Shuswap Magazine August-September 2020

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AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2020 | FREE. ENJOY!

homegrown love Feasting on Shuswap flavours - the harvest edition

PHOTO: KRISTAL BURGESS

growth | gratitude | goodness shuswapmagazine.ca


ASKEW’S Loves LOCAL! Q

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Get to know our local food producers! ✓Askew’s Foods

Blue Goose D Dutchmen Demilles Denzel’s Farmstrong Cider Fresh is Best

John O Stan Laura’s Pies Little Red Hen Madalea Growers Mo Mugi Rocana Meats Sandy Acres Shuswap Coffee

Shuswap Organics Shuswap Pie Skippy’s Tanto Latte Voets Coffee White Lake Organics Wild Moon Wolfgang's Grains

Post your completed puzzle on social media & tag us @AskewsFoods for a chance to win one of these local gift baskets!


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IN THIS

issue

14

Savouring the Fruits of Our Labour

Stalled in the Shuswap 55 CREATIVE GROUP

16

BERNIE & SHELLEY HUCUL

6

Coffee & A Bagel

Tsuts'weye Business Women Spreading Wings

LOUISE WALLACE-RICHMOND

55 CREATIVE GROUP

10

22

55 CREATIVE GROUP

55 CREATIVE GROUP

Now is the Best Time to Prepare for Wildfire

Pandemic Silver Lining - More Course Choices

the extras

PHOTO: KRISTAL BURGESS

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7

21

Take the Farm Way Home

Back to Basics

Home Grown

LOUISE WALLACERICHMOND

KARI WILKINSON

KRISTAL BURGESS

SHARING REFRESHING STORIES...

We distribute 4,000 copies throughout the Shuswap region, every two months, to grocery stores, shops, tourist information centres, hotels, restaurants, cafés, and professional businesses.

With the people who live, visit, work and value our communities.

In this time of Covid-19, we will be careful to follow health guidelines to ensure the safety of our readers.

Shuswap Magazine is a free bi-monthly magazine created by the 55 Creative Group. We share the best the Shuswap has to offer with our residents, seasonal visitors and tourists. We tell authentic stories with fabulous photography about the people, businesses and services that truly make the Shuswap an amazing place to live, visit and spend time in. Our content highlights the best of our outdoor experiences, unique shopping, entertainment, food and beverage, farm to table edibles, home services, professional services and our unique visitor experiences – as well as, other noteworthy story ideas you may have!

PLEASE CONTACT US AT: info@shuswapmagazine.ca for more information on our advertising rates or how to book your story space.

SHUSWAP MAGAZINE IS PRODUCED BY 55 CREATIVE GROUP 5th & 5th SW in Salmon Arm #4 - 471 5th Avenue SW Salmon Arm, BC V1E 1S9 info@shuswapmagazine.ca 250.832.8261

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savouring the fruits of our labour

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Shuswapmagazine.ca

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PHOTO: KRISTAL BURGESS


As early as 1890, Salmon Arm’s main fruit industry started with the famous non-irrigated apples. The apple crops grew to be a major industry in the Shuswap and by the mid 1940s, some 403,000 boxes were shipped through the Salmon Arm Farmers’ Exchange. HASKAP BERRIES, PHOTO: KARI WILKINSON

by SHELLEY & BERNIE HUCUL

F

rom the vantage points of Bastion Mountain, Mount Ida, Larch Hills and the Fly Hills, you can discover breath-taking vistas of the Salmon River Valley, Salmon Arm and surrounding communities. A colourful patchwork quilt of farmlands and orchards shows that the Shuswap region is in peak growing and mid-harvest season. As early as 1890, Salmon Arm’s main fruit industry started with the famous non-irrigated apples. The earliest settlers arrived and used the rich bottom lands for raising dairy, beef, sheep, pigs and the crops to support them. The settlers also discovered that apple, pear, crabapple, cherry, plum, prune and apricot orchards flourished up on the high benches. Grape vineyards, strawberries and raspberries also thrived there. The apple crops grew to be a major industry in the Shuswap and by the mid 1940s, some 403,000 boxes were shipped through the Salmon Arm Farmers’ Exchange. However, in the winter of 1949-50, a killing frost hit the region and the orchards were wiped out. Only a handful of dedicated families continue to present day. Annual harvests begin early in May and stretch into September and October; we are currently in full swing of the summer harvest. The Shuswap area is ripe for the picking, with a number of private and family farm growers. There is a wide variety of produce to buy, such as, cut flowers, rhubarb, salad, root and pickling vegetables, garlic, herbs, asparagus, corn, pumpkins and squash. And you just can’t beat a locally grown, crunchy sweet apple!

Also, there are many Berry farmers who cultivate delicious haskap berries, blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, blackberries and currants. For those who enjoy foraging for wild berries, there are Saskatoons and Huckleberries on the hillsides - just keep an eye out for the Bears! Local Beekeepers are our honey producers and the honey bees are the all important pollinators of the crops. Healthy and nutritious honey is used for cooking and baking, as sweetener in drinks or to spread on toast. Other byproducts include the sweet smelling beeswax candles. Our area Wineries produce delicious award-winning wines from the sun-drenched and rain-soaked red/purple and white/green grapes grown here. Local Cheesemakers culture dozens of tasty artisan cheeses which pair beautifully with the wines. Here in the Shuswap, we truly have a bountiful cornucopia of foods to set at our tables.

