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MAY - JUNE 2021 | FREE. ENJOY!

simple pleasures in the mean time The Night Café, Salmon Arm CREATIVE 55 PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: OTTO PFANNSCHMIDT

wellness | wander | winds of change shuswapmagazine.ca


illustrations

LOGOS. PRO M OT I ON AL G E AR . M A PS . S OC IA L ME D IA .

Just one of the many things we can help you with.

2020 BY THE NU M B ERS

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3,274

BATTERIES RECYCLED. That’s the weight of one Asian elephant.

NEIGHBOURHOOD EMERGENCY PROGRAMS in operation. That’s an increase of 14 over the previous year.

25,902 m3

YARD & GARDEN WASTE CHIPPED. That is equal to 785 loads in a large-tip dump truck.

24,720 kg

OF PAINT RECYCLED! That’s enough paint to fill a 24 foot x 10 foot wide pool 4 feet deep!

TONNES OF GARBAGE disposed of at CSRD landfills. That equates to the weight of 190 adult blue whales.

community 10 water systems.

of watermains. That’s equal to the driving distance from Anglemont to Salmon Arm.

14 Firehalls.

OF RECREATIONAL TRAILS. That is the approximate driving distance from Falkland to Sicamous.

300 paid on-call

MATTRESSES RECYCLED from CSRD landfills and transfer stations. That’s double the number recycled two years ago.

10

86,831 m

More than

8,198

BUILDING INSPECTION PERMITS. That’s up from 216 in 2019.

LITRES OF WATER pumped through CSRD water systems. That equates to the amount of water in 468.4 Olympic-sized swimming pools.

81,900 m

34,182

352

1,170,981,398

firefighters.

252 fire hydrants. Home assessments. 156 FireSmart

60 Developed parks. 4 Outdoor skating rinks.

2020 CSRD Annual Report

OT TO P FAN N SC HM I DT I L LU ST R AT I O N

2020 CSRD Annual Report

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Golf Course Drive Highlands

Golf Co urs

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Trans Canada Highway

TOLIVER DESIGN • OTTO PFANNSCHMIDT • HUCUL PRINTING • MEDIABILITY On the corner of 5th Street and 5th Avenue SW, Salmon Arm, BC


IN THIS

issue 4

Growing Money into Community Grants

PHOTO: SHUSWAP LAKE GOLF COURSE, story on page 10

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Shuswap Trail Network

55 CREATIVE GROUP

JIM COOPERMAN

8

16

Farm Market Season

Living with the Risk of Wildfire

55 CREATIVE GROUP

10

Fore! Shuswap Lake Golf Course BARBARA BROUWER

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Art & Agriculture Powering Business BARBARA BROUWER

SHARING REFRESHING STORIES... With the people who live, visit, work and value our communities. Shuswap Magazine is a free bi-monthly magazine created by the 55 Creative Group. We share the best the Shuswap has to offer with our residents, seasonal visitors and tourists. We tell authentic stories with fabulous photography about the people, businesses and services that truly make the Shuswap an amazing place to live, visit and spend time in. Our content highlights the best of our outdoor experiences, unique shopping, entertainment, food and beverage, farm to table edibles, home services, professional services and our unique visitor experiences – as well as, other noteworthy story ideas you may have! We distribute 5,000 copies throughout the Shuswap region, every two months, to grocery stores, shops, tourist information centres, hotels, restaurants, cafés, and professional businesses. In this time of Covid-19, we will be careful to follow health guidelines to ensure the safety of our readers.

the extras

PHOTO: KRISTAL BURGESS

PLEASE CONTACT US AT: shuswapmag@gmail.com for more information on our advertising rates or how to book your story space.

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7

14

Samosas Sell Like Hot Cakes

It's Healthy to be Kind

The Mean Time

BARBARA BROUWER

MIKAYLA WILKINSON

LOUISE WALLACE RICHMOND

SHUSWAP MAGAZINE IS PRODUCED BY 55 CREATIVE GROUP 5th & 5th SW in Salmon Arm #4 - 471 5th Avenue SW Salmon Arm, BC V1E 1S9 shuswapmag@gmail.com 250.832.8261

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SHUSWA P C OMMUN IT Y FOUN DATI O N

Growing money into community grants

ABOVE L to R: Lindsay Wong (SCF), Paige Hilland (SAFE), Jaylene Bourdon (SAFE), Jane Shirley (SAFE), Ineke Hughes (SCF), Judy Moore (SCF) and dogs Tulah and Loki. RIGHT: Al Neale and Beryl Herdan.

