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Table of Contents 6 10 13 15 17 18 21 22 25 29 30 32 33 34 35 36 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 47 48 51 52 55 56 57 60 61 62 63

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Editor’s Note Note from Chamber Contributors Doan’s Picnic Vernon Plaza Jack Teagarden/Roy Orbison Church of Christ New Hope Baptist Church Summer’s Last Blast Aquatic Center City Map Rodeo Time Museums Overview Vernon Burnin’ Service Directory Shop Local Wilbarger Outdoors Hunting, Land Opportunities Leo Brittain History Museum Retirement in Vernon Christmas Parade Coy’s Editorial Wilbarger County Wilbarger County Origin Great Places to Stay in Vernon Berry Patch Wilbarger General Hospital Care Center Wolf Chiropractic VISD Vernon College Vernon’s Ambassadors Rodeo Time

15 Summer’s Last Blast Heats up Vernon’s Streets

32 Christmas Parade Opens Holiday Season with Western Twist

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Doan’s Picnic Carries on Pioneer Tradition

25 It’s Rodeo Time in Vernon!

43 Vernon’s Ambassadors on Horseback


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Editor ’s Note

Howdy,

We’re pleased to welcome you to Vernon – the crossroads of North Texas. The rich history of the area is also very much one of a crossroad. The Great Western Cattle Trail ran north and south right through downtown – more cattle and cowboys traveled that trail than any other trail. Add to that the Colorado Road, which ran to the northwest and southeast. Before that, the Comanches camped along the Pease River in search of the great Buffalo herds. People have always been bumping into each other in Vernon. You’ll not find a more hospitable place to visit – whether for a day or for a lifetime. The opportunities to explore that interesting history and culture abound in this area with museums, historic sites, rodeos and the Doan’s Adobe – home of the oldest continuing picnic in the state of Texas, held annually since 1884. Vernon is still strategically located but with the most update and modern of conveniences. We’re just 2.5 hours from the DFW Metroplex, 2.5 hours from OKC, 2.5 hours from Lubbock and Amarillo. Major metropolitan and vacation points to the east, west, north and south are within an easy day’s drive. Major highways -- U.S.283, U.S. 287, U.S. 183, and U.S. 70 all pass through Vernon. A top notch airport also serves the community. Our community places great emphasis on education. Vernon College is consistently rated as one of the best values in education. Our citizens are involved in our schools and we have dedicated educators. We are proud to be home to nationally recognized enterprises -- the forensic mental health services of North Texas State Hospital and Texas A&M’s agricultural research center. Our businesses and industries feature some of the most innovative and cutting edge technology available. Our community leaders are dedicated with keeping Vernon competitive – not just with a welcoming business environment – but also with improving the quality of life. In 2012, the city unveiled a state-of the-art aquatic center in Orbison Park. Bring your bathing suit and come check it out. We know how to throw a party too. The annual Summer’s Last Blast boasts one of the largest antique car cruises in the region. Bring a lawn chair – we’ll save a spot for you. Daniel Walker

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Note from Chamber hat an exciting time to be in Vernon, Texas! The Vernon Chamber of Commerce & Tourism, the City of Vernon, Wilbarger County, the Business Development Corporation, Vernon Main Street, Vernon Independent School District, and Vernon College - all are working together to ensure Vernon is a quality place to live, work, and visit. We are seeing economic growth in leaps and bounds due to the hard work put into the improvement of our community, and we couldn’t be more proud! The Chamber is a common vehicle through which we all work together for the common good of our community. The Chamber is an organization made up of over 200 businesses and individuals who are investing their time and money back into the community by volunteering and supporting programs that encourage economic growth and stability. We also invite tourists to enjoy the simple pleasures that come with small town living. In an ever-changing world there are still some things that can be always counted onthe small town friendliness that guests experience when they come to Vernon is one of those things. The Chamber staff consists of an Executive Director, one full time staff person, and 15 elected board members, as well as 15 appointed members of the Vernon Tourism Committee which works to promote Vernon as a great place to visit. We have so much to offer in a sort of small town charming way- there are antique stores that provide hours of nostalgic shopping and the thrill of maybe finding that hidden treasure you have been searching for. For those who need a rest, they can come on in to the historic movie theater with two screens and then walk on up the street and enjoy a steak dinner with all the trimmings, before retiring to the nearby Bed and Breakfast. History buffs will marvel at Indian artifacts, the big game hunt exhibit, and history of the Great Western Trail, as well as works of world renowned artists at the Red River Valley Museum. Vernon has the rich history of the Great Western Cattle Trail, where thousands of cattle and cowboys made their way from Bandera clear up to Canada. Doan’s crossing, the site where the cattle drovers would stop and stay before crossing into Oklahoma, is still marked by the original adobe home of the Doan family. Two new museums, the Wilbarger County Historical Museum and the Jack Teagarden Museum, both scheduled for opening in the fall of 2013, give visitors and residents even more to add to the experience of Vernon’s rich heritage. There are several rodeos each year in Vernon including the famous Santa Rosa Rodeo, home of the Santa Rosa Palomino Club, Ambassadors on Horseback. The Santa Rosa Rodeo grounds are the only remaining rodeo facility in the United States to still use wooden chutes. These are just a few of the things that make Vernon such a special place. Our residents are proud of our heritage and continue to work hard to ensure our future is just as bright as our history is rich. Whether you are here for a visit or making Vernon your new home, the Vernon Chamber of Commerce is here to help you make your Vernon experience a real adventure.

Carrie Hawkins Chamber Executive

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Contributors Bret McCormick Publisher

Daniel Walker Managing Editor

Clint McCormick Advertising Director

Mike Chacanaca Regional News Editor

Chance Baskerville Sports Editor

Payton McCormick Classified/Circulation Director

Joyce Ashley Lifestyles Editor

Christi Coston Graphics

Charles Ashley Press Supervisor / IT Supervisor / Photographer

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Doan’s Picnic carries on Pioneer Tradition

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ince 1884, the Doan’s Picnic has offered a time of celebration, heritage and tradition. On the first Saturday in May, hundreds of visitors gather beneath the tall trees on the lawn of the Doan’s adobe north of Vernon for the oldest continuous celebration of its kind in Texas. The adobe, which still stands and serves as the site of the event, is the oldest structure in Wilbarger County.

In 1880, C.F. Doan took over the store and built a 30x50-foot building for the trading post. He also constructed corrals, branding chutes and furnaces for the trail drivers. Within a few years, he had his store in a large double building, and the firm of C.F. Doan and Company was doing a successful business. In fact, when the town of Vernon was settled, a branch store was opened.

The Doan’s picnic grew out of a time when the pioneer Doan’s family celebrated May Day with a picnic in nearby Watts Grove. The group repeated it the next year, and the picnic then became a tradition.

In 1881, an adobe home for the Doan family was built. The structure, which underwent refurbishing in the 1990’s, still stands today as the oldest house in Wilbarger County. It is located at the end of FMR 924, six miles north and east of the intersection at Hwy. 283 between Vernon and Altus. The adobe building was approved in 1977 for listing in the National Registry of Historic Places and is marked with a medallion from the Texas State Historical Commission.

The late 1880’s was a time of cowboys and cattle drives, Indians and pioneers when land was being settled, homesteads were carved out of the wild country, and thousands of longhorns were taken down the Western Trail through what is now Vernon. The cattle were taken across the Red River near Doan’s Crossing, so called after the establishment of the Jonathan Doan’s trading post nearby. Although the once thriving community is gone, the picnic continues as a tribute to early-day settlers, cattle drivers and pioneers.

At one time, Doan’s was a thriving community with several homes, the Bat Cave Café, McBride Hotel, Doan’s store and adobe warehouse, Louie’s blacksmith shop, Dr. F.C. St. John’s drug store, Hufstedler’s wagon yard, Charles Cleve

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land store, the Cowboy Saloon, headquarters and warehouse of Bar-H Ranch, churches, schools and other buildings. Doan’s was said to be the largest supply house outside of Fort Worth in 1892. Trail drivers, cowboys, buffalo hunters, pioneers, settlers and Indian made Doan’s their stop along the trail. But gradually the Fort Worth and Denver Railroad approached the prairies, and freight cars eventually replaced the trail herders to northern shipping points. Eventually, the community became deserted and now only a few homes occupy the land. The adobe house and granite markers pay homage to the history of the area. The picnic for many years included a variety of event and activities including horse racing, carnival rides, political speeches, music, food and even airplane rides. Crowning of a queen began in 1911, and a king was added in 1939. In 1968, the Doan’s Picnic Association began honoring a man or woman of the year, which changed some 10 years later to honoring both a man and woman.