Behind the lens In the Shuswap, there is a casual way about life that everyone seems to embrace — ­ even our farm animals. When we set out to DeMille’s Farm Market to set our table for the front cover photo, we didn’t realize the animals would assist us in creating the photo that utlimately ended up on the cover. Sometimes you just need to go with the flow. And the photos.... well we just had to share. Enjoy.

PHOTOS: KRISTAL BURGESS

Tell your story. Your way. We’ve already started working on the October/November edition. Do you have an interesting story to share with the rest of the Shuswap? Get in touch with us to discuss how we can help you - or to request a Shuswap Magazine rate card. info@shuswapmagazine.ca

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take the

faRM WayHOME

by LOUISE WALLACE RICHMOND

M

ost days, for the decade or so I lived in Vancouver, I almost always had to stand on the bus on the way to work. I used to watch out the window and wonder what part I played in the vibrancy of that shiny city on the Pacific. Often, for a change of pace, I would walk across the bridge and take the long way home. An auto shop, an industrial bakery, a printer’s, and wondered, if they too felt the same. Once home, with fresh food from the local grocers, I’d make myself some dinner and send myself to bed. I’d set the alarm and do it all over again. I decided there had to be more, enrolled in graduate program and spent a year at a local magazine. That’s when it happened. We ran a story The Keenan Family about white asparagus operate a certified and the phone lines went wild. “Where can I get animaI welfare some, how much is it, are approved farm in there any left?” Clearly, the Silver Creek concrete, the buses, the buildings and the rush of urban life had left others aching for a break from the city life for the farm

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PHOTO: KRISTAL BURGESS

way. And I got to do that very thing. My first weekend after moving here was that of the Fall Fair. I still have the polaroids of the giant pumpkins and the tractor display. I know I’m not alone in that motivation. Increasingly people are moving to Salmon Arm. Some are taking an impressive leap into a new life such as the Keenan Family who relocated here in 2017 from the Coast. With a deep commitment to building a healthier and more sustainable family life and with zero farming experience, the couple with their five children in tow, now operate a certified animaI welfare approved farm with pasture raised pork, grass fed lamb, chickens, eggs and produce in Silver Creek. Twenty years on, I no longer set my alarm. Not that I don’t work hard. We all have to. That’s how small communities thrive. I’ve learned that good things take time to grow. And I’m reminded of it daily as I pass by orchards and vineyards, hay fields and corn fields, fruit trees and vegetable gardens. You have to know when to water and when to wait, when to weed and when to sow. The lessons of the farm way have helped me grow in ways no big city could. PHOTO: VANESSA MORRIS


DE TASTE TRAIL GUIMBIA SHUSWAP, BRITISH COLU

USWAP sH ttahkeeyour taste buds ON tion A culinary expedi

UMCHEEN BY • ARMSTRONG & SPALL SALMON ARM • ENDER SHUSWAP • SICAMOUS • NORTH SHUSWAP • SOUTH FALKLAND • CHASE

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SHUSWAPTOURISM.CA

Go on a Taste Trail adventure To know a place, start with a meal. Why? Because our favourite travel stories so often begin with the perfect pairing, the hole-in-thewall café, farmers market magic or fruit stand finds. What’s less well-known? The off the beaten path foodie destinations that hide in plain sight, like those found right here in the Shuswap. So, get on the road, pack a cooler and plan your taste adventure. Choose from locally designed tour itineraries including: •The Highway 97 Tour • The Trans Canada Highway Tour • Couple Hours to Stop • Get Off the Beaten Path

Get a copy of Shuswap Tourism’s new Taste Trail Guide in print available at local Visitor Centres and kiosks, or view it online at shuswaptourism.ca/taste

Back to

PHOTO: KRISTAL BURGESS

basics by KARI WILKINSON

A

s all the fruit and berries, pickling cukes, garlic, dill, and fresh tomatoes start to ripen and arrive at the farm markets from our local growers, I’m thankful. It’s time to preserve nature’s bounty to take us through the coming cooler months until next year’s crop arrives.

As a child, I watched my grandmother can bushels of food in jars; peaches, cherries, salmon, jams and jellies. She lived through the ‘Dirty 30’s’ and it was essential to stock the cold room with fruit and vegetables and more to make it through the winter. Watching her year after year left a lasting impression on me. Once I had my family, I felt the need to get back to basics; and learn the art of canning. I opened the boxes of my grandmother’s canning jars and tools that had been handed down to me and invited my mom over to help make dill pickles, jams and salsa. We know exactly what ingredients are in each jar—and the taste in January—worth it. Canning is therapeutic, satisfying and provides a powerful connection to my grandmother. I just love the sound as I hear those jars go POP as they seal. I also love that the environmental impact is minimal when you can your own food. I reuse my mason jars—reducing the packaging going to the recycle centre—and my salsa only travels from the counter to the pantry instead of thousands of miles across the country on a truck. It’s time once again, to preserve the bounty of the Shuswap.