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Endowment Funds 101 THE SUCCESS OF SHUSWAP COMMUNITY FOUNDATION IS BASED ON A SIMPLE CONCEPT. THEY NEVER SPEND YOUR GIFT, BUT CAREFULLY INVEST IT. AS THE INCOME BUILDS UP THEY ONLY DISTRIBUTE THE INCOME GENERATED BY THE POOLED FUNDS. ANY DONATION YOU ENDOW WITH THEM IS THERE FOR GOOD, NO MATTER HOW BIG OR HOW SMALL THE DONATION.

I

n 2018 BC Housing, the government agency which oversees the Shuswap Area Family Emergency (SAFE) Society, mandated that women with pets as well as children be accommodated in transition houses. A pet-friendly room was prepared and opened in the SAFE Transition House, and immediately occupied. There has been high demand for the room ever since. Shortly thereafter, working in consultation with the SPCA, the Pet Shelter for Families Impacted by Violence or Trauma project was set in motion. Building is slated to begin by the end of April. In the past, the local SPCA has provided compassionate boarding at no cost to the society, and they will continue to do so if the need arises. However, having their pets within easy access will keep both animals and families impacted by domestic violence safer, and improve eventual outcomes. Research has shown that many women who arrive at a shelter have had a family pet abused or killed, and many delayed leaving an abusive relationship because of concern for a pet. An alarming number of these women reported their abuser had carried out their threats of harm. Furthermore, witnessing violence towards animals and particularly their pets can adversely affect children. Pets are a strong component of a person’s emotional support network, especially during challenging times. The society’s grant application to Shuswap Community Foundation (SCF) met SCF’s requirements in three critical areas: Animal Welfare, Health and Wellness, and Social Equality. 32 individual endowments provided contributions to the largest grant Shuswap Community Foundation has disbursed to date. Featuring three indoor heated and cooled dog kennels with access to an outdoor run for each dog, and a separate potty area, the Pet Shelter will allow clients easy access to their pets, enabling them to look after their dogs themselves knowing they are safe. There will also be water for sanitization and a wash sink, storage space for food and pet items, a perimeter fence for safety and security, and an additional storage room that could become a cat room in the future. In the meantime, cats and other small pets such as gerbils and rabbits will continue to be accommodated in the main house.

THE AL NEALE BURSARY FUND

"It was like a snowball that grows into a snowman, it just kept rolling and getting bigger." - AL NEALE “I was getting tired of yard sales, book sales, selling hotdogs, sandwiches, coffee and organizing pet shows around McGuire Lake, and I thought there had to be a better way,” Al says. That better way presented itself in the form of the Shuswap Community Foundation, which was incorporated in 1995 and issued its first grants in 1997, with Cindy Derkaz and Gary Brooke acting as co-chairs. Cindy, noting the result was an endowment fund that would provide funding to the local SPCA branch in perpetuity. “Al’s donation was the biggest sole donation at the time.” The Al Neale Bursary Fund, was Al’s pet project because it began as a shoestring but supports several mature students in their quest for an education. “It was just a few thousand dollars at the beginning, but I kept putting money in every year,” says Al. “Lynda Wilson was dean and under her guidance and nurturing, it has grown to the point it awards six or seven devoted students every year.” In response to their own children’s issues with mental health, the Dearlings, as Al and Beryl referred to each other, asked the foundation to create an endowment fund to benefit the local branch of the Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA). The aim of this fund is to support operational funds and provide help to families with a loved one suffering from a mental health issue. “It was like a snowball that grows into a snowman, it just kept rolling and getting bigger,” says Al humbly of his and Beryl’s financial commitment to community. “All the funds are like your own children; each one has its own merit and individual characteristics. Some of your kids drive you crazy while others are no problem at all – but you have an affinity for all of them.” Al says he and Beryl never expected anything in return for their gifts to the community, simply deriving satisfaction from their actions.

When Al Neale met his longtime partner, the late Beryl Herdan, he became involved with one of her most-loved projects – raising funds for the local branch of the SPCA. With Beryl leading the charge and many fundraisers later, a successful boat raffle helped raise money to build the local shelter in 1986 in the industrial park.

102 - 160 Harbourfront Dr NE, Salmon Arm, BC V1E 3M3 250.832.5428 shuswapfoundation.ca Youth Philanthropy Advisory Committee

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Let’s get

SIZZLING With ASKEW’S OWN Sausagс

YOUN G E N T R E P R E N E U R & PH IL A N T H R O P I ST

Made by ASKEW’S in Armstrong! •

All Natural ingredients

100% Canadian Pork

100% Canadian Beef

NO MSG

No preservatives

No colourings

Samosas sell like hot cakes by BARB BROUWER

A

rmaan Dhaliwal is an entrepreneur and philanthropist. He is also a charming 10-year-old, who started his Samosa Kid business, in part, to showcase his culture.

