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Ayoko Magazine

MAGAZIN E C O N N E C T I N G Y O U TO BUSINESS IN WINNIPEG

IN THIS ISSUE... Volume 3 Fall 2013

old school business tools

mentor

to win!

creativity at work

active Cross-media marketing with a new app-itude

NEW!

tom’s AYOKO MAGAZINE MOBILE APP

guide

VOLUME 3 FALL 2013

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GRA P HIC D ES IG N | BRA ND ING | W EB | M AR K ET I N G

PHOTO: ERIN ALEXANDER

Ayok o D e sign Inc . 2 02–1311 P ort a ge Av e nue W in ni p e g, MB R3G 0V3 AyokoD e si gnInc .c om 2 04.612.5944

Aim your mobile device here to download our new tom app DETAILS PAGE 3

tele~ miscommunication Electronic communication etiquette for business


A few things have changed...

HI! I’M TOM.

AYO KO M AG A Z I N E M O B I L E A P P

The True Story of THE WORLD’S MOST FAMOUS BEAR,

WINNIE!

204.430.0768

SAKE S SPEC IAL CLOTHIN G KEEP

M

o m m a

Bear Keepsakes

204.661.9566 vintagebling.ca

mommabearkeepsakes.com

1342 Main Street 204.339.5301 vintageverucaantiques.com

W H A T ’ SI N Y O

U RL O C K E T ?

204.832.8220

vintage • restoration •handcrafted

mobile & web applications for business Turning Ideas into Apps

Dinen Subramaniam, President 204.228.4785 solitonapps.com 120 Eugenie Street 204.235.1069

Developer of the TOM Mobile App for Ayoko Magazine

mcnallyrobinson.com

julie pedersen URBAN MUKLUKS & ACCESSORIES

juliepedersen.com


AYOKO MAGAZINE IS NOW INTERACTIVE!

DOWNLOAD THE NEW TOM APP

AYO KO M AG A Z I N E M O B I L E A P P

Win

How it works

A $5000 shopping spree!

? s i h t s ’ t Wha

I’ll be your guide as you explore all the exciting new interactive features Ayoko Magazine has to offer.

scan the qr code on the cover

STEP 1

STEP 2

Scan the QR code on the cover to download the TOM app.

Launch the TOM app and enter our contest to win a $5000 shopping spree.

unlock bonus features and content STEP 3 GUIDE MARKET

FROM THE MENU... Visit businesses in TOM’s Guide to unlock online shopping, coupons, videos, photo galleries and endless chances to win! Visit TOM’s Market to shop online.

4

AT ANY TIME... Tap the menu button to visit business listings or tap the QR button to scan codes for bonus content as you read.

Good Luck!

Tom

Keeping Winnipeg businesses TOP OF MIND.

TOM Illustrations by Justin Petkau


AYOKO MAGAZINE VOLUME 3 | Fall 2013

Contents

www.AyokoMagazine.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF + ARTISTIC DIRECTOR Yoko Chapman

In This Issue

WRITER + EDITOR Daniel Billinkoff ON THE COVER

A NOTE FROM YOKO  |  6

WRITER Andrea Danelak

INTERACTIVE PRINT Cross-Media Marketing With a New App-itude!  |  9

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Ayame Ulrich

How Mobile Apps Drive Business Success  |  10

PHOTOGRAPHERS Erin Alexander Sean Philips Liane Bergen

Creating Exceptional Value Through the Power of Film  |  11

INDIE BOOKSTORES Surviving and Thriving in a Digital Age  |  12

VIDEOGRAPHER Sean Philips

OUR HISTORY IN HANDWRITING Document Storage & Other Shoebox Treasures  |  14

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Dinen Subramaniam Sean Philips Lew Bayer

OLD SCHOOL BUSINESS TOOLS Why the Value of Relationships Never Fades  |  17

CORDLESS AND CUBELESS

SHONNAH HEINRICHS

How Cloud Computing is Changing the Way We Work  |  18

PHOTO: ERIN ALEXANDER PHOTOGRAPHY

TELE-MISCOMMUNICATION

TOM ILLUSTRATOR Justin Petkau

Electronic Communication Etiquette for Business  |  20 Ayoko Magazine

CREATIVITY AT WORK Preparing Students for the Workplace of Tomorrow  |  22

MAGAZINE C O N N E C T I N G Y O U TO BUSINESS IN WINNIPEG

MENTOR TO WIN

TOM APP DEVELOPER Dinen Subramaniam FOLLOW US ON

The Value in Building Life-long Relationships  |  27

IN THIS ISSUE...

old school business tools

Volume 3 Fall 2013

Doug Stephen: Adding the “WOW!” Factor to Hospitality Mentoring  |  28

mentor

to win!

creativity at work

Joelle Foster: Helping Budding Entrepreneurs Build their Businesses  |  29

active Cross-media marketing with a new app-itude

tom’s

PHOTO: ERIN ALEXANDER

GR APH I C DE SI GN | B R AN DI N G | WE B | M AR KE T I N G

AyokoMagazine.com

Ayo ko Desig n I n c. 2 0 2 -1 3 1 1 Po rt ag e Avenue Ayo k o Desi g nI nc. co m 204.612.5944

Leslie Lounsbury: Mentoring Central to Aboriginal Values and Business Success  |  31

VOLUME 3 FALL 2013

AYOKO MAGAZINE MOBILE APP

guide

Aim your mobile device here to download our new tom app DETAILS PAGE 3

tele~ miscommunication Electronic communication etiquette for business

Interactive Print

Ayoko Magazine’s Mentor to WIN! Contest Details | 33

PUBLISHER Ayoko Design Inc.

NEW!

Nigel Bart: Offering a Creative Outlet and Renewed Hope  |  30

202–1311 Portage Avenue Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3G 0V3 P: 204.612.5944 | F: 204.505.3034 www.AyokoDesignInc.com

SEE STORY ON PG. 9

PHOTO: A MOVING PICTURE STUDIOS

Devon Edie Photography  |  34

TOM’S GUIDE | 46 TOM’S MARKET | 50

Featured Businesses

4

PROOF READER Nanci Dagg

Printed with soy ink on recycled paper

VINTAGE BLING

EVOLVE SPECIALTY CATERING

Red Carpet Glamour for the Everyday Woman  |  38

Gourmet Cuisine Wherever You Please  |  42

© 2013 AYOKO DESIGN INC.

BLOOM & BRILLIANCE

STELLA’S BRIDAL & EVENING COLLECTIONS

Strategic Branding for Businesses With Heart  |  40

Unmatched Style & Beauty for Winnipeg Brides  |  44

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced online or in print without the expressed and written permission of Ayoko Design Inc.

AyokoMagazine.com


babies

little ones

weddings

engagements

family

expecting

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A Note From Yoko

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to find out more about a featured business, research products and services online and you can instantly purchase some of the products you see in the magazine. Even with all these advancements in technology and our tools for business, the ability to build relationships, collaborate and learn from others in the business community remains the ultimate tool in any entrepreneur’s arsenal. Here are some of the core themes you’ll find in this edition of Ayoko Magazine.

Scan to watch video

Entrepreneurship will increase and people will need to be prepared to change jobs frequently. Unconventional will soon become the norm. The ability to collaborate and build relationships will be more important than ever.

THE WAY WE WORK AND DO BUSINESS IS CHANGING

PRINT MEDIA CONTINUES TO BE AN IMPORTANT TOOL FOR BUSINESS

Goodbye cubicles, hello hot desking. Wireless technology allows us to work from anywhere, at any time, from any place, on any device. As future generations prepare for a more diverse digital workplace, they will need to think creatively, apply ingenuity and adaptability, and learn to identify and leverage opportunities.

There is no doubt that there will be less print media in the future, but what remains will be special, significant and memorable. People still enjoy the tactile and sensory experience of holding a printed piece. Would you rather be reading these words from a monitor or are you enjoying the experience of holding something tangible?