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SECRETS TO THE

Shuswap’s Best Breakfast by LOUISE WALLACE-RICHMOND

W

hen Janice Cannon and Karla Ferster get together to talk shop, there’s palpable energy and plenty of laughter. The two food entrepreneurs share much in common including a commitment to excellence as evidenced in their individual product offerings. Cannon owns Little Red Hen Artisan Bakery located in the North Broadview area of Salmon Arm on an historic acreage. Established in 2005, it’s the only commercial wood fired oven in the North Okanagan and since its establishment, the product line has expanded from organic bread to pastry, cookies, granola and yes, amazing bagels. In 2012, Ferster moved her burgeoning company, Frog Friendly Wild Coffee, founded in 2006 in White Rock, and established her roasting facility in Canoe. Unlike most coffees sold in grocery, Frog Friendly is grown wild in the Mexican cloud forest of Oaxaca on a privately owned finca (or farm). It’s the darling of the health food sector because of its low acidity and anti-oxidant properties.

PHOTO: KRISTAL BURGESS

Both share the challenges of raising a family and working from home whilst building a brand and a business in the increasingly competitive industrial food complex. Many large national grocery chains have embraced vertical integration owning not only stores, but distribution companies as well as food production facilities. One might think this poses overwhelming odds against artisan food producers but for Cannon and Ferster, this is clearly where their competitive advantages shine.

Coffee&aBagel For Cannon, the COVID crisis had laid bare the perilous nature of food supply, hence the robust increase in demand for local artisan baked goods. Same goes for Ferster, whose coffee company saw an upsurge in orders within days of the lock down. “When people feel vulnerable”, says Ferster, “they seek out reliable supply. Who can you rely on more on that your local suppliers?” They aren’t just building a customer base, they are building relationships and by doing so deepen our collective understanding of the fragility of food and the efforts of local producers to keep the crafts authentic, natural and sustainable. What’s more, the exchange of value is just plain delicious. The coffee and the bread are infused with their energy, their commitment and their joy which is very nourishing indeed.

Follow their journey on Facebook and Instagram. PHOTO: ANNA MARTIN

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PHOTO: KRISTAL BURGESS

4940 Canoe Beach Dr NE, Canoe, BC V0E 1K0 604.512.7868 frogfriendlycoffee.com

3590 30th St NE, Salmon Arm, BC V1E 3L1 250.803.2733 littleredhen.ca

Facebook @frogwild Instagram @frogfriendlycoffee

Facebook @littleredhenartisan Instagram @littleredhenartisanbakery

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Do you remember what it’s like to play outside as a kid, and enjoy activity?

play!

Let’s move together, and live better, for life

by LUCY FOX

According to the 2020 ParticipACTION Report Card, Canada’s annual report card on physical activity, just 39 per cent of Canadian children and youth ages 5-17 meet the recommended amount of daily movement. It’s time to work on changing that, right here in the Shuswap. PLAY Shuswap — an initiative that brings together local recreation, sport, health, education and media partners— hopes to provide more physical literacy opportunities and make activity a lifelong habit for all in the Shuswap community. WHAT IS PHYSICAL LITERACY? According to ParticipACTION’s website, it’s “the motivation, confidence, physical competence, knowledge and understanding to value and take responsibility for engagement in physical activities for life.” PLAY Shuswap is supported by Sport for Life, a national not-forprofit that supports change in sport and physical activity. Their two-year Physical Literacy for Communities program and grant — which PLAY Shuswap received— delivers workshops, brings in program mentors, and backs new physical literacy ideas presented by the selected region.

The grant is a starting point and incentive for collaboration between community representatives. Laura Paiement, School District 83’s Healthy Schools & Self-Regulation Coordinator and PLAY Shuswap partner, is looking forward to the opportunity to connect across sectors. Within the school district, there are functional movement screenings and physical education demonstrations, among other resources — ideas that could be brought to the PL4C table for support, expansion or inspiration. “I would really love to see [the involved sectors] working together to tackle certain goals,” Paiement explained. “... to really get the messaging to who it needs to get to [about] what physical literacy is and why it’s important not only for physical health, but also for mental health and lifelong health.” Whether with new equipment, local programs, workshops, or any other ideas that come to fruition through collective meetings going forward, PLAY Shuswap is a chance to prioritize physical literacy for the whole community. But, the program needs your help to take the next steps toward finalizing its goals.

Get more info. Get involved! EMAIL: playshuswap@gmail.com

Salmon Arm’s Choice for Footwear, Orthotics and Bracing. 117 Hudson Ave NE 250-517-7337 9


Now is the best time to prepare for the next

wildFire

W

hen a wildfire pops up near you it’s too late to start thinking about making your property FireSmart. The best time to start reducing your risk of property loss and damage due to wildfires is right now. The Columbia Shuswap Regional District (CSRD) is working to help residents, neighbourhoods and communities reduce their risk and make our region safer. FireSmart is a recognized program designed to empower the public and increase community resilience to wildfire across Canada. “With the FireSmart program, we can help you assess your home’s level of risk and decide what projects you could accomplish to reduce that risk,” says Len Youden, the CSRD’s FireSmart Coordinator. “Ultimately, the protection of private property from the threat of wildfire rests with individual property owners. No one has a bigger vested interest in protecting your home from wildfire than you do. We need to take action to protect our own homes and properties and the CSRD can help,” adds Youden. Your home and the first 1.5 meters that extends around your home is called the non-combustible zone. Ideally there should be nothing combustible within 1.5 meters of your home and those items directly attached to your home, such as a deck should also be noncombustible. “If you have a wooden deck you can screen in any gaps or debris traps in the steps. If you have gutters around your roof, make sure those are clean,” says Youden.