“I felt like to get my own business, it would be cool and would motivate other kids to start their own businesses,” says the articulate Grade 5 student. “I just thought it would be a fun thing.” Armaan started his business on March 17. His revenue as of April 18 was $3,000, of which $1,000 was profit. While he plans to save his money in order to take his family on a trip, Armaan already understands the importance of contributing to his community. He recently donated $500 to the Shuswap Hospital Foundation and is eyeing the Bahamas, Mexico or Hawaii as possible vacation destinations.

Let’s get

SIZZLING ASKEW’S OWN SAUSAGES

Wit�

! F F O 0 0 . 3 $ askewsfoods.com

VALID MAY 2021 AT ALL 4 ASKEW’S | 1 COUPON PER ORDER

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#SHOPShuswap

The samosas are made by a family friend, known as Vancouver’s Samosa Lady. They are vegetarian and consist of peas, potatoes and Indian spices. Armaan’s business grew out of requests from family and friends who tasted the spicy samosas and said “these are so good, we need more.” Now he receives about 1,000 frozen samosas a month and lets regular customers know when a new batch arrives. New customers can be assured that Armaan will fill their requests as soon as possible. Armaan operates his business after school until 7:30 or 8 p.m., getting his homework done in between dealing with customers. He says business is not getting in the way of his schooling. “I’m doing really good in math, I just have to work on my verbs a bit,” he says. If samosas make your taste buds tingle, text the Samosa Kid at 236-412-9145 or instagram: @thesamosakid.


it's HEALTHY to be

by MIKAYLA WILKINSON

W

hen we are little we are told to be kind. You are scolded when you are rude and praised when you are nice. It makes sense as the people and world around us are happier when we practice kindness.

But what if the simple two words of “Be nice” has a lot more meaning to it than you actually thought? A recent study from the Random Acts Of Kindness Foundation showed that people who participate in random acts of kindness, or volunteer on a regular basis, produce more endorphins, serotonin and oxytocin. Endorphins help to reduce physical pain in our bodies, serotonin helps us feel happier and healthier and oxytocin reduces our blood pressure making us more caring towards ourselves and others. When we are kind, anxiety, depression, stress and pain decreases. While our

Local organizations helping to spread kindness in our communities: ESSIE'S PLACE - created to help connect with the LGBTIQ2SA+ community in the Shuswap and surrounding areas, learn about their quality of life and help them improve it. Locals Jeanne Rokosh and Daylene Fleming would like to create a safe community and provide support. The first step is to gather information through a quality of life survey. Learn more and help out by filling out the survey at www.essiesplace.ca.

energy, happiness, satisfaction, and well-being increases. Studies also show that people who practice kindness regularly, may even live longer. Overall health is protected — twice as much — as aspirin protects against heart disease, when people give kindness to others. Kindness is contagious. When an act of kindness is performed in a crowd of people, everyone who witnessed or received kindness is significantly more likely to “pay it forward”. One random act of kindness can lead to improving the day of dozens of people. So by simply complimenting a stranger in public, paying for the person behind you in line, helping out your friends in need or volunteering for a local organization, you can increase your health, happiness and maybe even your life span, while making the world a better place. BE KIND!

DO SOME GOOD! JOIN A SALMON ARM ROTARY CLUB The original Salmon Arm Rotary Club was chartered in 1946 and is celebrating its 75th anniversary this year! Two other clubs have also been chartered: Salmon Arm Rotary - Daybreak and Salmon Arm Rotary Shuswap. All three clubs do amazing amounts of volunteer work and have contributed financially to many community projects. Learn more @ salmonarmrotary.org sadaybreakrotary.com shuswaprotary.org

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farm

market SEASON in the SHUSWAP

Salmon Arm, Sicamous, South Shuswap, North Shuswap, Enderby and Chase

E

at local, delicious, garden-fresh, and freshly made food. Local Farmers' Markets are coming to a community near you for another season of local goodness. Farmers’ Markets will be following the Guidelines set out by the BC Centre for Disease Control and the BC Farmers’ Market Association. This means the markets will be set up with appropriate modifications, to address the Covid-19 safety. SALMON ARM All Organic Farmers' Market Wednesdays, 1 - 5PM Askew's Uptown Store The only farmers' market in BC made up exclusively of organic food vendors. Check out the selection of organic vegetables, fruits, eggs, German bread, Dutch pastries, and even organic beer!