Photos: Erin Alexander Photography

hen I began working on this issue, a member of my team drew a diagram to illustrate an idea on a piece of paper. He smeared the ink as he swiped his finger over the image. He caught himself and said, “Look, that’s me trying to swipe my touch screen.” This is a perfect example of how the worlds of print and digital technology have collided, and how our tools for business are changing faster than we can adapt. Evolution as a means for survival has been a consistent trend as the business world struggles to adapt to the rapid changes in the way we work. Researching new technology and designing the new TOM mobile app to make Ayoko Magazine interactive has made me even more aware of how business tools constantly evolve to remain relevant. People continue to ask me why I have chosen to invest in print media as it moves towards extinction in a digital age. In my opinion, print is far from obsolete – it’s just changing. Embracing the print media capabilities of tomorrow, I’ve chosen to develop this edition using an interactive print format – one of the mosteffective cross-media marketing tools for business. Scanning the QR codes on each page with your mobile device will unlock augmented reality features, literally bringing the printed page to life. You can view additional content


AYOKO MAGAZINE’S TOM MOBILE APP DRIVES READERS STRAIGHT TO THE SOURCE

Ayoko Magazine’s new TOM (Top of Mind) mobile app offers an incredible augmented reality experience. Readers can now link to a company website, view a photo gallery or video, call or email a business, view a store map, download a brochure or instructions, “share” or “like” a page on social media, redeem coupons online or in store, listen to a podcast and even shop using a mobile device. MENTORS AND RELATIONSHIPS HOLD THEIR VALUE

With the introduction of email, social media and video conferencing,

the way we build relationships has changed forever. While the tools have evolved, learning from others, building mutually beneficial relationships and in-person networking are still essential to business success. WINNIPEG BUSINESSES ARE PUSHING BOUNDARIES EVERY DAY

From indie bookstores printing novels in-house to gourmet caterers on the go, Winnipeg business owners have once again proved that innovation is paramount. From the red carpet to the wedding aisle, learn how Winnipeg entrepreneurs are becoming market leaders by offering niche products you simply can’t find anywhere else. It’s my pleasure to share these

Typewriter from Vintage Veruca Antiques

stories and celebrate our thriving business community. After reading this magazine, I urge you to take a look at the way you work and brainstorm innovative ways that you too can push the boundaries of business. I hope you enjoy this issue! YOKO CHAPMAN Publisher, Editor-in-Chief + Artistic Director

Yoko AyokoMagazine.com

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85 Arthur Street Winnipeg, Manitoba R3B 1H2 204.612.YUMM (9866)

cake-ology.ca

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Inter active Print CROSS-MEDIA MARKETING WITH A NEW APP-ITUDE! ince the introduction of the first print magazine in 1731, the publishing industry has certainly changed. The world continues to find ways to apply new innovations and technology to everything we do, and the print magazine is no exception. Combining the best of print, mobile and video, interactive print magazines utilize augmented reality to create a brand new immersive medium. How does it work? A user scans or points their mobile device at a piece of text or an image and the page comes to life with video, sound and interactive links. This addition to the magazine experience provides a brand new layer of useful information, plus the ability to perform connected tasks on a mobile device. Augmented reality is a great way for businesses to highlight and promote their products and it also increases the visibility and reach of traditional advertising – it seamlessly drives readers online to learn about and purchase the products they see in the magazine. Interactive print publications like this could very well become one of the most-effective tools for cross-media marketing. It will only be a matter of time before consumers come to expect interactive features in all print publications. Vintage print publications Photo: Erin Alexander Photography

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HOW MOBILE APPS DRIVE BUSINESS SUCCESS “Whether it be showing their company video from their smartphone device as they visit clients, bringing in an expert via video to a customer meeting, building their company’s own app so they can connect and build relationships with their customers; the evolution of smartphones and networks they run on means many small businesses can now operate as the large ones do. As for the customers of those businesses, it means they can connect with the latest from their favourite companies, from virtually anywhere on their smartphone devices, all in real time.” — Linnae MacKenzie, Senior Manager of Consumer Marketing, Rogers Communications

Text by Dinen Subramaniam, President of Soliton Apps

Mobile apps are allowing businesses to operate with more flexibility and agility, resulting in significant cost savings. We developed the TOM app to create greater interactivity for Ayoko Magazine readers. TOM bridges the gap between the physical magazine and the valuable information available on the websites and social media pages of the advertisers. When readers use their mobile device to interact with a printed page in the magazine, they can instantly link to a company website, watch a video, “share” and “like” on social media, redeem coupons online, request a quote and much, much more. Traditionally, print advertising success has been extremely difficult to measure. With the TOM app, advertisers receive live tracking stats detailing how many readers are engaging with their print ad on mobile devices, as well as how many readers link to their website and social media pages.

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FIVE WAYS THAT MOBILE APPS CAN GENERATE INCREDIBLE ROI 1. SAVING TIME

Mobile apps can dramatically increase efficiency by eliminating unnecessary timewasting activities. One great example is an app we’ve developed for a local home window installer: the app has a quoting tool, providing immediate results for the client while saving a tremendous amount of time for the contractor. 2. INCREASING PROFITS

New markets can be opened and old leads restarted by providing business services through apps. Local businesses are delivering useful tools like financial planning aides through apps and have showed great success in converting them to paying customers. Think of the app as a functional marketing tool. It showcases your expertise and demonstrates that you have a deep knowledge of your clients’ needs.

connection to the office, businesses are saving on capital expenses. 4. OPENING NEW MARKETS

Perhaps the greatest potential for apps comes from the new markets that have been created. From social games, recipe apps, photo apps, music apps… the opportunities are endless. Local businesses have tapped into these opportunities by creating apps that are useful to their vertical markets. Investing in a mobile app may be the smartest business decision that you ever make. Savvy customers respect innovation and appreciate it when brands make their lives a little easier. Creators of Ayoko Magazine’s new TOM app, Soliton Apps specializes in developing mobile apps for iPhone, iPad and Android. You can learn more at www.solitonapps.com

3. REDUCING COSTS

Mobile apps are allowing businesses to operate with more flexibility and agility, resulting in significant cost savings. With mobile workforces that can work seamlessly using mobile devices as their primary

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Photo: Erin Alexander Photography

here are truly limitless opportunities in terms of great app ideas. If there’s a need, an app will soon follow.  Whether you’re interested in providing a convenient, 24/7 way for people to browse your products, innovative self-quoting capabilities or a creative tool to capture an otherwise untapped audience, developing a mobile app might be the answer.


CREATING EXCEPTIONAL VALUE THROUGH THE POWER OF FILM

“Visitors who view product videos are 85% more likely to buy than visitors who do not.” — Internet Retailer, 2010

Text by Sean Philips, Owner of A Moving Picture Studios he Web is changing every day and people are starting to expect a product demo or video profile of the goods and services they want to buy. Websites with video outperform those that don’t – it doesn’t just bring people to your site, it keeps them there.

51.9% of marketing professionals worldwide cite video as the type of content with the best ROI.

Photo: Supplied

Emarketer, 2013 After Joel Ross of Joel Ross Photography posted a finished brand profile video on his company homepage, he noticed an immediate spike in sales. He received a steady stream of compliments on the way the video showcased his work and – even more importantly – how it brought out his personality. For many service-based businesses, this is the power of video: the ability to leverage your unique personality before an initial meeting. I have had the pleasure of working on video content for Ayoko Magazine’s new TOM mobile app. Working on interactive print is exciting because you can create a strong connection between the written word – whether it’s the note from the editor or an advertisement – and the moving images. The end result is a fuller, more immersive experience than traditional publications. It’s very exciting.

TELLING YOUR BRAND STORY IN FOUR STEPS STEP 1: THE FIRST INTERVIEW

It all starts with a free consultation where I ask 1000 questions to get inside your head. The who, the where and the how much are important, but they are nothing compared to the why. From a customer’s perspective, knowing why you do what you do, having that window into who you are as a person, is the most important factor in generating a long-term relationship with a brand. STEP 2: TRANSLATING YOUR STORY TO A SCRIPT

We look for key people in your organization and bring out their passion or expertise. We look for visual metaphors that get to the core message of why you are unique and what makes you the right choice for your target audience. We look for ways to make people laugh or cry. We look for a soundtrack that heightens the emotional content. If we can make the viewer feel something, it’s one step closer to making them actually do something.

gives the right feeling while other brands are better served by hand-held shots to make it look more like a reality TV show. In many cases, a video testimonial from your best client is perfect. Every brand is unique and that’s why every video needs to be different. STEP 4: BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER IN EDITING

This is where the magic happens. Interestingly, even if the storyboard is planned perfectly, there are always little “mistakes” or changes that happen in the editing room that really take the production over the top. I can’t stress this enough: a brand personality video is by far the best way to draw an emotional response for your prospective client. It is FAR better than photos or the written word. Along with Brand Personality videos like the ones featured in the TOM mobile app, Sean Philips and A Moving Picture Studios specialize in wedding cinematography, real estate flythroughs and event highlight videos. Learn more at www.amovingpicturestudios.com

STEP 3: STORYBOARDING AND PRODUCTION PLANNING

We are always looking for interesting angles and locations to make the production come to life. For some brands, a helicopter fly-over

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Indie Bookstores

SURVIVING AND THRIVING IN A DIGITAL AGE

Local authors have used McNally’s Espresso Book Machine to print anywhere from one to 400 copies of their book in-store. Customers can also print one of approximately seven million titles available in the public domain in approximately eight minutes. This also includes rare and out-of-print books. The final product is a perfect bound paperback book with black and white interior pages and a full-colour cover. The EBM can print books with anywhere from 40 to 800 pages, ranging in size from 4.5 x 5 inches to 8 x 10.5 inches.

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Text by Yoko Chapman & Daniel Billinkoff

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their world and worthy of their attention. This has something to do with culture and something to do with community, but it’s definitely a case of the whole being greater than the sum of its parts. We take great pride in being a part of our customer’s real world.” Here are some of the successful strategies that McNally and other progressive bookstores have implemented. CARRY MORE DIVERSE PRODUCTS

Although McNally still carries a wide range of books, they have dedicated a great deal of their prime real estate to other products and services that will bring people into the store. They now sell toys, giftware, clothing, jewellery, stationery, office accessories, music and e-books to name just a few.

CARRY MORE SPECIFIC PRODUCTS

One way to build a devoted following is to carry extremely specific, targeted products. For a bookstore, that may mean stocking local books or ones that are hard to find, out of print, not available online or targeted to special interest groups. BUILD AND NURTURE COMMUNITY

One way that brick and mortar stores can compete with online juggernauts is to create a comfortable social environment buzzing with activity – a community. McNally’s Prairie Ink restaurant and coffee shop is a popular place to relax with friends, hold business lunches, watch and listen to an author speak or even take in some live music. McNally has always had a dedicated following, they’ve simply built a better place for them to come together.

