Page 1

SIAN ELLIS WRIGHT BA(Hons)

ARCHITECTURE UNDERGRADUATE WORKS

PORTFOLIO


CONTENTS ABOUT CURRICULUM VITAE

INTRODUCTION YEAR TWO AN INTRODUCTION TO MY PORTFOLIO

WORK PLACEMENT ISLAMABAD MOSQUE THORNBOROUGH GROUNDS FEASIBILITY STUDIES DIAGRAMMATIC ANALYSIS VISUALISATIONS

SKELETON LOGIC LEVENSHULME LIFE: URBAN SYNTHESIS PHOTOGRAPHY ELECTIVE MUSHFARM

YEAR ONE BODYSPACE ENTRANCE EXPERIENCE PARADIGMS: THE SNOWDON AVIARY

YEAR THREE CO-EXISTANCE IN THEORY - AN INTRODUCTION AGENDA: JOURNEY PLACE, NON-PLACE,HETEROTOPIA PROGRAMME POP

PLAYDOHM BEYOND EXPECTATIONS THE MANIFESTATION OF MEMORY


ABOUT SIAN ELLIS WRIGHT

ENGLISH

FLUENT

2 HUGHES CLOSE, MARLBOROUGH, WILTSHIRE, SN8 1TN 01672 516709 07870 357851

SPANISH

INTERMEDIATE

GERMAN

INTERMEDIATE

EXTRA CURRICULAR

SIANELLISWRIGHT@GMAIL.COM

EDUCATION 2012-2015

MANCHESTER SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

2008 - 2012

ST MARY’S SCHOOL, CALNE

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE BA(Hons) - 2:1 ADVANCED GCE - A* A B, ADVANCED SUBSIDIARY GCE - A, A, B, D, GCSE - 11 A* - B 2004 - 2008

FRANKFURT INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL STUDIED THE INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE

JOB HISTORY 2015 - PRESENT

MAINLINE CONTRACT SERVICES, SWINDON CREATIVE CONSULTANT AND MARKETING

2011

CAPITA SYMONDS, CARDIFF WORK EXPERIENCE

2014

2016 - PRESENT

INTERIOR DESIGN PROJECT

2015 - 2016

INTERIOR DESIGN PROJECT

2014

WEB DESIGN PROJECT

2013

EXHIBITION . GALLERY 27,CORK STREET,LONDON

2011

SIXTH FORM LECTURE PROGRAMME

2010 - 2012

LIFE DRAWING LESSONS

2007 - 2008

MAINZ ORCHESTRA

PRIVATE HOUSE . MALLORCA, SPAIN . DESIGNER MEDICAL CENTRE . NEWBURY, ENGLAND . DESIGNER DESIGNER OF MAINLINECONTRACTSERVICES.COM ARTIST PARTICIPANT & PRESENTER ARTIST SECOND CLARINET PLAYER

SKILLS

SUTTON GRIFFIN ARCHITECTS, NEWBURY ARCHITECTURAL ASSISTANT

2014

LANGUAGES

8TH MAY 1994

HELM ARCHITECTURE, LONDON WORK EXPERIENCE

InDesign ADVANCED Photography GOOD Photoshop ADVANCED Revit GOOD iMovie Microsoft Office

ADVANCED 3D Printing GOOD ADVANCED Hand Drawing

AutoCad

ADVANCED Laser Cutting

SketchUp

ADVANCED Painting (Oil/Acrylic/Watercolour)

ProMap & DigiMap Model Making

ADVANCED

ADVANCED Fabric Work (Sewing/Knitting) Ceramics


AN INTRODUCTION TO MY PORTFOLIO This is a journey through my last four years of studying Architecture. I begin with the most recent work carried out during my current twelve month work placement at Sutton Griffin Architects (part of the Carter Jonas network) in Newbury, UK. I have chosen a condensed selection of work from various projects that I have been involved with. These tasks have challenged me and I have learned new skills when working on them. I have also realised the value of my undergraduate studies during this time. I have referred back to skills in model making, photography, sketching and used presentation techniques, all of which have been very useful during my time in practice. I feel that I am gradually learning about how a practice is run and the standards and regulations Architect’s must comply with. There is so much more to learn but the prospect of developing myself into an accomplished Architect is exciting and I am eager to continue the process.

You will then see select images taken from my third, second, and first year syllabuses. On each page I give a brief description of the project and how I came to produce the outputs. I feel that by reading my portfolio one can see how I have developed over 4 years. I am a keen learner who completes any task with the utmost level of effort. I have faced a number of challenging unfamiliar aspects of Architectural study but feel that I have overcome these and continued to strengthen my skills. I feel that my hobbies such as sketching, photography and graphic design have all influenced my style as an Architecture student. I like to explore briefs with an open mind and push myself to create aesthetically pleasing drawings. I am keen to refine myself and decide my architectural position, as I feel that this is something I need to do in order to become a versatile Architect.


WORK

PLACEMENT


ISLAMABAD MOSQUE

This was one of the very first tasks I was set upon starting my placement at Sutton Griffin Architects. Physical model making was advocated during my undergraduate studies and I was pleased that this skill could be utilised whilst in practice. I was asked to create initial scale maquettes of a mosque which is part of a larger project my Practice is involved with. The building is striking and will be a flagship structure for both Sutton Griffin and also for Islamic architecture within the United Kingdom. This project is located in Tilford, Surrey, however, the development will be called Islamabad as it is a Muslim complex which will consist of school buildings, residential accommodation, sports facilities and mosque.