How can we

HELP? ✔ Business Support & Expansion ✔ Starting, Buying or Selling a Business ✔ Regional Relief and Recovery Fund For over 30 years, Community Futures has been a proven leader in supporting rural entrepreneurs and small to medium enterprises just like you throughout BC and across Canada to survive and thrive.

101-160 Harbourfront Drive NE Salmon Arm , BC V1E 4P9 P. 250.803.0156 TF. 1.877.803.0156

BeYourFuture.ca

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#RECOVERShuswap


Salmon Arm Downtown Farmers' Market Saturdays, 9 AM - 1 PM, Ross Street Plaza Starting Mother's Day weekend to Thanksgiving, you can buy produce, fruit, baking, arts, crafts, and more! Sicamous Farmers' Market Saturdays, 10 AM - 2 PM, The Red Barn Open to the public at the Red Barn at 1226 Riverside Avenue in Sicamous. Everyone Welcome. Sorrento Village Farmers' Market Saturdays, 8 AM - 12 Noon, Sorrento Plaza Local community family farms, food producers, artisans and crafters will be back starting on the Mother’s Day Weekend!

Scotch Creek Farm & Craft Market Sundays, 9:30AM - 1:30PM, The Hub May long weekend to Labour Day in the field behind The Scotch Creek Hub. Vendors offer fresh, local produce, honey, delicious baking and preserves, an array of hand-made jewellery, pottery, wood carvings, body lotions & soaps, and so much more! Celista Hall Farmers' Market Sundays, 9:30AM - 1:30PM, The Hub July - September. Local farmers, gardeners, bakers and craftspeople. Find baking, vegetables, eggs, free-range chicken, preserves, herbs, tea, flowers, and artisans. Enderby Open Air Farmers' Market Fridays, 10AM - 2PM, Splatsin Centre Local farmers, gardeners, bakers and craftspeople. Find baking, vegetables, eggs, preserves, herbs, flowers, and artisans.

Kingfisher Farmers' Market Wednesdays, End of June - September Starts the last Wednesday of June and runs to the first Wednesday of September. Established in the 1970s and one of oldest Farmer's Markets in British Columbia. Chase Farm & Craft Market Fridays, 10AM - 2PM, next to Safety Mart May to October. Fresh locally grown produce, eggs, honey and baking with a unique selection of artisan crafts from around the Shuswap. For more information on Shuswap Farmers' Markets visit: shuswaptourism.ca

Hospice and Palliative Care Resource Centre Hospice provides emotional support for grief and helps you on your wellness journey — and adds quality of life to each day. 250.832.7099

shuswaphospice.ca

Opportunity Knocks!

Will you answer?

The Creative 55 Team is looking for a unique individual to assist us with coordinating sales for Shuswap Magazine. You are outgoing, organized, friendly and like to interact with people and businesses. This a part-time gig - and will take a few hours per month. Interested? Email us your resumé.

Gain Confidence Mobility Strength in a Private Covid-Safe Downtown SA Pilates Studio 30+ years e xperien ce

250-833-6676 studiompilates.ca @studiompilatesca

shuswapmag@gmail.com

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Fore!

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#EXPLOREShuswap

Changes in the wind: New golf course owners happy to be home in the Shuswap


Karyn Bruschinsky and Ian Morrison tee up a new business venture as the new owners of Shuswap Lake Golf Course and Duffer's Den Grill & Lounge. Fore used to be a foreign concept to Karyn Bruschinsky and Ian Morrison. But the word is fast becoming their reality! The couple moved to the Shuswap from the Lower Mainland in the first week of February and took over ownership and operation of the championship Shuswap Lake Golf Course in the first week of March. Ian grew up in Sicamous and returned to the Interior every summer, so when the couple chose to give up a 30-year equipment and party rental business in the “rat race,” there was no question about the location for a new business. “Neither of us are golfers but we’re going to learn,” he laughs, pointing out there have been so many things to learn about the golf and food service business, there hasn’t been time to pick up a club. “Our golf pro is threatening to get us out there before the May long weekend.” PGA golf pro Brian O’Keefe has initiated training programs for people of all ages and capabilities, whether they are just learning the sport or are intent on perfecting their games. While they face a huge learning curve, Ian says he and Karyn are elated longtime staff have remained. “They’re phenomenal. They have been absolutely perfect and we’re like one big family now,” he says, noting communication is open and appreciated. “I can’t imagine what we would have done if we hadn’t had them in place.” CHANGES ARE IN THE WIND Changes are in the wind, some already underway, with more planned for the future. “The course is no longer private, it’s wide open to the public and we have sponsorship programs,” says Ian, noting the entire 18-hole course is now open. The driving range has undergone a facelift and addition of a mini pro shop and full-time greeter to serve food and refreshments.