Photo: Erin Alexander Photography

-books, digital publications, mobile devices and the Internet in general have changed the way we read books and access information. As the publishing industry continues to shift away from print to a digital distribution model, independent bookstores have been forced to evolve in order to stay afloat. Winnipeg’s largest indie bookstore, McNally Robinson Booksellers, is a great example of how a local business can evolve and diversify to hold its own against changing technology and a growing online marketplace. When asked why McNally is much more than just a bookstore to customers, owner Chris Hall said: “Somehow the bookstore has managed to become a place that people feel is an important part of


CREATE A WARM AND INVITING SPACE

As digital publications become increasingly more common, the touch and feel of the printed page and the beauty of highresolution photographs have become even more special and engaging. Creating cozy and inviting spaces within the store entices people to take a seat, turn off the outside world and dig into a book. INVEST IN TECHNOLOGY LIKE PRINT ON DEMAND

Self-publications, rare novels, out-of-print books or one of seven million titles in the public domain can be printed in-store using the Espresso Book Machine. Taking about eight minutes to print, the final product is a perfect bound paperback with black and white interior pages and a full-colour cover. Tyler Vitt, a McNally employee, says that local authors have printed anywhere from one to 400 books in-store.

BUILD RELATIONSHIPS WITH LOCAL AUTHORS

McNally offers in-store and online consignment opportunities to local authors and self-publishers who print their works on the Espresso Book Machine. Book design services are available for an additional charge. Authors can also hold book launches and events in-store to promote their work. Special services like this help bookstores build long-standing and mutually beneficial relationships with local authors. Indie bookstores play an important role in our social lives and support the local literary community. McNally Robinson is an inspiring example of how any business can evolve to stay afloat and beat the odds against massive online competition. Here are some ways you can support indie bookstores: • Shop online and buy in-store, instead of shopping in-store and buying online. • Purchase your e-books and e-readers from an indie.

• Use an Espresso Book Machine to print a book not stocked in-store. • Purchase gifts or gift cards in-store, especially books by local authors. • Attend community events at your local bookstore, or host your own event. • Take friends and clients for coffee or a meal at a local bookstore. • Start a book club and celebrate books of all kinds – new and old, digital and print. • Use social media to recommend books and bookstores to others.

The size of the crowds in McNally on a Friday or Saturday night is clear indication that indie bookstores play a strong role in our local community. Regardless of whether or not each person is there to buy a printed book or magazine, it is proof that this indie has become much more than a bookstore – it’s a gathering place for lovers of the written word. To learn more about McNally Robinson Booksellers, visit www.mcnallyrobinson.com.

So, a picture is worth a thousand words?

This one is worth 4.3 million. (scan it to find out why) JES SIC A EH LER S

web marketing video - brand personality video - event coverage training/educational video - trade show video - real estate video

www.amovingpicture.com

WEDDINGS & EVENTS 204.803.2324 WITHAFLOURISH.CA AyokoMagazine.com

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Our

History in Handwriting DOCUMENT STORAGE & OTHER SHOEBOX TREASURES

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Text by Yoko Chapman

hy don’t you take a picture? It lasts longer! This is a familiar phrase that you can still hear echoing in schoolyards across North America – and it has never been more true than it is today. A picture certainly will last longer, but only if you print it and tuck it away in a shoebox or photo album for future generations to discover. If you leave it on your hard drive, it will just get lost and forgotten among the thousands of photos you take every year. Remember the 5.25 inch floppy disk? Seemed like an outstanding idea at the time, but, just a couple decades later, no one has

the hardware to read them. Paper is very versatile and, when stored properly, could last upwards of 500 years. What will happen 500 years from now when the software we use to store and read our digital data has become obsolete? The threat of a Digital Dark Age is real and has huge potential to affect both our business and personal lives. Not only do we risk losing track of our own family history, businesses and governments are at serious risk of losing access to digital records. This isn’t something that many of us think about every day, but it’s a much larger problem than most people realize.

Going beyond the issues of file security and longevity, as we shift more and more correspondences and captured moments to a digital record, what will happen to the beautiful tactile experiences of days past? Can an email ever make the same impact as a handwritten letter? Can an iPhone background every replace the framed photo on your desk? While working on this article, I came across some very beautiful and interesting paper documents that were literally tucked away in shoeboxes in the basement. Opening the boxes was very exciting – I could have spent days going through all the old newspaper clippings, wedding invitations, telegrams, certificates and family photos. I was able to discover six generations of really interesting items from my family’s history: • A telegram from 1903 • A death announcement from 1892 • A thank you note from the Lady-inWaiting at Balmoral Castle on behalf of the Queen from 1954 • A photograph of the Riel family on River Road where my husband’s grandmother was a neighbour • Tintype photos from the 1800s • My grandmother’s metal index address book from the ’50s with phone numbers that had letters in them • Documents on Sir John Henry Pelly, Governor of the Hudson’s Bay Company, who turns out to be my daughter’s great, great, great grandfather Finding these clippings was exciting. Tracing my family’s roots while digging through a shoebox was an experience I’ll never forget. And, while scanning through photos or scanned documents on an iPad is fun, it can never replace the feeling of flipping through a childhood photo album or finding your extra wedding invitations stored away in a closet. So print your photos! Write letters! Send real invitations! The perfect solution for digital data storage and preservation has yet to be hammered out, so let’s all put aside a shoebox full of memories just in case. Turn to the next page for examples of shoebox treasures. Photo: Erin Alexander Photography Vintage Veruca Antiques: Ink, Glasses Cat & Fiddle Studio: Stamps, Tins, Rulers, Pins, Erasers

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Photos: Erin Alexander Photography

Examples of shoebox treasures

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Old

SchoolBusiness Tools

WHY THE VALUE OF RELATIONSHIPS NEVER FADES

Text by Yoko Chapman

19501950 19581958 19711971 19731973 19751975 19811981 19821982 19841984 19921992 19921992 19931993 19931993 19941994 19951995 19961996 19991999 19991999 20002000 20042004 20052005 20072007 20072007 20102010 20102010

The evolution of business tools since the ’50s

COMPUTERCOMPUTER

ince the typing pools and smokefilled offices of the ’50s, our tools for business have evolved. We’ve witnessed the introduction of the personal computer, Internet, email, smartphones, social media, Skype and wireless technology – they all help us connect faster and easier than ever before. After all these years, after all of these advancements, it’s still abundantly clear that the key to business success is the ability to connect with clients, prospects and a wide support network of friends, mentors and professionals. While these new gadgets help us to connect more efficiently, our innate ability to build relationships is the most important tool of all. As technology continues to evolve, we must remember that our ability to communicate with clarity and impact is what really matters. And, as staring at tiny screens becomes our new reality, sometimes a good old-fashioned handwritten note or phone call will make the experience far more memorable for both parties. Our modern tools are essential and most businesses wouldn’t survive without them. That being said, old school business tools like in-person networking and quick thank you calls still have their place.

PUSH BUTTON PHOTOCOPIER PUSH BUTTON PHOTOCOPIER EMAIL

EMAIL

MOBILE PHONE MOBILE PHONE LAPTOP

LAPTOP

THE PC

THE PC

COMMODORE 64 COMMODORE 64 THE MACINTOSH THE MACINTOSH SMS MESSAGING SMS MESSAGING SMARTPHONE SMARTPHONE

INTERNET INTERNET WEBSITES WEBSITES QR CODES QR CODES

YAHOO AND ALTA VISTA YAHOO AND ALTA VISTA GOOGLE GOOGLE

BLACKBERRY BLACKBERRY

BLOGS

BLOGS

WIKIPEDIAWIKIPEDIA

SOCIAL MEDIA SOCIAL MEDIA GOOGLE ANALYTICS GOOGLE ANALYTICS iPhone

IPHONE

3G NETWORKS 3G NETWORKS

Scan to view the first website ever created.

