tables to close that big deal or just relax after a long day on the show floor. Here are 25 303-861-2820; avenuegrill.com top restaurants from which to choose, all within walking distance of the Convention Center. Traditional San Francisco-style grill specializing in fresh

seafood, grill cuisine, pasta and delicious salads. Private room available. Serving until 11 p.m. weekdays, and to midnight Sat., Sun. 5-10 p.m.

1. Euclid Hall

303-296-3525; panzano-denver.com

13. ChoLon Bistro

1317 14th St. 303-595-4255; euclidhall.com

Located near the 16th Street Mall, the award-winning Panzano has become a true local favorite. Exceptional Northern Italian cuisine matches the warm and inviting setting.

1555 Blake St., Ste. 101 303-353-5223

From the owners of Rioja and Bistro Vendôme, this American tavern is focused on high quality and innovative pub food from around the world, including housemade sausages, po’ boys, poutine and schnitzels.

2. Ocean Prime 1465 Larimer St. 303-825-3663; oceanprimedenver.com Ocean Prime, the Modern American supper club located at Larimer Square, features Prime steaks and seafood, award-winning handcrafted cocktails, world-class wines and red carpet hospitality.

3. Bistro Vendôme 1420 Larimer Square, Suite 200 303-825-3232; bistrovendome.com Bringing some serious Parisian flair to the already tres chic Larimer Square, Bistro Vendôme is a Denver foodie favorite. The restaurant’s mouthwatering menu makes prodigious use of local, seasonal ingredients to create updates on classic French bistro fare.

4. Kevin Taylor’s at the Opera House 1106 14th St. 303-640-1012; ktrg.net A fixture on the Denver cuisine scene for more than 20 years, Kevin Taylor has dedicated his life to creating refined French-style cuisine, with a distinctive Colorado twist; located at the Denver Center for the Performing Arts.

5. Osteria Marco 1453 Larimer St. 303-534-5855; osteriamarco.com Spectacular Italian dishes are on display at Osteria Marco, a commodious Larimer Square basement establishment that exposes the high priest talents of cutting-edge kitchen magician Frank Bonanno.

6. Panzano 909 17th Street at Champa

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SNOW SHOW Daily | Day 1 snewsnet.com

7. Vesta Dipping Grill 1822 Blake St. Ste. D 303-296-1970; vestagrill.com World grill cuisine. Ethnic entrees and exotic dipping sauces served in a relaxed urban environment in the heart of LoDo.

8. TAG Restaurant 1441 Larimer St. 303-996-9985; tag-restaurant.com Troy Guard’s home to continental social food offers urban progressive dining in an intimate 125-seat setting right in the heart of Downtown’s Larimer Square.

9. Rioja 1431 Larimer Street 303-820-2282; riojadenver.com Chef Jennifer Jasinski’s much acclaimed Mediterraneaninfluenced eatery in Historic Larimer Square.

10. Appaloosa Grill 535 16th St. 720-932-1700; appaloosagrill.com This employee-owned neighborhood favorite offers highquality cuisine, a great atmosphere and live entertainment nightly. Kitchen open until 1 a.m. seven days a week.

11. 1876 Restaurant at the Grand Hyatt Denver 1750 Welton St. 303-296-1876; granddenver.hyatt.com Located in the heart of downtown Denver’s entertainment and business district, Grand Hyatt Denver’s 1876 Restaurant serves three meals daily. Weekday buffets for breakfast and lunch as well as a la carte dining. In the evening choose from a selection of contemporary dishes or from a prix fixe menu at just $52.80 per couple.

ChoLon, which translates to “big market,” is named after the largest Chinese-influenced market in Saigon, Vietnam. Executive Chef Lon Symensma, formerly of Buddakan and Spice Market in New York City, showcases his passion for Asian ingredients and French cooking techniques in a striking and eco-friendly environment.

14. Cook’s Fresh Market 1600 Glenarm Pl., Ste. 120 303-893-2277; cooksfreshmarket.com A treasure-filled store packed with good things to taste and eat: fantastic breads, pastries, oils, vinegar, imported cheeses, innovative prepared foods, delicious sandwiches, gift baskets and much more!

15. Corridor 44 1433 Larimer St. 303-893-0044; corridor44.com A stylish new Larimer Square establishment featuring a menu of small plates, sparkling wines by the glass and bottle along with a full bar and complete still wine list.

16. Cru - A Wine Bar 1442 Larimer St. 303-893-9463; cruawinebar.com Experience and explore the fascinating world of wine, with over 350 selections, 60 premium wines by the glass as well as taster pairings and wine flights. Eclectic, wine-friendly cuisine including shared appetizers, gourmet pizzas and entrees.

17. Earls Restaurant Downtown Denver 1600 Glenarm Place. Ste. 140 303-595-3275; earls.ca Offering an award-winning international cuisine with two outdoor patios, a private dining room and a full bar and lounge retreat with a west-coast atmosphere.

18. EDGE Restaurant & Bar 1111 14th Street 303-389-3000; edgerestaurantdenver.com

map Courtesy of Visit Denver

Thanks to Visit Denver for the reviews.


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At the show

/ Dining & Nightlife

Dining, Clubbing, Brewing Destination dining, hot nightspots and local suds round out the experience. Looking to spend a night off the SIA Snow Show campus to savor a special meal? Seeking of a historic downtown warehouse has what sports enthuthe best nightspots? Want to take advantage of being in the real Brewtown USA (Denver siasts crave—and a few gratuitous yet thoughtful extras for everyone else. brews more beer than any other U.S. city)? Here’s your guide to restaurants that are worth the drive; the hottest local nightclubs; and the best winter offerings from Colorado brewers. The Funky Buddha Thanks to Visit Denver for the reviews.

Root Down

1600 W. 33rd Ave. 303-993-4200; rootdowndenver.com Globally inspired seasonal cuisine with high-level service and a funky casual atmosphere. The menu incorporates fresh ingredients from local growers as well as sustainable meats and fish.

Olivea 719 E. 17th Ave. 303-861-5050; olivearestaurant.com Serving Mediterranean food inspired by the cuisines of Spain, Italy and Southern France, with an emphasis on utilizing local ingredients.

Sushi Den 1487 S. Pearl St. 303-777-0826; sushiden.net

Steuben’s 523 E. 17th Ave. 303-830-1001; steubens.com Created by the team behind Vesta Dipping Grill, Steuben’s is an everyday neighborhood restaurant serving regional American food. Signature items include the lobster roll, deviled eggs, the Cubano, fried chicken, and green chili cheeseburger.

Duo 2413 W. 32nd Ave. 303-477-4141; duodenver.com A hidden treasure for those seeking a special dining experience tucked in one of Denver’s hippest neighborhoods—Highlands—featuring an unassuming style and a seasonably changing menu.

One of the premiere sushi and Japanese restaurants in the United States for 25 years. Owned and operated by the Kizaki brothers, Sushi Den is truly a family affair.

Lola Coastal Mexican Cuisine 1575 Boulder St. 720-570-8686; loladenver.com Named one of the Top 5 places to drink tequila in the country by Food and Wine Magazine, Lola is one of Denver’s most acclaimed dining destinations. 5280’s Chef of the Year Jamey Fader’s menu is inspired by Mexico’s coastal regions.

The Night Is Young Green Russell

1422 Larimer St. 303-893-6505; greenrussell.com A chef-driven cocktail bar with the old school spirit of a prohibition-era speakeasy. The menu illustrates that philosophy: fresh ingredients, at the peak of their flavor profile.

The Cruise Room at the Oxford Hotel 1600 17th St. 303-825-1107; theoxfordhotel.com The award-winning cocktail lounge located in The Oxford Hotel appears frozen in time since its Art Deco facelift in 1933. The Cruise Room was fashioned after a lounge on the Queen Mary.

The Downtown Tavern 1949 Market St. 303-299-0100; tavernhg.com/downtown Beer? You’re in the right town.

36

SNOW SHOW Daily | Day 1 snewsnet.com

The best part about the Tavern Downtown is that it’s just what it sounds like: A tavern downtown. The bar inside

Quirky clubs, music venues and lounges make up SoCo, or South of Colfax, which is another flourishing nightlife community in Denver. The Funky Buddha has a multilevel rooftop on which body-painted go-go dancers just may be the night’s entertainment.

Lannie’s Clocktower Cabaret 1601 Arapahoe Street 303-293-0075; lannies.com For a little old-fashioned entertainment, hit Lannie’s Clocktower Cabaret, located on the 16th Street Mall in the basement of the landmark D&F Tower: big bands, sultry singers, comedy and all kinds of after hours fun.

Brewtown USA

Christmas Ale: Breckenridge Brewery At more than 7 percent alcohol, with a sturdy texture and rich flavors of caramel and chocolate, this holiday seasonal is the fermented equivalent of a good fire. ›› Visit the Breckenridge Ball Park Brew at 2220 Blake St.

Hibernation Ale: Great Divide Brewing Co. A robust, dry-hopped ale, the Hibernation has a malty richness balanced with a complex hop profile and hearty, warming character. ›› Visit the Great Divide Brewery Tap Room at 2201

Arapahoe St.

Belgorado: Wynkoop Brewing Co. A hoppy Belgian-style IPA made with fresh Colorado hops and Colorado malts. ›› Visit Denver’s first brew pub at 1634 18th St.

Snow Day Ale: New Belgium Brewing Co. Pleasantly hoppy, Snow Day carries the subtle chocolate and caramel flavors of a new brewing malt known as Midnight Wheat. Old Jubilation Ale: Avery Brewing Co. Gorgeous mahogany hue, a hint of hazelnuts, and a finish reminiscent of mocha and toffee.

Photo Courtesy of Visit Denver

Dining Worth the Drive

776 Lincoln St 303-832-8628; coclubs.com


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Supplier insight

/ Q&A

Burton’s Greg Dacyshyn

When it comes to design, Greg Dacyshyn says, “You have to be confident with what you believe.”

The brand’s chief creative officer on hardgoods, softgoods, Vogue and Sweet Cheeks. As Chief Creative Officer for Burton, Canadian-born Greg Dacyshyn’s innovative designs helped the company become a top-selling apparel brand. Here, he talks about the huge role he plays in setting trends in the industry, and how he helps steer the ship of the largest snowboard brand in the world. —Krista Crabtree Snow Show Daily: What’s your background in terms of design and snowboarding? Greg Dacyshyn: I have an eclectic background. I’m originally from Toronto. I grew up skateboarding and working in ski shops from a very young age. I’ve always been really into product and fashion and my true passion was design. I was the only kid in high school reading Vogue. When the opportunity came up 14 years ago to come to Vermont, it brought together my love of snowboarding and fashion. I came in as an outerwear product manager. At that time outerwear design was outsourced. I started doing designs in house and later, after having some success, managed to oversee design and lead up a great team both in hardgoods and softgoods. About a year ago, I took over marketing as well. SSD: What’s the Green Mountain Project (GMP) and how did your partnership with Mountain Dew start? GD: We’re trying to be more eco-conscience whenever possible. About three years ago, we started Green Mountain Project as a lab where we could work on ways to reduce impact with our production of outerwear. A year later, we implemented that into hardgoods, then added other layers of apparel. Mountain Dew approached us about a year ago, with the idea of starting a rPET program, which means using recycled bottles in our outerwear. Some of our riders are involved with Dew, so it seemed to be a great partnership. The bottles are turned into recycled pellets, pellets into yarn and yarn into fabric. Therefore, our fabrics are manufactured from PET materials made out of PepsiCo bottles. SSD: Is there a noticeable difference in terms of hand feel or performance to recycled polyester? Is there a cost benefit? GD: With a lot of these fabrics, you can’t tell the difference between virgin polyester and recycled so we haven’t sacrificed performance or hand feel. Mountain Dew provides the pellets that are from their bottles and they want to see these made into a renewable good. They help subsidize the cost of the fabric. We’re able to pass on that savings to the consumer so they don’t have to see an upcharge. SSD: As far as trend forecasting, how do you do your groundwork? GD: Jake’s mantra is to be team driven. They’re the ones out there all the time and living the lifestyle so they are very integral to the design process.