2404 Centennial Drive Blind Bay, BC V0E 1H2 Tee Times: 250.675.2315 shuswaplakegolf.com

DUFFER'S DEN GRILL & LOUNGE Duffer’s Den offers a takeout service and can feed up to 90 people at one time on the enlarged, outdoor patio, while adhering to Covid sanitization and social distancing restrictions. While relatively new to Duffer’s Den, the cook has longtime experience and has made s few changes to the menu – with more to come. “One new addition is breakfast,” Ian says, adding food specials change on a regular basis. “Wing Wednesdays are so popular they’re often sold out and there’s Fish & Chip Friday.” Covid guidelines are also front of mind as Ian and Karyn hope to be able to offer live music provided by local artists. The dozen year-round staff members will be joined by up to 60 more seasonal employees, with positions available for youth as well.

"We're all about supporting local vendors and artists. While we have ideas, the people might have better ones." - IAN MORRISON

“We’re all about supporting local vendors and artists,” Ian says, pointing out he and Karyn are intent on serving the community and don’t want to introduce something the public doesn’t want. “While we have ideas, the people might have better ones.” To express an interest in performing at Shuswap Lake Golf Course or to offer ideas, send a message via www.facebook.com/ shuswaplakegolfcourse. For career opportunities, visit www.shuswaplakegolf.com.

2404 Centennial Drive Blind Bay, BC V0E 1H2 Order Takeout! 250.675.2315 duffersden.ca 11


Shuswap’s amazing network of trails a success thanks to community collaboration

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by JIM COOPERMAN

I

f the pandemic has resulted in a positive impact, it would be that many of us have become better connected to our home place. Forced to stay home, more people are using the local trails to hike, bike, ski, and snowshoe. Fortunately, here in the Shuswap we have an amazing network of trails, thanks in part to the work of the Shuswap Trail Alliance. In just 15 years, the Trail Alliance has grown from a small group of volunteers to become one of the most important organizations in our community that has invested nearly 5.5-million dollars’ worth of grants, donations and in-kind services to construct 143 kilometres of new trails. The key to its success is the organization’s dedication to collaboration, as it has involved nearly every group that has an interest in the recreational use of local public lands.

programs, a dedicated volunteer base, partnerships with local government for new trails, the identification of over 300 kms of proposed trails and greenway corridors and the construction of over 50 kms of new trails. When the trail strategy was updated in 2015, one of the outcomes was the creation of a roundtable that would provide opportunities for a larger, more diverse group that includes the motorized recreation sector to help guide future trail planning and use. Meeting yearly, with a working group that meet quarterly, the Shuswap Regional Trails Roundtable works with all levels of government, and Secwepemc representatives to provide strategic, collaborative direction, feedback and participation in the many trail initiatives now underway.

PHOTO: Shuswap Trail Alliance (photo taken pre-pandemic)

Trail build training at South Canoe Trails

The first step was the formation of an advisory group with representation from local governments, First Nations, economic and tourism groups, recreation organizations and other associations. After a yearlong study to examine the viability of the vision and determine how communities and groups could work together to develop a system of trails and waterway routes, the Trail Alliance was formally incorporated as a non-profit society in November 2005. After a year of planning, the first Shuswap Trail Strategy was developed that proposed an ambitious 5-year program that would link existing plans with new ones to create a unified vision of active, healthy communities with a commitment to stewardship and ecological integrity, respect for First Nation values and heritage and ongoing consultations and partnerships. By 2010, the Trail Alliance had become the focal point for regional trail development and management leadership with many successes including a standards manual of best practices for trail design, commitment for unified signage standards, training PHOTO ON LEFT: Tappen Bluffs. Sarah Tokarek, shuswapadventuregirl.ca

To provide a better understanding of the amount of collaboration that occurs in expanding the trail network, consider how in 2019 there were over 50 organizations and hundreds of individuals and volunteers involved, with financial support from over 130 sponsors and funding partners. The existing network of 75 hiking and biking trails and trail systems are managed by either the Columbia Shuswap Regional District (CSRD) as part of its parks program, the municipalities, BC Parks or Rec Sites and Trails BC. For most of the newer trails, the STA helped with the planning and/or supervised the construction. A trail guide is produced by the STA in partnership with Shuswap Tourism and there is also an online version at shuswaptrails.com. We can all look forward to a future filled with opportunities for nature-based recreation, because of the Trail Alliance’s dedication to its vision of “establishing the entire Shuswap watershed as a united destination centre known for its active lifestyle, vibrant culture, natural beauty and commitment to ecological sustainability.”