QR CODE SCANNER QR CODE SCANNER IPAD

IPAD

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Cordless and Cubeless

HOW CLOUD COMPUTING IS CHANGING THE WAY WE WORK

f you were a fan of Star Trek or other science fiction shows, you’ve probably noticed that the futuristic gadgets that seemed ages away are all around us now. As Len Andrusiak, VP Business Development of 365 Technologies Inc. puts it, “Technology is like a runaway train.” From touch screen technology to Apple’s FaceTime and virtual reality in the form of Google Glass, the advancements we’ve made in the last five years alone are stunning. As a business owner who’s mildly obsessed with matters of this nature, it’s become quite clear to me that the way we work and do business is going through a transformation. “New hardware, software, apps, gadgets and communication tools are developed in response to overcoming real or perceived challenges,” explains Christine Dubyts of Dubyts Communications. “Many new technologies allow us to be more productive, communicate more effectively and harness a competitive advantage, even if it’s only for a short time, until the next best thing is released.” Wireless Internet and Cloud Computing have essentially changed how businesses operate. The Cloud allows us to access and share data from anywhere with Internet access. Combined with Wireless Internet,

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the Cloud enables employees to work from any device at any time from any place. With this shift, your job is now defined by what you do, not where you do it. For many businesses, the need for massive office space is now a thing of the past. Hot Desking – flexible office setups with shared workstations – allows people to work freely and come and go as they wish. The result is lower overhead, greater collaboration as people are freed from their cubes and, for many people, a greater overall work experience dictated by their own style and preferences. Business owners also gain new levels of freedom as they no longer need to hire the best nine-to-five employee within a onehour commute – they can simply hire the best employee, period. This is a huge deal for large employers who can now access a much larger candidate pool. With employees spread across the city, country and even world, the ability to collaborate and build relationships remotely is more important than ever. In fact, there are now countless tools and apps for this purpose alone. Starbucks is the new cubicle. The World Wide Web is the new conference room. Skype and FaceTime help people videoconference, share screens and compare

notes from any computer, tablet or even smartphone. Of course, as our needs change, the shear amount of apps and continuously out-ofdate devices can be daunting. “I believe our biggest challenge in the future will not be technology itself, but evaluating and selecting the ‘best’ technologies for your business. I’m an early adopter of all that is tech, so I’m excited about it and anticipate revolutionary advances that will continue to improve how we do business,” says Dubyts. Business owners who shy away from technology or believe that it’s all a fad are losing out. To say “an email can never replace a phone call” or that “computers can’t replace great people” is missing the point. All of the new technology out there isn’t a threat and it isn’t a replacement for good business sense, smart people and teamwork. In the business world, technology leverages what you’re already doing right. Today’s top leaders understand the importance of expanding capabilities through investments in technology. They embrace the new tools of business and don’t hesitate to the pull the plug.

Photo: Erin Alexander Photography

Text by Daniel Billinkoff


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Tele-Miscommunication

ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATION ETIQUETTE FOR BUSINESS

Text by Lew Bayer, President and CEO of Civility Experts Worldwide

— Albert Einstein

oodness, wouldn’t wise old Albert be stunned at how significant a statement this turned out to be! But, if we consider the breadth of advances in technology and how they’ve changed communication in the last 20 years alone, it really isn’t surprising that convenience, immediacy and trends often trump courtesy in our modern workplaces. Email is a great example of a modern communication tool that leaves the door wide open to misinterpretation and unpredictability. Chade-Meng Tan, author of Search Inside Yourself: The Unexpected Path to Achieving Success, Happiness, (And World Peace), says, “The biggest problem with email is that the emotional context is often miscommunicated, sometimes with disastrous results. Because of this missing context,

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changed either; use greetings in email, say hello and goodbye and thank you just as you would in person. Spell the recipient’s name correctly and use proper grammar. This applies for voice mail and all other forms of digital communication as well.

ALWAYS BE ACCOUNTABLE

Consider the likely impact of your words and actions and be sure you can manage that impact. For example, if you risk hurting someone’s feelings or potentially jeopardizing a workplace relationship when you press send, make sure you are willing to either apologize if/when needed or potentially forfeit the relationship before you send the communication. If you can’t manage the consequences, think twice about taking the action.

A key consideration when communicating in any mode is that the impact of your actions almost always outweighs the intention. In practice, this means that what you imagined would happen after you pressed send, or what you hoped or expected the person on the receiving end of your thoughts, actions or communications would feel or do, doesn’t really matter. You are accountable for what actually happens. This is why we must always consider consequences and act accordingly before we act, speak or write. RESPECT TRADITIONAL ETIQUETTE STANDARDS

It’s never been good manners to simply show up at a stranger’s office uninvited and immediately jump into conversation, but this is essentially what many people do with business email. It’s always been good manners to introduce yourself and make others comfortable. This guideline hasn’t

CONVEY WHAT YOU ACTUALLY MEAN

For example, don’t say you have a small issue if you’re really dealing with a significant problem. Be honest and be transparent. Don’t embellish and don’t pretend. Although we don’t see them written down as often as we used to, rules about workplace ethics and character still apply. FOCUS ON THE FACTS

Stick to what you know for sure, or at least be honest when you don’t know something and always differentiate between statement of fact and those that are just your opinion. CHOOSE YOUR WORDS CAREFULLY

BE MINDFUL OF YOUR TONE

Reserve slang and familiar social words for social communications. For example, words like “TTFN” and “Hi all” or even “cheers” convey a casual and familiar tone that is not appropriate for business communications that may get passed up the ladder. EXERCISE DISCRETION

Think about confidentiality and proprietary concerns. Remember that with workplace

Photo: Erin Alexander Photography

“It has become appallingly clear that our technology has surpassed our humanity.”

the brain of the person receiving the email often fabricates that context, and the result is major miscommunication! It is this reason that being keenly aware during responding to email is so important.” Sadly, many people don’t realize that an inability to communicate with respect and civility at work can undermine our personal credibility, strain our relationships, damage our reputations and decrease the effectiveness of our communications. In extreme cases, uncivil communications can completely destroy the overall morale and culture of our workplaces. The good news is that when it comes to modern guidelines for office etiquette, and for communication etiquette specifically, it’s not as difficult as you might think to meet modern expectations for manners. This is because the etiquette rules haven’t changed nearly as much as the technology has. Here are some easy ways to apply age-old etiquette rules to office communication:


communications you are representing a team and an organization and you have obligations to respect the privacy, space and property of others. BE CIVIL

Civility is essential at the office, at home or anywhere else for that matter. Civility is: • A conscious awareness of the impact of one’s thoughts, actions, words and intentions on others • A continuous acknowledgement of one’s responsibility to ease the experience of others (e.g. through restraint, kindness, non-judgment, respect and courtesy) • A consistent effort to adopt and exhibit civil behaviour as a non-negotiable point of one’s character

For many of us, fully embracing technology means a daily struggle to keep up with chronic change. Consumed by our efforts to be digitally competent, we often end up forfeiting the “high-touch” – the human side of interaction – for “high-tech” approaches. This is to be expected… to a point. But when we begin blaming the tools and the technology itself as an excuse for poor spelling, unclear messages and inappropriate tone, there can be long-term, negative impacts. To properly evolve along with these changes in technology, retaining our age-old standards of etiquette and civility are key.

According to Radicati Group Inc., a technology market research firm in California, an average of 144.8 billion emails were sent worldwide per day in 2012. The average time spent per week reading and answering email was 11.8 hours, or 28 % of a 40-hour work week.

To learn more, visit www.civilityexperts.com

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Creativity

at Work

PREPARING STUDENTS FOR THE WORKPLACE OF TOMORROW Text by Yoko Chapman Photos by Liane Bergen

LO RA SC HR OE DE R

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rom year to year, the changes in the tools and technology that children need to understand are fast and frequent. Many of the fundamental skills we learned in school are disappearing. As a parent, I’ve already seen some surprising changes: some kids can’t tell time unless they’re reading a digital clock and a number of schools have even stopped teaching handwriting! Our children are incredibly fortunate to mature in a culture of innovation. They are the first generation to grow up with computers – electronic devices of any kind can seem like a natural extension of their minds and bodies. With technology changing so quickly, how can we prepare students for the workplace of the future? Communication and collaboration will be vital and students will need to learn to be leaders. As technology evolves at lightning speed, we must prepare them to adapt quickly and often. Innovative teachers are already placing a greater focus on the ability to think

creatively and apply ingenuity. With a background in both business and theatre, elementary school teacher Lora Schroeder is a natural promoter, writer, actor, producer and collaborator. As co-founder of Winnipeg’s Shakespeare in the Ruins, both inventiveness and a keen business sense were key to her success in getting the production up and running. In the classroom, she places a huge emphasis on creativity, community building and collaboration. Every year at Wolseley School, Lora leads the much anticipated Shops Day. With her guidance, students get to create their own businesses and learn about earning, saving, counting and exchanging money. “Counting up for the Shops Day celebration on the 100th day of school gives the kids a reason to be excited and to want to learn about math,” says Lora. For a day, these young students become entrepreneurs. The theme varies from year to

year, but the list of shops typically includes a restaurant, veterinarian, pet adoption clinic, spa, hotel, sports centre, bank and a lottery. This unique program opens up conversations about our social system, government, taxes and budgets. It enhances the children’s understanding of what their parents do for a living as well as what career paths to consider for their future. Students get to shop for what they need and support each other’s businesses, while learning to be thankful and appreciative of what they have. Shops Day is just one example of how forward-thinking teachers, like Lora Schroeder, are proactively preparing our next great generation of entrepreneurs and professionals. As technology and business in general evolves, a creative approach to preparing students for the workplace of the future becomes even more important. The world is changing every day – let’s make sure our kids are ready.