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The traditional picnic was held for many years at the original site of Watts Grove, but due to flooding some years back, the event has now been moved to the spacious lawn which surrounds the Doan’s adobe. There visitors can settle beneath the shade of many large trees and watch as a Doan’s Picnic king and queen are crowned, pioneer ranch brands are recorded, Northside High School serves up taste-tempting Texas barbecue right on the spot, and visitors can still walk through the adobe and sign the guest book there. While the picnic is a much simpler event today than it has been in decades past, it remains as a celebration of heritage, tradition and honor of those early pioneers whose fortitude and determination settled the land.

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Vernon Plaza Celebrates Rich History, Continues Tradition for Movie-goers First built in 1953 on the ruins of the Vernon Opera House, the Plaza Theater was the crown jewel in the Interstate Theater Company’s line of movie houses, which included the legendary Paramount Theater in Abilene and the Hippodrome Theater in Waco.

are what make institutions like the Vernon Plaza Theater so important in small towns. Movies are our common “escape” from the sometimes-sobering real world. We visit Oz, Middle Earth, galaxies far, far away, and we laugh, we cry, we jump, and we melt, together.

Taking full advantage of the latest technology of the time, the Plaza was the first 3-D movie theater built in Texas. With special features like stereo sound (a new innovation at the time), a “Cry Room” for mother’s to take their unruly children and a 1,200 seat capacity, there wasn’t anything like the Plaza in the state of Texas—or anywhere else, for that matter!

Popular culture is culture, and it doesn’t matter if you prefer Clint Eastwood over John Wayne, we take a lot of life lessons from the movies. The Vernon Plaza Theater has been vital to the imaginations of the folks in Vernon for 60 years, now. The times have changed, the way we watch movies has changed, but what the movies mean to us has not changed. We still enter the darkened theater to escape, to get away, to dream.

Over the years, a number of stars and celebrities made their way across the stage to meet and greet the citizens of Vernon. The last such appearance was Sonny and Cher, and a great many of our older residents recall fondly seeing them here in person. Those stories, and many others, prop up the walls of the Vernon Plaza Theater. First dates, wedding proposals, anniversaries, celebrations of all kinds, and a whole bunch of “family nights”

Every weekend, it’s someone’s first date. It’s someone’s celebration. It’s someone’s family night. The Vernon Plaza Theater makes those memories by helping to unlock our dreams.

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a fledgling movie career with several appearances in “The Birth of the Blues, “The Glass Wall” and “Jazz on a Summer’s Day”. Teagarden joined the Paul Whiteman band in 1933, and Louis Armstrong’s All-Stars. Teagarden later left Armstrong and formed the Jack Teagarden All Stars Dixieland band in 1951. He died in 1963 and was inducted posthumously into the Big Band and Jazz Hall of Fame in 1985.

Rock ‘n roll legend Born Roy Kelton Orbison on April 23, 1936 in Vernon, Roy Orbison changed the sound of rock and roll music with his distinctive voice. His career spanned over four decades and included such hits as “Only The Lonely,” “In Dreams,” “Oh, Pretty Woman,” “Crying,” “Blue Bayou,” “Candy Man,” “Uptown,” “Leah,” and countless others, many of which are still played and enjoyed today. Orbison’s mother, Nadine, was a nurse, and his father, Orbie Lee, an oil field worker who gave him his first guitar. The first song Roy learned to play was the ernon has been home to at least two legends in the 1939 standard, “You Are My Sunshine,” world of music. Jazz great Jack Teagarden and rock written by former Louisiana governor and roll legend Roy Orbison were both born in Vernon. Jimmie Davis. By 1944, Roy had written his first song, “A Vow of Love,” in front of his grandmother’s house in Vernon. Orbison performed on KVWC Radio A museum to honor jazz great Jack Teagarden is currently in in 1945 after winning a contest. In 1946, the Orbisons moved to progress in downtown Vernon. The museum, located in the former the West Texas oil town of Wink, where, at the age of 13, Orbison Goodyear Building on Wilbarger Street, is on track for a fall 2013 formed his first band, “The Wink Westerners.” He graduated from opening. Wink High School in June 1954 and, before long the Wink WestTeagarden was born Weldon Leo erners were regulars on local television and radio programs. Teagarden in Vernon on Aug. 20, Though he initially passed on “The Teen Kings,” Phillips signed 1905, to Charles and Helen TeagarRoy Orbison to Sun Records after hearing Orbison and the Kings’ den. His father was an oil worker version of the Clover’s “Trying To Get To You” and “Ooby Dooby,” and his mother a piano teacher and a single they’d recorded at Norman Petty’s studio in Clovis, N.M. church organist. All four Teagarden Roy Orbison and the Teen Kings re-recorded “Ooby Dooby” for children became musicians. TeagarSun Records on March 27, 1956, and the single peaked at #59 on den’s father was an amateur brass the Billboard Pop Singles chart in June 1956, giving Orbison his band trumpeter and started young first commercial success. Orbison’s string of hits made him one of Jack playing the baritone horn. By the the most popular rock ‘n roll singers of the time. age of 10, Teagarden had switched Orbison performed his final concert in Highland Heights, Ohio in to playing trombone. His mother gave late 1988. He died of a heart attack on Dec. 6, 1988 in Nashville. him piano lessons as well. The tromA large colorful sign at the site of Christ the King Hospital, where bone, however, would become his Orbison was born, was dedicated on his birthday in April 2013. trademark. He made his first professional appearance playing duet with his mother at the local movie house in Vernon and later played in Chappell, Neb., where the family moved after the death of Jack’s father when Jack was 13. At age 16, he played with a quartet group at the Horn Palace Inn in San Antonio led by drummer Cotton Bailey who gave him the nickname, “Jack.” In the late 1920’s, his career soared when he joined the Ben Pollack Orchestra while beginning a prolific recording career, singing with notable band leaders and sidemen as Louis Armstrong, Benny Goodman, Bix Beiderbecke, Red Nichols, Jimmy McPartland, Mezz Mezzrow, Glenn Miller and Eddie Condon. He was featured on most of the major recording companies including RCA Victor, Columbia, Decca, Capitol and MGM discs. Among his most famous recordings were “The Sheik of Araby” “Stars Fell on Alabama” and “Basin Street Blues.” Teagarden had

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Church of Christ in Vernon since early 1880s The Church of Christ has been meeting in Vernon for more than a century. Organized in the early 1880s by R.F. Jones with the help of a gospel meeting conducted by Brother Rollins of Thorp Springs, Texas, the church began meeting in a school building at Fannin and Paradise Streets. T.W. Carruth and M.G. Gilbert were the first two elders. In 1890 the congregation built their own building at Deaf Smith and Marshall Streets. It was a small, one room, frame building. During the prosperous years of 1889-1891, the membership grew to about 200. After a long, severe drought that almost depopulated Vernon, the membership dwindled to 25. The early 1900’s were a busy time for the church in Vernon. W.A. Bentley became the first salaried minister. He was paid $15 per month, and his family supplemented this income by picking cotton. From 1900 to 1904 many meetings were held. Baptizing was done at Condon Springs, now known as Hillcrest. In 1907, when a storm damaged the building, a larger one room structure was built. W.P. Skaggs came to preach in Vernon for $40 per month and stayed six years. A baptistry and a balcony were added to the building. The membership of the church was about 50. From 1913 to 1927, Lee Mansfield, Foy E. Wallace, Jr., Tom Walker, T.E. Milholland, Don Hockaday, and T.M. Carney filled the pulpit in Vernon. In 1919 a large tabernacle was built on the west side of the building for revivals and Bible classes in the summer. In 1928 the church building was sold to the American Legion, and a large brick building was built at the corner of Houston and Pease by contractor T.B. Smith at a cost of $36,000. With the growth of the church, a second congregation was established in 1949 on East Paradise Street. Several different ministers worked with the

Houston & Pease Church during the following years. In 1965, while Claude Guild was the minister, plans began to be made to move to a larger building. Land was purchased at Wilbarger and Wheeler Streets, and a building designed by Jack Nubaum was built for a cost of $280,000. On April 6, 1969, after 41 years at Houston and Pease, the congregation met in the new building with Eugene Gilmore as minister. In 1970 T. Larry Marshall came to preach in Vernon, assisted by Weldon McKinney and later Daryl Green. The next minister at Wilbarger Street was Don Kleppe in 1978, with Duane Jenks, then Gary Richardson, then Bill Perring as youth ministers. In 1984 the Paradise Street congregation merged with the Wilbarger Street congregation. In September of 1987, John Roberts became the Pulpit Minister, followed by Kevin Ward in 1994. In 1988, David Lovejoy came as Youth Minister, followed by Dave Sager in 1990, Rob Anderson in 1993, Tony Hall in 1995, and Philip Thomason in 1999. Vendall Dollarhide was the Evangelism Minister in 2002. Chris Robey was the Associate Minister 2003 to 2006. From August of 1998 to 2009, Jay Hanley had served as Pulpit Minister. David Winn had been Youth Minister since February 2007. Winn is now Pulpit Minister starting from 2009 to present. Timothy Gibson is the newly hired youth minister since September. Elizabeth Hickenbottom is secretary and bookkeeper. She has been here since 2010. Juan and Gracie Regino have served as the church’s custodians since 1995.