13


A year into the pandemic, and there is still no clarity on a paid sick leave program for British Columbians

the

by GREG KYLLO, MLA for SHUSWAP

On Thursday, April 28, I stood in the Legislature in Victoria to recognize the National Day of Mourning, a day when British Columbians remember the workers who lost their lives in the workplace due to injury or illness, and reaffirm our commitment to creating safer workplaces for all. Although we have made great progress in our commitment to workplace safety, we still have far to go. In 2019, B.C. lost 140 workers. In 2020, we lost 170. COVID has changed our perspective about risks in the workplace. It has made us realize that our frontline and essential workers aren’t just our healthcare workers, but our teachers, firefighters, restaurant workers, police officers, grocery clerks, and many more who are risking their lives every day to keep our communities safe and supported. It has also reignited our debate about basic human rights such as paid sick days. No British Columbian should ever have to choose between being able to pay their rent or going to work sick. With an MNP survey citing that 53 per cent of British Columbians are less than 200 dollars away from insolvency, this is still the reality for far too many workers in our province. Despite government’s promises for a made-in-B.C. paid sick leave program, British Columbians have no further clarity on when such a program might actually come into place. Even Ontario has recently announced a temporary provincial paid sick leave program where workers are entitled up to 200 dollars per day for up to 3 days. We are more than a year into the pandemic and British Columbians are no closer to this kind of support from our government despite government promises that B.C. is prepared to “go it alone.” While I completely support a paid sick leave program, the Premier has stated that businesses cannot take on any additional costs right now. Our sick pay program must come from the three billion-dollar COVID funding government is sitting on and not from our WorksafeBC employer premiums or out of businesses’ pockets directly. A made-in-B.C. program should be supported by B.C. As your MLA, I will continue to work with my colleagues in the Official Opposition to advocate for a paid sick leave program that will help keep workers safe and supported in B.C. throughout the pandemic and beyond.

M.L.A. Shuswap Critic - Labour

Greg.Kyllo.MLA@leg.bc.ca

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Shuswapmagazine.ca

by LOUISE WALLACE RICHMOND

H

ave you noticed in conversations of late that people speak fondly of the before times and trepidatiously about the after times? That got me to thinking about the mean time. The time in between the time. I think we need to be talking more about that. Just for a minute, I’ll put on my economist badge to explain that the mean is also an important statistical measure and, in research matters, is preferred to the average where one number can skew many others. The mean is a measure of what’s called central tendency. Stats aside, it’s not lost on me, or you for that matter, that this pandemic has been, well, particularly mean. If we’re talking mean, as in the emotion, it’s given me its fair share. My parents live in Ontario and I haven’t seen them in two years. My contract work continues, but it’s a drip compared to a stream. I haven’t taught at the college or sat in my Council seat since March of 2020. That’s nobody’s fault and I bear no ill will. Doesn’t “mean” I don’t miss it. But, if we’re talking mean, as in central tendency, it’s been better than average for me. More time at home with my boys who, in the blink of an eye, will be adults. More walks in the Park Hill trails, more experimental cooking, more writing, more sketching and oddly, a better understanding of Italian. I often listen to Italian TV to pretend I’m on vacation. I started a food blog called Illustrated Eats and it’s going pretty well. I’ve contributed to this publication, the Shuswap’s first ever magazine founded not just in the middle of a pandemic but because of one. And that’s going pretty well too. So many amazing things have happened in the mean time.

Greg Kyllo

CONSTITUENCY OFFICE 202A - 371 Alexander St. NE Salmon Arm, BC PHONE: 1.877.771.7557

mean times

@gregkylloshuswap @KylloGreg

So, words aside, let’s talk numbers. They tell stories too - very important ones at that - and we’ve got a few here that might surprise you and hopefully inspire you to live for the mean time, be grateful the before time and hopeful for the after time.


42

YouTube episodes produced for Family Saturdays at the Salmon Arm Arts Centre

26,017 Number of Trail Forks check-ins at South Canoe Trails in 2020

10,426 23,000 Number of organic views in the first month of the new food blog IllustratedEats.ca

141

Nominations submitted to Salmon Arm Economic Development’s for the 20 under 40 awards

30,000

320,000

$ Number of meals prepared and delivered to vulnerable people by Sorrento Centre

Province of BC Agritech funding awarded to Valid Manufacturing for development of their nutrient-recovery system for the dairy industry

Number of printed copies of Shuswap Magazine since June of 2020

145,000

$

Prize money awarded to Tech Brewing Robotics, winner of the 2021 OKGN Angel Summit

9.5

M I LL I O N

Dollar value of Salmon Arm development permits from January 1 to March 31, 2021

15


Living in the Shuswap means... Walk around your home

Do you have cedar hedges or junipers? Are your roof gutters full of tree debris? Where is your firewood stored in the summer months? What other hazards lay in plain sight?

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living with the risk of wildfire O

ur wildfire seasons are hot and generally dry, our topography is hilly and our surroundings are full of fuel in the form of coniferous trees. Although human-caused fires are preventable, wildfire is a natural phenomenon that we can reasonably expect to deal with, given where we live. Despite the factors that lead to wildfire development and spread, generally the biggest threat to home loss are flammable items within 10 metres of your home. In a wildfire, embers can be thrown many kilometres from where the actual fire is burning. These embers can be parts of trees, large cones, branches and bark that get pushed up into the air from the heat generated from the fire. In some cases, they are small bits of debris. In severe fires, they are much larger and result in an ember storm. Embers land or get blown into combustible items around your home and, in dry conditions, can create spot fires. Coniferous trees and decorative bushes are some of the most flammable plants residents can have near their homes. Juniper bushes and cedar hedges are prevalent in most Shuswap neighborhoods. However, these bushes contain highly flammable oils that easily ignite. Cedar hedges are often used as privacy fences and junipers make great ground cover, especially in steep areas. But the dangers far outweigh the benefits.

Often cedar hedges look nice, green and healthy on the outside, but if you pull back a few branches, you will likely find an accumulation of dead, brown debris inside. Juniper bushes are commonly referred by fire professionals as ‘green gas cans’ because of the way they burn. Both plants are excellent at catching embers that burn fast and hot.

We recommend you have no cedar or juniper bushes within 10 meters (30 ft) of your home. There are other, safer alternatives for privacy fences and ground cover. Salmon Arm, Sicamous and the Columbia Shuswap Regional District all have resources available to residents who would like to learn more about how they can protect their homes in the event of a wildfire. Walk around your home. Do you have cedar hedges or junipers? Are your roof gutters full of tree debris? Where is your firewood stored in the summer months? What other hazards lay in plain sight? In neighborhoods where homes are closer together, we encourage neighbors to work together to reduce overlapping fuels.

To learn more about FireSmart or to request a free home assessment, visit your local municipality’s website or contact us via phone or email.

TM TM

firesmart@salmonarm.ca firesmart@csrd.bc.ca firesmart@sicamous.ca FireSmart, Intelli-feu and other associated Marks are trademarks of the Canadian Interagency Forest Fire Centre.

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TSUTS'WEYE WOME N ' S E N T R E PR E N E UR & I N N OVAT I O N N E T WO R K

art

agriculture

poweRing business by BARB BROUWER

Ten Shuswap women are powering up their passion for entrepreneurship with Tsuts’weye. The Art and Agriculture (A2) Program is part of a three-year initiative funded by Western Economic Diversification Canada and facilitated locally by Community Futures Shuswap. A2 participants have the benefit of workshops and classes along with one-on-one business mentor support. Each woman is learning to apply what she learns in the classroom directly to her business. Each of the following four A2 program participants has similar goals for advancing her own unique business:: SERENA CANER – Souper Meal “I’m looking into making affordable soups that we could deliver to schools for their hotlunch program,” she says, noting many students need lunches but because most schools lack cooking facilities, single-serving snack food and granola bars are regular menu items. “It’s better than nothing but it’s not great for a kid who is not getting well fed at home either.” Serena would like to expand the free Friday lunch program currently in place at Jackson, which serves soup, a bun and fruit to 180 to 200 students.

ley F Wild Val

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Shuswapmagazine.ca

|

z arm

#ShopShuswap

“I’m trying to figure how to make this a business,” she says, suggesting the society might consider providing schools with soup at a subsidized rate at the same time establishing reliable funding by selling to the public at a higher rate. “The nice thing about soup is we can make it out of local food ingredients, making it fairly affordable and healthy.” Contact Serena @ canerserena@gmail.com.