“In preparation for this rapid change, our education system can continue to foster and enhance opportunities for our youth to develop well-defined 21st century literacy skills that place a high emphasis on critical thinking and problem solving; learning environments that encourage the development of strong interpersonal skills, as well as many opportunities to continue the use and integration of technology in the classroom.” — Brenda McConaghy, educator at Miles Macdonell Collegiate

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Shops Day at Wolseley School

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Mentor toWin

THE VALUE IN BUILDING LIFE-LONG RELATIONSHIPS

A SPECIAL DEDICATION TO MR. AL WIEBE Al Wiebe, or Mr. Wiebe as many students knew him, was an exceptionally popular teacher at Kelvin High School. He was never my teacher, but I got to know him well through my participation in school musicals. He was one of those teachers that everyone loved, whether they were in his class or not. Not only was he an incredible mentor, role model and support to his students at school, his influence extended years after his students left Kelvin. He played an active role in planning school reunions and he stayed in touch with hundreds of his former students. He continued to be a positive force throughout the lives of the people he was a role model to, and is the perfect example of how and why mentoring can change lives. About five years ago, I reconnected with Al on Facebook. He and his wife, Darcy, saw a story about me in the Winnipeg Free Press and he wanted to congratulate me. During that exchange I realized what an incredible following he had on Facebook – I also learned that he was battling cancer. Al’s strength and positive attitude during his long battle against cancer was inspiring to many, and it was the support that he received from his legacy of people that kept him going as long as he did. Al’s genuine interest in other people guided him through his life and ultimately became his source of strength during his most challenging days. Al Wiebe passed away in July, but his legacy will live on through the teachers, students and parents he inspired. He was an incredible mentor and will be forever missed.

— Yoko Chapman

Text by Yoko Chapman he act of mentoring is sharing your life experiences to help others realize their own potential, set goals and learn from your example and knowledge. It means offering support, empowerment and motivation to help people establish a vision of where they want to go, and who they hope to be. When you mentor, you are investing in others and the act of sincerely caring whether they fail or succeed can make all the difference. Many business owners become mentors as a way to give back and pay it forward. When you mentor, you become a catalyst for change and you’ll often make a friend for life. There is no greater feeling in business than to watch a protégé reach the height of their success because of your support. Often mentors gain the most out of the relationship, growing their support network, gaining new experiences and learning new skills from tomorrow’s leaders. For this issue, I went in search of prolific Winnipeg mentors and found four people who have impacted dozens of lives. I’ve noticed that often the people who give the most don’t even know it; they consider themselves to be the ones who have gained. This group fits that description to a tee. I hope you enjoy learning more about the following four individuals: Doug Stephen, WOW! Hospitality Concepts Inc. Sharing experience and wisdom to empower up-and-coming restaurateurs Joelle Foster, Canadian Youth Business Foundation (CYBF) Tirelessly supporting entrepreneurs and business owners Nigel Bart, Artbeat Studio Helping artists with mental illness survive and thrive Leslie Lounsbury, SAY Magazine Giving Aboriginal youth a place to learn and grow

The best part about mentoring is that any one of us can be a mentor. Think about what you have to offer and the wisdom that you could share. We all have the ability to make an impact on at least one person’s life, possibly even thousands. If you’re interested in becoming a mentor, charities and government career start programs offer a great place to start. You can also get involved in business or community organizations where you will meet people that can benefit from your knowledge and experience. Lastly, contact a mentoring program within your community, as there is always a demand for people who can help. The Canadian Youth Business Foundation is currently looking for additional volunteers. Learn how you can get involved at www.cybf.ca

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DOUG STEPHEN ADDING THE “WOW!” FACTOR TO HOSPITALITY MENTORING

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oug Stephen has never been one to say “no” to people, especially to those seeking his guidance. The president of WOW! Hospitality Concepts Inc., Doug has worked in the food service industry for over 25 years and has often been recognized for his philanthropy, generosity and mentoring. Having co-founded the successful Stephen & Andrews Food & Wine Shoppe and Bridgeport Restaurant in Winnipeg and Florida, Doug has always taken a hands-on approach to his work. Not only have his restaurants seen great success, but he has also played a large role in helping other Winnipeg restaurateurs make their dreams a reality. “I want to give back,” says Doug, who believes in a collaborative culture and has passed on his values as business tools. “I don’t mentor intentionally – it happens by osmosis.” Verna Judge and Alan Shepard have experienced Doug’s mentoring contributions first-hand. When their restaurant, Step’n Out, opened its first location in Winnipeg’s vibrant Exchange District, it was in the same building as Doug’s corporate office. Doug’s experience and wisdom was always a valuable resource for the duo. Alan, as a self-taught chef, appreciated Doug’s suggestions and feedback on his new recipes. In addition to sharing his food expertise, Doug would also help Verna and Alan calculate their profit margins by breaking down their expenses and writing business plans on paper napkins. “Doug is a master with figures,” says Verna, adding that he continues to offer them support and advice. In fact, when Step’n Out received a coveted five-star review from a local food critic, Doug called right away to offer his congratulations. Also benefiting from Doug’s mentorship is Jeff Glover, who started working for him as a busboy at the Old Spaghetti Factory. After Jeff expressed an interest in learning more about the restaurant industry, Doug mentored – and according to Jeff, essentially raised him in the business. Jeff worked side-by-side with Doug when WOW! Hospitality Concepts Inc. was conceived in 1995, eventually moving his way up to director of operations. “Doug taught me that you have to have consistency in the way that you conduct yourself – to have accountability and self-motivation,” says Jeff. He calls Doug a visionary who always meshes creative ideas together to come up with something that people will love. Verna, Alan and Jeff mark only a handful of people mentored by Doug – they all describe him as generous to a fault. According to Ken Livingstone, president of Burrito Splendido, you would be hard-pressed to find someone with a bad word to say about him, as he is “hard on standards, but easy on people.” In his 15 years working with Doug, Ken has learned many key business values from him. Spending significant time and money on research, service, décor, menus and flatware, Doug ensures that diners have the best possible experience, no matter what the price point of the restaurant, says Ken. It’s that commitment that led to Doug being named Entrepreneur of the Year (Prairie Region) for Consumer Goods and Services in 1997. He was also the recipient of the 1997 Pinnacle Award for Entrepreneur of the Year by Foodservice and Hospitality magazine. But despite the industry accolades and appreciation from his mentees, Doug remains humble and seeks to continue mentoring whenever and wherever possible. “I am blessed to be in an industry serving the public,” he says. For more information about WOW! Hospitality Concepts Inc., visit www.wowhospitality.ca

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Photo: Erin Alexander Photography

Text by Andrea Danelak


JOELLE FOSTER HELPING BUDDING ENTREPRENEURS BUILD THEIR BUSINESSES Text by Andrea Danelak

Photo: Jérémie Wookey

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n her quest to help young business owners succeed, Joelle Foster has become the perfect example of an entrepreneurial success story. Joelle is the director of the Manitoba, Nunavut and Northwest Territories chapter of the Canadian Youth Business Foundation (CYBF), a national non-profit organization that is dedicated to growing Canada’s economy, one young entrepreneur at a time. Providing services like pre-launch coaching, business resources, mentoring and startup loans of up to $45,000; CYBF helps entrepreneurs aged 18 to 39 to launch and sustain successful businesses. As part of the CYBF’s offerings, Joelle built and grew a mentorship program from the ground up. The program matches community volunteer mentors with entrepreneurs for a few hours each month, allowing the volunteers to offer practical advice to the budding entrepreneurs and help them learn how to navigate the business world. Thanks to the program’s success, the CYBF has seen a 96% loan repayment rate in Manitoba. Joelle’s words of wisdom and experience in helping establish the program have inspired the young people who come to her, hoping to pursue entrepreneurial ventures of their own. Her role extends well beyond her paid position, as she has made herself available to all entrepreneurs enrolled in the program, mentoring them in any way that she can. “And any of the 80 past entrepreneurs can call me at any time,” she adds. Anrea Zaslov witnessed Joelle’s dedication when she interned at CYBF for six weeks while finishing the Creative Communications program at Red River College in 2012. “I was so fortunate to work alongside Joelle – I saw her give tirelessly day in and day out to her entrepreneurs,” says Anrea. “Joelle is a force and her entrepreneurs are not just a number or going through a pipeline – they are part of her dream and family. She is making a dent in the entrepreneurial landscape in Manitoba through her passion, commitment and time to mentorship.” Not only did Anrea witness Joelle’s dedication to the entrepreneurs in the program, but she also benefited from her mentorship herself. “Joelle has always lifted my spirits and been there for me when I have needed assistance or direction,” she says. “I take great comfort in knowing she is there for me as a mentor, because I know I can count on her to point me in the right direction. I know I have gained more than a mentor – I have gained a meaningful friendship.” Mentee Bryce North is also grateful for Joelle’s help. “Joelle has pushed me from day one and is the reason my company is where it is today,” he says. “She has this amazing way of pumping you full of energy that makes you believe you can accomplish anything.” “Joelle consistently works with an enthusiastic approach towards entrepreneurs and new venture creation,” adds fellow mentee Luc Bohunicky. “Always results oriented, Joelle works closely with Manitoba’s startup community, to allow our ‘leaders of tomorrow’ the greatest opportunity of success.” Thanks to the program’s popularity and an unprecedented number of new businesses starting up in Manitoba, the CYBF is in desperate need of more mentors. “We can’t give entrepreneurs money until they have a mentor assigned,” says Joelle, who hopes to continue to mentor as many entrepreneurs as possible through her program. For more information on the CYBF or how you can get involved with the mentorship program, please visit www.cybf.ca