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New Hope Baptist Church has served community since 1911 ew Hope Baptist Church, located at 1001 Houston, has been an integral part of the local religious community since April 1911, when it was first established in Vernon. The church celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2011. The Rev. George Easter has served as the church’s pastor since 2004.

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On April 18, 1911, five men, including the Rev. W.A. Thomas, Will Brown, George Dixon, Jim Martin and T.F. Hooker formed a committee to organize the New Hope Baptist Church. The building was erected on May 15, 1921. It was rebuilt in 1941 and again in 1944 to replace the one room church under the leadership of the Rev. M.S. Rice. In 1950, tragedy struck the church when a fire destroyed the building. It was rebuilt but burned again in 1958. The Rev. C. Simpson led the project of repairing the church. In 1963, the Rev. H.L. Tabor organized the youth department. During the leadership of the Rev. L.W. Campbell, the church was remodeled.

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Over the years, the building has undergone refurbishing and remodeling to add modern conveniences. It now stands as a religious pillar for the African-American community and offers a Bible-based faith for its congregation, preaching the Word of God to all who attend. Pastors who have served New Hope Baptist Church during its 100 years include: the Rev. W.A. Thomas, 1911- 1931; the Rev. W.D. Davis, 1931-1935; the Rev. M.S. Rice, 1935-1943; the Rev. C.H. Durden, 1944-1945; the Rev. A.L. Davis, 1945-1952; the Rev. C. Simpson, 1952-1962; the Rev. H.L. Tabor, 19621964; the Rev. L.W. Campbell, 1965- 1971; the Rev. J.J. Lewis, 1971-1974; the Rev. R.L. Vasher II, 1976-1986; the Rev. E.J. Tyson, 1986-2003; the Rev. George Easter, 2004-Present.

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Summer’s Last Blast Heats up Vernon’s Streets

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n 1990, the Vernon Street Machine and Classics Association sponsored an event they called the Vernon Super Cruise. Thirty-seven cars showed up, and very few of them actually cruised. Those first efforts, however, have evolved over the past years into an event that brings thousands of vintage and classic cars and vehicles to the streets of Vernon while an additional several thousand spectators line the curbs to watch, listen to music, host tailgate parties, and enjoy a full schedule of activities. The year 2014 marks the event’s 25th year, and Summer’s Last Blast now explodes onto the scene each August, drawing visitors from all across the country. In the week preceding the Summer’s Last Blast weekend, concerts, car shows and even a “Redneck” car show are all held at various businesses, while the weekend traditionally kicks off on Friday evening with a rocking concert in Wilbarger Auditorium. In the past, such well-known artists as the

Crickets, The Vels, Classic Rock All Stars, Crew Cuts with Mitch Ryder and the Detroit Wheels, Gary Lewis and the Playboys, The Crystals, Kraig Parker, the Legend Lives On, 1964 Beatles Tribute, The Cowsills and The Return Beatles Tribute have entertained the concert-goers. Following the concert, Burnout Contests heat up the streets as drivers show off by “smoking their tires” for prizes. On Saturday, vintage vehicles and classic cars fill Roy Orbison Park, headquarters for the event, as cruisers wait for the Nostalgic Cruise, the centerpiece of the weekend. The restricted Cruise, for vehicles 1978 and older, begins at 7 p.m., Saturday, filling Wilbarger Street from one side of town to the others while spectators line the curbs with live bands, vendors and a chance to view some of the finest classic, antique and vintage vehicles around. The success of Summer’s Last Blast, which now draws multitudes of visitors of all ages

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from throughout the United States, is the result of careful planning and dedication by members of the sponsoring organization. Vernon Street Machine and Classics Association members have deliberately stayed focused on their original goal: to bring a quality car event to Vernon.

While there are similar car happenings around the country, Summer’s Last Blast remains one of the premiere, “not-to-be” missed events. Those interested in the event may go online to vsmcblast.com. Summer’s Last Blast 2013 will explode onto the scene this year on Aug. 9 and 10. From the pre-show activities earlier in the week to the classic Nostalic Cruise on Saturday, the event should be another success. The kickoff concert this year will be The Return sponsored by the Santa Rosa Belles, set for 6:30 p.m., Friday, Aug. 9, at Wilbarger Auditorium. Other activities during the week will include a pre-show on Thursday at Vernon Nursing & Rehab Center, and an Elvis concert at Wynwood the same night as well as a classic car show at the Waggoner National Bank, and a Red Neck Car Show at SumnerColley, all set from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., on Friday, Aug. 9. The traditional Nostalgic Cruise will take place on Saturday, Aug. 10, as participants are once again invited to cruise one of the longest drags in the southern United States region.

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The success of Summer’s Last Blast, which now draws multitudes of visitors of all ages from throughout the United States, is the result of careful planning and dedication by members of the sponsoring organization. Vernon Street Machines and Classics Association members have deliberately stayed focused on their original goal: to bring a quality car event to Vernon. The first year, 1990, was mostly a car show at Hillcrest Plaza held on June 2. There was no formal cruising involved, but organizers quickly recognized the appeal of the event, and decided to hold it again the next year.

Jamaica and the Bahamas as part of the attractions of the event. A model car show was also added. In 1994, Car Craft magazine was on the scene and published an article with pictures on the show. By then, the event had been moved back to August. No doubt the most talked about year was 1995, when the event was to feature Wolfman Jack. Unfortunately, the legendary disc jockey and celebrity died unexpectedly just two weeks before he was to appear at Summer’s Last Blast. Taking his place was the Wolfman’s son, Todd Weston Smith.

The second event was moved to September and called Summer’s Last Blast. It involved a car show on the parking lot of the old Furr’s Supermarket on Hillcrest Drive, poker runs, games and the first official cruise night. There were about 70 cars that year.

The event featured a sock hop on the parking lot of Carnegie City-County Library with a crowd turning out to listen and dance to the sounds of classic rock and roll. It was also the first year for the Burnout contest sponsored by the Vernon Police Association.

In 1992 and 1993, the car club found sponsors to give away exotic cruises to

In 1996, the Crickets made their first appearance as concert performers for

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Summer’s Last Blast. The group drew such a big crowd to the Empire Room of Wilbarger Auditorium, that many concert-goers ended up on the auditorium’s lawn trying to catch the sounds coming through the open windows. Texas Highway magazine also did a feature article that year on the event. Gary Lewis and the Playboys along with the allgirls group, The Crystals, drew an enthusiastic crowd to Wilbarger Auditorium in 1997. The show was moved to the auditorium’s main stage in order to accommodate the crowd. In 1998, the Classic Rock All Stars was the concert attraction. The band featured former singers or musicians with such groups as Rare Earth, Iron Butterfly, Sugar Loaf and Hannibal and the Headhunters. Poker runs and mini cruises set the tone for the main event. In 1999, The Crickets returned to perform in concert and close to 1,000 cars registered for the weekend activities. The year 2000 saw the Crew Cuts bringing lots of memories with their special blend of musical talents

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Time to cool off? Visit Vernon’s Aquatic Center W hen the temperatures begin to rise, nothing could be more refreshing than a dip in the water at Vernon’s state-of-the art aquatic center. Vernon unveiled the attractive aquatic center, located at Orbison Park, 4400 Sand Road, during the summer of 2012. The pool is open to the public days a week, weather permitting. The pool is closed each Monday for cleaning. Hours of operation are from noon to 6 p.m. The general admission fee is $3.50 and a passbook of 25 passes is $75. The aquatic center includes a state-of-the art pool house, a water slide, three swimming lanes, diving board, beach entry access, a mushroom shower and a lazy river as well as free Wi-Fi access for patrons. The Aquatic Center has a capacity to hold 425 people with an average expected attendance of 325 a day; it holds 180,000 gallons of water, takes up 75,000 square feet, and has an estimated annual budget of $100,000. Pool parties can be scheduled Tuesday and Wednesday as

well as Friday through Sunday from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. A weekly family night will be held each Thursday during the season from 7 to 9 p.m. A 2-hour party rental is $220 for up to 100 people and $260 for more than 100 people. A 3-hour part costs $320 for up to 100 people and $360 for up to 160 people. A down payment of $100 is due when reservations are made and the full fee must be paid within two weeks of the rental a party date. No cancellation is allowed within two weeks. There is also a group birthday night held once each month in which several groups will hold parties at the same time. The event will be held the second Saturday of each month and costs $75 for a two-hour rental. The Roy Orbison Clubhouse and Flora Belle Gazebo at Orbison Park are available for family reunions, banquets, and meetings. For reservation scheduling information about any of the parks and recreation facilities, contact City Hall at (940) 552-2581.