90%

of homes lost or damaged in a wildfire are caused by falling embers.

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#RECOVERShuswap

Most homes in our region have a non-combustible roof such as metal or asphalt singles and this is a big factor in determining risk. Metal and asphalt shingle roofs should not catch fire if properly installed and maintained.

Ultimately, the protection of private property from the threat of wildfire rests with individual property owners. We need to take action to protect our own homes and properties and the CSRD can help. ─ LEN YOUDEN, CSRD FIRESMART COORDINATOR If your siding is combustible, simply creating a 15 cm clearance to the ground will reduce your risk should embers accumulate up against your home. Cracks in siding, and open or nonmetallic screened eaves are simple things you can do to reduce wildfire risk. “We can dramatically reduce damage from wildfire if we all take responsibility for understanding and managing our own risk,” adds Youden. Remove combustible materials, such as firewood directly stacked up against your home. Bark mulch is very flammable and should be replaced with gravel or rock.


Wildfire Structure Survival Statistics 4%

20%

Flammable Roof Flammable Roof No Treatment No Defensive Action

70%

90%

Non-Flammable Roof

All Vegetation Treated Within 10m of Home

Non- le ustib comb Zone 1 & Zone

Fire doesn’t wait for you to be prepared The best thing about being FireSmart is how easy it is. The homes that are prepared are the homes left standing. Thankfully, there are simple steps you can take to drastically reduce your property’s risk.

• Clean your roof and gutters. • Move firewood and propane 10-30 metres away from your home. • Bark mulch is very flammable and should be replaced with gravel or rock. • Have a wildfire evacuation plan within your household.

Book a

FREE

FireSmart assessment and you could qualify for a $ 500 rebate.* www.csrd.bc.ca/firesmart

History has shown that neighbours and communities who work together dramatically reduce their individual and community risk. The FireSmart program recognizes that people are reluctant to get rid of trees around their home. However, there are things you can do to reduce the risk associated with keeping them. Trimming coniferous trees to two meters off the ground may prevent a surface fire from running up the tree. Removing branches that are close to or directly contact the home will make it tougher for fire to reach the house. Removing dead branches, keeping trees watered and generally maintaining their health is also important. History has shown that neighbors and communities who work together dramatically reduce their individual and community risk. The goal is to break the cycle of disaster by not allowing the fire to proceed beyond the barrier that a FireSmart Community creates. Becoming nationally recognized as a FireSmart Community is not as difficult as one might think. Being nationally recognized doesn’t mean that the risk of wildfire to a community is zero, but it does recognize that residents are working on reducing risk and have an active plan to do so over a number of years. “Many urban and rural communities within Canada have achieved this status. We are

encouraging individuals within the CSRD to consider the national recognition program for their neighbourhood and we are here to help,” says Youden.

Book a FireSmart assessment for your property Through our FireSmart initiative, the CSRD is committed to providing homeowners and communities, the information they need to reduce wildfire risk - at no charge. In fact, if you implement some of the recommendations to improve your risk, you could qualify for up to a $500 rebate. A FireSmart assessment will allow you to familiarize yourself with factors that reduce risk, provide information that focuses on ‘Zone 1’ improvements around your home, help you self-assess your individual risk, and provide simple steps you can take to reduce your risk in the short and long term. “Why not get in front of this issue within your neighbourhood and reduce the wildfire risk in your community?” asks Youden. Learn more at csrd.bc.ca/firesmart or email firesmart@csrd.bc.ca to educate yourself and request a free wildfire property assessment.

LEARN MORE www.csrd.bc.ca/firesmart EMAIL firesmart@csrd.bc.a CALL TOLL FREE 1.888.248.2773 * Must meet eligibility requirements. View at www.csrd.bc.ca/firesmart

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Support your local

baRber We can help you move forward on the road to recovery Community Futures is the only non-profit organization throughout rural BC with a mandate for small business and community economic development. Community Futures offers a variety of services and tools to help entrepreneurs and small business owners achieve their goals, including business support services, business planning advice, loans and self employment assistance. We are here to help you through the COVID-19 recovery process.

by 55 CREATIVE

Looking for a hot fade, or a cool cut? These masters of hair know their way around their razors, scissors, and blades. The COVID-19 pandemic has certainly changed the whole personal grooming industry - including barbering. If you happen to be walking down Hudson Avenue - you might just find Matt Koivisto chatting with the locals in his new waiting room located on the sidewalk just outside his front door. Matt is the first in BC to be accredited as an ‘International Master Barber’ by the British Master Barbers Alliance, one of the largest Industry certification organizations in the United Kingdom. Health and safety is taken seriously - both Matt and fellow barber Dawnivan are certified in Health and Safety; infection control and COVID-19 specific certification through Barbicide, Wahl and Milady. Matt is also fully BeautySafe Certified through the Beauty Council of Western Canada. Looking for men’s personal grooming products? You’ll find pomades, beard oils, shower and shave esssentials and more ­— the largest selection in the Shuswap. Matt has been barbering since 2007 and opened Salmon Arm Barber Shop in 2013. The shop is open 6 days a week from 9am with appointments preferred. They are social - so follow them on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.