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NIGEL BART OFFERING A CREATIVE OUTLET AND RENEWED HOPE

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igel Bart strives to reduce the stigma experienced by those living with mental illness in a unique way. Enter Artbeat Studio, a non-profit registered charity in Winnipeg’s historic Exchange District that provides workspace for up to nine artists living with mental illness. Founded in January 2005, Artbeat provides resources and peer support to promote mental health healing and empowerment through artistic activity, including fine art, music and poetry. Studio facilitator Nigel started the program with his parents, Ernie and Lucille, after his diagnosis with schizophrenia. Working in his mother’s pottery studio after a major acute episode and his subsequent diagnosis at age 19, he found more than just a creative outlet – he found renewed hope. Eventually obtaining his Bachelor of Fine Arts from the University of Manitoba’s School of Art, Nigel needed to share what he had discovered with others suffering from similar illnesses. Inspired by the connection between mental illness and art, Nigel pursued his dream of art recovery through the formation of Artbeat. Accommodating nine artists with studio space and equipment over a period of six months, the studio allows them to work on projects and develop technical skills through its mentorship program, free of charge. In addition to providing the safe, supportive workspace, Artbeat also gives artists the opportunity to sell their artwork at its own gallery as well as at Studio Central, also located in the Exchange District. Not only does Artbeat provide its participants with a creative outlet, it also gives artists like Shonnah Heinrichs a real sense of belonging. “I used to keep my art to myself, but the studio has given me a solid foundation to build confidence in all aspects of my life,” says Shonnah. Even after they have finished the program, artists like Shonnah continue to feel like they’re part of the Artbeat community, thanks to the warm atmosphere and mentoring provided by Nigel and his parents. “I’ve known Ernie and Lucille Bart since before their involvement in getting Artbeat up and running, and through them, was introduced to their sons,” says Artbeat volunteer Justin Petkau. “The entire Bart family brings hard work and passion to everything they do, and when you spend time with any of them, it is easy to be drawn in and help with their inspiring and compassionate undertakings.” Considered a role model for anyone living with mental health issues, Nigel has shown people that they are not alone and that they can be part of a community of people with shared interests and similar challenges. And perhaps most importantly, by increasing awareness of the issues surrounding mental illness, Nigel is helping to beat the stigma, one piece of art at a time. For more information about Artbeat Studio, visit www.artbeatstudio.ca

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Photo: Erin Alexander Photography

Text by Andrea Danelak


LESLIE LOUNSBURY MENTORING CENTRAL TO ABORIGINAL VALUES AND BUSINESS SUCCESS Text by Daniel Billinkoff

Photo: Erin Alexander Photography

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proud Métis mother of six, Leslie Lounsbury wanted to spread the word about all of the great Aboriginal Peoples and stories coming out of her community – and not only locally, but across North America. And so, after years of research and deliberation, Leslie founded SAY Magazine, an Aboriginal owned and operated magazine that provides inspiration, information and hope to its readers. Mentoring was listed as one of the objectives in the mission statement that appeared in SAY’s very first business plan. The concepts of mentoring – and those of inclusion and sharing – are so inherent in Aboriginal values that there was no need for discussion or explanation. Right from the initial planning stages for the business, Aboriginal youth were brought onto the team. Throughout her professional life, Leslie has mentored everyone from the general manager of a major Manitoba credit union, to the chief of a reserve, to the head of a First Nations investment group, to a loans relation officer at an Aboriginal financial group in Winnipeg. Alan Greyeyes, now the manager of Manitoba Music’s Aboriginal Music Program, was a teenager when he first met Leslie at a youth conference. After learning that she needed assistance with the magazine, he jumped into action, assisting in initial key projects and then spending the following summer as the publication’s youth editor. “I’ve put together some really great marketing campaigns for the Aboriginal Music Program and Aboriginal Music Week in the last eight years. I credit the success of those campaigns to my ability to communicate with graphic designers, and that’s definitely a skill I picked up during my time with SAY,” he says. When SAY launched at the 2002 North American Indigenous Games (NAIG) held in Winnipeg, one of the individuals working with NAIG was Marion McKenzie. Intrigued by the magazine and its work, she had a number of suggestions for Leslie’s team while she was working in the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network’s marketing department. Eventually, Marion joined the SAY team as a project manager. “SAY Magazine gave me the confidence to reach as far as I could to make my career dreams a reality,” she explains, “knowing that as a young person, I had a voice and it was important to share it so that those who hadn’t found theirs yet would know that it was okay and that SAY Magazine was a gift that we could use in a positive way to share our thoughts and dreams for our vision of our future.” Leslie Lounsbury and SAY Magazine are the perfect examples of how mentoring can be central to both business and cultural mandates. At the same time that Alan and Marion gained incredible experiences under Leslie’s guidance, SAY Magazine gained exposure and grew significantly. “It is not enough just to bring individuals into your business – to provide ‘real’ mentoring opportunities, actual involvement and engagement are necessary,” says Leslie. “Yes, it may take some time initially, but my experience proves that in the longterm, the payoff is there. The reality is – they [my mentees] mentor me now. It has come full circle and that is the true value of mentoring!” SAY Magazine is the only lifestyle magazine in the world targeted to Aboriginal Peoples. In Canada, SAY is available at Chapters/Indigo, McNally Robinson and International News outlets. For more information, visit www.saymag.com

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AYOKO MAGAZINE’S MENTOR TO WIN! CONTEST DETAILS

ou could win the opportunity to design your own double page spread like the one featured here by 19-year-old Devon Edie from Devon Edie Photography. You will have the opportunity to work with members of our team and try your hand at planning, staging, photographing, writing and designing your own article to promote your business. MENTORSHIP PROGRAM GOALS

To offer the successful applicant the opportunity to practice and learn about business planning, branding, marketing, advertising, researching, writing and designing a double page magazine spread for promotional purposes for a real or hypothetical business. The successful applicant will be given the opportunity to create a business and marketing plan and design a magazine spread promoting their business. They will design a logo, plan, style and execute a photo shoot, conduct research and write an article promoting their business for publication in the April 2014 issue of Ayoko Magazine, Connecting You to Business in Winnipeg. The successful applicant will be given the opportunity to play a mentorship role in training the next successful applicant. QUALIFICATIONS

• Must be exploring the possibility of starting a business or already own a business • Must be an ambitious and talented individual with strong creative skills • Must exhibit energy, enthusiasm and dedication • Must demonstrate exceptional attention to detail, organizational, time management and problem-solving skills • Must possess strong communication and presentation skills • Must possess the ability to motivate and inspire others • Must have training and experience in graphic design and knowledge of Adobe Creative Suite (InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator) • Must possess research and writing skills • Must possess web design and HTML fundamentals • Must be proficient in MS Powerpoint and Word • Photography skills are an asset TO SUBMIT YOUR ENTRY

Scan the QR code to download the PDF application form or visit www.AyokoMagazine.com CONTEST DEADLINE

Entries must be submitted by March 1, 2014

Scan for application form

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I am a 19-year-old guy who loves photography and graphic design. I recently graduated with honours from Red River College’s Professional Photography Program and I’m currently enrolled in their Graphic Design Program. I started my freelance business in high school and photographed my first wedding at 17 years of age. I struggled in school until I joined graphic design and yearbook – it was there that I discovered my passion under the guidance of several amazing teachers. In high school, I took part in a co-op program that saw me working with several photographers and a graphic production company who inspired me to pursue my dreams. Since graduating high school, I’ve seen a number of amazing advancements that have changed the way my industry operates. Society is more mobile than ever before. Our everyday


for According to Quentin George of IPG Mediabrands, “2013 will become the year that the number of mobile Internet devices (smartphones and tablets) exceeds fixed-line Internet devices (PC and laptops).”

technology is changing and becoming obsolete at an alarming rate. Just ask any elementary student what a Walkman is!

knowledge make me the ideal candidate for both your photography and graphic design needs.

From wireless technology to advancements in digital photography and editing software, it’s a whole new world for professional photographers. Rechargeable and portable battery packs, lightweight backdrop framing options, WIFI-enabled cameras and cell phone credit card readers allow photography to be more mobile than ever before.

Pictures are not only important to mark occasions, but also serve as art and have a vital role in advertising. Pictures preserve and connect us to people, places and things. Photographs evoke emotions. If you or your business needs the help of a professional photographer, it would be my pleasure to help.

On one of my recent shoots, the use of portable studio lighting would convince you that it was shot at night instead of on a bright sunny afternoon. Software can also produce similar mind-deceiving illusions. When used correctly, the effects that are possible from a program like Photoshop are seamless. So why hire a professional like myself when digital SLRs have become affordable and easy to use? Why would you need a photo editor when an iPhone app has a ton of beautiful filters? The answer is simple: the technology is only one piece of the puzzle. A professional is trained in composition, lighting, photo processing, photo trends and print product options. My eye for photography, attention to detail and extensive software

Devon Edie is the owner of Devon Edie Photography. Visit www.devonedie.com or email devon@devonedie.com to learn more.


CARMEN NEUFELD President, Planners Plus Inc.

LYNNE SKROMEDA Executive Director, Winnipeg Folk Festival

JASON GRESCHUK Owner, Afforda Pro Painting

They say that “free advice” isn’t worth the paper it is written on, but that does not apply to mentorship. Every mentee should take the advice, suggestions and commentary they receive simply as options for them to consider. The road travelled by others just may offer some nuggets that will make your entrepreneurial trip an easier one. As for the mentor, sharing what you have experienced is not only an acknowledgement that you have made it, but also that you have survived!