“For colors, we see more muted tones, old ‘70s camping equipment colors, dirty bright, offset maybe with an unexpected bright tone, a little pop to give it flavor so it doesn’t look like a remake of a vintage piece.” 38

SNOW SHOW Daily | Day 1 snewsnet.com

I’m such a product addict and luckily I get to go in a direction I feel is right. You have to be confident with what you believe. Colors may change year to year, but we are who we are. We’re a big heritage brand, but other vanguards are quality, functionality, timelessness and I like to think we put a lot of style in there, too. We want our stuff to perform and we don’t want it to be dated in a year. SSD: What’s hot for 2013 in terms of fabrics, fit profiles and color palettes? GD: I think for fabrics, simplicity is key these days. When I mention heritage style, I mean heritage fabrics such as waxed cotton, like an old barber jacket. Even if it’s a faux look, it’s kind of vintage and it wears the more you wear it. Nylon oxfords, canvas, these fabrics are classic and will stand the test of time. The outdoor look is hot now, whether it’s new-tech outdoor, like Burton’s AK line or vintage. For colors, we see more muted tones, old ‘70s camping equipment colors, dirty bright, offset maybe with an unexpected bright tone, a little pop to give it flavor so it doesn’t look like a remake of a vintage piece. The silhouettes are longer and leaner. Not trench length, but three-quarter length that’s still easy to move in. Everything’s less boxy and baggy. Pants are trending toward a midfit, like classic 501 fit. Ladies pants are sexy but practical. SSD: Speaking of ladies, tell me about Sweet Cheeks. GD: Sweet Cheeks was established by two of our team riders, Hannah Teter and Gabi Viteri. We love working with team riders, and this was a great way to collaborate. They’ve made cute, sexy, first layers out of Dryride Ultrawick fabric. It’s a fun project to help support our riders and offer a unique product to the women’s snowboard market.


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Supplier insight

/ Q&A

Anthony De Rocco of K2 Sports New CEO on the 50th Anniversary, The Rolling Stones and new boots. K2 Sports hits the SIA Snow Show ready to celebrate 50 years of ski innovation. The brand also has a new president and CEO in longtime brand executive Anthony De Rocco, who sat down with the Snow Show Daily to help kick the party off. —Peter Kray Snow Show Daily: It’s been a pretty incredible year in terms of K2 Sports celebrating its 50th anniversary, you being named president and CEO, and now the news that you are introducing ski boots. Ever had a year like this before—and what stands out? Anthony De Rocco: What stands out is the incredible brand history, the commitment to fun and innovation that we’ve maintained over the years, and future opportunities that we have with K2. Spending time on the anniversary project has been a great inspiration for everyone associated with the company, whether it was from the marketing angle or the product development side with our current goggle launch, and upcoming ski boot and outerwear launches. We have a number of creative sales programs lined up for our dealers that will make this a special year for the industry. SSD: What can the industry expect from you being at the helm at K2, and what opportunities do you see for the brand to continue its growth? AD: K2 has shown strong growth for the past eight years through product innovation and strong relationships we’ve built with our world class dealers and their customer base. This trend will continue through investments in product development and sales programs in our current categories and expansion through new categories like K2 OutNew K2 President and CEO Anthony De Rocco.

“We need to continue to drive solutions that will bring more people into the winter sports arena to experience the great outdoors.” erwear, K2 Goggles, K2 Ski Boots and Backcountry Tools for skiing, snowboarding and snowshoeing. We’re just getting started. K2 Sports will only be successful if our retail customers share this success and thus we will look to build stronger partnerships with our global retail base in analyzing, planning and fulfilling these opportunities. SSD: 50 years is an incredible mark. How are you guys celebrating the anniversary? AD: Our plan is to have some serious fun true to the K2 brand’s heritage. You will see some incredible products, programs and marketing collateral including the recently released Rolling Stones special limited edition skis, a stunning 50th anniversary brand book and some creative POS to drive sales of other great looking products. We will also have plenty of fun at SIA and other global shows. SSD: What goes into releasing Rolling Stones skis—and does something like this come out of the marketing budget, or with sales do they really pay for themselves? AD: Finding a great partner like the Rolling Stones, who are also celebrating their 50th birthday and happen to be skiers, was the first move. After that it is all about collaboration and working together to come up with the right product and graphics that work to promote both brands. Yes, it costs money but there is money to be made through retail sales and PR exposure that benefit the brand, excite consumers and benefit our dealers. SSD: The new boots are huge news. What makes them different from other boots on the market, and how does it change the conversation you can have with your retail partners? AD: Well we’re staying tight lipped on the launch but there are opportunities for innovation in ski boots including last shape, materials, liners and closure mechanisms and we are actively looking at every area of the ski boot in this regard. You should expect K2 to use the same recipe we use in other categories to develop innovative products with targeted features and benefits to improve the skiing experience and allow people to have more fun. One of the main things it does for our position with the retailers is that we are now a full-line hardgoods supplier offering both flat skis and integrated system skis, boots, poles, helmets, goggles and tools. In the end this allows us to be a larger supplier and creates opportunities for overall growth programs that we can extend to our retail customers. SSD: Finally, with the strength of early season sales this year, and record sales and skier visits last year, do you feel snow sports have reached a new plateau? And if so, how do we harness this momentum and keep riding it? AD: I don’t think I would ever say we have reached a plateau. Our goal is to continue to bring meaningful innovation to market that make our sports easier, more accessible and more enjoyable for a wider variety of participants. In the end, we need to continue to drive solutions that will bring more people into the winter sports arena to experience the great outdoors. Our involvement in “Romp to Stomp” events, the “SOS society,” “Winter Trails,” and “Outdoors for All” are just a few examples of our commitment to this goal. We believe this support will help drive the momentum forward so that our sports have a long-term future.

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/ Hit the Slopes

Colorado Ski Country offer returns for Snow Show attendees

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For the third straight season, SIA and Colorado Ski Country USA are making it easy for showgoers to stick around and ride some of the state’s famous slopes. Thanks to an ongoing partnership, free or 2-for1 lift ticket vouchers are available for showgoers, and will be valid from Jan. 30 to Feb. 3 at any of 21 participating CSCUSA member resorts. “It’s a fantastic way for Show attendees to explore Colorado, visit some place they haven’t been before, discover the variety of terrain we have here, and get a thorough sampling of our snowy winter goods,” says Melanie Mills, President of CSCUSA. There are two separate voucher offers accompanying all Show badges: Snow Show Buyers will receive three free lift tickets vouchers and all Snow Show Attendees will receive three 2-for-1 vouchers. Just present those vouchers at any participating resort, and you’re on the lifts! Participating resorts include Arapahoe Basin, Aspen Highlands, Aspen Mountain, Buttermilk, Copper Mountain, Crested Butte, Echo Mountain, Eldora, Howelsen, Loveland, Monarch Mountain, Powderhorn, Purgatory (Durango), Ski Cooper, Snowmass, SolVista Basin, Steamboat, Sunlight, Telluride, Winter Park, and Wolf Creek Ski Area.

Photos by (from left) Colorado Ski Country USA/ArapahoeBasin/Jack Dempsey; Colorado Ski Country USA/AspenMountain/Jeremy Swanson

Top News

M

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www.1Love.org


Whistler Telus Festival an industry rite of spring While pondering your future ski and ride schedule, keep in mind it’s been dumping at Whistler Blackcomb, B.C., yet another reason to make plans now for a rite of spring and one of the snow sports industry’s biggest and best gatherings: The Telus World Ski & Snowboard Festival, April 13-22, 2012. Whistler is offering killer rates (as low as $99 CDN a night) valid April 11-30 so you can catch all the snow, arts and music. Go to whistlerblackcomb.com/twssf.

Vail Resorts Epic Pass only $239 for show attendees You can feel good and do good right here at the SIA Snow Show by buying a Vail Resorts Epic Pass for only $239—65 percent off the already low original price. Not only does the exclusive SIA Epic Pass give you unlimited and unrestricted access to Vail, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Keystone, Arapahoe Basin, Heavenly and Northstar-at-Tahoe for the remainder of the 2011/2012 season, but $10 from each purchase goes to support SIA’s consumer initiative, Winter Feels Good, providing outreach tools that introduce youth to snow sports. Only credentialed SIA Show Attendees are eligible for the Epic Deal. Adult passes only and purchases must be made in person right here at the SIA Snow Show, January 26-29, 2012 at the Epic Pass booth (#766).

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Top Trends

/ Alpine Rental

Early-rise tips (and tails) dominate rental ski offerings

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▲ K2 Super Rx

If much of the talk these days in the rental–and in-line–world, is about rocker, the systems concept remains a vital part of the rental story. The main players of the past, HEAD, Elan and Dalbello, Rossignol, and Salomon, remain the main players today,

▲ HEAD Rev 80

You Can’t Beat the Systems

▲ Elan e-Rise

Some new technologies sneak up on you with incremental stealth, while others explode onto the scene with all of the subtlety of a thunderstorm in August. Count the arrival of rocker in the latter, as the biggest thing to hit ski design since the reshaping of sidecuts about 20 years ago. “It has been a way bigger leap than super sidecuts,” says Rossignol’s Kurt Hoefler, sounding like a proselytizing apostle spreading news of a great, religious awakening. Perhaps the most interesting thing about the evolution of rockered skis, however, has been the ever-expanding application and re-invention of the technology. Rocker was first conceived, of course, for deep-snow surfing, with a completely inverted camber from tip to tail. Now falling under the rocker rubric are variations quite different from the original concept. As applied to learning skis, early-rise tips and/or tails combine with traditional camber underfoot. The basic concept is to make turn initiation extremely easy and, once the turn is started and the ski is on edge, to allow the carving capability of the traditional camber to take over. While companies still want to ride the marketing rocket that rocker has launched, they typically use proprietary modifiers— e.g., auto-turn rocker or catch-free rocker—to emphasize the purpose of the design for easier skiing, not powder skiing. Whatever you want to call it—rocker, early-rise, or by some other name–it is, says Hoefler, the inescapable reality of the rental future. “If you have no rocker in your fleet in a year, you’re going to be off the back,” he says. Among the big players in the fleet-rental business, HEAD introduced early-rise into its fleet program with the introduction of its Link skis last year. For 2012-13, the company is adding to that a slight upgrade to three REV rental models—70mm, 75mm, and 80mm underfoot—that are rental adaptations of in-line models. The REV concept combines the early-rise tip with a wider shovel so that the skis can still “maximize surface engagement (of the edge),” according to HEAD’s Mike Poole. K2, which bills itself as the original rocker company, includes some kind of rocker in every model it builds. It applies what it calls “catch-free rocker,” with tip and tail rise, to its entry-level Strike model. K2’s Darrin Haugen declares the catch-free concept to be “the most easy, learn-to-ski tool there is.” In the climb up the skill-level ladder, K2 comes in with the A.M.P. RX and the Super RX, rental versions of the in-line Photon and Superific, respectively, that feature just tip rocker. Elan gets into the rocker game with its eRise concept, featuring only minimal tip and tail rise. According to Elan’s Bill Irwin, the company’s main fleet model, the XR eRise at 75mm underfoot, has just four millimeters of tip and tail raise. The result, says Irwin, is a ski that “is much quicker into the turn and takes full advantage of a true, parabolic sidecut.” Rossignol’s Experience Rental model, Hoefler believes, “will set the standard for rental skis.” With Rossi’s so-called “auto turn” rocker, the ski also features a progressive sidecut, varying according to the length of the ski. Rossi also throws in the Pursuit Rental with early-rise tip to offer a ski at a competitive price point, along with the basic Flash IRS rental.

▲ Rossignol Pursuit

Systems remain big, high-performance models increasing.


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moving forward with only a few tweaks in their systems packages. Salomon’s basic fleet-rental ski, the Focus, “has been in the stable for the last couple of seasons,” says Mike Aicher. But Salomon replaces the Focus boot with the Mission boot, still featuring a four-sole-length system concept, with color coding. The company will also offer a new binding track making it easy to slide different binding components on and off a ski and potentially “minimizing the number of bindings” a rental operator might have to carry, according to Aicher. For Head, if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. The BYS system, a pathfinding concept that established the limited-sole-length standard a few years ago, returns in “the same format as the last seven years,” says HEAD’s Poole, meaning three consolidated sole lengths. Elan and Dalbello teamed up a few years ago to create packages based on Dalbello’s 4Factor system, based on four soles lengths. While the two are no longer corporate partners, they continue to work in tandem in the fleet-rental market, with many of the reps from the previous marriage continuing to represent both companies. Dalbello’s basic 4Factor fleet boot is the Vantage, but it will also offer the higher-performance Viper LTD (for men) and the Mantis LTD (for women). Both boots feature what Dalbello calls a “Contour 4” last, providing additional space at four common pressure points to improve comfort for a variety of foot shapes. Elan’s new boot partner, Alpina, has not yet created a compatible, consolidated-sole boot but does package the X3R with Elan skis as a price-point option. “It is an economy boot, but with quality,” says Elan-Alpina’s Irwin. Rossignol’s basic fleet-rental boot remains the Flash IRS, in four sole lengths, but it also offers a new upgrade option to the three-buckle Evo 80 (men) and Kelia 60 (women). “They are stiffer than the Flash RS for more performance-oriented skiers,” says Rossignol’s Hoefler. Both boots can be coupled with Rossi’s Flash IRS system skis and bindings. Jake Strassburger of Atomic concedes: “We don’t have a mass-rental solution.” So while Atomic might not technically be in the fleet-rental systems game, it does offering what Strassburger calls “premier-package rentals.” Its basic rental package, combining the Whiteout (men) or Affinity (women) skis with Hawx H+ boots, is based on in-line Nomad Smoke Ti models modified for rental. Atomic continues to offer its ETL (Easy to Learn) skis that have been retooled with 10 percent tip rocker and 90 percent traditional camber. Atomic has also matched Elan in developing very short skis for absolute beginners. Elan is offering a 130cm eRise ski that Irwin calls “beginner specific,” while Atomic has gone even shorter with the ETL 123. It is what Strassburger calls a “mini-carving ski” that may evoke memories of ski boards or the old Graduated Length Method.

Mixing and Matching Boots and Bindings While systems make a lot of sense, logistically and financially, for large fleet-rental operations, they obviously are not right for everyone, especially areas seeking rentals that offer a step up from basic learn-to-ski gear. Cherry-picking gear from different companies brings important players like Marker, Nordica, Lange, and Tecnica, without complete skis/boots/bindings offerings, into the rental game. Start with Marker, often the binding option that rental shops choosing the a la carte approach turn to first. The company has redesigned its 10.0 Fastrak III binding with lighter construction and a shorter track to allow skis underneath to flex more easily. With a single lever underfoot, the bindings should be easier to adjust than their predecessors. They are also color-coded to be compatible with Dalbello’s 4Factor boots. In the higher-performing demo realm, Marker’s Geoff Curtis claims that Markers are “the demo bindings of choice” being used by independent ski companies. As Nordica’s Andy Hare points out, “with no binding, we can’t offer a full system,” but a company that historically has made its name in boots comes to the table with basically a two-tiered line-up. The Cruise, with a generous 104mm, fills the entry-level rental niche. Going up a notch, the Fire Arrow F4 Rental slots in as a high-performance rental boot. Built with lateral stiffness but fore-aft flexibility, it is specifically designed “to work with new ski shapes,” says Hare. Lange counters with its Concept RTL boot at an entry

While systems make a lot of sense, they are not for everybody.

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level, stepping up to the Blaster, with a fairly rigid (by rental standards) 100 flex for men, and the Delight, with a 90 flex for women. The company has decided to discontinue the Super Blaster and comes in instead with the RX 100 RTL, with a 100 flex, to fill the performance niche. Among the boot specialists, Tecnica offers a basic fleet rental boot in the Mega 8 RT and the Esprit 8 RT for women. Its signature Air Shell is featured in the Phoenix Max RT, a fleet upgrade from the Mega and Esprit models.

Stepping Up in Performance Integrating a rental fleet with higher-performing or higher-priced gear comes in two contexts: First, to provide skis for a higher-level skier or a demo program, and second, for a discriminating resort clientele demanding quality. Geoff Curtis of Völkl puts it this way: “We are not the fleet ski for every resort, but for resorts where they (guests) recognize us as a step up.” One rental ski that Völkl is especially enthusiastic about is its new RTM Junior (Chica for girls), which was tested extensively in collaboration with the Garmisch ski school and the technical university in Munich. Curtis also says that there is “a lot of energy in wider skis,” especially at Western areas. That is why Elan, for example, is aiming the 88mm-waisted Apex and 98mm Spire at the Western performance market. Most companies continue to offer many (or most) in-line models in demo/rental versions, typically characterized by a beefed-up top sheet and/or tip to withstand the beating of repeated demo usage. One step-up of particular note comes from Salomon, which this year introduced its in-line BBR with its unique shape, tapering more than 60 millimeters from tip to waist. For next year, the company will bring forth a special rental version–the 7.5R for men and the Limelight for women–with a narrower waist and softer flex than the in-line models. —Peter Oliver Read more about new products, systems and technology in SAM’s Rental Buyer’s Guide at saminfo.com/marketplace. And at the SIA Snow Show, attend the 1 p.m., Friday, Jan. 27, discussion on “How Rocker Technology is Rocking the Rental World” at the Rental World booth.

▲ Dalbello Viper LTD

▲ Marker Fasttrak III

▲ Lange Concept RTL

▲ Rossignol EVO

▲ Tecnica Phoneix Max RT

snewsnet.com SNOW SHOW Daily | Day 1

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Spotlight

/ TOp Retailers and Reps

America’s Top Retailers & Reps Every year, SIA honors reps and retailers who stand out from the crowd with its SnowSports Rep and Retailer of the Year Awards, recognizing those on the front line who go beyond the call of duty in increasing snow sports sales and growing participation. Rep accolades are culled from more than 800 nominations from leading retailers across North America, while retailer awards are selected by suppliers and reps and chosen for their contribution to the growth of snow sports, promotional and marketing techniques, and overall success. Each day of the SIA Snow Show, Snow Show Daily takes a closer look at four of this year’s winners in each category. Retailer of the Year:

Cole Sport For Gary and Jana Cole, who founded Cole Sport in Park City, Utah, in 1982, personal relationships are key, both in how they run their four stores in Park City/Deer Valley, as well as in the close-knit snow sports industry. Born out of their passion for the outdoor lifestyle, Cole Sport remains a familyowned business while employing more than 100 people, all of whom are dedicated to each other, the store and its cause. “Our employees are the biggest key to our success,” says operations manager Scott Cahoon. “Of our management team, the shortest time anyone’s been here is 10 years, with some people here for 20. We even have seasonal,

hourly employees who have been here for 15 years. They make it a great place to work and make the job easy.” It’s these employees who have helped the store earn SIA’s Retailer of the Year award for the past two years running, and also the respect of the Park City locals. “Our employees are very involved in the community,” says Cahoon, adding that the store’s managers volunteer locally for everything from organizing charitable golf tournaments to serving on the boards of such organizations as the Mountain Trails Foundation and Ski Utah. “It helps endear us to the community.” The store also recently received the region’s Recycler of the Year award for its environmental efforts, including

organizing such events as Pride in the Park day and annual mountain clean-ups. It also donates money from pro and team sales to local recycling efforts. Cole Sport has also invested in its e-commerce operations—now run by the founders’ sons, Adam and Jason— as an outlet for what it offers in its four stores. It also offers an extensive fleet of rentals and demos in each store, and prides itself on its apparel lines, offering “clothing you won’t find anywhere else.” As for what’s moving this year, Cahoon says the rodeo bull-inspired Blizzard line, including the Bodacious, Bonafide, Cochise and Bushwhacker, have been selling well, as has Lange’s ski boot line. “We’re already running out of equipment,” he says.

Cole Sport in Park City


Ed Green feels lucky to be in the ski business.

Awards Ceremony

ReP of the Year:

Ed Green

Brands: Dynastar, Lange, Look, Kerma, Sun Valley Ski Tools, Sportube While he might be hard pressed to sell snow to Eskimos, that’s who SIA Rep of the Year Ed Green credits with cementing his career in snow sports sales. Green started skiing in 1966 with Denver’s Eskimo Ski Club, fueling a passion for snow sports that has stayed with him for life. After spending a few years working in rental/retail shops in Crested Butte, he moved to Durango for college before uprooting to Eagle in 1993 to work as a sales associate for Dynastar/Lange. From there he moved to Utah to handle the company’s four-state intermountain territory of Utah, Idaho, Montana and Wyoming (“I was accused of being a ‘bird brain,’” he says, referring to days spent skiing Snowbird) before heading back to the Centennial State to become the company’s Colorado rep. It’s a role that comes naturally. “I enjoy selling products that I use and believe in,” he says. “People pick up on that enthusiasm and passion.” To be successful, he says that reps need to continue to focus on educating retailers. “That’s one of a rep’s most important jobs,” he says. “The more knowledge they have the more confidence they’ll have. If they’re educated on your brands they’ll be more confident selling them and be the experts the consumers are looking for. “The staff needs to be able to filter the products they

have to meet the consumer’s needs,” he adds. “If a shop offers great customer service with knowledgeable sales staff, word of mouth will bring people in.” In his nearly 20 years in the trenches, he’s noticed that reps’ roles have changed. “Reps have to evolve,” he says. “It’s about working smarter and being as efficient as possible. You also have to become more knowledgeable about how the entire business is evolving and what your role in all of it is. You have to do more with less. As well as being salesmen, we’ve become consumer service, marketing and service reps.” But he wouldn’t have it any other way, especially as it has created a lifestyle he loves for him and his family, and involves him in an industry as tight-knit as Inuits living in an igloo. “I enjoy working with like-minded people who enjoy the winter sports lifestyle,” he says. “It’s given me the opportunity to travel to some great places and meet some great people along the way. I feel very lucky to be involved with this industry.” —Eugene Buchanan

The 2011 Rep of the Year Awards will be given out on Friday, Jan. 27, at 6 p.m. The SIA Awards in the CSCUSA Central Food Court &the honor industry’s best. Lounge on the Show floor. Each winner will receive an award recognizing their commitment to the industry, as well as a one-year SIA Rep Membership. Rep of the year winners include: Ed Green (Rockies), Tom Blair (Midwest), Brad Decker (South), Chris Dunham (West), Kent Fried (Atlantic), Jamie Lavalle (Northern California), Tim Parker (Eastern Lakes), Andrew Shaw (Northeast), Dan Sorcinelli (Northwest), Evan Cole (Ontario), Derek Hale (BC, Manitoba, Saskatchewan), Andrew Hicks (Alberta), and Gilles Lachance (Quebec). Retailer of the Year Award winners include: Cole Sport (Mountain), East Coast Alpine (New England), Buckman’s Ski & Snowboard Shop (Mid Atlantic), Sturtevant’s (Pacific), The Ski Center (Southeast), Trollhaugen Ski & Board Shop (North Central), and Retail Concepts (South Central).

1800-770-8750 - Johna@rocesusa.com - SIA Denver Show - Booth # 4174 Untitled-2 1

1/14/10 1:54:34 PM


Top Trends

/ new exhibitors

Sommeregger, Madshus, Hookease About 100 brands, from emerging to established, hit the SIA Snow Show floor this week as New Exhibitors. Here are three of the newcomers and their stories. Sommeregger ‘walks’ the line Traditional Austrian fashion hits U.S. Over the past 20 years, Sabine Sommeregger has lent her design prowess to numerous labels— Sport Alm, Peralp Italy, Head, Kneissl, Daks of London and Fifth Avenue St. Moritz, to name a few—but now her personal collection is making headlines. The high-fashion après-ski line, called simply, “Sabine Sommeregger,” is hand-cut, sewn and stitched in Sommeregger’s native Kitzbühel, Austria. “Sabine aimed to develop exclusive pieces where attention to detail and quality was paramount, a process which required extensive preparation and design for each individual item,” Lori Kirk, a founder of the collection’s U.S. distributor, Sisu Sports LLC, says. Sommeregger’s winter line is predominantly made from boiled wool, a traditional Austrian mountain farmer’s material, called “walk” in German. During this boiling process, thousands of air pockets are naturally forced into the fabric, acting as a buffer that keeps the cold outside the coat and the warmth created by the body within it, while still allowing the wearer’s skin to breathe. The fabric is also water repellent. Representative of the most current Austrian Alpine fashion, Kirk believes the Sommeregger collection adds flare that retailers won’t find elsewhere. “Sabine Sommeregger products are extremely representative of current and future fashion in both alpine resort communities and metropolitan cities, an objective which is on the forefront of Sabine and her design team,” she says. sabine-sommeregger.at; Booth #566

Madshus expands its reach Nordic race brand looks for whiter pastures Founded in 1906 by Martin Madshu, Madshus cross-country skis are “a Norwegian heritage brand,” explains Graham Gephart, brand manager for Madshus’ U.S. division. Although the company is now gaining traction in the recreational market of the sport, Madshus refuses to compromise on its competitive-level quality (the brand’s more than 150 Olympic medals date back to 1928), despite its foray into a new consumer market. Ranked number No. 2 globally in cross-country ski business (second only to Fischer), Gephart says, Madshus made a name for itself in its homeland of Norway, where Nordic skiing is intertwined with daily life. K2 Sports recognized potential in the heritage brand and purchased the company in 1988. Madshus has seen considerable growth since K2’s adoption, but the brand really exploded three years ago in the U.S. and Canadian markets with its introduction of a recreational product, in addition to the race- and fitness-driven products popular in Europe. Although Madshus has appeared at the SIA Snow Show in years past in the Atlas booth, and before that with Alpina, Madshus isn’t sharing its square footage this week. After launching a full line of cross-country ski boots in 2006 and just a year later a full line of cross-country ski poles, Madshus aspires “to be all things

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cross country for all dealers, all consumers,” Gephart says. The 2008 introduction of the MemBrain softshell boot construction has been well received by consumers and dealers who “have recognized that breathable softshell materials provide a much higher standard of comfort by managing moisture inside and out,” Gephart says. Hitting the market this year is the Nanosonic Carbon Skate R-Soft Ski, with “distinct splay, short pressure areas and low-profile skate tip geometry.” madshus.com; Booth #3732

Ski schools playing Hookease Kids beginner tool gets thumbs up When Scott Coleman constructed a device that allowed him to guide his daughter gracefully down the mountain despite her lack of skiing prowess, a group of inquisitive skiers followed him to the mountain’s base, asking questions about where he got the clever contraption. Now Coleman’s entourage includes Olympic gold medalist Picabo Street. “(She’s) now raising and teaching her own kids to ski, and she fell in love with our products,” Coleman says of Street’s decision to endorse the Hookease product, what he hopes will be a revolutionary tool for teaching beginners to ski. The design is simple. Attach an adjustable, plastic clamp to the back of each of the beginner’s skis and a metal hook to the end of each of the instructor’s poles. A hole in the plastic clamp allows the instructor to hook the end of her pole to the child’s skis, guiding movement without physical contact. Hookease launched in select ski schools last year for initial testing and now expands to a commercial audience in 2012. Coleman believes that by using his product, children will have better experiences and will be more likely to stick with the sport. “In that huge circle of companies that make up our industry, I think that we are the ones that give birth to the little skier who is going to then buy products from all of these other companies,” Coleman says. “Gold medalists in 20 years will say, ‘I remember how my dad taught me how to ski with Hookease.’” hookease.com; Booth # 3742 —Coutney Holden Hookease is designed to make learning easy for kids.


Top Trends

/ new exhibitors

adidas Outdoor, Voile, Helmet Band-Its About 100 brands, from emerging to established, hit the SIA Snow Show floor this week as New Exhibitors. Here are three of the newcomers and their stories. adidas Outdoor eyes snow Global footwear giant intros winter gear Greg Thomsen is one of the 41,978 people who “like” adidas Outdoor. And that’s just the Facebook aficionados. “When they see the product, it’s really high level, and it’s really well detailed,” Thomsen, managing director or adidas Outdoor, says. “We’ve gotten a lot of word of mouth.” The German company entered the outdoor market back in the 1970s when Reinhold Messner found a need for products “to get him to the mountains lighter and faster,” Thomsen says. The brand’s outdoor niche had once been filled by Arc’Teryx and Salomon, previously owned by adidas. But in 2008, three years after Adidas sold Arc’Teryx and Salomon, adidas was ready to set up an exclusive outdoor division all its own. Spearheaded by Rolf Reinschmidt, adidas pulled its best and brightest from all over the world, and in the years between 2008 and 2010, adidas Outdoor launched in Europe, Asia and Russia, respectively. Now it’s ready for the U.S. “The U.S. market is a very competitive, difficult market,” Thomsen says. “(We) were holding off the U.S. until (we) felt like the product was really dialed in perfectly.” Thomsen is confident that adidas is there. The Terrex collection is the signature line with Gore-Tex and PrimaLoft features. Terrex Swift boasts similar design attributes at a lower price point. “We’re really focusing on people who work out and train for their outdoor activities,” Thomsen says, adding that adidas Outdoor is on track for sales in excess of 500 million euros by 2015, which would put it in “the top three outdoor brands in the world.”

Voile’s backcountry bliss Original splitboard brand gearing up Billed as the original creator of the splitboard, Voile is heading to the SIA Snow Show for the first time in 10 years. With backcountry’s recent explosion, the company is ready for the close-up. “There are a lot of people out there who don’t know that we started this thing,” says David Grissom, part owner and Voile’s sales and marketing manger. Numerous industry powerhouses have entered the splitboard market, including K2, Burton and Never Summer. “A lot of major players are getting into it, and they’re working with us in most cases to license their patent and buy the hardware,” Grissom says. Voile plans to introduce several of its own models at the show. Having had one signature board for the past four years, in 2012 Voile will return to sidewall construction with four new models: a true twin, a men’s and women’s directional twin, and a big mountain directional tapered shape. All new models feature a unique rockered, dual-camber profile for float and liveliness. “We’re very known for the hardware, but we’re not very known for the snowboards,” Grissom says. “The challenge for Voile and the motivation to go back to SIA is that we want to bring our product line into the mainstream.” Grissom adds that 98 percent of Voile’s manufacturing currently takes place in Salt Lake City, where the brand owns its buildings and equipment. “We’ve been making backcountry products for over

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30 years,” he says. “We’re a solid company. We’re going to be around for a long time.” voile-usa.com; Booth #1710

Make out like Band-Its Helmet accessory blends fashion, function At the intersection of snow, style and safety, Robin Dorman promises you’ll find Helmet Band-Its. “Anybody who has seen the product has just gone crazy,” she says of the popularity of her faux fur, premium fur and bandanna-style helmet accessories. The one-size-fits-all bands wrap around any helmet and can then be adjusted by a Velcro loop on the logo lining. Starting her career as a buyer for Saks Fifth Avenue and then spending 22 years as an interior decorator, Dorman knows fashion. After a tumble on the hill in 2003, Dorman and her husband marched their kids to the sporting goods store to pick out helmets. “The kids looked at me asking, ‘so which one are you picking out for yourself?’” she says. Grudgingly selecting one for herself that was “limited in looks,” Dorman bought a fur headband and hot-glued it to her helmet. After a few more years and hundreds of compliments, Dorman decided to present the product to a larger audience. “It’s just a phenomenal way to look good and be safe,” she says. “It’s a win-win situation.” The women’s fur variety can be worn as a shawl collar on a sweater or jacket, a look Dorman calls, “Tres chic!” Add the matching sleeve cuff, which easily attaches like the slap bracelets of yore, for added style. helmetbandits.com; Booth #2451 —Coutney Holden Band-Its presents its own version of before and after.


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Top News

/ History

Snow sports museum planned for Denver Joint effort would include SIA-curated gear collection. The SIA Snow Show could have another attraction for attendees by the time it returns in 2013: A new International Center for Snowsport History and Art, which would be housed just three blocks from the Colorado Convention Center in the historic McNichols Building in Civic Center Park. The plans were announced in early November by Bernie Weichsel, chairman of the Ishpeming, Mich.-based U.S. National Ski and Snowboard Hall of Fame and a director of the International Skiing History Association, and by David Scott, the chairman of the Vailbased Colorado Ski and Snowboard Museum. The Center would house rotating exhibits from four sources: the Beekley International Collection of Skiing Art and Literature, the national museum of the Hall of Fame, the Colorado Ski and Snowboard Museum, and SIA’s collection. The group is working on creating a non-profit corporation, naming an independent board of directors and establishing a budget as well as hiring staff and renovating the space. Scott figures the project will require a $2 million to $3 million capital campaign and the group is armed with seed money from the two museums. Scott is optimistic the effort will receive support from manufacturers and resorts, but the bulk of funds are expected to come from elsewhere. “We’re not looking to raise this in the industry, but from within the Denver philanthropic community, from people who love the sport,” Scott says. “We hope to open in time for the SIA Snow Show in January 2013,” Weichsel says. “That’s our goal,” adds Scott. “I hope we can make it. There are plenty of challenges.” The Snowsport History and Art Center would occupy 9,000 square feet of space on the third floor of the McNichols Building, a Greek Revival structure built in 1910 and owned by the City of Denver. The group would pay the city a rental fee. “The City of Denver is investing in the building. We’ve been embraced by the City,” Scott says. The project would include a gift store and theater and offers opportunities for an array of events, including receptions hosted by resorts and suppliers. The second floor of McNichols is an event floor designed for social functions. “There are a lot of possibilities,” Scott says. The Denver site would not alter CSSM’s operation of its Vail museum other than giving it the opportunity to broaden its reach, Scott says. The project is also supported by Natale Messina, the trustee for the renowned and expansive Beekley Collection, which had been housed in Mammoth Lakes, Calif., for six years. It is now seeking a home in a location where it can drive more visits. Beekley items not on display at the new museum would be stored at CSSM’s facility in Golden. —Andy Bigford The future home of the International Center for Snowsport History and Art.

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At the Show

/ Who & Where

Exhibitor List Company

Booth #

10th Mountain Division Foundation, Inc.................. LL 180s LLC...............................1555 1Love.org.............................. 206 241.......................................... 319 32 Degrees LLC................... 658 3point5.com.........................2529 4FRNT Skis, LLC.................4233 5150 Snowboards.............3914 540 Snowboards.................. 702 686..........................................3213 AAS - Anomaly Action Sports Inc.........................3935 ACADEMY Snowboard Co................3713 Active Helmets...................3166 Active Youth Alliance.......4503 adidas Outdoor.................1166 Advanced Racking Systems.............................4346 Aerial 7.................................. 912 AFRC-Outdoor Gear, Inc............................2755 Airblaster..............................3912 Alpina Sports Corp............2774 Alpine Valet™....................3358 AMATERRACE Inc.............. 333 Ambler..................................... 747 American Paper and Plastic Co................. 573 Anakie Outerwear............. 419 Analog Clothing.................2913 Anarchy Eyewear..............1311 Anon Optics.........................1918 Apex Sports Group LLC...3890 Arbor......................................1619 Arc’teryx Equipment Inc...1339 Arctix......................................2468 Armada..................................4229 Arnette................................3607 ARVA...................................4579 Ashbury Eyewear................ 517 Aspire Brands LLC............... 745 Astis Mittens.......................2566 Athalon Sportgear, Inc.....4261 Atlas Snow-Shoe Co.........3832 Atomic USA, Inc....4055/4155 Auclair Sports, Inc.............1355 AYG-All Year Gear...........2347 Backcountry Access, Inc........................3378 Backcountry Experience.......................4506 Backshop + Rental + Uniform...........4677 Backside Clothing Company........................4308 Bailo.....................................1361 Banshee Bungee.................. 510 Bataleon................................2208 Bearded Apparel................ 421 BEARPAW............................1032 Bergans of Norway............. 758 Bern Unlimited Inc............2119 Betty Rides............................. 317 Billabong USA.....................3619 Black Diamond Equipment Ltd................3428 Black Diamond Sportswear........................ 742 Blizzard Sport.....................3778 Bluebird Social Zone.......... 303 Board Retailers Association (BRA).........1714 Boardkor...............................1816 Bogs Footwear...................... 948 Bolle’......................................... 528 Bon Hiver Inc.....................2107 Bonfire Snowboarding Company..........................2902 Bonnier Mountain Group.................................3751 Booster Strap......................3472 Boulder Gear.......................2755 Bounceboards, LLC............ 214 brandbase Inc........................ 328 Brandwise.............................3745 Bridgedale............................3365 Briko.......................................3560 Buff Inc.................................... 311 BULA......................................1028 Burnstreet............................ 305 Burton Snowboards.......1913/2513 Buzrun Snowboards........... 702 C3.............................................2919

58

Company

Booth #

Camtrol.................................... 316 Canada Goose....................... 536 CandyGrind ........................1108 CAPiTA Snowboarding....3219 Capix.......................................3702 Carrera..................................4274 Causwell................................3837 Celerant Technology Corporation....................... 938 CelsiusSnow USA, Inc......1715 CenterStone Technologies, Inc...........1964 CEP Compression Sportswear...................... 664 Chaos......................................2456 Cheetah Factory Racing (CFR)..................1908 Chill.................................... UL-25 Chuckbuddies...................2921 COAL Headwear................2919 ColdDist LLC.......................2319 COLDPRUF Base Layer.... 746 Colorado Ski & Snowboard Museum/Hall of Fame......LL Colorado Ski Country USA...................1747 Colorado Ski Country USA Central Lounge & Food Court.......................2132 Concrete Wave.................1810 Contour.................................4528 Contract Snowboards...... 314 COREUPT.COM.................4231 CoVelo Clothing Inc..........1163 Crash Pads............................2156 crazeeHeads inc................... 946 Crescent Moon Snowshoes.......................3733 Croakies................................1136 CSA - Leggett & Platt.......4135 CTR (Chaos Thermal Regulation)......................2456 Cushe Footwear...............1350 CW-X, Wacoal Sports Science Corp...................2941 DAKINE.................................2519 Dalbello Sports LLC..........4177 Dale of Norway, Inc............. 773 Darn Tough Vermont......2290 DC Shoes, Inc......................2102 Deeluxe...............................3920 Demon Snow.......................2209 Dermatone...........................3174 Descente North America, Inc....................... 345 Devils Thumb Ranch.......... 371 Dinosaurs Will Die Snowboards..................... 910 Discrete Headwear...........3267 DNA.......................................... 345 Dot Dash.............................1110 Double Diamond Sportswear........................ 742 DownUnders Footbeds...4240 DPS SKIS...............................2962 Dragon Alliance..................1519 Drake......................................3202 Dregs Distribution/ Indoboard........................2219 Drop MFG............................3034 DRYGUY LLC......................2453 Dye Precision...................... 515 Dynafit and Salewa...........3164 Dynastar Skis......................3770 EC3D Sports........................ 950 Echelon Snowboards......4207 Eggbar-Vise, LLC................3948 Eider........................................1039 EIRA........................................4624 Eisbar USA.............................. 947 Elan Blanc.............................1749 Elan Skis................................2774 Electric Visual....................... 619 ELM CO.................................1511 EMSCO Group....................2150 Endeavor/Air Hole............. 908 Entity Tall Tees..................4211 EORA - Eastern Outdoor Reps Assn....UL-20 Epic Pass.................................. 766 Erica Molinari...................... 564 Erik SportsWhiteWoods..................3576 Erin Snow..............................1263 Eurosocks International... 934 EVEREST AMERICA........... 669

SNOW SHOW Daily | Day 1 snewsnet.com

Company

*Subject to change

Booth #

EWSRA - Eastern Winter Sports Reps Assn.........UL-20 Expand A Sign USA...........4210 Faction Skis..........................4237 Fast Strap..............................3266 FATE Clothing....................... 969 Fat-ypus Skis.......................3361 FedEx/FedEx Office..........4619 Fera International Corp....1168 Firehouse LLC....................... 513 Fischer Skis US...................4568 Fits Sock Co.........................2464 Five Seasons........................1735 Flow Sport Inc/ Flow Snowboarding.....2921 Flux Binding Systems.......3716 FlyLow Gear........................3169 Footbalance System Inc........................ 223 Forum....................................... 919 Foursquare............................. 919 Fox 40 International Inc............3471 Fox River Mills, Inc............2564 Frends....................................1717 FTWO Snowboards........... 702 Fuel Clothing.......................1312 Full Tilt Boots......................3858 Function..............................4576 Fuse Optics.......................... 215 G3 Genuine Guide Gear Inc...............3565 Gabel Sports Group (North America) Inc.....3560 Garmont NA, Inc................3365 Geiger of Austria Inc........1775 GES Service Desk...................UL GHEEK...................................2940 Girl Powder, Inc................1608 Giro Sport Design..............3728 Glowboardz, LLC................ 512 GNU........................................1307 Goldwin.................................1733 GOODE Ski Technologies...................3356 GoPro....................................... 319 Gordini USA, Inc.................2834 Gorski Group.....................1258 Grabber Inc..........................4161 Grace Folly........................... 558 Grandoe................................2836 Grangers...............................3567 Grateful Outdoor Service (G.O.S.)............... 213 Grenade Inc.........................3907 G-Shock................................. 511 H2O Outdoor Gear..........4313 Halti Oy................................. 565 Happy Goat Lucky.............1558 Hart Ski Corporation.......2971 Head Wintersports...........3155 Heat Factory Inc................2791 Hell is for Heroes...............1564 Helly Hansen (US) Inc......1755 Helmet Band-ITS..............2451 HESTRA GLOVES, LLC..................2160 High Sierra Sport Co........3747 High Society Freeride Company LLC.................3917 Highgear................................3567 Highland Trading Company/Sportube......2890 Holden...................................3419 Holmenkol.US.....................4357 hOme Swiss Watches.....3015 Homeschool Snowboarding................3211 HootieBrown Designs, LLC..................1466 Horizon Agency, Inc Outdoor Sports Insurance..........................2790 Hot Chillys............................3350 Hotfingers Gloves.............1776 Hotronic USA, Inc..............3355 House of Marley................. 703 i.N.i. Cooperative............... 206 Icebreaker USA.................... 542 Icelandic Design................... 559 Icelantic Skis........................3368 Impact Canopies USA......1962 Implus Corporation..........3567 INA International, Ltd..........................3502/3702 Information Booth..............LL-2

Company

Booth #

ISHA - International Skiing History Assn............LL Itasca Footwear by C.O. Lynch Enterprises........... 734 Jacob Ash/Schuessler........ 750 Jambu.................................... 593 Jones Snowboards............2910 Joshua Tree Skin Care...... 591 Joystick..................................3837 K2 Skis......................3929/3933 K2 Snowboarding..............3922 Kali Protectives................4213 Kamik div of Genfoot America............. 570 Karbon..................................... 175 Karvena Helmets and Goggles..................... 314 Kastle GmbH.......................3775 KD Kanopy, Inc.................4164 Khombu.................................1373 Killtec NA Inc......................2168 Killy.........................................1042 Kiss My Face LLC...............1490 KJUS USA............................... 576 KLINT.....................................4339 KneeBinding, Inc................3570 Kombi Ltd.............................3050 Komperdell..........................3773 Krimson Klover..................1348 Kuhl Clothing......................2164 Kulkea, LLC........................3675 KUUsport Mfg. Ltd...........4163 KVZ Sports, LLC.................1035 Kwik Tek, Inc........................3847 La Sportiva N.A. Inc...........4246 Lamar........................................ 506 LandYachtz........................1707 Lange Ski Boots..................3770 Launch Pad.........................3739 Launch Snowboards........4513 Laundromat.........................1161 Lazer Sport.........................4516 L-Bow Mittens...................... 952 Learn to Ski and Snowboard Month......UL-24 Leisure Trends Group......1750 LEKI USA, Inc......................3160 Lib Tech..................................1507 Lib Tech NAS (Skis!)..........4235 Liberty Mountain...............2970 Liberty Skis...........................3855 Life-Link................................3365 Line Skis.................................3655 Liquid Boardwear..............4107 Liquid Image Co, LLC........2421 Little Hotties Warmers.... 3567 LODGESOXX™.................... 673 Loki..........................................1364 Long Advance International Co, Ltd...1368 Lorpen North America Inc......................1764 LTD Snowboards.................. 506 Lucky Bums Inc...................2770 M. Miller.................................. 962 Madshus..............................3732 Majesty Skis......................... 314 Mammut Sports Group USA.....................3563 Manzella Products............3134 Mariner Business Solutions............................. 764 Marker Ltd............................. 255 Marker Sport and Travel Bags.......................4165 Marker USA.........................4557 Marmot Mountain, LLC................1446 MasterFit Enterprises.....3742 MeCo Designs.....................1464 Megaphone US.................1559 Mental....................................1774 Mervin Manufacturing..1307/1507 MFD........................................4238 Millennium Three (M3)...3502 Mitchie’s Matchings........... 373 Molehill Mt. Equipment, Inc.......2090 Moment Skis........................4239 Montana Sport North America Inc........3942 Moon Boot...........................3678 Moon Shadow.....................2456 Morrow Snowboards.......3922 Mount Tec Gloves..............2364

Note: New Exhibitors are in bold

Company

Booth #

Mountain Hardwear, Inc...1046 Mountain Shades...............3434 Mountain Uniforms............ 632 MRA - Midwestern Reps Assn.......................UL-20 MTN Approach...................3921 MWSRA - Midwest Winter Sports Reps Assn..................................UL-20 Mystery Ranch...................4311 NARGEAR............................ 216 NSSRA - National Ski & Snowboard Retailers Assn ...................................4577 NSAA - National Ski Areas Assn.....................UL-23 NSP - National Ski Patrol........................UL-22 NBS - Nation’s Best Sports........................ 267 Native Eyewear..................3142 NEFF.......................................3206 Neve Designs......................1746 Never Summer Industries.........................1513 New Wave Enviro Products...........................4355 NEWSR - New England Winter Sports Reps, Inc..........................UL-20 Niche Snowboards............1607 Nidecker USA, Inc.............2910 Nike.........................................3622 Nikita Clothing USA.........3107 NILS............................1736-1742 Nirvanna Designs................ 762 Nitro Snowboards............... 907 Nobis......................................2809 Nomis....................................... 328 Nordica USA........................4169 North Star Fur & Trading.... 590 Northside by Triple T Trading Ltd...................1669 Northwave...........................3202 NOW Snowboarding......2910 NXTZ......................................2423 Oakley Inc................1132/1328 ON3P Skis..........................4305 Oneballjay............................1512 O’Neill....................................1522 OnTheSnow.com..............4578 Optic Nerve.........................3434 ORAGE..................................1728 O-range USA.....................1367 Ortovox USA Inc................3167 OSBE USA Inc.....................3245 Outdoor Research............... 739 Outdoor Technology.......... 623 Outer Edge Industries....4515 OZ Snowboards.................. 211 Pajar........................................1468 Panda Hats.........................4500 Parajumpers........................1564 Patagonia Inc.......................1823 Pepper’s Performance Eyeware, Inc....................3424 Peter Grimm Headwear.........................2915 Pieps ......................................2970 Pinnacle Designs................2568 PISTIL.....................................2254 Planet Earth Clothing......4120 POC USA LLC......................1023 Pocket Disc.......................... 306 Point Zero Canada............. 332 point6 LLC............................1451 Poivre Blanc.........................3042 POLARMAX.........................2347 POW Gloves........................1907 Powderhorn.........................1751 Precision Mountainwear/ Helix Snowboardwear......748 Press Room..........C Mezzanine Promotive.com...................2529 ProRider..............................1713 Pro-Tec...................................3408 PSIA-AASI.............................3974 PTL Enterprises.................. 569 Pull-In..................................1346 Pulse.......................................1223 Pyour Performance Sport Tights.....................2452 Quickpoles, LLC.................3737 Quiksilver Inc......................1202 R.E.D.......................................1919 Rab..........................................3571

Company

Booth #

Rawik......................................2755 RC Products......................... 315 Recco Systems Ltd.............UL-1 Reclaim Project..................3317 Recon Instruments Inc...... 423 Redfeather Snowshoes...3580 Regina Imports LLC..........1573 Registration Desk................LL-1 Rep The Zip.......................... 422 reusch SnowSports.........2250 Ride Snowboards.......3715/3914 Ripzone / Powder Room.4216 Roces USA, Inc....................4174 Rocky Mountain Sunscreen........................2528 Rocky Mountain Underground RMU.....4356 Rome Snowboard Design Syndicate............. 915 Rossignol..................3665/3765 Rossignol Apparel.............3861 Roxa North America.........2960 Roxy........................................1502 Ruffolo Enterprises, Inc... 2527 S4® Optics...........................1313 Sabine Sommeregger........ 566 SABRE....................................2310 Salomon Snowboards......2502 Salomon USA..........4047/4147 Santana Canada...............1373 SCARPA North America, Inc.....................3171 Schure Sports U.S.A., Inc............................ 175 Scott Sports............3037/3337 Screamer................................. 755 Sector 9...............................3406 Seirus Innovation...............2844 Serengeti Eyewear.............. 528 Sessions LLC........................2507 Shenzhen Pengyifa Industrial Co LTD........... 331 Shifty...................................... 592 Show Management Office................A Mezzanine Shred Optics........................3935 Shred Ready Inc.................. 312 Sidas.....................................4572 SKEA, LTD.............................2469 Ski Kare, Inc.......................3578 Ski Retriever......................3666 Ski Tops/Chaos/Moon Shadow/CTR...................2456 SKIHOOKUPS Inc............3579 SKILOGIK.............................3468 SkiMetrix, Ltd......................3472 SkiSkootys............................3390 Skullcandy, Inc....................2202 SkyTech Sport, Inc............. 769 Slide-On..............................3472 Slytech Protection............3935 SmartWool Corporation.....................2763 Smith Optics...........2828/3128 Smokin’ Snowboards........2907 Snapdry.................................3355 Sno Life, LLC......................... 738 Sno Skins Inc.......................... 966 Snow Angel............................ 942 Snow Dragons.....................2755 Snow Show Daily................. 264 Snow Sports Recycling Program...........................LL-20 Snowjam LLC......................... 702 SOS-Sportswear of Sweden..............................1737 Soul Poles...........................4574 Spacecraft.............................2807 Spark R&D............................1807 Special Blend......................... 919 Spice Snowboards............... 702 SpiritHoods........................1657 Sport Obermeyer Ltd.......2173 Sportcaster Company, Inc..................1223 Sports Accessories America Inc......................2760 Sportube...............................2890 Spy Optic, Inc......................3707 Spyder Active Sports, Inc.”......................1175 Spyderco...............................4162 STANCE.................................1813 Steez Gear LLC..................... 222 Stepchild Snowboards.....3902

Company

Booth #

Stockli Ski USA...................3363 Storm Creek Apparel.......1569 Strap Pad LLC......................2908 Stylesight.............................. 193 Subaru of America, Inc..... 531 Sun Valley Ski Tools Inc.....................3844 Sunbelt® Optic..................2125 Suncloud Polarized Optics................................2827 Sunice.....................................1766 Superfeet Worldwide Inc................2560 Surface Skis..........................3837 Swany.....................................1777 Sweet Turns LLC................1659 Swix Sport USA, Inc..........3174 SWRA - Southeastern Winter Reps Assn.......UL-20 Tailfish Sports...................... 212 Technine..............................2309 Tecnica USA.........................3778 Terramar Sports Inc............ 723 The North Face...................4219 The Program.......................... 919 The Soze Group..................4572 Therm-IC...............................4572 Thirty-Two Boots...............1909 Thorlo Inc..............................1561 Thule Inc................................3374 TOKO.....................................3190 Tomahawk International................... 420 Toyota Tsusho Corporation....................... 630 Transpack..............................3146 TransWorld Media.............. 302 Trespass USA......................... 261 TREW.....................................1611 Tubbs Snowshoes..............3833 Turbine Boardwear............. 706 Turtle Fur Group................1155 UCLEAR..............................4674 Ugg Australia.......................1051 Under Armour - MTN........ 728 Union Binding.....................3016 Unity Snowboard Manufacturing LLC......2916 USRA - United States Reps Assn.........UL-20 Uvex........................................3174 Vail Resorts Inc..................... 766 Vans.........................................3612 Venture Snowboards.......1711 VestPac................................. 310 Vew-Do Balance Boards................................. 307 Vintage Winter...................2490 VIRUS Action Sport Performance................... 313 VIST North America.........1361 Vittoria Industries North America...............3202 Voile Splitboards..............1710 Voile-USA...........................3269 Volcom..................................... 710 Volkl........................................4557 Volkl Performance Wear..................................4566 VonZipper.............................1012 VR2 Distribution Inc........1733 W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc..........RM 202 White Sierra.......................... 555 Wigwam Mills, Inc.............2460 Wind X-treme America, LLC...................4218 Winter Park Resort...........2366 Winter Trails......................UL-21 Wintersteiger Inc..............3342 Wrong Gear Inc.................... 603 WWSRA - Western Winter Sports Reps Assn .................................UL-20 Yaktrax...................................3567 Yeah For It Distribution.....................2208 YES Now Board..................2910 YRC........................................... 668 Zanheadgear & Bobster Eyewear............. 911 ZDAR Boot USA................. 567 Zeal Optics...........................3223 Zeon Corporation............2108 Zero/The Fairfield Line...1351 Ziener.....................................1733


At the Show

/ Calendar

Events

What’s happening at the 2012 SIA Snow Show.

Daily Events 7:00AM-9:15AM | Room 103 | Donut Dunking Christian Fellowship Donut Dunking Christian Fellowship Note: not available on Thursday

9:00AM-11:00AM | Booth #223 | Footbalance System Inc

FREE Foot Analysis and 100% Custom Footbeds Start your show with Fresh Feet! Show us your retailer badge and receive a FREE Foot Analysis and FREE pair of 100% custom made footbeds. Walking the show has never felt so good!

9:00AM-11:00AM | Booth #4619 | FedEX

Get Your Morning Jolt with Us at FedEx Stop By for a Free Cup of Java to Give Your Day a Jump Start. 9:00AM-5:00PM | Room 206 | SIA International Lounge Note: 9:00AM-1:00PM, Sunday

America, have taken these tenets to new heights with a collaboration project never before seen in the wintersports market. Join these legendary brands for the unveiling on opening day of the SIA show.” 9:00AM-6:00PM | Booth #2456 | Chaos Headwear Chaos Headwear Fundraiser to Benefit the Outdoor Industries Women’s Coalitions and SOS Outreach “To celebrate some of Chaos Hats’ programming, Chaos will sell discount hip, cool beanies in SIA booth #2456, January 27, the second day of the show. Proceeds of the day’s collections will be donated to both the Outdoor Industries Women’s Coalition (OIWC) and Colorado-based SOS Outreach. Visit the Booth Jan. 26-29 for your positive purchase.

9:00AM-end of show | Booth #702

FTwo Board and Binding Giveaway Stop by booth 702, take a look at the new FTwo out of Austria, check out their proprietary KillAir Composite Honeycomb core. Super light, rides amazing and you won’t believe the margins! Enter to win one of 5 boards and 5 bindings we’ll be giving away!

10:00AM-11:00AM | Booth #755 | Screamer Glen Plake Signing Autographs! Glen Plake will be in the Screamer booth #755 for company photos and signing autographs.

musicians from Oceans Edge School of Music, Ft. Lauderdale FL who are also avid skiers and snowborders. Refreshments will be served. “

5:00PM-6:30PM | Booth #4578 | OnTheSnow.com

Happy Hour! OnTheSnow.com (OTS) would like to say thank you for the continued industry support and invites all the members and exhibitors at SIA over to the OnTheSnow booth for a beer. We will be giving away OTS pint glasses to the first 100 guests. 5:00PM-6:30PM | Booth #1028 | Bula BULAS LIVING THE GOOD LIFE PARTY Join BULA for cocktails and live music from Colorado’s Eminence Ensemble. Get your night started right by swinging by the BULA booth jamming out to the Ensemble and enjoying a few cocktails.

5:00PM-6:30PM | Backcountry Experience | H2o Outdoor Gear

Dean Cummings’ The Steep Life premier The Steep Life is a chronicle of how one man’s lifelong passion and commitment to skiing leads to epic solo first descents of two of the most challenging lines ever skied in Alaska’s daunting Chugach Range. Matt Reardon

5:00PM-7:00PM | Booth #919 | The Program

Daily Instaprint Grinding & Ski Boot Evaluation Masterfit is passionate about making outdoor footwear fit better. Don’t miss this opportunity to fit your AT, Telemark, and Snowboard boots with Masterfit. Note: not available on Sunday

10:00AM-5:00PM | Booth #216 | Nargear

FREE RAFFLE! NARGEAR is hosting a FREE Raffle for a NARGEAR Backpack at Booth 216! Make sure to stop by Booth 216 and drop off a business card or fill out a form to be eligible to win! Drawings held DAILY!

Foursquare Wet Plate Art Show Foursquare’s “THE WET PLATE PROJECT” is a first ever, unique approach to snowboard and action photography shot by experimental lifestyle and accomplished snowboard photographer Ian Ruhter. The Foursquare Team along with Ian set out to shoot snowboarding in an entirely new way, through one of the oldest photo processes ever developed, Wet Plate Photography.

10:00AM-4:00PM | Booth #4506 | Backcountry Experience

12:00PM-1:00PM | Room 301

5:00PM-8:00PM | Booth #4229 | Armada

10:00AM-5:00PM | Booth #3742 | Masterfit

Daily beacon searches with Tailgate Alaska and Tailgate BC crew Winner awarded at 6pm each day at BCE booth Note: not available on Sunday

1:30PM-2:30PM | Room 302 | Waste Not Recycling

Armada’s 10 Year Anniversary In recognition of our 10 year anniversary, GORE-TEX® presents the Armada “Mustache Bash.” Outlandish manscaping will be heavily appreciated and rewarded. All stashes welcome, come one come all. A flashback to our early years, presented by our newest partner. 5:00PM-8:00PM | Booth #3155 HEAD HOMECOMING PARTY Join HEAD Wintersports in SIA Booth 3155 for our official homecoming party. Our Winter Sports Division is relocating to Boulder, CO.

DAILY PRODUCT GIVEAWAY Register to win a free Spyderco! We will draw a winner each day at 12 pm - does not need to be present to win. Complete registration card at booth 3860.

2:00PM-3:00PM | Booth #3665 | Rossignol

Goldwin Japanese Night 60th Anniversary Join us for sushi and Japanese beer to celebrate Goldwin’s 60th.

4:00PM-4:30PM | Booth #2451 | Helmet Band-Its

3:00PM-3:30PM | Booth #3765 | Rossi

10:00AM-5:00PM | Booth #2528 | Rocky Mountain Sunscreen

Free Skin Cancer Screening from the Colorado Skin Cancer Task Force Stop by Rocky Mountain Sunscreen Booth #2528 to sign up for this service as space is limited. Note: 9:00AM-3:00PM, Saturday. Not available on Sunday

10:00AM-5:00PM | Room 204 | SIA

Supporting Member Lounge Note: 10:00AM-1:00PM, Sunday

12:00PM-12:30PM | Booth #4162 | Spyder Co

Daily Helmet Band-Its Giveaway “Play Safe! Look Great! For your chance to win Helmet Band-Its, the new fashion accessory for helmets, answer our daily safety trivia throughout the day @helmetbandits and Facebook. The first to answer correctly, wins! Stop by booth #2451 for official demos.

5:00PM-6:00PM | #Booth 2132 | SIA

SIA Daily Happy Hour Stop by grab a beer, catch up with old and new friends and enjoy the X Games. Sponsored by SIA, Aspen and Bud Light. Note: not available on Sunday

F/W 13 Color and Megatrends Stylesight focuses on the trends driving the Snowsports sector, through the use of comprehensive color combinations as well as inspirational mood images and themes. Key silhouettes and design details, prints & graphics, and innovative materials will be explored, focusing on performance, surface textures and directional developments in technology. Jeanine Pesce

12:30PM-1:30PM | Booth #4506 | Backcountry Experience Be Snow Smart with Dean Cummings (lunch provided)

Snow Sports Recycling Program 101 Gear belongs on the mountain not in the landfill. Greg Schneider Outside Magazine Gear of the Year 2012 Presentation Outside Magazine will present Rossignol Snowboards with the Gear of the Year Award for the 2012 Krypto MagTek.

Outside Magazine Gear of the Year 2012 Presentation Outside Magazine will present Rossignol with the coveted Gear of the Year Award for the 2012 Super 7 freeride ski. 3:00PM-4:00PM | Booth #755 | Screamer Glen Plake Signing Autographs for Shops! Glen Plake will be in the Screamer booth #755 for company photos and signing autographs

4:00PM-4:30PM | Booth #2490 | Vintage Winter

5:00PM-6:00PM | Booth #4506 | Backcountry Experience

Extreme Ski Lodge Decor Giveaway Some of the coolest, most innovative, cutting edge home decor and vintage/antique wood skis will be given away each day. Drop your card in to enter, must be present to win. 4pm each day

6:00PM-7:00PM | Booth #4506 | Backcountry Experience

4:00PM-8:00PM | Room 102 | Sports Industry Credit Association

Happy Hour kegs arrive!! Note: not available on Sunday

Daily beacon search winner awarded Note: not available on Sunday

All day | Winter X-Games

The Aspen/Snowmass Winter X Games viewing lounge will feature live action from Winter X Games in Aspen, CO throughout the week. The action will be featured live from the ESPN family of networks on large screen TVs in the center of the show floor. When there are no live events taking place replays from the previous action will be shown. Note: not available on Sunday

Thursday, January 26, 2012 8:30AM-9:00AM | Colorado Convention Center Lobby, 14th and California Street entrance | SIA 2012 SIA Snow Show Opening Morning Ceremony Al White

9:00AM-11:00AM | Booth #1175 | Spyder Active Sports

Audi Unveiling “Color impact, asymmetry, bold strokes, and discovery elements often collide in modern design. Spyder, along with Audi of

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NSCA Group US Snowsports Credit Meeting Exclusive to NSCA members 4:15PM-5:00PM | Booth #312 | Shred Ready Hucka Buckle Can you Hucka Buckle? Come see Shred Ready in booth 312 to find out. The fastest person to buckle a Shred Ready hemet without using their hands walks away with a free helmet, swag and $50 cash. Daily contests start at 4.

5:00PM-6:00PM | Room 301

F/W 13 Color and Megatrends Stylesight focuses on the trends driving the Snowsports sector, through the use of comprehensive color combinations as well as inspirational mood images and themes. Key silhouettes and design details, prints & graphics, and innovative materials will be explored, focusing on performance, surface textures and directional developments in technology. Jeanine Pesce

5:00PM-6:00PM | Booth #4506 | Backcountry Experience Be Snow Smart with Dean Cummings

5:00PM-6:15PM | Room 103 | Donut Dunking Fellowship

Donut Dunking Christian Fellowship Reception “Come meet Fellowship members and listen to nationally known Christian contemporary

5:30PM-8:00PM | Booth 1733 | VR2 Distribution - Goldwin

6:00PM-7:00PM | Booth #4506 | Backcountry Experience

Steep Life Film screening http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=kMzCl0A52mQ

6:00PM-8:00PM | Mile High Ballroom, CCC | SIA

2012 Snow Fashion & Trends Show Plans for the 2012 Snow Fashion & Trends Show feature a live DJ and eye catching multi-media video projections as a back drop for the beautifully styled models. Everything is presented in an exciting format of old school photography shown in a dynamic way on the big screen.

6:00PM-12:00AM | Cervantes Masterpice Ballroom, 2635 Welton Street Denver, Colorado 80205 | TREW

Cold Smoke Awards Peoples Choice Tour The kickoff event for The Cold Smoke Awards, a celebration of winter culture, with films, lift ticket giveaways, and Big Sky Brew. Show starts at 7 p.m., $3 Big Sky Brews, tons of prizes, and after party.

7:30PM-8:30PM | Mile High Ballroom | Outdoor Industy Women’s Coaltion

Ramp it Up RAMP IT UP is the grand finale to SIA’s fashion show when the ‘real’ work of the fashion show ends, the fun begins. Notable industry veterans (all men) will look hot in feminine, yet technical, women’s outdoor clothing. RAMP IT UP provides a unique way to call attention to SIA brands that are putting energy behind making high-quality women’s-specific products. This is your opportunity to showcase your women’s products and your brand in a FUN, ENERGETIC, and ATTENTION-GETTING way. And most importantly, RAMP IT UP is a fundraiser for OIWC, providing funds for advocacy, education and resources for women at all stages of her career.

Friday, January 27, 2012 7:30AM-9:00AM | Mile High Ballroom | SIA

Growing Snow Sports Participation from a Woman’s Perspective What does the industry need to do to tap into the women’s powerful influence to get more people on snow. A panel discussion moderated by Kelly Davis, SIA. Breakfast served. 9:00AM-10:00AM | Room 302 Keys to Successful Fundraising If your company is seeking capital,


whether private equity, bank financing, or an acquisition partner, the key to success is having a plan to attract the right kind of capital and structure. This commercial banker and transactional lawyer, who focus on outdoor industry companies will talk about funding options, structuring a deal, and mistakes to avoid. Chris Hazlitt, Gary Gomulinski

9:00AM-11:00AM | Booth #755 | Screamer Coffee and Pastries for Retailers Screamer will be offering retailers complimentary coffee and pastries on Friday January 27th 10:00AM-11:00AM | Booth #755 | Screamer

GLEN PLAKE SIGNING AUTOGRAPHS Glen Plake will be in the Screamer booth #755 for company photos and signing autographs for retailers!

10:00AM-6:00PM | Booth #3739 | Launch Pad

Picabo Street Endorses Launch Pad Products Picabo Street will visiting the SIA show on Friday, January 27th to promote Launch Pad products, Hookease and Wedgease. She will be available throughout the day to speak with buyers and media about her endorsement of Launch Pad products.

10:00AM-4:00PM | “Grand Concourse, CCC” | Malakye.com

Snow Sports Industry Job Fair & Networking Event

10:30AM-11:30AM | Room 302 Get Paid Faster! All companies would like to know the secrets of how to get paid. We will review the easiest ways for you to better leverage your receivables and get paid faster! Debbie Golbach Samanta Allma 11:00AM-12:00PM | Room 301

Is your Retail Business Social? More than 63% of all US consumers spend time every day using social media, yet nearly 1 in 5 retailers surveyed said they do not see the value in social media. The gap comes from the lack of performance results that retailers are seeing with their social media efforts. Lynn Switanowski 12:00PM-1:00PM | Room 302 I’ve got a Facebook (Twitter/YouTube/Google+) Audience...Now What? You’ve invested in social media. You’ve laid a foundation, set up pages and accounts on all the key platforms where your potential customers Jessica Hamel 12:30PM-1:30PM | Booth #4506 | Backcountry Experience From Sidecountry to Backcountry with Mike Hattrup (lunch provided)

5:00PM-6:00PM | Booth #3434 | Optic Nerve

Beer/Goggle Fundraiser for SOS Outreach Buy a pair of fresh out of the oven 2012 goggles from Optic Nerve for $20, stick around for a beer, feel good knowing all proceeds will benefit SOS Outreach. (While they last).

5:00PM-6:00PM | Booth #1046 | Mountain Hardwear and MSP Films

Mountain Hardwear/MSP Films Partnership Launch Join the Mountain Hardwear and MSP Films crews to celebrate the latest and greatest partnership in the world of snow sports. Come raise a glass to incredible athletes and awe-inspiring skiing!

5:00PM-6:30PM | Booth #565 | Diamond Head Sports Inc. - HALTI

Arctic Journey with Halti Make a stop at booth 565 to take a deep breath, a sip of drink and reminisce the journey of Halti Ski Wear from Finland.

5:00PM-7:00PM | Booth #2921 | Flow Sports

Flow Fusion Join Flow Sports Friday January 27th, 5pm at booth 2921 as we introduce the world to the Future of Snowboarding Technology. Flow Fusion will include; Free Beer, Live Music by “The Misfritz” (a Misfits cover band) and free goodies for everyone. Snowboarding will change forever at SIA 2012 once the Flow Fusion is introduced to the masses. Flow has been “Sick Since ‘96” and will continue giving back to snowboarding into the future. Mike Basich

5:00PM-7:00PM | Room #401 | Christy Sports Rental Network

Grow Your Rental Business through Worldwide Exposure! Retailers and rental shops face ever growing financial challenges with competition, being heard in the market, and increasing rental revenues by acquiring new customers. The Christy Sports Rental Network (CSRN) provides a solution for all these obstacles. Helping qualified shops, wholesalers, agents and groups generate new rental business at no additional cost, while gaining exposure through established worldwide marketing initiatives. Come by and meet with the CSRN team, current affiliates and other prospective affiliates to get a better understanding of this program and the many benefits it has for you and your customers. Free form open house with complimentary beer, cocktails and appetizers

5:30PM-6:30PM | Booth #4506 | Backcountry Experience

Q&A with Jeremy Jones on backcountry travel and splitboarding

6:00PM | Central Food Court and Lounge on the Show Floor (booth number 2132) | SIA

Managing your business in the Google Cloud Tools to help your retail business flourish. Lynn Switanowski

SIA Awards Ceremony SnowSports Industries America will be presenting the Industry Achievement Award, the 2011 SIA SnowSports US Retailer and Rep of the Year Awards, and the Canadian SnowSports Rep of the Year Awards. We will also have a few kegs on hand to help celebrate!

1:00PM-2:00PM | Booth #4677 | BACKSHOP + RENTAL + UNIFORM

6:00PM-7:00PM | Room 102 | Sports Industry Credit Association

1:30PM-2:30PM | Room 302

6:30PM-11:00PM | Red Rocks Amphitheatre, $39.50 | Icelantic and AEG

1:00PM-2:00PM | Room 301

How Rocker Technology is Rocking the Rental World. The past, present, and future of rocker technology in rental business, and how it is transforming the experience for beginners and enthusiasts alike.

Business to Business eCommerce for Suppliers, Reps And Retailers. New tools for quick and easy work flow. Using an iPad or PC? Want to place or track an order at 10:00 PM from a shop or mountain hideaway? Maybe you’d like auto-replenishment without doing a thing. The newest Web tools for B2B work flow connect reps, retailers and suppliers 24/7/365. Learn what’s available now and what is just on the horizon. Whit Johnson

3:00PM-4:00PM | Room 302 How Technology Can Enable Success in the SnowSports Marketplace NetSuite focuses on helping businesses like yours run better in the cloud integrating suppliers, customers and inventory without headaches and inefficiencies of disconnected and costly – in-house IT systems for finance, order and inventory management, ecommerce and more. Join us for an interactive discussion about how cloud technology from NetSuite can further enable your entire SnowSports business enabling you to run more profitably, faster, efficiently and manage everchanging seasonal demand. Ranga Bodla, Scott Winborne 4:00PM-6:00PM | Booth #2464

FITS Socks Sells Socks to Benefit the Outdoor Industries Women’s Coalition Join FITS all day for this special sale! FITS Socks Co. is proud to announce their sponsorship of the Outdoor Industries Women¹s Coalition (OIWC) in conjunction with the launch of their new women¹s ski sock line. To celebrate both, FITS, the maker of the best fitting socks available, will sell discount premier ski socks, with Full Contact Fit TM. Justin Lichter

NSCA Website Demo/Presentation Website launch event featuring a live demonstration and presentation

Icelantic’s Winter on the Rocks Icelantic and AEG Live Rocky Mountains are teaming up to produce the first winter concert at Red Rocks, including bands such as Atmosphere, Common, Grieves, Budo and Get Critchy.

7:00PM-10:00PM | Pepsi Center, $18 - $70

Denver Nuggets Discounted Tickets Come out with your co-workers, friends and clients to watch the Denver Nuggets take on the Toronto Raptors on a Friday night at Pepsi Center. Tickets available for anyone associated with the SIA Snow Show.

9:00PM-1:00AM | Suite 200 on Larimer Street in LODO | Fischer Skis US

Fischer Hybrid Launch Event Launch event for new, innovative ski line. VIP attendees by invite only. All attendees at SIA Snow Show are welcome. Venue is Suite 200 on Larimer Street in LODO. Venue will be open to the public during event.

9:00PM-2:00AM | THE HALL: 3545 Larimer st. | Ink Monstr and Smith Optics

FREE 4 ALL Vol. 2 - REDMAN Come enjoy a visual light experience like you have never seen before. Headlining performance by Redman plus BrikAbrak, Whygee, Gydahip. Free entry, free drinks. Located in Exdo’s new space, across the alley.

Saturday, January 28, 2012

5:00PM-6:00PM | Room 301 Multi Generational Marketing- Getting Boomers to Bust out their wallets and Generating Moohla from the Millennials This seminar provides an in depth look at the consumers of today. Dealing with critically important factors on why and how consumers spend money is the key for your business as it seeks generate revenue from the shopping public. Lynn Switanowski

OIWC Awards and Keynote presentation To help launch the OIWC Professional Development theme, sporting goods veteran Gwen Manto will speak on “Leading and Navigating Change.” OIWC Leadership Awards will be presented to two women. Registration not required, but arrive early to get a seat and have breakfast.

5:00PM-6:00PM | Booth #4506 | Backcountry Experience

7:30AM-9:00AM | Room 210

Further teaser screening http://www.tetongravity.com/further/

7:00AM-9:00AM | Mile High Ballroom 4 | Outdoor Industry Women’s Coaltion

Ski NH Association Breakfast

7:30AM-9:30AM | Room 105 Growing the Sport in Utah

8:30AM-9:00AM | Main Lobby, Colorado Convention Center

Active Youth Alliance Youth Summit Representatives from the nation’s largest youth outdoor charities will be joining forces to raise awareness for getting youth outdoors. Youth ambassadors who have benefitted from outdoor programs will be on hand to thank the industry and talk about their experiences. Industry and outdoor representatives will speak to support the effort. The event will be a celebration of the difference that the snowsports industry is making.

9:00AM-10:00AM | Room 301

On-line - All the Time Choosing the right tools for building your brand reputation with social media Lynn Switanowski

9:00AM-10:00AM | Room 302 QR and Beyond: The Future of Mobile in the SnowSports Industry A recent survey of 553 of the top brands in outdoor found that 72% are using QR codes. Learn where mobile marketing is headed for the snowsports industry for the next 12, 18, 24, and 36 months. Findings will be released from conversations with analysts from SBI, comScore, Forrester, and the CTIA. Yoon Kim 10:00AM-11:00AM | Booth #755 | Screamer

Dave Watson talking about skiing down K2 Dave Watson will be in the Screamer booth talking about his experiences skiing down K2. Stop by and get some photos for your shop! Dave Watson

10:30AM-11:30AM | Room 302 | Logic Solutions Revolutionize Sales with Mobile Technology Capitalizing on the mobile boom to increase profits and distinguish yourself in the marketplace Mike Huegli 11:00AM-12:00PM | Room 301 | Investing in Merchandising

The retail landscape is evolving faster than ever, with more players vying for consumer dollars. You view your business as an investment. You invest in fixtures, employees and advertising, not to mention new stock each season. Yet often times merchandising takes a back seat to day to day obligations that it takes to run a successful business. Ali Levy

12:00PM-1:00PM | Room 302

The high-loyalty fan: how to take your social media portfolio to the next level Snowsports is a high-loyalty industry, yet most brand Facebook pages have lower engagement and less than 200,000 fans. How can outdoor manufacturers better harness the power of brand and sport loyalty online? Crystalyn Stuart

12:30PM-1:30PM | Booth #4506 | Backcountry Experience From Sidecountry to Backcountry with Mike Hattrup (lunch provided) 1:00PM-2:00PM | Room 301 Easy ways to Improve your Marketing in 30 Minutes or Less. With all of the options we have as marketers today, it’s easy to forget the fundamentals of marketing and how they can help you drive business. Whether you are tweeting, sending a direct mail postcard, running a print ad or creating an in-store banner, there are some basic tips that can make your advertising efforts even more effective. David Melnick 3:00PM-4:00PM | Room 302 | Map Your Show

Using Online and Mobile Marketing to Maximize your ROI at Snow Show This presentation will cover the different opportunities available to exhibitors that allow them to connect with attendees before, during, and after Snow Show through the website and mobile application. Learn how you can leverage these resources to develop a list of sales leads before the show and drive traffic to your booth at the show. Brett Glatfelter

3:00PM-4:00PM | Booth #755 | Screamer

Dave Watson Talking about K2 Skiing Experiences Dave Watson will be in the Screamer booth talking about his experiences skiing down K2. Stop by and get some photos for your shop! Dave Watson

5:00PM-5:30PM | Booth #4506 | Backcountry Experience

Come support the team, the United States Ski Mountaineering team with the Uphill/Downhill kick-off party and donation drive” “Come support the team, the United States Ski Mountaineering team with the Uphill/Downhill kick-off party and donation drive” 5:30PM-6:30PM | Booth #4506 | Backcountry Experience Who says the East Coast has no Backcountry? Who says the East Coast has no Backcountry, Meathead films will prove us all wrong with their film Prime Cut http://www.meatheadfilms.com/

Sunday, January 29, 2012 9:00AM-5:00PM | Booth #4506 | Backcountry Experience Uphill/Downhill donation drive Uphill/Downhill donation drive, come support the team, the United States Ski Mountaineering team. Drop off your product for the raffle at the awards ceremony for the Uphill/Downhill event which takes place day one of the demo 4pm at Winter Park

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At the show

/ Top news

Backcountry boom opens up opportunities for sales, education. Whether touring just outside ski area boundaries or traveling deep in the wilderness, it’s all backcountry. And with four avalanche fatalities in Colorado between Jan. 18-22, the need to educate the public and retailers on the latest in backcountry-specific products and safety practices has never been higher. In response to the growth of backcountry snow sports, SIA unveils the new Backcountry Experience exhibit (Booth #4506) to focus on the latest in hardgoods and accessories while bringing in some of the sharpest minds on snow to share their knowledge. Experts Dean Cummings, Mike Hattrup and Jeremy Jones are on hand to share their insights on proper route finding, gear trends, beacon basics, avalanche warning signs and more. “Participation in backcountry snow sports is growing—it’s probably seeing the most growth in the industry—and it’s great to see SIA doing their part to educate our peers and retailers,” says Dean Cummings. “I’m pleased to be joining Mike Hattrup and Jeremy Jones in sharing this knowledge, and help to strengthen that sector for the entire industry.” Product Categories: ›› Splitboards—boards, boots, bindings ›› Freeride/Backcountry—skis, boots, bindings ›› Backcountry Touring & Mountaineering—skis, boards, boots, bindings ›› Accessories—beacons, skins, probes, shovels, avalanche bags, etc. Daily Events (Detailed schedule at: siasnowshow.com/backcountry): ›› 10A-4P, Beacon Searches with Tailgate Alaska & Tailgate BC Crew ›› 12:30P, Lunchtime Expert Clinics ›› 5P, Happy Hour - live music, films, refreshments Safety gear at ›› 6P, Beacon Search Winners Announced the Backcountry ›› 9A-6P, Register for Uphill/Downhill Challenge at On-Snow Demo Experience exhibit. —Mike Horn

The Snow Show began with a somber moment of silence for Sarah Burke this morning. And throughout the show there is an outpouring of emotion for the 29-year-old fallen superstar, who died on January 19, succumbing to injuries sustained in an accident in the Park City Mountain Resort Eagle superpipe on January 10th. Her ski sponsor, Roxy, will have a tribute in front of its booth for fans and friends. At Smith Optics her image looks out from everywhere across the booth. “Sarah was more than an athlete for Smith. She was a close friend and a part of our family for more than a decade. Comprehending this loss has been next to impossible, but we know Sarah’s spirit will live on through the legacy she left behind. Not just the mark she left on skiing and women’s sports but also her genuine soul and thirst for life. I’ll think about her every day,” says Tag Kliener, Smith’s marketing director. At sponsor Swix, her photo is the first thing that greets booth visitors and the brand is beginning to work on a pole to raise money in her honor. “Her name was bigger than skiing. Her popularity goes beyond the industry. Regardless of what brand she was associated with, her name was a brand,” says Swix marketing manager Andy Canniff. —Doug Schnitzspahn

Photo by ben fullerton

Backcountry Experience focuses on fresh Sarah Burke’s sales in off-piste category freeskiing legacy


Question of the Day

/ At the show

When did you first ski or ride and under what circumstances? “I was probably on skis before I could walk.” —Greg Packer, Interactive marketing coordinator with Colorado Ski Country Started skiing age 2

“I was in Banff, and it was -10 degrees. I had my mother’s 1940s snowsuit on, and no long underwear. But I learned to fall in love with (skiing).” —Jackie Owen, Professional photographer Started skiing age 22

“My dad used to put me between his legs, and he’d hold out his pole so that I could hang onto it. I’d ski between his legs.” —Emma Whitney, Rep assistant with Helly Hansen Started skiing age 4

“My birthday is on Christmas. I took my first board out of the box, mounted it, and rode it at midnight … on my birthday.”

Photos by Morgan Varon

—Chris Thomas, Rep for Rossignol and Giro Started boarding age 15

“I just felt connected. I loved the sport instantly.” —Christian Connolly, Sales manager for Anon Started boarding age 8

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/ Heard in the aisles

Cover shoot, Take 1: Tim Petrick clinches “most valuable model” honors for donning a circa-1986 Rossignol one-piece suit for our cover shoot. Runnerup award goes to Yeti.

Other than that, Mrs. Lincoln… Coming off a record 2010-11, Billy Langlands, owner of Killington-based Darkside Snowboards, was prepared to blow it up this winter. Then Irene intervened in the fall. “People couldn’t get to many of our shops. We couldn’t get to our (internet) shipping,” he recalls. Then it didn’t snow till late December. “Despite all that, business has been good. We’re not ready to jump off the Quechee Gorge Bridge. This is the life we chose.”

Gimme Shelter The SIA Snow Show transition from Vegas to Denver has gone smoother than anyone could have expected. The loudest complaint? Not the lack of strip clubs, gambling, cheap hotel rooms, or the potential for dicey weather. Instead, it’s the presence of homeless on the 16th Street Mall and elsewhere. It’s not that the panhandlers are threatening or dangerous, but the growing numbers just make some attendees... extremely uncomfortable. One concerned party even offered to pack up and ship all the homeless to a “tent city” at an undisclosed location, where they would be fed and housed through the duration of the Show. The proposal died.

Rep Rule of the Road No. 1

“Never ever take a poop in a retailer’s bathroom.” —Andrew Shaw, SIA Rep of the Year over the past week; Winter Park’s base was at 49 inches. Colorado Ski Country USA trumpeted the arrival of winter with a $50,000 full-page ad in the Sunday New York Times. Meanwhile, temps hit the mid-60s in Denver on Wednesday and, other than possible snow and showers on Friday, will stay in the 40s and 50s with plenty of blue sky.

President’s Stimulus Package Snow sports needs more consumers like SIA President David Ingemie. Bucking the industry mantra of freebies or at least pro form pricing, Ingemie decided long ago that he should support his own cause at full retail. Including gifts for his wife, two kids and three grandchildren (and a parka for himself), Ingemie figures he spent about $4,000 over the holidays at six snow sports shops in the Washington, D.C. area. “I make my living at it. I think it’s worthwhile.”

White Equals Green

Awesome, Dude

New snow totals reported on Jan. 23: Squaw Valley USA, 56 inches; Northstar, 29 inches; Silverton Mountain, 29 inches; Mammoth, 18 inches; Whistler Blackcomb, 11 inches, Big Sky, 7 inches, Mt. Bachelor, 6 inches. Several Colorado resorts received one to three feet of snow

“I don’t have any photos, but if I did they would be awesome.” —An unidentified and unprepared marketing coordinator talking up the 2012-13 product images that he doesn’t have for Snow Show Daily.

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At the show


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2012 SIA Snow Show Daily Day 1  

Day 1 of the 2012 SIA Snow Show kicks off!

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