BeYourFuture.ca

Salmon Arm

B rb r S op 120 Hudson Ave NE, Salmon Arm, BC 778-489-4722 (4SAB) www.salmonarmbarbershop.ca 12

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#101, 160 Harbourfront Drive NE Salmon Arm, BC V1E 4P9 250.803.0156 1.877.803.0156


SALMON A RM’ S PREMIER

Wellness Spa We are the premier full service skincare spa in Salmon Arm and also specialize in immune suppressed skin and diabetic care. We are dedicated to maintaining a clean, serene spa environment, one of tranquility and relaxation.

Mental Health Fundraiser:

GRANDKIDS’ COVID TRIM by GREG KYLLO, MLA for SHUSWAP

The past months of dealing with the ups and downs of the pandemic response have been challenging for everyone and many have found it has taken a toll on their mental health. This has been especially true for those who already face the challenges that come with anxiety and depression. The immediacy of change, the lack of social interaction and the elimination of previously comforting routines has been difficult. And I think it is important for us to realize that it is okay to not be okay. It is completely understandable for fear and anxiety to accompany a worldwide pandemic, and we need to allow ourselves to seek out support. As my wife Georgina has said, “When I wake up with the world feeling so crazy... I tell myself; It’s ok not to feel happy right now. It’s ok to feel worried right now. It is ok to take time to not pretend and to be open about how my emotional and physical self is feeling.”

• PEDICURES • MANICURES • FACIALS • MICRODERMABRASION • RELAXATION MASSAGE

Reservations 250.804.2335 www.AquaSoleilSpa.com 2450-D 10TH AVENUE NE, SALMON ARM, BC

While attitudes towards mental wellbeing are beginning to change for the better, we still have work to do to end the stigma so that all those who need support are able and willing to get the help they need. Addiction is also closely associated with mental health - it is estimated that those dealing with mental illness are twice as likely to have a substance use problem compared to the general population, making it all the more important that mental health services are readily available. To support mental health in our community, I am hosting a fundraiser, running through August 8th, for our local Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA) Office. I have agreed to let my grandkids cut my COVID-style hair and beard when we reach our fundraising goal of $10,000. Get the details — and the photos on my Facebook page.

Greg Kyllo

WE’RE OPEN! Visit us online for shows, times, tickets and safety protocols.

salmartheatre.com

M.L.A. Shuswap Critic - BC Hydro

Greg.Kyllo.MLA@leg.bc.ca CONSTITUENCY OFFICE 202A - 371 Alexander St. NE Salmon Arm, BC PHONE: 1.877.771.7557

@gregkylloshuswap @KylloGreg

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stalled in the Shuswap

2 + 4 + 2 + 4 = $185 million by 55 CREATIVE

Driving the Shuswap highway corridor is a mismash of 2 lanes, 4 lanes, 2 lanes, then 4 lanes and back to 2 lanes. Not efficient. Definitely not safe. With the announcement that the TCH Salmon Arm West Project was finally moving ahead in 2016 — there was a hopeful sigh of relief. Now nearly four years later, the current government of British Columbia recently announced the project would be scaled back. What would have been three sections of highway converted to four lane highway, will now only be two sections. And those two sections will cost more than double the original estimate.

50 Ave NW

“When this project was initially announced, it was 6.1 kilometres of four-laning, and the announced project price in 2016 was $162.7 million. Now, that equates to approximately $26.6 million per kilometre. The project has now been scaled back to 3.3 kilometres. One segment has been cancelled, and the project price has gone up to $184.7 million, which equates to $55.9 million a kilometre.” says Greg Kyllo, MLA for the Shuswap.

Which section was cancelled? Why? And, why have the costs doubled? Well, things get a little confusing here, so let’s try to make it clear. According to the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure’s plan from the summer of 2017, the Salmon Arm West Project was to upgrade the section of the highway starting just south of Sandy point, through the Neskonlith territory all the way to 1st Avenue SW. This section was labelled IR3 to 1st Avenue SW on the government’s plan. It was a 2.8 kilometre stretch of the highway, almost half the entire length of the project. Cancelled.