Fig. 1.2

Fig. 1.1

The maquettes have been very important during the early stages of technical design and have been present during Design Team meetings. They have acted as beneficial visual aids and I am subsequently very proud of my work. Fig 1.3 shows the development of my model as I was progressing with this task. Fig 1.1 is the final 1:100 model which has now been sent over to the client. The shadows inside the model are what made this structure interesting for me and I am excited to see it be constructed. Fig 1.2 is a rendered image created by the practice. The transformation of this building has been informative and interesting to watch and I am very glad I could play a helpful part.


Fig. 1.3


200m

Scale 1:2500 (m)

0

60

20

80 100

40

60

Pond

80 100

Drain

200m

N Pond

Scale 1:2500 (m)

Silo

@ Carter Jonas. Quality Assured to BS EN ISO 9001 : 2008

Source: Ordnance Survey

Silo

Cattle Grid

Pond

Drain

Drain

FB

DRAWING TITLE

PROJECT TITLE

Thornborough Grounds Cottages

Lay-by 76.0m

Thornborough Bridge

75.1m

A 421

Cattle Grid Cattle Grid

Drain

FB

(um) Path

Thornborough Grounds

74.3m

Drain

Track

Bdy & Ward

Lay-by

Twins)

CS

(The

3920 PL01

Site Location Plan (A1)

Twins)

k

ED

DWG. NO.

DWG. NO.

THORNBOROUGH GROUNDS

(Th e Twins)

CS

Drain

Foot Bridge

DRAWN CHECKED APPROVED 11/02/15 1 : 2500@A1 Project Status

APP.

T:01635 230 220 Newbury

DESCRIPTION REV.

ISSUED BY DATE SCALE STATUS

Drai

n

Foot Bridge

Thornborough Grounds

Track

Drain

3920 PL02

SW IB

DATE

Path

(um)

Cattle Grid

Thornborough Mounds Tumuli

Pond

@ Carter Jonas. Quality Assured to BS EN ISO 9001 : 2008

Source: Ordnance Survey

No dimensions are to be scaled from this drawing. All dimensions are to be checked on site. Area measurements for indicative purposes only.

Drain

This drawing may contain: Ordnance Survey material by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of the Controller of Her Majesty's Stationery Office © Crown Copyright 2015. All rights reserved. Reference number 100018575

Thornborough

0

20

N

40

Drain

DATE

SW IB

DRAWN CHECKED APPROVED 11/02/15 1 : 2500@A3 Project Status

APP.

T:01635 230 220 Newbury

DESCRIPTION REV.

ISSUED BY DATE SCALE STATUS

Drain

PROJECT TITLE

Broo

Und

Drain

DRAWING TITLE

(The

ury Padb Und

Site Location Plan (A3)

CS

CS

CS

THORNBOROUGH GROUNDS

1

The Planning Application for this dwelling was successfully approved and the barn conversion will be constructed shortly (2016). Fig 2.1 shows the Planning Application in its' entirety. I had to draw the existing elevations and ground floor plan, and the proposed elevations, sections and ground floor plan. Due to the fact that I created these drawings with Revit I could take 3D views from it (shown in Fig. 2.2).

2

GROUNDS

Thornborough Grounds for was a very important project for me, as I was trusted to create all planning drawings for the final application. The project in simple terms is a barn conversion which looks at transforming three disused agricultural barns into a large private dwelling. I had never been involved with anything like this before and the process has provided me with a great deal of insight into how planning applications are made. I used Revit to create these drawings which was exciting as it meant I could start using a program that I had only been learning for a couple of weeks prior to this

No dimensions are to be scaled from this drawing. All dimensions are to be checked on site. Area measurements for indicative purposes only.

This drawing may contain: Ordnance Survey material by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of the Controller of Her Majesty's Stationery Office © Crown Copyright 2015. All rights reserved. Reference number 100018575

THORNBOROUGH

Barn 2 5 MATERIALS KEY: 7

Blockwork

8

Timber posts

9

Timber boarding

10

Corrugated metal roof sheeting

1

Red/orange plain roof tiles

2

Red brickwork

3

Natural sandstone

4

Concrete columns

5

Corrugated cement fibre roof sheeting

11

Corrugated metal wall cladding

6

Corrugated cement fibre wall sheeting

6

7

EXISTING EAST ELEVATION (A) 1 : 100

5

1 9

8

2

Barn 3

Barn 1

EXISTING EAST ELEVATION (B) 1 : 100

PROJECT TITLE

PROJECT TITLE

THORNBOROUGH GROUNDS

THORNBOROUGH GROUNDS REV.

DWG. NO.

DESCRIPTION

APP.

REV.

DATE DRAWING TITLE

DRAWING TITLE

Existing Ground Floor Plan 3920 PL03

ISSUED BY Newbury DATE 11/02/15 1 : 100@A3 SCALE STATUS Project Status

Existing Elevations

T:01635 230 220

DRAWN CHECKED APPROVED

SW IB

DWG. NO.

DESCRIPTION

ISSUED BY Newbury DATE 11/02/15 1 : 100@A3 SCALE STATUS Project Status

3920 PL05

APP.

DATE

T:01635 230 220

DRAWN CHECKED APPROVED

SW IB

MATERIALS KEY:

MATERIALS KEY:

10

11

1

Red/orange plain roof tiles

7

Blockwork

1

Red/orange plain roof tiles

7

Blockwork

2

Red brickwork

8

Timber posts

2

Red brickwork

8

Timber posts

3

Natural sandstone

9

Timber boarding

3

Natural sandstone

9

Timber boarding

4

Concrete columns

10

Corrugated metal roof sheeting

4

Concrete columns

10

Corrugated metal roof sheeting

5

Corrugated cement fibre roof sheeting

11

Corrugated metal wall cladding

5

Corrugated cement fibre roof sheeting

11

Corrugated metal wall cladding

6

Corrugated cement fibre wall sheeting

6

Corrugated cement fibre wall sheeting

EXISTING WEST ELEVATION (A) 1 : 100

10

10

5

9

1

11

4

7

3

EXISTING NORTH ELEVATION 1 : 100

EXISTING WEST ELEVATION (B) 1 : 100

PROJECT TITLE

PROJECT TITLE

THORNBOROUGH GROUNDS

THORNBOROUGH GROUNDS REV. DRAWING TITLE

Existing Elevations DWG. NO.

Fig. 2.1

3920 PL06

DESCRIPTION

APP.

REV.

DATE DRAWING TITLE

ISSUED BY Newbury DATE 11/04/15 1 : 100@A3 SCALE STATUS Project Status

Existing Elevations

T:01635 230 220

DRAWN CHECKED APPROVED

SW IB

DWG. NO.

3920 PL07

DESCRIPTION

ISSUED BY Newbury DATE 11/04/15 1 : 100@A3 SCALE STATUS Project Status

APP.

DATE

T:01635 230 220

DRAWN CHECKED APPROVED

SW IB


EN SUITE

EN SUITE CHILD ROOM 1

CHILD ROOM 2

MATERIALS KEY: Red/orange plain roof tiles

7

Blockwork

2

Red brickwork

8

Timber posts

3

Natural sandstone

9

Timber boarding

4

Concrete columns

10

Corrugated metal roof sheeting

5

Corrugated cement fibre roof sheeting

11

Corrugated metal wall cladding

6

Corrugated cement fibre wall sheeting

WARDROBE

1

2

3

CUPBOARDS

1

GUEST SUITE 1

MASTER SUITE EN SUITE

BATHROOM

EN SUITE

DRESSER GUEST SUITE 2

EXISTING SOUTH ELEVATION (A)

B

LIVING ROOM

PL11

1 : 100

RECEPTION / ENTRANCE

5

UP

BAR

4

SNUG WINE STORAGE

W.C.

STUDY 2

LARDER

7

KITCHEN

PLAY ROOM

EXISTING SOUTH ELEVATION (B)

DINING ROOM

UTILITY + PLANT ROOM

1 : 100

PROJECT TITLE

3920 PL04

DWG. NO.

DESCRIPTION

APP.

ISSUED BY Newbury DATE 11/02/15 1 : 100@A3 SCALE STATUS Project Status

B

THORNBOROUGH GROUNDS REV.

DRAWING TITLE

DATE

REV. DRAWING TITLE

Proposed Ground Floor Plan

T:01635 230 220

DRAWN CHECKED APPROVED

SW IB

DWG. NO.

DESCRIPTION

ISSUED BY Newbury DATE 10/30/15 1 : 100@A3 SCALE STATUS Project Status

3920 PL09

APP.

PL10

B PROJECT TITLE

THORNBOROUGH GROUNDS Existing Elevations

PL12

STUDY 1

DATE

T:01635 230 220

DRAWN CHECKED APPROVED

SW IB

3 3 MATERIALS KEY:

MATERIALS KEY: 4

1

Existing Masonry

1

Existing Masonry

2

Existing/reclaimed tiles

2

Existing/reclaimed tiles

3

Profiled metal roof

3

Profiled metal roof

4

Metal framed glazing

4

Metal framed glazing

5

Timber cladding

5

Timber cladding

6

Brick

6

Brick

5

5

6

WEST ELEVATION (A) 6

1 : 100

EAST ELEVATION (A) 1 : 100

3 3

2 5 2

6

4

1

1

EAST ELEVATION (B) 1 : 100

WEST ELEVATION (B) 1 : 100

PROJECT TITLE

PROJECT TITLE

THORNBOROUGH GROUNDS

THORNBOROUGH GROUNDS REV.

DRAWING TITLE

Proposed Elevations DWG. NO.

3920 PL11

DESCRIPTION

APP.

ISSUED BY Newbury DATE 10/30/15 1 : 100@A3 SCALE STATUS Project Status

DATE

REV. DRAWING TITLE

Proposed Elevations

T:01635 230 220

DRAWN CHECKED APPROVED

SW IB

DWG. NO.

DESCRIPTION

ISSUED BY Newbury DATE 10/30/15 1 : 100@A3 SCALE STATUS Project Status

3920 PL12

APP.

DATE

T:01635 230 220

DRAWN CHECKED APPROVED

SW IB

MATERIALS KEY:

MATERIALS KEY:

1

Existing Masonry

2

Existing/reclaimed tiles

2

3

Profiled metal roof

3

4

Metal framed glazing

5

Timber cladding

6

Brick

1

2

1

Existing Masonry Existing/reclaimed tiles Profiled metal roof

4

Metal framed glazing

5

Timber cladding

6

Brick

SOUTH ELEVATION (A) 1 : 100

3

3

3 5

5

5 4

6

4

6

NORTH ELEVATION

SOUTH ELEVATION (B)

1 : 100

1 : 100

PROJECT TITLE

PROJECT TITLE

THORNBOROUGH GROUNDS

THORNBOROUGH GROUNDS REV.

DRAWING TITLE

Proposed Elevations DWG. NO.

3920 PL13

DESCRIPTION

ISSUED BY Newbury DATE 11/02/15 1 : 100@A3 SCALE STATUS Project Status

APP.

DATE

REV. DRAWING TITLE

T:01635 230 220

DRAWN CHECKED APPROVED

SW IB

Proposed Elevations DWG. NO.

3920 PL10

DESCRIPTION

ISSUED BY Newbury DATE 10/30/15 1 : 100@A3 SCALE STATUS Project Status

APP.

DATE

T:01635 230 220

DRAWN CHECKED APPROVED

SW IB

Fig. 2.2


Guest Suite

Bedroom 1

FEASIBILITY

Snug

The brochure I created has been sent through to Planning and we are waiting for a response. Fig. 3.2 is another residential development which I developed the planning application for. This development allowed me to gain experience designing on a smaller scale as the site had very limited space on which we could build on. I thoroughly enjoyed the process of creating a usuable and well thought out design despite the constraints the site presented. Fig. 3.3 is a project which differs slightly from the other Feasibility Studies I have been involved with. This project's brief was to redesign Newbury Football Club's pitch site as it was at the time being looked at as potential land for housing. Our Practice has some personal relations with the Club and wanted it to remain and in order for this to happen the original full size grass pitch had to become more uses. I had to consult documents from Sport England and FIFA in order to design pitches which complied with the correct standards.

Dresser

E.S.

Boot Room Entrance

W.C. Master Suite

Void

Laundry + Utility Dining Room

Bedroom 3

Ground Floor Plan

Bedroom 2

First Floor Plan

PROJECT TITLE

TANNERS LANE, BURFORD RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT DRAWING TITLE

INDICATIVE FLOOR PLANS (UNITS 1-4) DWG. NO. 3943_SK11

STUDIES

During my time at Sutton Griffin Architects one of my main tasks has been completing Feasibility Studies for potential new projects. The process has become very familiar to me and I enjoy creating the brochures that are sent off to the client as they act as the starting point of the design process. Each project is different which has allowed me to gain an understanding of standards used in practice for a variety of buildings.The figures shown are all projects which I have designed personally. All these projects are examples of ones that I have been involved with from the very outset. I attended site visits in which I took photos and analysed the locations. Fig. 3.1 is a project in Oxfordshire which was appointed to our Practice through a connection of our Parent Company 'Carter Jonas'. The plot is a greenfield site located in a Cotswold town, which is, traditionally quaint and it was important to be in-keeping with this. The houses in this town where relatively large as well which dictated the size of the houses I put forward.

E.S.

Kitchen

Living Room

ISSUED BY Newbury Dec 2015 DATE SCALE@A3 1:100 Draft STATUS

T: 020 7016 0720

DRAWN CHECKED APPROVED

SW IB IB

Bedroom 3 Utility

Dining Room Bedroom 2

Kitchen

Master Suite

E.S.

W.C.

Garage

A/C

Boot Room Guest Suite

Dresser Bedroom 1

Living Room Entrance Bathroom

Ground Floor Plan

First Floor Plan

PROJECT TITLE

TANNERS LANE, BURFORD RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT DRAWING TITLE

INDICATIVE FLOOR PLANS (UNITS 5 & 6) ISSUED BY DWG. NO. 3943_SK12

Fig. 3.1

Fig. 3.2

Newbury

Nov 2015 DATE SCALE@A3 1:100 Draft STATUS

T: 020 7016 0720

DRAWN CHECKED APPROVED

SW IB IB

E.S.


OJECT TITLE

Fig. 3.3

ARADAY ROAD STADIUM, NEWBURY


KEY

M AIN RO U T ES J O URNE Y F RO M P I ER TO S IT E (2 0 M INS ) RAILWAY S IT E KE Y P L ACES

Te v i l l e G a t e , W o r t h i n g

Fig. 4.1

SITE

Fig. 4.2


S

RO

U

TE

UTE

U

MA

IN

IEW

TR

YV

AFF

KE

IC

RO

B

IN

G

W

IN

D

MED

KE

Y

VIE

W

FR

AM

ED

OPEN SPACE

K

N

EY

V

IE

W

N

SITE ANALYSIS

DESIGN STRATGEY

NEWBURY WHARF, BUS TERMINAL

NEWBURY WHARF, BUS TERMINAL

Fig. 4.3

ESS

*

*

BU

F

R FE

PEDESTRIAN ACCESS

KEY VIEW

OPEN SPACE

RIAN ACC

IL

W FRA

*

A EV

PEDEST

*

PR

KEY VIE

OPEN SPACE

P

ED

ES

TR

IA

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IN

FO

RC

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ST

RE

ET

FR

ON

TA GE

PR

A EV

IL

IN

G

W

IN

D

DIAGRAMMATIC

ANALYSIS

Another long standing job that I have been set in Practice is that of creating visually effective diagrams which show our site analysis, explain our design strategies and present our final solutions. This work is usually carried out on projects that are being presented in front of a group of people or projects that are being put forward into compeition against other Practices. My approach in creating these diagrams has changed over my time being here and I feel more confident in creating work that I feel looks effective and is done in my own style. Fig. 4.1 is an example of a competition project for a site in Worthing and was one of the very first tasks I was set during my placement.

Fig 4.2. is a very interesting project which challenged me. I was left to my own devices when creating this document. It was another example of a project in which I had attended the initial site visit and then had to create a presentation brochure. I met with the Senior Planners and liased with them throughout. I had to begin thinking as a Masterplanner and an Architect as the proposed development was to fit over 90 houses (2,3,4-bed) on a greenfield site alongside an extra care development and new medical facilities. Fig 4.3 are examples of site analysis and design strategy diagrams I did for a smaller project which was for a proposed bus shelter in Newbury.


VISUAL ISATIONS

Visualisations are very important for Architects. I learnt this at Architecture School and they have been even more relevant in Practice. Creating effective visulations for projects are vital as they are the one type of image that we as Architects can produce which are easily understood. A plan, section, elevation or strageic diagram can show a lot of information but the final outcome can be difficult for people to visualise. I was excited to be set the task of creating these images as I knew that they were going to be presented to not only the Client and Planning Commitee but also neighbouring residents. Figs. 5.1, 5.2 & 5.3 are all images of the same project from neighbouring gardens.

The poject is a Premier Inn Hotel which will be constructed in Newbury. This is a large building which will contain up to 100 bedrooms and for a small city like Newbury it will affect a number of residents. I wanted to create the most aesthetically pleasing images I could to make sure that everyone was happy with the decision to go ahead with the project (all these images were given to the neighbours). Fig. 5.4 is a project for a private client who wants to develop land on his property. Two 4-bed houses have been designed uniquely for this plot, however the Planning Commitee had major reservations about how a new driveway would affect the existing Street. It was my job to create these visualisations that were then put into the planning application.

Fig. 5.1

Fig. 5.2


Fig. 5.3

Fig. 5.4


YEAR 3


CO-EXISTANCE A N

IN THEORY-

I N T R O D U C T I O N

The concept of place, displacement and nonplace were completely new to me at the beginning of this year. Within my Atelier ‘Co-existence in Theory’, the theoretical concepts we learnt about grounded my understanding of the urban environment in a way that I was not familiar with. In hindsight the concepts we learnt of are relevant in everyday life. They allow you to distinguish between why you relate with a given space and why we choose to pass by others. What stood out for me was the concept of phenomenology, which by definition is the experience you personally receive from an object and how it affects your consciousness. This concept and the understanding behind it became crucial when analysing our territories as we would then choose our final site in these locations. We were asked to look in more detail at the infrastructure situated in these sites, and draw our own conclusions of whether spaces around these structures, and within these territories, could be categorised as ‘places’ or ‘non-places’. Using phenomenology as my primary concept I based my placement

decisions on memories and an amalgamation of my sensory feelings, which later informs my decisions for my program idea of ‘P O P’. Learning about these theories has broadened my understanding of architecture, and has allowed me to appreciate the importance of site analysis as an initial part of the design process. Throughout the deeper design process I aimed to keep this at the forefront of my mind. This idea has heavily influenced the decisions of my program and thus the overall aesthetics and form of my final building. The program of ‘P O P’ itself studies the ongoing conflict between transition zones and destinations, which I feel, as an Architecture student, should be addressed, as the land and architecture in the transition zones is often neglected and ignored by the vast majority of society. This conflict is one between efficiency and phenomenology. Society today strives for efficiency in every aspect of daily life and this often leaves one to ignore ones journey and focus solely on the destination they are travelling to. This is the problem which ‘P O P’ looks to solve.


WE BELIEVE THAT BY USING

PHENOME N O L O G Y

WE CAN

JOURNEY INTO A SERIES OF PLACES

TRANSFORM A

AGENDA: JOURNEY - Group Poster (spin the page all the way around)


AGENDA:

JOURNEY

At the beginning of this year we were given a number of readings to gain some initial background information and inspiration. Out of all the readings, I found the piece: ‘Non Places’ by Mark Auge came to be the most advantageous and directly influential. Auge’s extensive use of physical examples such as airport terminals and walled cities allowed me to further my understanding of the concept. I began to realise it was not the physical attributes of an area that determined its value in architecture and landscape, but the mental association and memories the area held and embedded in one’s individual mindset. For example, an underpass is something that the majority of society would steer away from. The seemingly unattractive, dimly lit and daunting setting of this area naturally instils fear and anxiety; feelings we have been programmed to avoid if possible. However, for a homeless person an area such as this would provide much needed shelter and protection. The duality of experiences that can be had in one location became a very interesting concept for me and for others in my year.

We were put into smaller groups based on the similarities in our work and after more research we realised that theory of phenomenology was what we would base our agenda on. Our agenda group asked the question whether it was possible change people’s perceptions of certain spaces by using phenomenology - ‘We believe that by using phenomenology we can tranform a journey into a series of places’

We mapped out a timeline, which showed the development of transport links in Manchester, as we believed that as more routes were defined the contrast between ‘places’ and ‘non-places’ became more apparent. Our brains have subconsciously decided that exploration is now seen as dangerous or unwanted and that sticking to the more travelled route is the better option. This has meant that we automatically see a space that we feel we aren’t meant to be in as a ‘nonplace’. I created a short film for our group which depicted our agenda. I shared the short film online and created the hashtag “stopandlook” to spread our message to other people.


If being viewed virtually simply hover over this page with your cursor and click play


‘Place’ Photomontage - Naples, Italy


‘Non-place’ Photomontage - Naples, Italy

PLACE, NO N- P L A C E ,

HETEREOTOPIA

The next few images show photomontages that I created in Manchester and in Naples during our study trip to the Almafi Coast. I started to realise that there was a pattern to my montages. My ‘places’ were all ‘destinations’ - they were locations in which people made the effort to reach. You could watch the public take out cameras or simply look up at a building and you knew you were in a ‘place’ that was familiar or of some kind of importance, you felt comfortable. My ‘non-places’ were all the transport links themselves - bridges, motorways, airport terminals or shipping ports. People didn’t give these places any thought and passed through these locations. My heterotopian montage took elements from Manchester and Naples and consisted of the weird and wonderful features that do not fall into either ‘place’ or ‘non-place’.

They are the locations where nature has taken over abandoned buildings, or an artist has graffitied a deserted tunnel, or where a homeless person has attempted to construction a home. These features are not ‘destinations’ but they do make you look twice, even if you do not stop. I realised that the locations of these features were generally near transport links as well. Photomontaging allowed me to develop my own opinion of what I personally feel to be a ‘place’ and ‘non place’. Throughout every photomontage, the theme of ‘transition’ vs. ‘destination’ was one that remained constant and unchanging. The only exception was the ‘heterotopia’ montage, which I feel was a bridge between the two concepts that allowed them to fuse.

My aim was to take the characteristics of a ‘heterotopia’ and inject them into my work. Following the group work we carried out in the first term, the idea that society does not engage with journeys remained with me and prevailed in my future work. I decided I wanted to banish the ‘commuter culture’ that has become so popular and is growing constantly. I feel that the aim I developed for my work was that to combat the concept of dystopia and the ‘rat race’ and make the site I later chose a catalyst to promote creativity and individuality. To achieve this I wanted my programme to be a space where people were able to stop and enjoy the ‘transition’ like never before. Once I had a clear vision of what I wanted my programme to achieve, I started to look at a site that would be appropriate and could hold this vision.

As I wanted to turn a ‘transition’ into a ‘destination’ I felt that the Mancunian Way was the perfect location for this as it ran through both territories. My specific site, along with the Mancunian Way, was a roundabout that has the function of an underpass to allow people to move underneath the motorway. Instead of a gloomy underpass that evades sunlight, I wished to reverse this and allow individuals to engage with the Mancunian Way that runs over my site.


‘Place and Non-Place’ Photomontage - Manchester,UK


‘Heterotopia’ ‘Heterotopia’ Photomontage Photomontage - Manchester,UK - Manchester,UK and Naples, and Italy Naples, Italy


P ROGRAMME Looking at what kind of places people stop along their journeys brought about my initial ideas of programme. Facilities such as service stations on motorways became relevant as these buildings have the purpose of providing people with much needed breaks for food, water and rest. I then moved away from looking at places you ‘need’ to stop at and looked at places where people stop because they ‘want’ to and feel like they can. I looked at precedents such as drive-through cinemas, which are loosely connected with this concept due to the fact that as you are driving you can also stop and experience something new on your journey.

Also the psychology of why we spend time in these places became interesting to me and what I discovered was that places like cinemas, casinos, and shopping malls actually made you believe that time was not passing by due to the lack of windows and clocks, and this is why we enjoy spending a lot of our time in them. During this research the growing industry of pop-up cinemas came to light and I found the temporary nature of these sites to be exciting and different.


PROG R A M M E The fact that these places appear and ‘popup’ unexpectedly in urban environments allow people to stop and do something new that maybe they had not planned on doing. Therefore, I decided that creating a building, which encompassed these factors, is what I wanted to achieve. However, I wanted to create something bigger and braver than simply a one-purpose building such as cinema as I felt that my programme could have a bigger impact. I decided at this point that instead of focussing solely on pop-up cinemas that it would be an interesting proposal to create the

facilities in order for other creative people to design pop-up constructions of anything they wanted. The idea that pop-up theme parks, or pop-up gyms, swimming pools, spas, and residential areas could be dynamic and constantly changing excited me and so I set out with the intention of creating ‘hubs’ that would consist of studio areas and workshop areas and therefore be the places where these new and innovative pop-up structures could be designed.


POP


‘P O P s t r i v e s t o c o m b a t s o c i e t y ’ s e v e r - g r o w i n g need t o b e e f f i c i e n t i n e v e r y a s p ec t o f l i f e b y creatin g a f l a g s h i p p o p - u p h i g h l i n e w h i c h w i l l a llow a j o u r n e y a l o n g M a n c u n i a n W a y t o b e c o m e a d ynamic a n d v i b r a n t d e s t i n a t i o n a n d n o t s i m p l y a transition zone’


POP

The concept of place, displacement and non-place were completely new to me at the beginning of this year. Within my Atelier ‘Co-existence in Theory’, the theoretical concepts we learnt grounded my understanding of the urban environment in a way that I was not familiar with. In hindsight, the concepts we learnt are relevant in everyday life. They allow you to distinguish between why you relate to a given space, and why we choose to pass by others. What stood out for me was the concept of phenomenology, which by definition is the experience you personally receive from an object, and how it affects your consciousness. This concept and the understanding behind it became crucial when analysing our territories at the beginning of the year - Castlefield and the Piccadilly Basin. We were asked to look in more detail at the infrastructure situated in these sites and draw our own conclusions of whether spaces around these structures and within these territories could be categorised as ‘places’ or ‘non-places’. Using phenomenology as my primary concept, I based my placement decisions on memories and an amalgamation of my sensory feelings, which later informed my decisions for my program idea of ‘P O P’. Learning about these theories has broadened my understanding of architecture and has allowed me to appreciate the importance of site analysis as an initial part of the design process. Throughout the deeper design process I aimed to keep this at the forefront of my mind. This idea has heavily influenced the decisions of my program and thus the overall aesthetics and form of my final building. The program of ‘P O P’ itself studies the ongoing conflict between transition zones and destinations, which I feel as an architecture student, should be addressed as the land and architecture in the transition zones are often neglected and ignored by the vast majority of society. This conflict is one between efficiency and phenomenology. Society today strives for efficiency in every aspect of daily life

and this often leaves one to ignore ones journey and focus solely on the destination they are travelling to, this is the problem which ‘P O P’ looks to solve. After a significant amount of time spent working out the sizes of spaces and how I aesthetically wanted the building to look, and also the impact my building has on the site, I decided that creating a single hub (which could be repeatedly constructed along the Mancunian Way was too small for my idea to meet the great expectations I had for my programme. I then started looking at how I could bring in the duality of having another building that could produce the materials needed for the construction of the hubs. I had to develop my hub design to be a building that had a very simple framework, which could be manufactured on site. I decided to look at I beams and the procedures that took place in steel factories and I wanted to replicate this on a smaller level on my site. I visualised the uses of the buildings as a process that complimented one another and were vital to the other ones existence. The factory would make the steel framework which would then be used in the hub buildings, which would then design pop up architecture to be situated a long the Mancunian Way. The steel factory would also have the job of making platforms and frameworks. These would connect to the motorway and allow these pieces of pop-up architecture to sit parallel to the traffic lanes. It is important to remember that I am designing these buildings for the future, and so the Mancunian Way will no longer be a busy 4-lane motorway. My proposal aims to transform the Mancunian Way into a semi-pedestrianised highline, which will be like a ‘high street’ for pop-up architecture. This means changing the dual carriageway of the Mancunian Way into a two-lane road. This would have large pavements to draw people in and make them feel safe and comfortable walking along this highline. I had to address a new list of spaces I would need in the factory.


Ground Floor Plan


First Floor Plan


Second Floor Plan


Third Floor Plan


YEAR 2


SKELETON

LOGIC

Skeleton Logic was a project that began with each student exploring cantilever structures. Firstly, we were to understand what a cantilever structure was, and then create our own adaptation from precedents. Once I knew what cantilevers were I started to think of objects that projected out and were fixed at one end. My tutor at this time was such an inspiration; he was an eccentric who loved the Northern Soul movement.

I was curious as to what this was and researched and as soon as I saw the moves that the dancers could make I related it back to cantilevers. I took the sharp shapes that the pointed shoes and hands would make and from that created my cantilever.


SKELETON

LOGIC

The brief moved on from here and we were asked to repeat and translate our models into quasi-buildings - use them as structures, and at different scales so they became something more than just 1:1 models. We were all then asked to reinvent a site in Levenshulme (Greater Manchester) by introducing our structures.

visualised my structure to become a sweeping concrete canopy over the local market that took place in my specific site. I took inspiration from The Besiktas Fish Market in Turkey.


LEVENSHULME LIFE:

URBAN SYNTHESIS This was our main project in second year, which lead on from Skeleton Logic. Our brief was to design a community hub in Levenshulme, which would have a positive impact on the local population and economy. To carry out our research of the site we were put into groups and asked to create a short film which we felt depicted the feelings of this suburb. We interviewed people and I took it upon myself to compile the clips as I have always enjoyed filmmaking.

After researching it was clear that Levenshulme had changed drastically over the years into a very multi-cultural location. Multi-culturalism can make a place colourful and vibrant, however, in Levenshulme there seemed to be a disconnect between the different nationalities.


LEVENSHULME LIFE:

URBAN SYNTHESIS I wanted to create a piece of Architecture that would celebrate these cultural differences and came up with my idea of an art complex which consisted of a large public art gallery and smaller 1st floor flats which had ground floor studio spaces for artists to work in.

I have always believed that art connects us all, and by providing an environment where it is encouraged can only lead to positive impacts on such a multi-cultural population.


LEVENSHULME LIFE:

URBAN SYNTHESIS I designed the building to have a courtyard behind the gallery which all studio spaces and flats would look out on. I envisaged this courtyard to become a dynamic space decorated by plants and outdoor artwork and furniture that the residents could choose themselves.

I purposely wanted the building to be made of monolithic concrete like that of Habitat 67, as it would act as a ‘blank canvas’ which residents could then personalise. I wanted to relate my design back to Levenshulme and when looking at the plan you can see how the traditional town house footprint influenced the design of the studio space and accommodation.


PHOTOGRAPHY

ELECTIVE

These are some photographs I took whilst completing a photography elective at University. We were asked to pick specific locations within Manchester and photograph the buildings that appealed to us. The two locations I picked were UMIST and Ancoats. I chose to photography UMIST as I have always loved brutalist architecture and the buildings fascinate me. I love how vast they look compared to other buildings within Manchester’s city centre.

The spans of white render have such an impact on the landscape, which make you look at them (whether you love them or hate them). The second location I chose was that of Ancoats which is where the original factories were built during the industrial revolution in Manchester. They are situated right on the canal that has recently been part of a large scale redevelopment. It has seen a vast majority of new residential properties being built and I love the contrast between the new and the old in this location.


MUSHFARM MushFarm was an extra-curricular event set up by the 5th years for 1st and 2nd years to participate in. The idea was to create a purpose-built mushroom farm with every aspect of it being built out of recycled materials. We created the framework of our farm out of wooden pallets that we attained from a nearby building site.

We gathered recycled containers such as bottles and bags, to fill with coffee waste from the cafĂŠ in our studio building to grow our mushroom spawn in. I created a stop motion film to show the construction process of our framework. Prior to this a number of design meetings were held where we decided, as a group, what visual impact we wanted the farm to have.


YEAR 1


BODYSPACE Bodyspace was my first project at Manchester School of Architecture. At first glance at the brief I remember being confused as to why we were being asked to create garments from recycled materials as an introduction to Architecture. After our tutors had explained to us that this project was asking us to survey and explore our body as a site and research the way that materials can create shapes and enclosures everything started to make sense. I wanted to use the aspect of ‘movement’ as my starting point because it was clear to me that we had to make a garment that could be worn on a moving body. I began with creating fluid curved models out of straws. I did this, as straws were accessible and easy to work with.

I wanted to create round shapes that represented the curves in a woman’s body when it moved. I then moved on from this as I decided that I wanted to make a bigger impact with my garment. I realised that I wanted my garment to elaborate the body’s movement and subsequently create exaggerated shapes itself. I created a wedding veil made out of bin bags as my final output. I felt that a white wedding veil was a very feminine item of clothing, as I still wanted to make a garment that related to a woman’s body. I made the veil out of bin bags as the weight of the material meant that unusual shapes and spaces would be created by it when a person started to move.


ENTRANCE

EXPERIENCE Entrance Experience was a university project but also a competition that the entire first year was entered for. The aim of the competition was to create an installation for a lobby in a new secondary school in Greater Manchester. We were taken to the site in order to see the void space where the installation would be placed, this also acted as my first experience of visiting a site under construction. The first stage of the competition was for every single student to present their own idea and then the best ideas were put forward onto a shortlist. If your work got chosen for the shortlist you were then put into groups with other students, which helped you, refine your own idea.

I wanted my installation to promote the importance of recycling but also be as striking and unusual as possible. I wanted to use a material that was accessible for everyone and started collecting the scrap paper found in studio. I started folding ribs into the paper to create shell-like shapes which, when hung, would spin in ways which made them look like optical illusions. My idea was shortlisted and my group and I developed the idea to have typed messages on one side of the paper. We decided that to involve the school students with out installation that we would let each class have several shells that they could write their own messages on.


PARADIGMS THE SNOWDON AVIARY This specific project asked us to create a scale model of a given structure. Each of the structures were chosen by the tutors and looked to test our technical knowledge as all were of a complex nature. We were given The Snowdon Aviary located at The London Zoo, which was designed by Cedric Price, Frank Newby, and Antony Armstrong-Jones in 1964. The structure needed to be an obstacle-free volume that allowed the bird’s unimpeded flight. The netting is attached to tension cables that run along the rectangle structure.

Assemblies of tetrahedral tubular compression structures anchor the cables to each of the corners of the construction. The roof section is held up by supported tubular steel columns, which form ‘V’ shapes. The cable and net structure of the whole building is clearly expressed through the use of steel compression members and cables in tension. To get this to work on a small-scale model was increasingly difficult.


PLAYDOHM Playdohm was an exciting and fun project that our whole studio group was involved with for 2 days in studio. It was another project, which showed the importance of model making but on completely different scale. The idea was to create structures from cardboard triangles and bulldog clips, which we then had to brand and make into a product. We had to imagine that we were selling to schools as the brief asked us to create easy build structures that children could replicate on the playground.

We obviously were told to use triangles as they were great to tessellate and the fact that a variety of different triangles could be used meant that every studio group could came up with a different structure. Our studio group decided to use equilateral triangles and create an igloo type shape, which we named ‘Playdohm’. We created an instruction manual as well and packaged up all the parts that the children would need. I created a stop motion video showing our development as well.


BEYOND

EXPECTATIONS Beyond Expectations was my first taste at designing an actual building. All first year projects prior to this tested other skills and provided us with a rich knowledge of model making techniques and creative thinking towards different briefs. This final brief acted as a resolution to first year. Firstly, we were put into groups and asked to investigate the site of The University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST) campus, which is located just south of Manchester’s city centre. The campus has a rich history of being a leading research-based university within the UK; it also has an interesting past in terms of Architecture.

The campus was built during the 1960’s and has been branded recently (as most brutalist buildings are) as ‘ugly’ and ‘tired’. It became our job to reinvent the campus in some way. Our group decided to use the canal as our starting point; the canal system in Manchester had been the catalyst which kick started the development of the city. Through our research we found that one of the very first canals used to run through UMIST before it had been developed into a concrete jungle. We thought that if we could bring the waterway back into the site this would change the landscape for the better, but also act as a symbol to the city’s past.


BEYOND

EXPECTATIONS After each group had come up with an idea, we were left to start our individual projects. I have always loved brutalist Architecture and I wanted pay homage to the linear nature of the buildings that make up the campus. This manifested itself into how I brought the waterway into a central courtyard on the campus. I wanted the ground to look like it had cracked and within the gaps have water flowing through. The next stage of this project was to create our buildings – our brief for this part of the project asked us to create new ‘ateliers’ for postgraduate Architecture students.

We were to create studio type spaces and locate them within the site we had picked. I designed my building like I had designed the new landscape I had envisaged. I wanted my atelier to sit on top of the linear waterways like an island. The shape and materiality of my building came from modernising the aspects of UMIST that I loved. This therefore led to my building becoming a stacked modular construction, which was made from concrete, as this is the material I wanted the landscape to be as well. We were asked to create a seductive section, an external perspective, and exploded axonometric drawing of our proposals.


THE MANIFESTATION

OF MEMORY The Manifestation of Memory was an extra-curricular event, which was set up by 5th year students at Manchester School of Architecture for first and second year students to be involved with. I chose to be involved with this particular event as I found the brief very interesting. The image to the left shows the Holocaust Lipstick image by Banksy, it was also the same image that was put on the poster for this event. This image is very important when explaining what our brief asked. The image was created by Banksy after he had read an extract from a diary of a Lieutenant Colonel who was among one of the first British soldiers to liberate Bergen-Belsen in 1945. It read “It was shortly after the British Red Cross arrived, though it may have no connection, that a very large quantity of lipstick arrived. This was not at all what we men wanted, we were screaming for hundreds and thousands of other things and I don’t know who asked for lipstick. I wish so much that I could discover who did it; it was the action of genius, sheer unadulterated brilliance. I believe nothing did more for these internees than the lipstick. Women lay in bed with no sheets and no nightie but with scarlet red lips, you saw them wandering about with nothing but a blanket over their shoulders, but with scarlet red lips.

I saw a woman dead on the post mortem table and clutched in her hand was a piece of lipstick. At last someone had done something to make them individuals again, they were someone, no longer merely the number tattooed on the arm. At last they could take an interest in their appearance. That lipstick started to give them back their humanity.” The event coordinators wanted us to visit the Imperial War Museum North and choose two separate objects and bring them together in a piece of graffiti art. We were asked to create a story between our two objects, and then project them in a car park in Manchester’s city centre. My artwork was chosen as the best of everyone’s in the event and subsequently was put on a postcode that represented first year projects for the School. I chose a handgun, which was owned by one of the first woman soldiers in the First World War, and a white feather that was a symbol of cowardice and used by suffragettes to shame men who were not soldiers during this time. I decided that my piece of artwork would show the gun shooting the feather like a bullet as this denoted women’s strength during WW1.


Undergraduate Works Portfolio - Architecture - Sian Ellis Wright  

A condensed portfolio of my undergraduate works.

Undergraduate Works Portfolio - Architecture - Sian Ellis Wright  

A condensed portfolio of my undergraduate works.

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