Our Musical Mentors and Young Performers programs are both wonderful ways to allow Winnipeg youth to learn music – in particular, folk music. Mentoring is something our organization focuses on as part of artist development and is particularly great as it works from both angles – the kids are excited to learn how to play an instrument, write songs and build confidence and the mentors themselves are able to develop a meaningful relationship with the kids and see first-hand how music can make such a difference in their lives. Music programs sadly are disappearing in schools and these programs are a way we can help ensure kids of all backgrounds continue to experience the joy of learning and performing.

Why bother to mentor someone? Because it takes your life from being already successful to a place of significance. There is no better way to learn leadership skills than by mentoring someone and no better feeling than to guide and watch a pupil grow, learn and change because you took the time to invest in them. The effects cannot fully be measured.

GAYLE SIDNEY Owner, McDiarmid Flowers As the owner of a family run flower shop for 26 years, it is fulfilling to know that I have found a person who shares my commitment to keeping the business going. I didn’t think anyone would want to take over the shop; I was expecting to be closing my doors when I retire. Finding someone like Maverick, who truly enjoys working in this business and is happiest when he’s in the flower shop, was an unexpected and welcome surprise. It is well worth my investment in training and it has been a rewarding experience for us both.

BRIAN JAMES MEADEN John Maxwell Certified Coach, Teacher, Speaker, The Leadership Guy Life will never, ever, ever give you what you want. It will only ever give you who you are. Being and having a mentor is simply not normal for most people. So are you being normal like everyone else and getting what everyone else has? Or, are you Breaking Normal and arguing for more out of life?

BEN HOPPER Small Business Coach and Social Media Advisor, Hopper Associated Mentoring is a gift… a gift you give others, but also one you can give yourself. It’s an exchange of information, experience, successes and failures. It allows you to help others grow and learn from your past struggles and help them shape their future. It can also bring you back to the time when you were in their shoes and remember how you felt, acted and performed both at work and away. These are valuable lessons for everyone involved and can have a very lasting impact.

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Vintage Bling

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ancy a red carpet look without breaking the bank? With a cache of classic jewels and endless creativity, Dayle Goertzen and Vintage Bling have carved a unique niche in Canada’s jewelry market. When Dayle’s creations generated buzz at her workplace nine years ago, she decided to take her unique line of handmade costume jewelry to market and founded Vintage

Bling. Inspired by the Great Gatsby era of glitz, glamour and jewels, Dayle recently began designing an Art Deco collection. Boasting one of a kind necklaces, bracelets and the extremely popular hand jewelry pieces, this throwback line has proven to be a good ol’ fashioned success. Having already gained popularity on the red carpet, Vintage Bling was invited to attend the DPA Gifting Suite at the Toronto

vintage bling www.vintagebling.ca

Dayle Goertzen | 204.661.9566 38

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International Film Festival this past August. “My line was discovered online by the CEO of the gifting suite and it was my  Gatsby bracelets that drew her to my jewelry,” Dayle explains. “Vintage Bling was a huge hit amongst the celebs, mainly because my style is very red carpet. The Gatsby bracelets, rings and earrings were definitely the most popular pieces this year.” Upon seeing Vintage Bling for the first time, actress Mireille Enos of Devil’s Knot, World War Z and The Killing exclaimed, “This is so beautiful, I would love to wear this on the red carpet.” Other big names who praised the collection included Stephen Moyer of True Blood and The Starter Wife, as well as Alfre Woodard of 12 Years a Slave, Steel Magnolias, L.A. Law, Desperate Housewives and Star Trek fame. But despite the celebrity kudos, Dayle designs her collection primarily with a different audience in mind. “Though the celebrity thing is a great experience and a lot of fun, I am most passionate about the everyday women I meet – moms, wives, career women, students and grandmothers. They are champions and celebrities in their own worlds,” says Dayle.  “I am told on a regular basis that, when they wear their Vintage Bling pieces, they feel different, special, beautiful and confident. That means far more to me than seeing a celebrity don Vintage Bling on a red carpet somewhere. This is the real world – I love to contribute to women’s personal style.” And while her styles fit right in on the red carpet, women don’t need a movie star salary to afford Vintage Bling designs. Robert Herjavek of Dragon’s Den and Shark Tank even told Dayle of the collection’s low prices: “Your price point is too low for one of a kinds. You gotta go bigger!” If you’re interested in bringing red carpet style to your wardrobe, you can view and purchase the Vintage Bling collection online at www. vintagebling.ca

Photo: Erin Alexander Photography

RED CARPET GLAMOUR FOR THE EVERYDAY WOMAN


P HOT O: SA BRINA NAAYEN PHOTOGR APHY MODEL: MELI SSA AMBER HAI R: LES KI ESMAN M AKEUP: MELI NDA GULB I NSKI CL OT HING: FASHI ON EYES APPAREL

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Bloom & Brilliance

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or Janelle Desrosiers, the owner of Winnipeg branding studio Bloom & Brilliance, business success goes beyond the bottom line – every day she strives to create positive change on individual and global scales. “I seek out clients whose business goals go beyond financial success,” says Janelle. “I love working with entrepreneurs who are driven by a clear and conscientious purpose, meaningfully involved with their business and are committed to exploring their brand’s potential.” Janelle has been passionate about entrepreneurship and design as long as she can

remember. In essence, her career began as a child with her first lemonade stand – she even drew the signs! Her passion continued into adulthood where she worked in a large advertising agency as New Media Coordinator and then as an independent web design contractor before starting her own successful creative studio: Bloom & Brilliance. Merging creativity with marketing strategy, Bloom & Brilliance offers a wide range of services from traditional graphic design and branding to a modern mix of social media strategy, blog creation and even the customization of online stores. From initial strategy meetings to delivering the

bloom & brilliance www.bloomandbrilliance.com

Janelle Desrosiers | 204.293.0383 40

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final printed goods or training clients on WordPress, Janelle manages all projects and works one-on-one with her clients to ensure quality and maximum satisfaction. “Every business has a different authentic personality – it’s my main goal to help entrepreneurs define, develop and leverage their brand to create meaningful experiences for their audiences,” Janelle explains. “Branding is more than logos and business cards, it’s the personality and voice of the business. It helps people understand who you are, what you offer and what makes you unique – it’s absolutely essential, especially in competitive markets.” Janelle’s goal is to build Bloom & Brilliance into Winnipeg’s go-to design firm for organizations focused on health, philanthropy, activism and conscientious business. A born collaborator, Janelle searches out clients who are creative, passionate and dedicated to developing their brand stepby-step. “I’ve worked with all types of clients – from stay-at-home moms looking to turn their hobby into a business to multi-million dollar organizations needing a brand new corporate identity to local companies finally putting their website together. I love that my career allows me to help other people build their dreams,” she says. Bloom & Brilliance works with a wide range of clients including The InterlakeEastern Regional Health Authority, The Winnipeg Trolley Company, Lower Fort Garry National Historic Site, The Pringle Prescription, Delicious by Olivia Lauren and Benetech. To ensure that her services are accessible to businesses of all sizes, she offers affordable, flexible pricing and special rates for Manitoba Youth Entrepreneurs and Aboriginal/Métis-owned businesses. You can also enjoy great entrepreneurship articles, web and social strategies and some feel-good freebies at www.facebook.com/bloomandbrilliance

Photo: Erin Alexander Photography

STRATEGIC BRANDING FOR BUSINESSES WITH HEART


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Evolve Specialty Catering

GOURMET CUISINE WHEREVER YOU PLEASE him to open Evolve Specialty Catering, a one-stop mobile catering company. “Freshly prepared food is very hard to come by in a farmer’s field overlooking the lake – many beautiful settings come with major compromises in terms of cooking,” says Corby. “With our mobile kitchens, however, every hors d’oeuvre, every course of every meal, even every cup of coffee is prepared right on site to the highest standards.” Along with cooking, Corby oversees Evolve Specialty Catering’s menu, staffing, scheduling, mobile kitchen movement and client meetings. Kelly, with extensive experi-

evolve specialty catering www.evolvecatering.com

Kelly Hummerston | 204.781.7170 Corby Pearce | 204.510.1510 42

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ence in construction, was the perfect partner. “Kelly basically built our first kitchen from scratch, starting with a blank trailer and giving us our greatest tool,” explains Corby. In addition to the construction of the kitchens, Kelly manages the company’s finances, purchasing, maintenance and repairs – and, of course, partakes in cooking, too. Evolve Specialty Catering strives to constantly grow and make every event it caters better than the last, which means it regularly invests in new and exciting equipment. After five years in business, the company now has two large mobile commercial kitchens, both fully stocked with independent power and water and capable of producing menus for anywhere from 15 to 500 people. As their capabilities have grown, so has their list of happy clients. “As a local event production company who specializes in outdoor events that are unique and often challenging in their everchanging circumstances, we rely on Corby and his team at Evolve Catering to elevate the event’s food and beverage with a touch of class and flare,” says Karen Mott, Owner of Ugly Duckling Productions. “The food and customer service are above and beyond and he is very skilled at adapting to changing requirements without much notice. He always comes through for us and our clients and we highly recommend him and wish we could work with him all the time.” Within the next few years, Evolve Specialty Catering hopes to have another kitchen on the road, providing services to Manitoba’s booming film industry, as well as offering mobile catering services to the many beautiful locations across the province that make the perfect backdrop for weddings, festivals, family reunions or concerts. To learn more about Evolve Specialty Catering, visit www.evolvecatering.com

Photo: BJ Burrows

he brainchild of Corby Pearce and Kelly Hummerston, Evolve Specialty Catering boasts humble beginnings, rooted in the chefs’ mutual desire to create delicious, freshly prepared food. The two chefs met at Red River College while studying culinary arts and apprenticed at several high-end restaurants before graduating with honours as Red Seal Certified Chefs. While Corby and Kelly had the option of returning to restaurant kitchens after completing their studies, they went down a different path. Corby’s passion for catering events and film sets eventually led


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Stella’s Bridal & Evening Collections “This is the one!” t’s the dream of so many brides-tobe – the moment that she finds the perfect wedding gown. Choosing a dress is one of the most important – and sometimes difficult – decisions a woman will make before walking down the aisle. While some of the newer franchises in Winnipeg offer a large selection of inexpensive gowns, Stella’s Bridal & Evening Collections offers only the highest-quality dresses from a select number of specialty designers at remarkably reasonable prices. “We focus on carrying only the most beautiful fabrics, a wide range of fits and products with excellent quality,” says store manager Monica Montanaro. “But worry

not – prices are still accessible for the everyday bride!” By carrying the latest styles, colours and fits, Stella’s Bridal ensures that brides walk out happy. With gowns ranging from sizes 6 to 28, the shop is proud to carry designs from Justin Alexander, Maggie Sottero (including a beautiful plus size line), Alfred Sung, Stella York, as well as Canadian designers Angela and Allison, Paloma Blanca and Mikaella. “What makes us unique compared to other bridal stores is the way we build relationships with our customers,” Monica explains. “Weddings are difficult, emotional times and we enjoy forging a strong bond with brides by offering support and guidance.”

stella’s bridal www.stellasbridal.ca

Monica Montanaro | 204.453.9253 | 516 Portage Avenue 44

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The Stella’s Bridal team makes the whole dress shopping experience a breeze for brides. When a bride walks through the doors, staff ensures they get a feel for her personality, her preferred style(s) and her budget, after which they suggest four or five gowns for her to try on. “Solid lace gowns are very popular this season, along with Great Gatsby-inspired styles and pearls,” Monica explains. “A classic style is definitely huge: boat-necks, ball gowns, Grace Kelly – very vintageinspired styles. Very few brides buy pure white dresses anymore; 90 % buy a shade of ivory, grey, silver, gold, pearl, oyster, blush pink or even red.” The store also carries a new bridesmaid dress line exclusive to Stella’s Bridal called Sorella Vita, featuring beautiful, flowing Grecian styles. Soft, muted tones are the most popular, with many women choosing purples, pale pink, mint green, pale blue and silver for their bridesmaid dresses. Thanks to the growing popularity of online shopping and websites like Pinterest over the past year, Monica has noticed changes not only in brides’ and bridesmaids’ style, but also in the way in which they shop. “We love seeing the pinboards brides bring in,” she says. “It’s the modern-day version of bridal magazine clipping and it’s a lot of fun. We even use Facebook ourselves to showcase our brides and some of the beautiful looks we’ve had the chance to create.” If you or someone you know is getting married, Monica suggests booking an appointment for a custom consultation in order to have the best possible dress shopping experience. Stella’s Bridal is holding a one-time sample dress blowout sale on November 2 and 3, with prices ranging from $100 to $500 for dresses normally costing $1000 to $5000. They are also holding a grad dress sale on October 25 featuring 90% off savings. Both of these sales are the largest in Stella’s history. To learn more about Stella’s Bridal & Evening Collections, visit www.stellasbridal.com

Photo: Rygiel Photography & Video

UNMATCHED STYLE & BEAUTY FOR WINNIPEG BRIDES


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AYOKO MAGAZINE Yoko Chapman 204.612.5944 ayokomagazine.com

FORUM ART CENTRE Daryl Dumanski 204.235.1069 forumartcentre.com

MCNALLY ROBINSON BOOKSELLERS 204.475.0483 mcnallyrobinson.com

JOSEPHINE DESIGNS Josephine Pulver 204.295.7109 josephine-designs.com

SAY MAGAZINE Leslie Lounsbury 1.866.485.2380 saymag.com

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WINNIE THE BEAR Mary Anne Appleby winniethebear.com

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COLLISION REPAIR CENTRE LTD. EK COLLISION REPAIR Peter Brooks 204.663.8886 ekautogroup.ca

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AYOKO DESIGN INC. Yoko Chapman 204.612.5944 ayokodesigninc.com

BLACKBIRD CREATIVE Daniel Billinkoff 204.999.1829 blackbirdcreative.ca

BLOOM & BRILLIANCE Janelle Desrosiers 204.293.0383 bloomandbrilliance.com

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BNI ELITE Kate Brito bniwinnipegelite.com

BNI MANITOBA Denis Hamel & Judy Murata 204.256.5209 bnimanitoba.com

CANADIAN YOUTH BUSINESS FOUNDATION Joelle Foster 204.480.8481 cybf.ca

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ARTBEAT STUDIO Nigel Bart 204.943.5194 artbeatstudio.ca

COMPUTER SERVICES & REPAIRS

SOLITON APPS Dinen Subramaniam 204.228.4785 solitonapps.com

CORPORATE GIFTS & INCENTIVES

LITTLE FLOWER SHOP Peggy Wiebe 204.388.4108 littleflowershop.ca

FASHION & BEAUTY

JULIE PEDERSEN URBAN MUKLUKS & ACCESSORIES Julie Pedersen 204.474.0686 juliepedersen.com

GAUTHIER FINANCIAL INC. Lorraine Gauthier 204.947.1547 ext 2209 lorraine.gauthier@sunlife.ca

MAISON BIRKS Caroline Ksiazek 204.786.7468 www.maisonbirks.com

KENDRA LARIVIERE 204.294.4198 experts@makeaccountingeasy.ca

TOTAL SHE INC. 1.888.882.8534 totalshe.com

VINTAGE BLING Dayle Goertzen 204.661.9566 vintagebling.ca

EVENTS & PLANNING SERVICES

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FOUR POINTS FINANCIAL SOLUTIONS Thomas Russell 204.235.0004 ext 3 fourpointsfinancial.com

FOOD & HOSPITALITY

AMICI Brian McKnight 204.943.4997 amiciwpg.com

CAKE-OLOGY Pamela Kirkpatrick 204.612.9866 cake-ology.ca

FINANCIAL SERVICES & INSURANCE

EVOLVE CATERING Corby Pearce 204. 510.1510 evolvecatering.com

STELLA’S BRIDAL Monica Montanaro 204.453.9253 stellasbridal.com

BROOKS FINANCIAL Tesia Brooks 204.612.3879 brooksfinancial.ca

RED RIVER GENERAL Monique Buckmaster 204.661.8393 redrivergeneralstore.com

WITH A FLOURISH Jessica Ehlers 204.803.2324 withaflourish.ca

DLW DEDICATED CONSULTING Dawn Williamson 204.226.8531 dlwbookkeeping.com

SWEET IMPRESSIONS Krista Robertson & Aynsley Rosin 204.237.0743 sweetimpressions.ca

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WOW! HOSPITALITY CONCEPTS Doug Stephen 204.942.1090 wowhospitality.ca

HEALTH & FITNESS

INTERPERSONAL WELLNESS SERVICES Joyce Odidison 204.668.5283 interpersonalwellness.com

RIVERBEND COUNSELLING Gerry Goertzen 204.334.4801 riverbendcounselling.ca

ERIN ALEXANDER PHOTOGRAPHY Erin Alexander 204.981.9242 erinalexanderphotography.com

LVB PHOTOGRAPHY Liane Bergen 204.891.6397 lianebergen.com

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CAT & FIDDLE STUDIO C.F. Copp-Waterfield catandfiddlefolk.blogspot.com

CHATEAU LORETTE CONDOMINIUMS Clara Mitchell Enns 204.452.9627 chateaulorette.com

SHWEIKI MEDIA 512.480.0860 shweiki.com

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

XOPHORIA Maxine Piche | maxinep@mts.net turnbacktimewithchocolate.com

RARE FINDS

THE CIVILITY GROUP Lew Bayer 204.996.4792 civilityexperts.com

DONALD SUTHERLAND CONSULTING Donald Sutherland 204.254.1473 donaldsutherlandconsulting.com

A MOVING PICTURE STUDIOS Sean Philips 204.230.1747 amovingpicturestudios.com

KNUDSON LAW OFFICE Curtis Knudson 204.505.3033 knudsonlaw.com

DEVON EDIE PHOTOGRAPHY Devon Edie 204.899.3780 devonedie.com

RE/MAX PERFORMANCE REALTY Clara Mitchell Enns 204.452.9627 heartsandhomes.ca

SOURCE WITHIN Maureen Becker 204.275.1704 sourcewithin.com

VINTAGE VERUCA Monique Buckmaster 204.339.5301 verucaantiques.com

TRADES & SERVICES

BRITO YARD SERVICES Kate & Victor Brito 204.292.8636 facebook.com/BritoYardServices

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