IR3 to 1st Ave SW CANCELLED

NESKONLITH IR #3

1 Ave SW

ADAMS LAKE IR #7

10 Ave SW to 10 St SW IN DESIGN

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10 St SW

30 St SW

50 St SW

10Ave SW

1st Ave SW to 10 Ave SW TENDERED

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The two other sections of the plan, labelled 1st Avenue SW to 10th Avenue SW and 10th Avenue SW to 10th Street SW and the new frontage road from 1st Nations road are still going ahead. Why was the IR3 to 1st Avenue SW cancelled? According to British Columbia Transportation Minister Claire Trevena, the Ministry did not have all the facts when they came up with the original plan. “They didn’t have the full engineering work,” Trevana told the Legislature on June 26. “didn’t have the awareness of the archeological impacts and didn’t have the agreement with indigenous communities.” There is also an issue with Federal funding for the project which was initially pledged at $48.5M and has since been reduced to $31.4M, leaving the Provincial Government to come up with the $17.1M dollar difference. Adding the $22M increased budget to the lost $17.1M the Feds pulled for the project, equates to nearly $40M of increased cost to BC taxpayers. “The reason that we no longer have the federal funding,” Trevana went on to explain, “is because we don’t actually have an agreement with the Neskonlith... That [Federal] funding is linked to having an agreement.” Kyllo states, “The reasons the Feds reduced their funding by $17.1M is because the NDP have cancelled the the third phase of the project, having removed it from their capital plan. The Feds committed funding to all three segments of the project, prior to having concluded agreements with Neskonlith. For Trevena to blame the Neskonlith for the $17.1M in lost funding, for the segment of the project government cancelled, is both disingenuous and disgraceful.” Then there is the requirement that any company bidding on the project must meet the requirements of the new Community Benefits Agreement (CBA) introduced in 2018. An analysis by the Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB) shows that CBAs could add as much as $4.8 billion more to the cost of public infrastructure projects. The government does seem to have an accommodation agreement with the Neskonlith for the other two sections of the project as the contracts for one of those section has finally gone out to tender... but the original deadline for submissions has been extended. Perhaps they are waiting for a bid to arrive. In the meantime, we have some nicely shaped piles of dirt. DISCLAIMER: Louise Wallace-Richmond, a 55 Creative contributor recused herself from this story given her role as an elected official for the City of Salmon Arm. 55 Creative did reach out to Chief Judy Wilson for comment, and she had not responsed at press time.


J

The henry With the Flying Scotsman at the wheel

by BERNIE HUCUL

Phil Stewart of Salmon Arm beams with pride when interviewed following the completion of his 1951 Henry J Gasser drag car. The Henry J was an American automobile built by the Kaiser-Fraser Corporation and named after chairman, Henry J. Kaiser. Production began in 1950 and continued through 1954. A car buff at heart, Phil says this is a unique vehicle, popular with the hot rodders in the ‘60s and ‘70s. The original car was found in Chase, some 15 years ago. He purchased it from the Rust Valley Restorers in Tappen, November 2018. The Henry J now features a 555 cu. in., 900 horsepower Reher-Morrison big block Chevy racing engine, Turbo 400 transmission and a 9” Ford rear end. It was completely built at the Rainbow Glass shop here in Salmon Arm. As of press time, the car was scheduled to make its first test runs at the track in Cache Creek with the Flying Scotsman at the wheel.

We salute our educators and childcare providers. Thank you for keeping our kids safe.

250.832.6558 IN PERSON OR VIRTUALLY. We’re excited to see your smile again! shuswaportho.com 250.832.6558 shuswaportho.com

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THE TSUTS’WEYE BUSINESS PROGRAM

Tsuts’weye women

IS AVAILABLE TO ALL SHUSWAP FEMALE BUSINESS OWNERS.

spreading wings N

early one-quarter of businesses in the Shuswap are owned and operated by women, and many of them are getting help and support from a program specifically designed to help them take their companies to the next level.

Floatation therapy is a zero-gravity environment that allows the mind and body to completely let go, relax, and reset. Using over 900 pounds of Epsom Salts, the buoyancy of the water makes floating on water feel like floating on air.

Tsuts’weye (pronounced “shoots-way-a”) is a three-year, federally funded initiative managed through Western Economic Diversification Canada and facilitated locally through Community Futures Shuswap. The project supports femaleowned or led enterprises within the Shuswap region and is available to businesses in any phase of operation: start-ups through to long-standing established companies.

Kate is well aware of the effects chronic pain and limited mobility can have on your life. She suffered a brain injury, broke most of the major bones in her body and is a cancer survivor.

Boots on the ground, find your calm energy Kate Bischke has a long history of entrepreneurship in her family. Her great-grandparents opened Salmon Arm’s first pharmacy in 1904 on Hudson Avenue, and some of their furniture now sits in her wellness centre also located on Hudson Avenue. She opened Shuswap Float & Wellness because of the profound, lasting difference alternative healing can have. Her business goal is to build a bigger wellness collective offering a wider variety of healing therapies. Dissolve stress, anxiety, pain and enhance your human experience at the Shuswap’s best kept secret – a hidden healing oasis with a Float Centre, Neurospa and Halotherapy.

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I have gained more confidence in myself and my business has received a boost as I have been introduced to new marketing strategies. ─ KATE BISCHKE Tsuts’weye Entrepreneur-in-Residence, Caroline Grover has been working with Kate to identify the gaps and needs in her business; and to connect her to Shuswap business professionals to assist her with marketing and website. Learn more about Shuswap Float & Wellness at shuswapfloatandwellness.ca


Business Recovery & Expansion Program The Business Recovery & Expansion Program (BRE) is specifically for established businesses, two years or greater, led by a woman or for women who play a key role in a family owned business. It is preferred the business will have revenues of $250k to $10 million and need assistance to position their business for growth and a healthy future with a planned exit strategy. The BRE program will offer 6 months of group and private coaching that is preceded by an in-depth, online assessment of each participant’s business. The group presentations will be held at the Salmon Arm Innovation Centre in person. The first group session will begin September 14th, 2020. Apply online at tsutsweye.ca or get more details by emailing shuswapmentor@gmail.com The Tsuts’weye Womens Network works with other regional economic development agencies collaboratively to support women and men in business in our region. Called the Shuswap Business Hub it is a one stop location with diverse services and assistance for all businesses large and small. The two Entrepreneurs in Residence working within the Shuswap Business Hub have assisted over 80 local businesses in the past nine months. Ranging from business concepts to exit strategies. Find more info at recovershuswap.ca

calm, cool, coordinated Styleline Interiors can help your design plans

K

itchens and bathrooms are two of the hardest-working spaces in any home. Building or updating your spaces, ensure they stay at peak functionality by hiring a kitchen and bathroom designer. A professional kitchen designer and colour consultant with an eye for aesthetics, and a practical approach to layout, Patti Holmes can help you execute a new build or remodel suited to your personal needs. The stars aligned allowing Patti and Alan Holmes to change their life path and move to the Shuswap area 2 years ago. Patti’s passion for cabinetry, design and colour along with the availability of retail space on Lakeshore Drive in Salmon Arm provided the opportunity needed to open Styleline Interiors. Patti is the heart and designer of the business, while husband Alan is the installation expert and their sheltie, Zoe the showroom host.

Opening a business has lots of twists and turns — and like a renovation, can be very overwhelming. A neighbouring business recommended Patti get in touch with a local marketing professional to assist her with social media - which led her to Tsuts’weye.

Caroline helped me focus, reign things in, get a plan and move forward. ─ PATTI HOLMES Patti and her husband Alan are working with the business advisors to assist them in determining their strengths and assess areas where additional training or supports are required. They are excited to build their business. Learn more online at www.stylelineinteriors.com

101 - 160 Harbourfront Dr NE, Salmon Arm, BC V1E 3M3 EMAIL: info@tsutsweye.ca www.tsutsweye.ca Supported by

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FoRecast

Looking forward through the arts The Salmon Arm Art Gallery will open August 15 for “The Forecast,” an exhibition with eight regional artists exploring evidence of climate change through photography-based mixed media. These installations will ask viewers to consider this important issue through an interpretive lens, one in which we question what is true, manipulated, or “fake news.” The Art Gallery will be open Tuesday to Saturday 11am to 4pm with social distancing measures in place. The Salmon Arm Pride Project evolved through the Covid-19 crisis and is addressing the need for outreach and education in 2020 while postponing the Pride Project Arts & Awareness Festival until 2021. This year, plans will still include a PRIDE exhibition from October 14 to 17, 2020 at the Art Gallery, and online opportunities for everyone to learn, understand and celebrate the LGBTQ2S+ community. Roots & Blues has pivoted their annual festival to an online series of concerts, both past and present. New performances by artists from all over the world are being recorded right now, and together with spectacular footage from previous festivals will be offered in a virtual 3-day concert from August 14 to 16, 2020. Register at rootsandblues.ca. Isolation Art: The Third House is partnering with Shuswap Association of Writers in a publication called

“Isolation Art,” with writing and visual work produced during the quarantine shutdown. The anthology is expected to be published and available to the public by end of August, but people can view much of the writings and artwork now online at thethirdhouse.ca/isolationart. Family Saturdays at Home: While families may miss the weekly art-making program Family Saturdays at the Art Gallery, they can still access one of the 18 episodes of “Family Saturdays at Home,” where kids from Salmon Arm have written, directed, produced and starred in their own video demonstrating the creation of an art project. This online series is on youtube and facebook (Salmon Arm Arts Centre) and will continue until the end of 2020. Interested in being featured? Contact Kate at: info@salmonarmartscentre.ca. Celebrate the Shuswap - Coming through COVID a live streaming music event planned for the Thanksgiving weekend. The organizers include Ted Crouch from Acoustic Avenue Music, Craig Newnes from Lakeshore Village Ltd., and Mike Southworth from Collide Entertainment. Three emerging artists/ groups representing different genres will record and live stream on Sat. Oct 10. Performances are scheduled for 1 pm, 4 pm and 7 pm. Details will be available at www.acousticavenue.ca.

THE ICEBERG: KENNETH WHYTE

CAGED SALMON: PATRICK HUGHES

LADYBUG: MARY THOMAS

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Big ideas for

business innovation

PHOTO: KRISTAL BURGESS

by LOUISE WALLACE-RICHMOND

A

s the community evolves and responds to the local impacts of the global pandemic, what’s clear is our community’s willingness and ability to collaborate and cooperate. The Shuswap Economic Recovery is a hub for local businesses with an immediate and long term support in six critical area so businesses can grow and thrive short and long term and is a partnership of Shuswap Economic Development, Shuswap Tourism, Community Futures Shuswap, Salmon Arm Economic Development Society and Tsuts’weye Women’s Entrepreneur & Innovation Network.