Los Lobos Artisans - Cocoa & Caramel

Souper Meal

LINDA WATSON – Suspence Designs Linda combined her love of sewing with business in 1982, making lingerie in her Lower Mainland home. “I decided I wanted a Victorian Line, which features white cotton and lace, is oldfashioned, vintage, very detailed and very romantic.” Linda put her business on hold in 2000 to take care of family business. Sixteen years later and following her mom’s death, Linda and her husband moved to Salmon Arm. “I’m giving it my all,” she says of her newfound passion for restarting her business and setting goals. Using her own patterns, Linda designs, creates and shows her stunning pieces in her in-home workshop and gallery. White cotton blouses trimmed with lace are displayed among equally romantic night gowns and lingerie. “This time I am concentrating on a children’s line and adult daywear like bathing suit covers,” she says. Linda’s romantic collection is currently available at the Sorrento Artisans’ Market and the Saturday morning market on Ross Street in Salmon Arm. Contact Linda by email @ spencewatson@shaw.ca. NIKA GUILBAULT – Wild Valley Farmz While Nika isn’t worried about which came first, chicken and egg sales are the foundation on which she is building her agri business. And the Agriculture and Art Program is helping her discover creative ways to do that. “This program is helping to open so many doors; it is helping me to remove boxes and think outside the box,” she says, noting she is responding to the public’s growing preference to eat locally grown and produced food. “I’m very hands-on and I love working on the farm, but I am finding the computer and administrative work quite interesting too.” Nika’s goal is to raise food on a small to medium scale. While the current mainstay is the sale of eggs, which Nika delivers throughout the Shuswap on Tuesdays, pork and beef sales are planned.

Suspence Designs

Meat chickens are being raised for sale and baby chicks are also available. As well, Nika says she will be working meat sales in tandem with her mother who raises sheep on her farm. “We are planning to offer mixed boxes and will have farm gate sales.” she says of her Turtle Valley farm. “Future plans include building a huge food forest providing berries and other fruit.” Despite the long hours required to run the farm, Nika says she is happy her desire to provide good food for her family is being expanded to other families. Contact Nika by email @ wildvalleyfarmz@gmail.com. JUSTINE ATWOOD – Los Lobos Artisans Justine and friend Kara Hamblin, who founded Los Lobos Artisans, create small-batch chocolates and confectionary. The women are both trained pastry chefs with a passion for producing sweet treats such as salted caramels and macarons from the highest quality ingredients. “We use cocoa and caramel and try to limit the use of additives,” says Justine. “Kara’s specialty is craft truffles.” The women have been investigating local flavours such as Salmon Arm’s Canadian Barley Company Mo’mugi organic tea, and are planning to add chocolate bars to the product line. Justine and Kara participated in the grand opening of The She Shed Market, an enterprise created by another Agriculture and Art Program participant – Monique Cusson. “One of the best things about the program is the inclusiveness of being able to talk about things that are different but very much the same in terms of creating a business model for success, specifically geared to food production and artisans,” says Justine, who calls the networking opportunities amazing and very helpful. Email Justine and Kara @ loslobosartisan@gmail.com. For more information on this and other Tsuts'weye programs, visit www.tsutsweye.ca

101 - 160 Harbourfront Dr NE, Salmon Arm, BC V1E 3M3 EMAIL: info@tsutsweye.ca www.tsutsweye.ca Supported by

19


Wildfire season is here.

PROTECT Your home and property. We live in a wildfire prone area. Learn how simple FireSmartTM principles can help reduce your risk of property loss or damage due to a wildfire. The first step is booking your Free FireSmart assessment. Get tips on how to implement a plan to protect your home and property and how to earn a $500 financial rebate.

Watch our online FireSmart Webinar www.csrd.bc.ca/firesmart

Watch our online Webinar on

YOUR SCHEDULE Book awww.csrd.bc.ca/firesmart

FREE

1.888.248.2773

FireSmart assessment and you could qualify for a $ 500 rebate.* * Rebate available in Sicamous and CSRD only.

www.salmonarm.ca/429/firesmart EMAIL: firesmart@salmonarm.ca PHONE: 250.803.4000

TM

www.csrd.bc.ca/firesmart EMAIL: firesmart@csrd.bc.ca TOLL FREE: 1.888.248.2773

www.sicamous.ca/firesmart firesmart@sicamous.ca PHONE: 250.836.2477 EMAIL:

FireSmart, Intelli-feu and other associated Marks are trademarks of the Canadian Interagency Forest Fire Centre. The name and image of Ember are trademarks of CIFFC.

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Shuswap Magazine - May-June 2021  

Shuswap Magazine - May-June 2021  

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