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It’s Rodeo Time in Vernon! F

or almost 70 years, the Santa Rosa Roundup has brought the excitement of rodeo to fans. It was in 1945 that E. Paul Waggoner decided that Vernon needed to spotlight the cowboys. By then, rodeo was a popular sport as well as a big business. The Rodeo Cowboy Association had been founded to police the sport and give it respectability. The RCA also set up a fair and accurate way to determine national championships in the sport. Waggoner dreamed of presenting an annual rodeo and quarter horse show that would dazzle the spectators. At the time, however, World War II was still being fought, so Waggoner held his plans in abeyance. In 1946, Waggoner began construction of the rodeo plant, considered one of the finest ever built. Plans of rodeo grounds throughout the United States were studied to incorporate the most modern and complete features of the time. The first performance was held May 29-June 2, 1946 with two afternoon and four evening performances attended by some 50,000. The event was held in conjunction with a homecoming for the men and women of World War II and was dedicated to their honor. The Santa Rosa Roundup is now a premier event on the rodeo circuit. A big four-day event gets underway on Wednesday with a massive parade through downtown Vernon followed by the first night’s performance in the rodeo arena. The rodeo continues through Saturday night with a full schedule of events, including bronc riding, bareback riding, calf roping, team roping, barrel racing and bull riding, In the years since, a number of world champions have seen action in the rodeo arena, including Casey Tibbs, Eddy Akridge,

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Deb Copenhaver, Dean Oliver, Benny Combs, Ronny Sparks, Jim Shoulders, and in more recent years, Will Lowe, Trevor Brazile, Cody Ohl, Stran Smith, Ty Murray and Roy Cooper as well as others. In addition, famous faces have entertained the rodeo crowd over the years, including Rex Allen, Slim Pickins, Ken Curtis, Michael Landon, and Tanya Tucker. And to add to the excitement, Waggoner Ranch cowboys get in on the action as well as they compete in a number of events to the thrill of the rodeo crowd. The famed Santa Rosa Palomino Club also performs nightly to add its own special touch of color to the event. The Santa Rosa Roundup continues today to uphold the rodeo tradition set in 1946. Kenneth Dockery took over the rodeo arena in 2008, purchasing it from Grady Kent Stowe and John Mikkelsen, who had owned the grounds since 1974. Dockery’s daughter, Mary Kay Riley of Amarillo, is the current the owner, and Gary and Cindy Werner lease the arena and grounds. The arena is located just south of Vernon and includes a covered seating area to protect rodeo spectators from the weather with a seating capacity of 3,500 general admission seats. In addition to the annual Santa Rosa Roundup, the massive arena, under management of the Werners, is also available for rental to permit other events and also offers services such as horse boarding and overnight stay for stock, along with a dance hall. For further information on facilities available for events and rates, you may contact Gary Werner at (570) 916-7007.

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Museums Offer Visitors A Peek Into County, City History

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or those who enjoy seeking out the past, Vernon is fortunate to have a number of interesting museums that will appeal to history buffs of all ages.

Historical Museum

The new Wilbarger County Historical Museum, located in the old county jail, is on track for a Spring 2014 opening , according to project leader Preston Cary. The unique museum will give visitors to Vernon an entertaining and fascinating look at the county’s history and heritage. The original building was constructed in 1912, with an addition added in the 1930s. The museum will have two entrances – the regular original entrance and a ramp to make it handicap accessible. Cary said that museum will feature exhibits on local life and businesses in Wilbarger County. Plans include a gift shop that will sell historic reproduction prints.

Teagarden Museum

Honoring jazz legend and Vernon native Jack Teagarden, the Teagarden Museum is located in a building on Wilbarger Street which originally housed a Studebaker dealership in the 1930s. It later became a Goodyear tire dealership, but any semblance to those former businesses will be gone when the renovations to the unique Teagarden Museum are complete. When finished, the museum will be a repository for Jack Teagarden collection and memorabilia, including a computer area, audio and video equipment and a library of reference books and research materials. Teagarden fans will find the museum a treasure trove. Teagarden is regarded as the “Father of the Jazz Trombone” and appeared with a number of other jazz and Big Band greats, including Louis Armstrong, Benny Goodman, BIx Beiderbecke, Red Nichols, Glenn Miller and others of the era. He was born in Vernon in 1905.

Railroad Museum

The JD&PA Railroad Museum features an extensive model railroad collection as well as railroad memorabilia. The railroad museum is located at 2512 Pearl and owned by Jackie Barnes and is a “must” for all railroad buffs. To visit, call 940552-6419.

Red River Valley Museum

The Red River Valley Museum was founded in 1963 with a box of arrowheads, housed in an unused cloak room at the Wilbarger Auditorium. In 1975, an old, vacant hospital

building was donated, and with the move into larger quarters, the museum’s mission was expanded to include memorabilia relating to Vernon. In 1983, William A. Bond offered a donation to kick off a building fund, and if successful, he would donate his collection of over 130 record-holding wild game trophy mounts from around the world. Within a year the funds had been raised. In 1985, the present 15,000 square feet building located adjacent to Vernon College was dedicated and the mission expanded further to include the preservation and exhibition of artifacts that encompass and influence the education, history and lives of Vernon and Wilbarger County inhabitants. A replica of Electra Waggoner Biggs art studio offers a look at the life of the famed sculptress, and Great Western Trail exhibits are constantly expanding. The museum is, in fact, currently in the process of creating a Great Western Trail Heritage Center in tribute to the Western Trail which wound its way from south Texas through Vernon and onward to northern destinations as thousands of cattle were driven up the trail in the 1880s.The Red River Valley Museum is home to the Bond Collection, considered one of the best in the world. There is also a room dedicated to the famed Waggoner Ranch and in the Berry History and Science Room, visitors will find exhibits that depict local history all the way back to the age of the dinosaurs, and includes an indigenous tribal artifact collection donated by Mr. and Mrs. J. Henry Ray. A very popular annual exhibit is an international juried art show by artists from far and wide. Approximately 100 pieces of art ranging from paintings to bronzes are accepted from the applications. Significant cash awards are made to the winning artists in each category. The museum is located next to Vernon College. Admission is free, and hours are 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Sunday.

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Vernon Burnin’ just might be your speed L

ike to bike? If so, the Vernon Burnin’ Bike Ride is just your speed.

For the past 18 years, bike riders have found the Vernon Burnin’ a fun and challenging event. Co-sponsored by the Vernon Jaycees and the Vernon Optimist Club, the ride is held each August and draws bike ride enthusiasts from a number of states. Four routes are offered to participants, including a 12-mile ride for beginners or those who just want to take it easy; 22-miles for the hardier rider; 38-miles for the more advanced bike rider, and a challenging 62 miles (100K) for the serious rider.

The Vernon Burnin’ starts and ends at the Vernon College southwest parking lot. At the same time the ride is taking place, there is also a kids’ event for the younger group with all participating youngsters receiving prizes. Contacts for the Vernon Burnin’ include Rick Graf at 940-552-2511 or 940-838-9200, ricky@wnbvernon.com or Gib Baskerville at 940-5552-2511 or 940-839-6286, Gib@wnbvernon.com.

Detailed course maps and controlled intersections are provided along with frequent rest stops stocked with water, ice, sports drinks, fruits and cookies. Road assistance is provided by sag wagons. Finish line festivities include first place awards and door prizes provided by local and area merchants.

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SERVICE DIRECTORY

UTILITIES

CIVIL SERVICES

City Hall

Tax Assesor

Southwestern Rural Electric (SWRE)

County Clerk

1725 Wilbarger St, Vernon, TX 76384 Phone: (940)-552-2581 Fax: (940)-552-0569 913 U.S. 70, Vernon, TX 76384 Phone: (940) 552-9792 American Electric Power (AEP) 12569 FM 3430, Vernon, TX 76384 Phone: (940)-886-2627

Atmos Energy

1700 Wilbarger, Room 17 Vernon, TX 76384 Phone: (940)-552-9341 Fax: (940)-553-2324 1700 Wilbarger, Room 15 Vernon, TX 76384 Phone: (940)-552-5486 Fax: (940)-553-1202

DMV

Phone: (888)-286-6700

1700 Wilbarger St, Vernon, TX 76384 Phone: (940)-552-6372

Suddenlink

Wilbarger Human Society

Phone: (855)-992-5130

AT&T

2801 Sullivan St Vernon Phone: (940)-552-5373

Phone: (855)-637-9525

EMERGENCY Police Department 1306 Main Street Vernon, TX 76384 Phone: (940)-553-3311

Print & Digital Media Vernon Daily Record 3214 Wilbarger Vernon, Tx 76384 Phone: (940)-552-5454

Sheriff Department

1700 Wilbarger St, Vernon, TX 76384 Phone: (940)-552-6205

Vernon Fire Department 4109 Wilbarger St. Vernon, TX 76384 Phone: (940)-553-1782

Wilbarger County Judge

1701 Wilbarger St # 12 , Vernon, TX 76384 Phone: (940)-553-2300

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Wilbarger Outdoors W

hen it comes to the outdoors of Wilbarger County and the surrounding area it isn’t hard to see what makes this North Central Texas county special. Formed in 1858, Wilbarger County is 978 square miles of diverse terrain such as open grasslands, mesquite, pasture and rugged, forested river bottom land. With thousands of acres of hunting land available, sportsman from all over the state and even the country head this way for hunting expeditions. The famous Waggoner Ranch, the largest contiguous ranch in the United States, starts on the southern side of the county. With over 500,000 acres of fenced, private land, wild game in the area are the most sought after. Hunting land surrounding the ranch is the most coveted for big bucks during deer season. But deer season isn’t the only reason for hunters to come to Vernon. The area is home to the white tailed deer, mule deer,

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wild hogs, javelina, turkeys, dove, ducks, geese, and other game birds as well as many varmints like coyote, skunk, badger, etc. There has even been rare sightings of a stray elk or two making their way through. Farmers in Wilbarger County have a variety of crops that have helped wildlife flourish over the years. Wheat, Winter Wheat, Corn, Alfalfa, cotton, and other crops give animals small and large a diverse diet. But the cattle area have the biggest effect. In West Texas it is vital to have a water source for livestock and with an abundance of water tanks, outdoorsmen don’t have to rely on the rivers to find active game. Dove season is a great time of year in the area. With all the aforementioned reasons, dove flock to the area in mass quantities. Bagging a limit of any legal species is a breeze on a daily basis as long as you have enough ammo or are a crack shot. Morning, White-winged and White-tipped dove are all prevalent in the area.

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hunting, land opportunities abound in area

Fisherman are not left out in Vernon either. Within minimal driving distance are Lake Kemp and Lake Diversion as well as many lakes within 4-8 hours of driving. Bass, catfish, and perch are the main targets for the aquatic outdoorsmen, but catfish is the winner by far. Along with the lakes, the Pease and Read Rivers offer unique opportunities for bold as Noodling or Hand fishing is now legal in the state of Texas. For those of you who are not interested in hunting or fishing when it comes to wildlife, there is plenty to do in the area as well. Those interested in looking to the stars can head to Crowell, TX where many people travel across the county to get a glimpse at the stars at the Three Rivers Foundation. Anyone keen on nature hikes, bird watching, or even camping can head to Copper Breaks State Park for some time away from civilization and enjoy a quite setting with little traffic through the area.

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field dedication to honor former Vernon head coach Leo Brittain took place at halftime of the VernonGraham game on Friday, Oct. 11. Former members of his coaching staff joined with ex-players and a host of fans to commemorate the official renaming of Lion Stadium to “Leo Brittain Field at Lion Stadium.”

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Honored guests included former assistant coaches Bill Blythe and Geary Coker, as well as ex-Lions such as Dexter Butler, T.J. Smith, Kyle Williams, Billy Boyce and others who presented the legendary Vernon coach with a plaque honoring his accomplishments. Brittain’s wife Karen and their three children were present as well.

and a Class 3A State Championship in 1990. He retired as the longest tenured coach in the history of the Vernon High School football program. His 167 wins also made him the winningest coach in VHS history. He was inducted into the Texas High School Coaches Association’s Hall of Honor on July 22, 2009. His career record totaled 208 wins, 106 losses and 12 ties. Brittain spent three seasons at Graham High School before arriving in Vernon, and five years as the head coach at Wichita Falls High School following his departure from the Lions. In 2000, he took WFHS to the state semifinals and a No. 1 ranking in Class 4A during his final season as a head coach.

Coach Brittain took over as head coach for the Lions in 1976 and remained in charge for 19 seasons. He compiled an overall record of 167-59-11 during his regime for the Lions. His achievements included 12 consecutive playoff appearances (1983-1994), eight regional titles, four appearances in the state semifinals, two state finals berths

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History Museum On Track For 2014 Opening

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he new Wilbarger County Historical Museum, located in the old county jail, is on track for a September opening according to project leader Preston Cary. The unique museum will give visitors to Vernon an entertaining and fascinating look at the county’s history and heritage. The original building was constructed in 1912, with an addition added in the 1930s. Rewiring was required. Along with the electric system, each room in the building has had an individual cooling system installed. “We’ll be able to adjust the temperature for each room depending on what the displays need,” he said. On Friday Cary and worker Francisco Enrique Najera were working to pull up the last of the tile. “We’ve had to take up the entire old tile except in two rooms,” Cary said. “We’re getting the floors ready to stain and seal.” “After that, we need to finish painting the wood work, put down the rubberized base and then we’ll be ready to start putting in the displays,” he said.

“One of the first displays we’re moving in is the seat booth from the old Flame,” he said. Cary said he’s received a much appreciated labor from Lonnie Chism who has pledged to build the frames for the pictures that will be displayed. “He offered to donate his time for the museum,” Cary said. Another project on tap in the near future is the installation of a wheel chair ramp at the front of the museum. “The museum will have two entrances – the regular original entrance and then we’re also going to build a ramp to make it handicap accessible.” Cary said that museum will feature exhibits on local life and businesses in Wilbarger County. Plans include a gift shop that will sell historic reproduction prints. Workers are at the museum most every day and Cary said volunteers and donations are always appreciated.

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Retirement In Vernon Easy, Enjoyable

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hen it’s time to sit back and enjoy the rewards of many years of hard work, Vernon is an ideal community in which to spend those retirement years.

Affordable housing is available with a slower paced lifestyle, friendly atmosphere, many recreational opportunities as well as exceptional medical services. There are also quality living facilities for those who need care in their daily lives, as well as assisted living facilities for those who can pretty well manage on their own but just might require a little additional help in their senior years. Vernon also has a number of home health care agencies, offering in-home care, and of course, Wilbarger General Hospital is located right in Vernon to offer quality medical assistant. Vernon is fortunate to have a number of doctors and specialists, saving seniors the time and expense of having to travel to other towns for many of their medical needs. On the social side, the Chaparral Senior Activity Center is a hub of activity for seniors. Located behind the Vernon

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College campus, the center offers a variety of programs and activities for local senior citizens, including computer accessibility, exercise programs, cards and dominoes and other fun events and programs. A hot, nutritious meal is served at noon each day, and those attending enjoy the opportunity to socialize with others. Iva Belew serves as the center’s director. Information on programs and activities is available by calling Belew at 5526114. For residents who live at home but need some help, such as with meals, the Wilbarger County Meals on Wheels program is available. Sylvia Hinojosa is director of the program and can be reached at 940-552-6114 for information on how to qualify for this service. Wilbarger County’s Senior Citizen Transportation is another service available to senior citizens, offering rides for doctor’s appointments, beauty shop, grocery shopping, Chaparral Center and other excursions. For information, call 940-839-5574.

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Christmas Parade Opens Holiday Season with Western Twist

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n the second Saturday in December, Vernon celebrates Christmas with a western twist. “Christmas on the Western Trail” involves a number of activities, including the arrival of Santa Claus that afternoon along with downtown festivities from horse rides to motorcycle rides, activities at a number of locations around town, vendors set up around the decorated courthouse with crafts, art and other items, and a host of other attractions for the enjoyment of residents and visitors alike. Among highlights of the day is the arrival of Santa Claus atop a fire truck. Santa and Mrs. Claus then visit with youngsters in the fire safety house on Marshall Street. The Vernon Fire Department is sponsor for Santa’s visit, which kids of all ages eagerly anticipate. That evening, the Lighted Christmas Parade winds its way through downtown Vernon with floats, antique and classic cars, bands, horses wagons, carriages and various other entries, all brightly outlined in lights. The parade lights up the December night as it makes it way past spectators who gather in downtown Vernon for the exciting event. It’s a very distinctive way to celebrate the holiday and bring a sparkle to the eyes of the spectators. Prizes are awarded to the best decorated floats. The parade is sponsored by Vernon’s Christmas Parade Committee, a group of dedicated residents who begin early in the year to plan and coordinate the event.

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Coy’s Discount Foods Coy’s Discount Foods has been locally owned and operated since 1973. Currently Ronnie Moore (second generation) and daughter Bambi Nava (third generation) are at the helm of Vernon’s longest lasting grocery store. With larger corporate stores such as United Supermarkets as well as Walmart in the same town, this family run operation is able to keep pace with these market giants by offering services that most people wouldn’t remember from a grocery store.

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Coy’s customer service is top notch. They still walk people to their vehicles and load their groceries for them, have a drive-thru assistance so that people can get what they need without leaving their vehicle, and even offer home delivery. Along with their service, the produce and meat offered by Coy’s is some of the best in the entire area. They look for local suppliers whenever possible, and keep their prices competitive if not under the larger competition.

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ilbarger County boasts some of the most productive farmland in the United States. Cotton, wheat and peanuts are three major crops that produce abundant crops. In 2010, there were 86,754 acres of wheat harvested and 22,879 harvested acres of cotton.

Wooton also carries a full line of Great Plains drills and agricultural equipment, Summers Manufacturing products, Wheatheart post drivers, Highline bale processors, Land Pride, Rhino and Husqvarna. “We have the farmers covered and we can meet your residential needs with our Husqvarna equipment,” Caster added.

Dedicated to keeping farmers in their fields is the Wooten New Holland dealership, located on the west side of Vernon south of 287 on U.S. 70. The business opened in May of 2013 specializing in New Holland agricultural equipment. “There’s no reason to go out of town, we have everything right here. We have the parts, the sales and service,” said Scott Caster. The business carries a full line of New Holland products along with a large selection of used equipment. The business is also able to handle all parts and service needs. “We have a good selection to choose from. If we don’t have it, we’ll find it,” Caster said.

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Wilbarger County

CREATED IN 1858

ORIGIN OF TOWN’S NAME STILL MYSTERY

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ilbarger County was created on Feb. 1, 1858 and named for Josiah and Mathias Wilbarger, two brothers who were early-day settlers to the area. Josiah Wilbarger is the better known of the two brothers. Born on Sept. 10, 1801 in Kentucky, Josiah Wilbarger came to Texas soon after his marriage in Pike County, Mo. in September 1827 to Margaret Baker. The couple arrived at Matagorda on Dec. 26, where Wilbarger taught for a year before moving to La Grange, where he taught and did surveying until he settled in Stephen F. Austin’s colony in a bend of the Colorado River 10 miles above the site of present Bastrop. He was granted a league of land in January 1832. Josiah Wilbarger’s younger brother, Mathias, came to Texas from Kentucky in 1829 to join his brother. In August 1833, Josiah Wilbarger was a member of a surveying party that was attacked by Comanche Indians near Pecan Springs, about four miles east of the present-day site of Austin. Wilbarger was wounded with an arrow in the neck and was scalped, but managed to cover his head with a sock. He drug himself to Pecan Springs, where he was found the next day by Reuben Hornsby, who took Wilbarger to his home. Wilbarger never completely recovered from his wounds although he lived for some 11 more years. He died at his home near Bastrop on April 11, 1844, survived by his wife and five children. Mathias Wilbarger died on Feb. 20, 1853. Texas history records little of his life. Wilbarger County was established in 1858 and named in honor of the two Wilbarger brothers. The county has had many interesting incidents in its history, one of which was the wolf hunt in which President Theodore Roosevelt took part. The hunt occurred in April 1905 with Comanche Chief Quanah Parker also on the hunt.

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WHAT’S IN A NAME? Vernon , which eventually became the county seat of Wilbarger County, was not the first settlement in the county. That distinction went to Doan’s, a community near the Red River, where the Doan family had established a trading post . In 1879, a mail line was established from Wichita Falls to points north through Doan’s. A mail route was also established south to Seymour in 1880 and settlers began to move in very rapidly. Wilbarger County was officially organized on Oct. 10, 1881 and named for bothers Josiah and Mathis Wilbarger. The county government was established, and Vernon was incorporated in 1889. The exact origin of the town’s name is somewhat of a mystery. In the early beginnings, the village to be known as Vernon was first called Eagle Spring by Tonkawa Indian Scouts because of eagles nesting in the cotton wood trees beside the fresh water spring. Later, a trading post was located at Condon Springs (now Hill Crest Country Club) and a community was established called Eagle Flat. The post office department later declined the name due to too many other towns with “Eagle.” The town’s name was then changed to Vernon. It is not clear exactly how the name was chosen. Some accounts report that it was in honor of Washington’s home, Mount Vernon with the “Mount” dropped as there were no mountains in the area. Another more colorful story suggests the town was named after “Vernon Brown,” a whiskey drummer, who left free samples of his wares.

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he Holiday Inn Express Hotel at 700 Hillcrest Drive opened in 2006 under Joe and Joanie Rogers of Rogers Lodging. At the Holiday Inn Express Hotel in Vernon, guests can enjoy the convenience of swimming in an indoor pool, relax in the whirlpool, host a meeting or prepare for a presentation in the hotel’s boardroom and 24-hour business center or surf the web using the hotel’s free high-speed Internet access available in every room and in the public areas of the hotel. Whether guests are coming to historic Vernon for business or pleasure, they’ll enjoy this award-winning hotel with its clean rooms, great amenities and friendly staff. The hotel also houses a fitness center, has flat-screen TVs throughout the hotel and offers a complimentary, hot breakfast.

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nother local business under the ownership of Rogers Lodging is the Hampton Inn Vernon hotel, located at 4131 Western Trail Drive. The hotel was built in 2011 and was a Lighthouse Award winner in 2012. As a Lighthouse Award winner, the Hampton Inn Vernon hotel was designated one of the top five percent of Hampton hotels in 2012. The award recognizes Hampton Inn hotels for high rankings in accommodations, service and quality. Every year, based on guest feedback, Hampton rewards those hotels that have shown exceptional dedication to customer service, overall guest satisfaction and an infectious spirit that they like to call “Hamptonality.” At the Hampton Inn Vernon hotel, guests can stay in one of the hotel’s 64 modern and attractive guest rooms and enjoy a clean and fresh bed. The hotel features an outdoor swimming pool, which is good for family reunions and group events. There is a big fitness center and free high-speed internet access is available. The Hampton Inn Vernon offers a free hot breakfast, or a free ‘Hampton On the Run’ breakfast bags, which are available Monday through Friday. Other offerings include print and photocopying access, or a 600 sq. ft. meeting room for up to 42 guests, in various seating arrangements. Joe and Joanie Rogers reside in Vernon and are both active in the community.

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Historic Bed and Breakfast Offers Delightful Experience

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isitors to Vernon who would like a unique lodging experience will find it in the Berry Patch. With a Spring 2014 opening scheduled, the elegant bed and breakfast will transport guests back in time. “We’re very excited and proud of it,” said Glenna Bryant, who operates the establishment with her husband Pat. The two-story house, located at 2429 Texas Street in Vernon, is registered as a Texas Historic Homes. It has been completely remodeled inside and out back to its original designs. “We’ve kept the interior the same – it has a lot of beautiful woodwork,” Glenna said. “We’re trying to furnish it in the same late-Victorian style.”

The downstairs has a large living area, ½ bath dining room and kitchen. Guests will be served a homemade continental breakfast while arrangements can be made for other meals when reservations are made, Glenna added. She also noted that the house can be used for wedding receptions and other special occasions. “It’s very flexible and can be used for anything,” she said. Reservations can be made seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. by calling 940-886-8265. There are no minimum stay lengths.

The house features four rooms for guests. One of those rooms is a full suite with a bedroom, sitting room and an elevator. The interior features elaborate Victorian detailing. Another bedroom opens out onto a spacious balcony with a sitting area.

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WILBARGER GENERAL HOSPITAL

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key for stability in any rural, small-town is the availability of quality healthcare services, and Vernon is lucky to be home to 10 practicing healthcare professionals and a 24-bed acute care hospital that is dedicated to providing modernized, efficient healthcare services to the surrounding area. Wilbarger General Hospital first opened its doors in 1969 and in those 44 years the facility has strived to stay up-to-date with the latest advances in medical technology in an effort to ensure quality healthcare services are available to area residents. ““We are committed to building for the future and working to ensure residents have the healthcare services they need right here in their local area,” said Jonathon Voelkel, CEO of Wilbarger General. The recently renovated 3rd Floor Medical/Surgical Unit features 20 large, private rooms all with new paint schemes, lighting, decor and flat screen TVs, along with the latest nurse’s call system and computers in each room as the hospital now uses an electronic medical records system. There is also a 4-bed monitored unit for patients who need constant nursing supervision. New observation deck/waiting room areas are also located on either end of the new floor and provide plenty of natural lighting. Another new addition to the 3rd Floor is a Hospice Room that is dedicated to Hospice patients. Most of the hospital equipment has been removed and the room décor provides a homey, warm atmosphere. The room is also located away from the nurse’s station and elevator to give families more privacy. As a Level IV Trauma Center, the Emergency Department is staffed 24 hours a day/seven days a week with qualified physicians along with nurses certified in Advanced Cardiac Life Support, Pediatric Advanced Life Support and specialized trauma care. In an effort to provide convenient, faster medical care for those with non-emergency matters, WGH has the Walk-In Clinic. Located in Suite 800 of the Doctors Clinic, the Walk-In Clinic is open from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday. “The Walk-In Clinic fills that gap when residents need medical help and their doctor’s office is closed, or they don’t have a primary care physician,” the CEO said. “It offers them a

way, other than going through the hospital Emergency Department, to see a doctor, and saves them both time and money.” The Laboratory and Radiology departments offer the latest in state-of-the-art diagnostic equipment. This includes a revolutionary new MRI machine designed to quickly perform high-quality MR scans with a high level of patient comfort. The machine can significantly reduce exam time and has a wide opening to accommodate patients of varying size, age and physical condition. Other Radiology Department services include x-rays, CT scanning, mammography, DEXA scanning, bone densitometry, ECHO cardiography, diagnostic sonography and much more. Laboratory Department services include blood banking, microbiology, drug screening and blood chemistries. WGH is also the only hospital in the area that has an inpatient behavioral health program dedicated to senior citizens. The Western Trail Behavioral Health Unit is also the area’s only behavioral health unit located inside a medical hospital, so physical health issues can also be treated. The Western Trail Behavioral Health Unit is a short-term, inpatient treatment facility for seniors struggling with depression, grief, dementia and other mental health issues. An intensive out-patient program, the Alternatives Program, is also available for senior citizens suffering from depression, anxiety and other disorders who could benefit from counseling services. Wilbarger General also has an outstanding Rehabilitation Department, Home Health Department, Surgeon’s Clinic, Surgery Department and Kidney Dialysis Center. “Our plan at Wilbarger General is to provide quality healthcare services that are easily accessible to all of our area residents,” Voelkel said. “All of our WGH team members work every day to provide those services with compassion and caring.” Wilbarger General Hospital is located at 920 Hillcrest Drive. Additional information on services is available at 940-5529351 and at www.wghospital.com.

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New State-Of-Art Rehabilitation,

Care Center Blends Luxury and Comfort for Older Citizens

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lending luxurious and comforting lifestyle choices, Advanced Rehab and Healthcare of Vernon, formerly Vernon Care Center, is Vernon’s new, state-of-the-art rehabilitation and long-term care center. Located behind Wilbarger General Hospital, the new 120bed, 52,820 square-foot facility features comfortable, private rooms; spacious living and common areas; large, beautiful dining areas; a courtyard; and a state-of-the-art rehab gym and equipment.

is committed to providing quality healthcare services. The new facility will enable them to continue to fill this important need for the community of Vernon.” For more information about Advanced Rehab and Healthcare of Vernon or to schedule a tour, please call (940) 552-9316.

“This new facility will enable us to serve those in need of rehabilitation and skilled nursing services in an enhanced setting,” said Mary Pfeifer, chief operating officer of Advanced Healthcare Solutions, the company that manages the facility. “The team of skilled and compassionate caregivers at Advanced Rehab and Healthcare of Vernon

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WO L FF C H I RO P RACT I C

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r. Robert Wolff of Wolff Chiropractic Wellness Center has been in business since August of 1986, serving Vernon through the drugless & non-surgical methods for neck pain, lower back, should, elbow wrist, hip, knee & foot pain as well as numbness or tingling in extremities. Dr. Wolff also treats disc problems and believes that conservative methods should be employed before more drastic measures are taken that are irreversible and could leave you disabled. Research is constantly backing up what chiropractic does and its effectiveness. The U.S. Government studies justify that when you have lower back pain, chiropractic is the first choice to turn to. You do not need your medical doctor to refer you to see a chiropractor. At Wolff Chiropractic Wellness Center we use: 1. Spinal decompression, a table that allows for painless treatment for herniated discs or bulging discs in your lower back with great success. 2. Low Level Light Therapy (LLLT) or Cold Laser for reducing pain and muscle spasms as well as healing of soft tissues and is used in spinal decompression therapy. 3. Therapeutic Exercise devices for in office as well as to purchase to use the privacy of your home. This helps to stabilize your spring. 4.

Spinal Adjustments that do amazing and “WOW” experiences on problem cases as well as a TRUE means for wellness care. Most people take better care of their cars than their bodies. Both go out of alignment that causes degeneration. Adjustments that are done WITHOUT force. Both doctors treat 98 year olds as well as new born infants with certainty and with little to no force with results.

5. Whole Food Nutritional Supplements from foods not natural or synthetics. 6. We take our own X-rays. 7. Power Wave water massages done without ppointment or adjustment needed. 8. Deep Tissue release of muscles. 9. Soon to be offering water for better health.

How can these procedures help with our health? We work with getting to the cause of problems and work on prevention and support. We always tell our patients “what caused their problem.” Movement of the spine creates circulation and nutrition to slow or stop arthritic tendencies. You can have a pinched nerve in your neck or lower back and NOT HAVE THE PAIN! That is right, no pain. Christopher Reeves had an accident while riding a horse and severely pinched his nerves but had no neck pain. Eighty percent of nerves coming out of your spine go to “functional organs.” The other 20 percent go to “sensory or pain fibers” causing pain. So 80 percent of the time you could have a pinched nerve and not know it. What happens when you do have a pinched nerve I you get muscle spasms followed by decreased motion in your spine, followed by stiffness or other complaints in your body followed by a diagnosis, followed by spinal degeneration, then pain.

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Surprised? This is just plain human physiology that happens in the very common scenario. What can you do about this? No matter where you are in your age category, you can begin to move in a right direction of health. Only 3 to 5 percent of all diseases are hereditary. What are the other factors that are causing diseases in the U.S.? It is our ENVIRONMENT. Your environment controls your gene expression. The cancer, heart disease, and diabetic genes will not express themselves unless those genes are turned on by your environment. What is environment? It consists of three things. 1. Emotional or mental component. This includes stress from job, financial, family, friends, etc. How well you handle these. 2. Chemical or toxins. This includes foods that have shown to be bad for your health including artificial sweeteners, preservatives, additives, flavorings or colorings. Yes, we are all exposed to these every time we eat processed foods.

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Physical or trauma issues. Such as, reading a book in bed with pillows to prop up, or sleeping with too many pillows. Sitting at a computer too long or being out of shape to keep our muscles toned. As we age we lose muscle mass into our 50’s, 60’s, 70’s, and more into our 80’s. It is imperative to exercise with weights to gain muscle mass so we can combat the degnernative changes.

Also, our bodies need sleep, about 9 hours per night, half your body weight in ounces of spring water every day, and a good attitude to start the day as well as meditation. But most of all, everyone should put their trust in Jesus Christ to have a good life as a road map for life and this includes daily reading of the Bible and memorizing and meditating on God’s word. Dr. Wolff has a staff of 3 people. Diana Wolff, Dr. Wolff’s wife of 27 years, is the office manager & insurance head. Alya Choat and Autumn Tubbs Smith are chiropractic staff members. Dr. Lindsay Browning has been associated with our office since September 3, 2013. Chiropractic is NOT JUST FOR SICK PEOPLE but for people who are well and want to stay well.

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VISD Offers Many Extracurricular Activities to Students

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he Vernon Independent School District emphasizes academics, extracurricular activities and citizenship to enable students to obtain the best education possible. The district consists of three elementary schools, a middle school and a high school. The elementary schools include McCord Elementary School (pre-kindergarten through first grade) at 2915 Sand Road, Central Elementary School (grades 2-3) at 1300 Paradise, and Shive Elementary School (grades 4-5) at 3130 Bacon. The secondary-level campuses include Vernon Middle School (grades 6-8) at 2200 Yamparika and Vernon High School (grades 9-12) at 2102 Yucca Lane. The district also administrates and staffs the educational program for the North Texas State Hospital Adolescent Forensic Program (AFP). Besides the school campuses, other district facilities including the Vernon School Administrative Center at 1713 Wilbarger, a Disciplinary Alternative Education Program (DAEP) on London Street south of VMS, Transportation Department at 1401 Main and the athletic complex at VHS that includes the recently named Leo Brittain Field at Lion Stadium, a field house, tennis courts, softball and baseball fields along with the D.O. Fulton Gym. There are also gymnasiums at VMS and the three elementary school campuses.

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In addition to the academic offerings, the district offers many opportunities for students to participate in fine arts programs, career and technical programs and academic contests. All of these programs have had many successes and all have had students advance to state level competition. VISD’s fine arts program consists of the Vernon High School Roarin’ Lion Band, which consistently has students advance to state level competition in the solo and ensemble competition. The band program also added a flag corps to enhance the marching shows. The district’s choir program has grown into an excellent competition group and provides several performances throughout the year for the community. The drama department consistently advances past the district level and participated in state competition for a number of years. The visual arts program offers a wide variety of classes for students. Students can compete in a multitude of academic contests ranging from social studies to speaking starting at the elementary level. These contests sponsored by the University Interscholastic League (UIL) are an excellent opportunity for students to showcase their skills and talents.

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Vernon College V

ernon College is an accredited two-year community college with the home campus located in Vernon and the taxing district of Wilbarger County. Vernon College operates the home campus as well as learning centers in Wichita Falls and Seymour focusing on extending a wide scope of educational opportunities to students in a twelve county service area. In addition to traditional academic transfer courses, the college offers a number of programs in allied health and workforce/technical areas to prepare students for the local, regional, and statewide workforce. Vernon College offers day and night courses in 8 and 16 week terms during the Fall, Spring, and Summer. Fall 2013 enrollment for Vernon College including all locations exceeded 3100 students. The Vernon Campus offers a Student Residence Center, recreational facilities, and food service for a complete campusliving experience. It is also the home of the Chaparral rodeo, softball, baseball and volleyball teams. Tuition, fee and book expenses for Vernon College are approximately $2,500 per semester for a full time student, but vary by program. Information: call 940.552.6291 or visit the website at www.vernoncollege.edu.

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Vernon’s Ambassadors on Horseback F

or almost 65 years, the Santa Rosa Palomino Club of Vernon has thrilled audiences with its fast-paced performances, color, spirit and dedication to maintaining a tradition of being perhaps the finest non-professional riding club in the nation. Each performance of the Santa Rosa Roundup features the famed club, which traditionally sets the pivots for the massive grand entry and then offers its own breath-taking performance for rodeo-goers. It was in 1949 that the late John Killough, manager of the Vernon Chamber of Commerce, and the late Walter Heard discussed having a riding club in Vernon that would promote the community and the Santa Rosa Roundup. From this conversation, a meeting of 16 men was held, and the idea received an unanimous endorsement. Committees were appointed to select shirts, hats and chaps, and it was decided that each member would ride a palomino. John Biggs was elected president of the club. Other charter members were Drew Cartwright, Elzy Youngblood, Judge A.D. Green, Earl Walker, Bill Bond, Kenneth Wolfe, I.W. Traxler, Wylie Sweatman, Mark Neal, Jess Hancock, Ervin LeBus, Walter Heard, Fred Hanna, John Killough, and L.H. (Shorty) Wall. The group made its first ride in 1950 in Childress with 29 riders. For the next two years, the club won first place trophies wherever it appeared. However, members wanted to create a uniqueness for the club unequaled by any other, so in 1953, club president M.K. Berry, who had a background of calvary training and mounted drill from his years as a cadet at the Virginia Military Institute, instituted a series of maneuvers which evolved into the precision drill for which the club became famous. The drills, which have changed little over the years, have become a trademark of the club’s performances. Since its inception, some 200 men have been members. They are completely self-supporting with each man supplying his own horse and equipment and bearing his own expenses. The club, with its distinctive uniform, matching palomino horses and spectacular drill, has become well known and

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sought after. They have represented Vernon and the Santa Rosa Roundup from Tucson to Birmingham and from Houston to Cody, Wyo. The horsemen have earned over 400 first place parade trophies and in the two times they have entered the competition, they have both times won the title of National Drill Team Champions. In 1989, the House of Representatives of the Texas Legislature proclaimed the Santa Rosa Palomino Club as the official “Ambassadors on Horseback” for the state of Texas. The Palomino Club has since ridden in two inaugural parades for the governor in Austin, ridden in two Cotton Bowl parades, an International Lions Club parade and appeared on the Today Show as well as on ESPN and TNN. When performing for the Houston Stock Show and Rodeo in the Astrodome, the group received a standing ovation from 37,000 cheering fans. Most recently, the famed group was invited to participate in the Rose Bowl Parade in Pasadena, Calif.


It’s Rodeo Time In Vernon!

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or almost 70 years, the Santa Rosa Roundup has brought the excitement of rodeo to fans. It was in 1945 that E. Paul Waggoner decided that Vernon needed to spotlight the cowboys. By then, rodeo was a popular sport as well as a big business. The Rodeo Cowboy Association had been founded to police the sport and give it respectability. The RCA also set up a fair and accurate way to determine national championships in the sport. Waggoner dreamed of presenting an annual rodeo and quarter horse show that would dazzle the spectators. At the time, however, World War II was still being fought, so Waggoner held his plans in abeyance. In 1946, Waggoner began construction of the rodeo plant, considered one of the finest ever built. Plans of rodeo grounds throughout the United States were studied to incorporate the most modern and complete features of the time. The first performance was held May 29-June 2, 1946 with two afternoon and four evening performances attended by some 50,000. The event was held in conjunction with a homecoming for the men and women of World War II and was dedicated to their honor. The Santa Rosa Roundup is now a premier event on the rodeo circuit. A big four-day event gets underway on Wednesday with a massive parade through downtown Vernon followed by the first night’s performance in the rodeo arena. The rodeo continues through Saturday night with a full schedule of events, including bronc riding, bareback riding, calf roping, team roping, barrel racing and bull riding, In the years since, a number of world champions have seen action in the rodeo arena, including Casey Tibbs, Eddy Akridge,

Deb Copenhaver, Dean Oliver, Benny Combs, Ronny Sparks, Jim Shoulders, and in more recent years, Will Lowe, Trevor Brazile, Cody Ohl, Stran Smith, Ty Murray and Roy Cooper as well as others. In addition, famous faces have entertained the rodeo crowd over the years, including Rex Allen, Slim Pickins, Ken Curtis, Michael Landon, and Tanya Tucker. And to add to the excitement, Waggoner Ranch cowboys get in on the action as well as they compete in a number of events to the thrill of the rodeo crowd. The famed Santa Rosa Palomino Club also performs nightly to add its own special touch of color to the event. The Santa Rosa Roundup continues today to uphold the rodeo tradition set in 1946. Kenneth Dockery took over the rodeo arena in 2008, purchasing it from Grady Kent Stowe and John Mikkelsen, who had owned the grounds since 1974. Dockery’s daughter, Mary Kay Riley of Amarillo, is the current the owner, and Gary and Cindy Werner lease the arena and grounds. The arena is located just south of Vernon and includes a covered seating area to protect rodeo spectators from the weather with a seating capacity of 3,500 general admission seats. In addition to the annual Santa Rosa Roundup, the massive arena, under management of the Werners, is also available for rental to permit other events and also offers services such as horse boarding and overnight stay for stock, along with a dance hall. For further information on facilities available for events and rates, you may contact Gary Werner at (570) 916-7007.

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Vernon Texas