Digital Recovery Project Need help moving your products to an online storefront? The Digital Recovery project is one of the spokes of the support hub and connects Okanagan College School of Business students to small businesses to grow their online sales through Shopify. Work is already underway and more businesses in the Shuswap are welcome to apply. Its an ideal opportunity as it provides valuable work experience for students and provides businesses with the valuable training and tech savvy of the students. The work is supervised by mentors and managed by recovery hub partners. To learn more about the emergency support hub, call 250 833-5928 or e-mail support@recoveryshuswap.ca

Business Support Hub 250.833.5928 support@recovershuswap.ca www.recovershuswap.ca

Community Futures - Regional Relief and Recovery: loans up to $40,000 for businesses not approved through the Canada Emergency Business Account If your business has been adversely affected because of the COVID-19 pandemic; and you did not qualify for support through the Canada Emergency Business Account (CEBA) or the Emergency Loan Program delivered through Aboriginal Financial Institutions, you may qualify for support through Community Futures. Small business owners can apply for loans up to $40,000 through the Community Futures Regional Relief and Recovery Fund as long as you have less than 500 employees and annual sales revenue of less than $20 million, and produce goods for the market economy regardless of their business structure; the applicant has not been approved for other federal supports, and was established prior to March 1, 2020. The loans are similar to the Canada Emergency Business Account; with 0% interest until Dec. 31, 2022; no principal payments until Dec. 31, 2022; and 25% up to a maximum of $10,000 in loan forgiveness available, provided the outstanding balance is paid back before Dec. 31, 2022. Get full details and download the application form at: www.recovershuswap.ca/financing-cash-flow/

101 - 160 Harbourfront Dr NE, Salmon Arm, BC V1E 3M3 250.803.0156 info@futureshuswap.ca www.beyourfuture.ca 19


I

n true Canadian spirit and with huge thanks to our incredibly generous Salmon Arm and Shuswap communities, the Rotary Club of Salmon Arm was able to present cheques totalling $22,000 to the Safe Society and the Second Harvest Food Bank, each organization receiving $11,000.

Rotary Club doubles up dollars and gives

11,000 $ 11,000 $

plus

Past President, Christina Lutterman, presented cheques to Jane Shirley and staff at the Safe Society, and to Vahlleri Semeniuk and Cathy Ingebrigtson at Second Harvest. The Double Up Your Gift Campaign, ran for 6 weeks from mid-May to the end of June with the Rotary Club offering to match individual community donations.

SHOW YOUR CANADIAN PRIDE RENT A FLAG FROM ROTARY! The need is great and the requests for assistance many — so the Rotary Club of Salmon Arm is already planning their next fundraiser. The Great Canadian Rent-a-Flag program. The club is hoping to turn Salmon Arm into Canada's most patriotic town. Being careful to maintain healthy distances, the club will install a large flag on a 10 foot pole on your front lawn over two long weekends this fall. For a donation of $25, we'll put the flag in the week before Labour Day and Remembrance Day, and remove it the week after. All funds raised from this campaign will go towards those affected by Covid-19 and the economic downturn in Salmon Arm and area. Order your flag at Order your flag at www.salmonarmrotary.org

NEED TO GET OUT OF THE HOUSE & GET WORK DONE? Why not give coworking a try at the Salmon Arm Innovation Centre – Powered by SASCU? There’s never been a better time. Our coworking rates are more affordable than ever! Bring your laptop and to-do list, and we’ll take care of the rest. Set up in one of our bright, open spaces, surrounded by incredible views and zero distractions, and we guarantee your productivity will only go up. Host your meetings in one of our private, professional spaces and feel confident you’re making a great impression with your clients. Connect to our high-speed internet, and you’ll be rewarded with faster access to your cloud-based documents, higher quality video and audio streaming, and increased reliability. Finally, (and we saved the best for last!) work alongside like-minded professionals, who share your passion for innovation and excellence. There’s no shortage of opportunities for collaboration here! At the Innovation Centre, we’re all about finding solutions. Regardless of your workspace needs, we have an option that’s right for you. Drop in for the day, go month-to-month or rent space by the hour. We’re here to help!

250 833 0608 - info@saeds.ca - 220 Shuswap St. NE, Salmon Arm

WIFI - PRINTER - OFFICE & HOT DESKS - MEETING ROOMS - ROOFTOP PATIO 20

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PHOTO: KRISTAL BURGESS

home grown

PHOTO: KRISTAL BURGESS

by KRISTAL BURGESS

I

don’t have a green thumb. In fact, I don’t have a green bone in my entire body. And that’s probably why I appreciate a garden the way I do. It’s not the final harvest that brings me so much joy, but the journey and growth which has transpired to get to that delicious day. Our schools are also a bountiful garden, each year with a new crop of students reaching their educational goals. They have weathered the storm, and have made it to the harvest, typically with a grand graduation celebration. But this year was different; our students didn’t just weather a storm. This year it was a drought, then a flood. A wind storm with hail. Aphids and locusts and murder hornets. And the neighbour’s cat pooping in the garden bed. This year was a difficult season for growth. We all watched as hundreds of students were uprooted and forced into foreign soil, and still managed to graduate in dozens of unique ways.

PHOTO: KRISTAL BURGESS

We all watched as hundreds of students were uprooted and forced into foreign soil, and still managed to graduate in dozens of unique ways. Like a sun kissed tomato pulled from the vine, some of these graduates will go on to big, bold things. Shipped off to the city and molded into an executive or transformed into a 5 star meal, the opportunity in this world is indefinite. