Page 1

Ryebank Fields

site analysis Ryebank Fields_Humanities and Technology 2_ Sian Bury_12001296


Historic analysis

Originally the site in concern was made up of sections of a number of fields, marked by either trees or hedging. The lands use is unknown though it is highly likely that it had some form of agricultural purpose. The surrounding area continued to be developed throughout history, especially during the 1920s where there was a demand for housing, though the site itself has changed very little. One significant change however was the change of use into a clay pit, no doubt impacting on the current day soil. The boundary is likely to have been marked by trees, similar to its appearance today.

1920s -

Clear boundary definition

-

Dense housing surrounding

-

Reference to claypit

-

Reference to Longford Park

-

Longford Hall and land defined adjacent to site

-

Allotment garden plots developed alongside site

1840s

-

-

Area exists as a series of fields Spars evidence of housing

-

Boundary definition differs significantly from

-

present Longford Brook cuts through field horizontally

-

Natural drainage routed via stream Brick kiln sited nearby

1900s -

Increased boundary line definition

-

Longford Brook continues to run through site

-

1890s -

Site continues to be rural

-

-

drain

Natural drainage cut across site horizontally Evidence of housing development nearby

-

Boundary lines to top half of site clearly defined

-

Longford Brook runs through site

-

Pond pools water nearby drain

-

horizontally

-

Longford Hall visible to South-West of site

Ryebank Fields_Humanities and Technology 2_ Sian Bury_12001296

Pond continues to pool nearby water Building development evident evidently less rural Evidence to brickworks replaces kiln

Brickworks adjacent


Historic analysis The clay pit continued to feature until the 1950s, from where it then appears to go back to its original vegetative surface. By the 1980s the entire boundary to the site is defined, and remains this way today. One feature that has continued to show on the site maps is the water drain running horizontally across the site. The site itself has remained relatively flat, apart from when the land was used as a clay pit (it would appear that this has since been reinstated).

1980s

1930s -

Clay pit clearly defined by excavated ground

-

Clear consistent boundary definition

-

Pond continues to be evident, as does water drainage

-

Boundary fully defined

-

Allotment gardens still featured

-

Densely built up area (housing plus 2 schools

-

Housing increasingly dense in

-

added)

surrounding area

-

Drainage continues to be clearly featured

Open green space of Longford

-

Allotment no longer featured - replaced by housing

Hall adjacent to site

-

Stadium built on open space of Longford Hall

1950s -

Boundary clearly defined to North, South and West of site

-

Densely built up surrounding are

-

Clay pit land reclaimed

-

Brickworks no longer featured

-

Drainage featured horizontally but no sign of pond

-

Boundary fully defined - marked by mature tree line

-

Allotments continue to feature

-

Densely built up area

-

Green space of Longford Hall continues to feature

-

Desire lines evident from satellite map

-

Site left open

Ryebank Fields_Humanities and Technology 2_ Sian Bury_12001296

2010s


Mapping the Site

Signs of Anthropogenic Activity

During the site visits, a considerable amount of rainfall had already taken place, making the ground noticeably wet and muddy. The planting was dominated by numerous grass species as well as mature trees bordering the site. It is probable that much of the open grassland is a result of self seeding. Goat willow was a strong indicator of the damp soil conditions, as were the clusters of reed beds towards the centre of the site.

hawthorn hedge planted pre 1900 as field boundary cluster of oak trees - planted 10yrs ago?

Identification of Indicator Species + Evidence of water

Willows thriving in damp setting,probably associated with historic ditch

A cluster of hybrid poplars appears to have self seeded, based on their staggered height. It would be interesting to see how this develops over the next 10/15 years. It is probableble that seeding on the desireline path was prohibited by trampling.

rosebay willow herb on site of old bonfire site

Soil Pit A

Hawthorn hedge developed into mature trees and shrubs

desire lines follow site boundary ---

Minimal/no cultivationgrazing-ploughing taken place for many years enabling plants to take hold

Historical ditch/drain waterlogged soil surrounding

Soil Pit B

Brambles and nettles remain undisturbed, colonising in ditch

Reed bedsdamp, boggy ground

earth mound near entrance to site

Mosses indicative of damp shady conditions

Greater Plantain

Meadow Fescue

Sheep’s Sorrel

Meadow Buttercup

Toad Rush

Pussy Willow

Ryebank Fields_Humanities and Technology 2_ Sian Bury_12001296

Cleavers Evidence of water

Ryebank Fields is a space used frequently by the local habitants of Chorltoncum-Hardy. The position of the entrances to the area has an influence on the route taken and is indicated by desire lines. Desire lines seem to suggest that most human activity occurs around the boundary to the site, mainly by dog walkers. It is probable that the drain running across the site restricts the natural route through. As the site has remained a non specific open space throughout most of its history, anthropogenic activity identified has been very incidental. Two soil pits have been marked on the plan, each one indicating quite different conditions. The mound situated at the south of the site is of unclear origin though it would appear to be man made.

Desire lines were noticeable across much of the site. These mainly led to and from entrances to the site or around the perimeter boundary. Few plants are able to grow successfully in these areas.

A noticeable area of standing water provides a home for an indicator species of reeds in the centre of the site. Although there had been a significant amount of rainfall prior to the site visit, it is clear that this area is prone water logging. Being located next to the drain is a contributory factor. The majority of the site is covered in uncultivated grasses, considered a weed to most people. The height of the plant material inhibits human activity, other than to make use of the site as place for dog walkers.


Site observations

The initial site visit was made at the onset of winter. Deciduous trees had lost their leaves and many perennials were at the die back stage. The site was relatively exposed with little or no shelter, apart from the boundaries. Recent wet weather contributed to boggy conditions underfoot.

Types of plant material observed appears to be typical of that found on uncultivated land in this region dominated by a variety of grasses as well as wild flowers.

Ryebank Fields_Humanities and Technology 2_ Sian Bury_12001296

Trees range from well established around the border to younger less mature specimens.


EXISTING PLANTING

Image from site depicting typical planting. Clumps of singular species such as Rosebay Willow Herb form pockets within the site. English Oak is becoming to dominate

Map highlighting the dominant plant species located on site.

Site visit sketches of various grass species located on site. Observing from a distance made it difficult to recognise the number of different species however on closer inspection, the various types and textures could be identified.

Ryebank Fields_Humanities and Technology 2_ Sian Bury_12001296


Recording the Soil Soil Pit A

Soil Pit B

O horizon (undecomposed organic matter) • Drainage; Partly drained • General description of plant/animal material present; Evidence of small grains of gravel and numerous moribund insects. Field mouse activity was noticed and a siting made when disturbed. • Anthropogenic material; Waste material was present including concrete rubble and remnants of plastic. A horizon (topsoil) • •

O Horizon

1.5cm

A Horizon

10cm

• • • • • B

B Horizon 30cm

C Horizon

xcm

Drainage; Partly drained General description; Significant quantities of organic material, showing signs of various stages of decomposition Texture; Fine and silty Colour; Ranges dark brown-black Smell; Distinctive, organic and earthy Anthropogenic material; Evidence of fragments of waste material pH; 6.5 (Slightly acidic) horizon (subsoil)

Drainage; Partly drained General description; Significant amounts of organic material present including roots, earthworms observed • Texture; Very difficult to dig due to large stones and grit • Colour; Sparse amounts of brown soil found • Smell; Less noticeable than A horizon • Anthropogenic material; Significant amounts of building rubble • pH; 6.5 (Slightly acidic) C horizon (if any - parent material) N.B. Not penetrable • Drainage; Partly drained • Texture; Compacted rubble - difficult to dig through compacted material • Colour; Insignificant quantities of soil to allow observation - high proportion of grey stone compacted rubble

• • • • • O Horizon

1.5cm

A Horizon

10cm

Perched Water Table

5cm

Compacted Layer

2cm

• •

Weather conditions at time of recording (Nov 2012); Dry, though had been raining previously.

Ryebank Fields_Humanities and Technology 2_ Sian Bury_12001296

O horizon (undecomposed organic matter) • Drainage; Waterlogged • General description of plant/animal material present; Mixture of perennial and annual weeds, mainly uncultivated grasses • Anthropogenic material; Some evidence of waste material present A horizon (topsoil)

B Horizon 20cm

Groundwater Table

Drainage; Waterlogged Texture; Fine and silty Colour; Dark brown Smell; Offensive and strong Anthropogenic material; Evidence of building waste • pH; 7.5 (Slightly alkaline) Perched Water Table • General description; Takes form of contained area of water between A horizon and B horizon. Water remains trapped by compacted soil (gleying) B horizon (subsoil) • Drainage; Partly drained • Texture; Heavy with builders rubble content • Colour; Blue, black and orange • Smell; Offensive and strong • Anthropogenic material; Builders waste • pH; 7 (Slightly alkaline)

xcm

Weather conditions at time of recording (Nov 2012); Dry, though had been raining previously.


Location A Dominant species include: Field Bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis) ・ Creeping Buttercup (Ranunculus repens) ・

A2 A1

-

Meadow Buttercup (Ranunculus acris) ・

Common Couch (Agropyron repens) ・

Annual Meadow Grass (Poa annua) ・

Perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne) ・

Pineapple Weed (Matricaria discoidea) ・

Sheep’s Sorrel (Rumex acetosella) ・

Cleavers (Galium aparine) ・

Cow Parsley (Anthriscus sylvestris) ・

Smooth Meadow Grass (Poa pratensis) ・

Wavy Hair Grass (Deschampsia flexuosa) ・

Buck’s Horn Plantain (Plantago coronopus) ・

Common Vetch (Vicia sativa) ・

Cock’s Foot (Dactylis glomerata) ・

Curled Dock (Rumex crispus) ・

Meadow Fescue (Festuca pratensis) ・

Stinging Nettle (Urtica urens) ・

Greater Plantain (Plantago major) ・

Purple Flowered Raspberry (Rubus odoratus)

Goat Willow (Salix caprea)

Elder (Sambucus nigra)

Bramble (Rubus fruticosus)

English Oak (Quercus robur)

Section line at edge of boundary Desire line running parallel devoid of plant growth

-

Some smaller species e.g. Common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) at edge of path - trampling reduces likelihood of colonisation

-

Drain runs across section, impacting

-

on moisture content of soil Waterlogged ground - soil visibly

-

darker Bramble dominates

-

Same (or similar) plant species located at opposite side of path, suggesting self seeding/pollinating

-

Little interference from human activity has allowed planting to develop

A1

A2

naturally -

Closer inspection of soil showed signs of silty properties

-

Dense growth suggests good nutrient content of soil

Cross section A is located across the dividing drain line. The soil appears to feature a proportion of brick rubble, perhaps linking to its previous use as a clay pit. The dominance of grasses and bramble means that any individual trees or shrubs have a much greater visual impact than those bordering the site. In this instance the singular mature Goat Willow (Salix caprea) and Elder (Sambucus nigra) create landmarks to the area. The juvenile oak could have been planted by a squirrel, and is doing well considering its position close to the boggy ground.

Ryebank Fields_Humanities and Technology 2_ Sian Bury_12001296

LIGHT

WINDSPEED

HUMIDITY

A1

A2

A1

A2

A1

1250

1000

0

0

87%

A2 100%


Location B Sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus)

Cross section B is sited along the boundary edge to the East of the site. The historic drain is sited close-by, impacting on the moisture content of the soil. The mature sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) is clearly well established and forms part of a tree lined perimeter edge to the local school. Much of the Rosebay Willow Herb is above 5’, meaning any small species have little chance of survival.

B1

Dominant species include:

B2

Cleavers (Galium aparine) ・ Cock’s Foot (Dactylis glomerata) ・ -

Common Couch (Agropyron repens) ・

Section line by boundary of site Desire line running parallel devoid of Rosebay Willow Herb (Epilobium angustifolium)

plant growth -

Some smaller species e.g. Clover (Trifolium arvense) at edge of path trampling reduces likelihood of colonisation

-

Annual Meadow Grass (Poa annua) ・ Smooth Meadow Grass (Poa pratensis) ・

Bramble (Rubus fruticosus)

Same (or similar) plant species

Meadow Fescue (Festuca pratensis) ・

located at opposite side of path, suggesting self seeding/pollinating, -

Rosebay Willow Herb (Epilobium angustifolium) dominates

-

Little interference from human activity

Perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne) ・ Wavy Hair Grass (Deschampsia flexuosa)

has allowed planting to colonise naturally -

Inspection of soil shows signs of silty properties

-

Dense growth suggests optimum nutrient content of soil for colonising species

-

Close proximity of drain impacts on water retention of soil

-

Fewer and sparser grass species

B1

B2

than opposite side of path competition from Rosebay Willow Herb may be less dominant species

Ryebank Fields_Humanities and Technology 2_ Sian Bury_12001296

LIGHT

WINDSPEED

HUMIDITY

B1

B2

B1

B2

B1

B2

700

1000

0

0

75%

74%


Location C C1

Sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus)

C2

English Oak (Quercus robur)

Sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus)

English Oak (Quercus robur)

English Oak (Quercus robur)

Common Ash (Fraxinus excelsior)

Dominant species include: Cock’s Foot (Dactylis glomerata) ・ Common Couch (Agropyron repens) ・ -

Annual Meadow Grass (Poa annua) ・

Section line near boundary line Well worn desire line through section

Smooth Meadow Grass (Poa pratensis) ・

prohibitive to plant growth -

Area dominated by grass species (some up to 2 metres)

-

Oak trees beginning to mature probably planted approx 10 years

Meadow Fescue (Festuca pratensis) ・

ago -

Perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne) ・

Little interference from human activity has allowed planting to colonise

Wavy Hair Grass (Deschampsia flexuosa)

naturally

C1

C2

Cross section C is towards the North West of the site. Oak trees have begun to establish themselves in this area, forming a natural woodland cluster and adding an additional layer to the mature tree border. A desire line running through the section line divides the grasses in half. It appears to have little impact on the growth of the younger trees, however it was noted that attempts have been made to break off younger branches spreading across the path. The mature trees create a shaded area with less vigorous undergrowth than is found elsewhere on the site. Well worn desire lines expose a lattice of roots, possibly as a result of erosion resulting from human activity and weathering.

Ryebank Fields_Humanities and Technology 2_ Sian Bury_12001296

LIGHT

WINDSPEED

HUMIDITY

C1

C2

C1

C2

C1

C2

1200

2000

0

0

79%

58%


Design

Stand shape design development

The shape of the stands has been inspired by the 19th century enclosure shapes of the area concerned. Ash, beech, birch, oak and pine woodlands were studied and a decision was made to design 2 stands for each type in order to create observation opportunities. As the stands develop, it will be interesting to see how they influence each others growth and dominance. Different edge effects will also be observed, including the softening of the perimeter through time. Native species have been selected, and where possible, trees of local provenance will be used. Particular regard has been given to the damp oak stand, incorporating the drain so as to replicate the preferred conditions.

Drain line

Whips are known to be better than mature trees at establishing themselves, and therefore have been selected for planting. This will also make the project more cost effective, as there will be minimal loss if any whips are lost in the early stages of growth. By using a geometric grid, planting the whips is simplified and systematic. The effect is harmonious, creating blocks of shape and colour. Access will be at specified points and will provide routes for vehicles and pedestrians. Forestry guidelines state a width of 3.4 metres is recommended for access. Sinuous paths have been designed so as to give access to all the stands and allow maximum observation. Psychologically, it is known that curved routes give a greater feeling of safety. Each stand will have its own thinning regime. Piles of deadwood will be retained to encourage wildlife habitats. Thinning will allow diversification of the size and structure of the canopy as well as the development of rides and glades. This will be based on observations made of the initial planting.

Field patterns acted as the main inspiration behind the stand designs

Ryebank Fields_Humanities and Technology 2_ Sian Bury_12001296

Visualisation of how the stands may look once beginning to mature


Trial Succession A sample strip taken from trial succession area to highlight the change in vegetation over 40 years.

A2 A1

-

5 years A1

A2

-

-

10 years

A1

A2

-

20 years

-

-

A1

-

-

40 years

-

-

-

Ryebank Fields_Humanities and Technology 2_ Sian Bury_12001296

Field layer overtakes ground layer Community plants become established Competitive reeds, nettles, rosebay willow herb and brambles dominate as light demanders Seed dispersal less likely to be wind bourne, greater potential for small mammals and birds to spread Seedling/sapling pioneer willow and elder emerge

A2

-

A1

Seed bank presents species found in and around ryebank area Reeds, grasses and buttercup community establish in area of drain Rosebay willow herb benefits from full light (score 7 Ellenburg) and optimum conditions Newly planted nearby stands provide perches for small birds to aid seed dispersal

New shrub layer becomes established with elder Fast growing willow established in damp soil drain area Bramble and elder compete with rosebay willow herb for light (rosebay will herb recedes) Field layer becomes more dense

Damp drain area continues to support reeds, buttercup and willow Upper storey partial canopy of willow sits against elder shrub, now at its maximum height Tree able to produce own seeds and also attract great range of wildlife Dense undergrowth provides green corridor effect to now established woodland stands

A2

1:100 @ A3


Masterplan Ryebank Fields Landscape Lab

Stand F: Birch aim: to use birch species to create a single genus stand, demonstrating a mix of plant spacings

Stand A: Pine Aim: “To create an open character, evergreen stand dominated by Pinus sylvestris, the aim being to function as a productive woodland” PS

JC

TB

PS

PS

PS

PS

PS

JC

PS

TB

JC

PS

PS

TB

JC

PS

TB

JC

PS

PS

PS

PS

PS

TB

A

BNa

BPa

BPe

BNi

BPe

BPe

BNa

BPu

BPa

BNi

BPu

BNi

BNa

BPe

BNi

BNi

BNa

BPa

BPu

BPu

BPu

BPa

BNa

BPe

BPa

b

Latin name

Common name

Mature h/s

Features

% Stand

Qty

JC

Juniperus communis

Juniper

4-8x2.5-4m

Aramatic leaves

20

77

PS

Pinus sylvestris

Scots Pine

12x8m

Good outline

60

232

TB

Taxus baccata

English Yew

12x8m

Red fruits

20

77

3m

c

Aim: To create a medium dense, single genus stand, made up of beech species, chosen for their varied foliage colours FSP

FS

FSA

FSD

FS

FSA

FSA

FSP

FSP

FSA

FS

FS

FSP

FSD

FS

FSA

FS

FSA

FSP

FSD

FSD

FSP

FSD

Latin name

Common name

Mature h/s

Features

% Stand

Qty

FS

Fagus sylvatica

Common Beech

12x8m

Spiny fruits

25

113

FSA

Fagus sylvatica ‘Asplenifolia’

Cut-leaved Beech

8x6-8m

Cut leaves

25

113

FSD

Fagus sylvatica ‘Dawyck Gold’

Beech

12x4-8m

Upright habit

25

113

FSP

Fagus sylvatica ‘Purpurea’

Purple Beech

12x8m

Purple foliage

25

113

QP

SA

QP

CA

QP

QP

QR

QP

QR

QP

CA

QP

SA

CM

QP

QP

QP

QR

QP

QP

SA

CA

2m

Mature h/s

Features

% Stand

Qty

CA

Corylus avellana

Hazel

8x4-8m

Nuts/ catkins

10

65

CM

Crataegus monogyna

Common Hawthorn

4-8x4-8m

Red berries

10

65

QP

Quercus petraea

Sessile Oak

12x8m

Round crown

50

393

QR

Quercus robur

Common Oak

12x8m

Acorns

15

98

SA

Sorbus aucuparia

Rowan

12x4-8m

Red fruits

15

98

FE

PA

FE

PT

FE

FE

FE

FE

FE

PA

FE

PT

FE

PA

FE

FE

FE

FE

PT

FE

PT

h

Peeling bark

26

201

BPa

Betula papyrifera

Paper Birch

12x8m

Peeling bark

31

245

BPe

Betula pendula

Silver Birch

12x8m

Peeling bark

14

111

BPu Betula Common White pubescens Birch * BNi BPa x3 planted in same pit

12x8m

Peeling bark

14

111

PS

PS

BPe

PS

BPe

PS

PS

PS

BPe

PS

BPe

PS

BPe

PS

PS

BPe

PS

PS

PS

BPe

PS

PS

BPe

BPe PS

Latin name

Common name

Mature h/s

Features

% Stand

Qty

Betula pendula

Silver Birch

12x8m

Striking bark

30

145

Pinus sylvestris

Scots Pine

12x8m

Good outline

70

338

Indoor Lab

RF

FS

FS

QP

FS

QP

FS

QP

Latin name

Common name

Mature h/s

Features

% Stand

Qty

FS

Fagus sylvatica

Common Beech

12x8m

Spiny fruits

50

QP

FS

SN

QP

FS

107

QP

Quercus petraea

Sessile Oak

12x8m

Round crown

30

FS

QP

FS

QP

64

FS

RF

Rubus fruticosa

Blackberry

6-9x6-9m

Berries

10

SN

FS

FS

RF

21

QP

SN

Sambucus nigra

Elderberry

4-8x3-4m

Black fruits

10

21

3m

Succession Trial Area

stand I: Oak

i

Latin name

Common name

Mature h/s

Features

% Stand

Qty

FE

Fraxinus excelsior

Common Ash

20x8+m

Winged fruits

60

348

PT

Populus tremula

Aspen

15x8m

Grey catkins

25

145

PA

Prunus avium

Wild Cherry

12x8m

Purple berries

15

87

Aim: To create a medium dense, multilayered, typically english damp oak woodland, with a continuous canopy

j

QR

QR

QP

AG

QP

QP

AG

SC

QP

QR

SC

QP

QP

QR

SC

AG

QR

AG

SC

AG

SC

SC

QP

QR

AG

Latin name

Common name

Mature h/s

Features

% Stand

Qty

AG

Alnus glutinosa

Common Alder

12x4-8m

Winter catkins

20

105

QP

Quercus petraea

Sessile Oak

12x8m

Round crown

20

105

QR

Quercus robur

English Oak

12x8m

Acorns

50

263

SC

Salix caprea

Pussy Willow

8-12x4-8m

Large catkins

10

52

2m

Stand J: Birch aim: to create a dense multilayered stand in order to support wildlife using Betula, Sorbus, Prunus and Lonicera

2m

Stand E: Ash Aim: To create a medium dense, two storey productive stand, dominated by native ash species Latin name

Common name

Mature h/s

Features

% Stand

Qty

Carpinus betulus

Hornbeam

12x4-8m

Fruit clusters

10

84

CA

Corylus avellana

Hazel

8x4-8m

Nuts/catkins

20

168

FE

FE

Fraxinus excelsior

Common Ash

20x8m

Winged fruits

50

420

CA

FEW

Fraxinus excelsior ‘Westhof’s Glorie’

Ash

12+x4-8m

Yellow in autumn

20

168

FE

FEW

FE

CA

FE

FE

FE

CB

FEW

FE

CA

CB

FE

CA

FEW

FEW

CA

FE

CB

FE

FEW

FE

FE

2m

12x4-8m

PS

FS

Aim: To create a single storey stand with a light open canopy of native ash, aspen and cherry PA

River Birch

PS

FS

stand D: Ash

FE

Betula nigra

stand H: Beech

g

Common name

PT

111

BNi

Aim: To create a multilayered stand with an open character, dominated by native fagus sylvatica

Latin name

PT

Qty

14

f

Aim: To create an open two storey mixed stand using clumps, dominated by Quercus petraea, selecting supporting species for their benefit to wildlife QP

% Stand

Ground cover

e

Stand C: oak

QR

Features

0.3x0.5m

2m

2m

SA

Mature h/s

Dwarf Birch

Aim: To create a medium dense natural pine wood dominated by Pinus sylvestris with some Betula pendula

d

stand B: Beech

FSD

Common name

Betula nana

Stand G: Pine

3m

FS

Latin name BNa

CB

BPe

SA

BPe

LP

PP

SA

BPu

PP

BPu

BPe

PP

LP

BPu

BPe

SA

SA

BPe

LP

LP

BPu

PP

PP

SA

BPu

LP

1m

5

Latin name

Common name

Mature h/s

Features

% Stand

Qty

BPe

Betula pendula

Silver Birch

12x8m

Striking bark

20

146

BPu

Betula pubescens

Common White Birch

12x8m

Peeling bark

20

146

LP

Lonicera periclymenum

Honeysuckle

4-8x1.5m

Fragrant

20

146

PP

Prunus padus

Bird Cherry

12x4-8m

Black fruits

20

146

SA

Sorbus aucuparia

Rowan

12x4-8m

Red fruits

20

146

10

20

30

40

50m

s ld Fie Lab 296 nk e 01 tan ba cap D:120opoli Rye nds ury rIMetr e La n B este 0 y Fil Siaanchrsity @ 1:5nolo 0

M ive A1 ch Un ale 2 Te Sc ar Ye

Ryebank Fields_Humanities and Technology 2_ Sian Bury_12001296

g

Profile for SianBury

Ryebank Fields: The Formation of a Landscape Lab  

A visual study of Ryebank Fields, uncovering its potential as an outdoor research space.

Ryebank Fields: The Formation of a Landscape Lab  

A visual study of Ryebank Fields, uncovering its potential as an outdoor research space.

Profile for sianbury
Advertisement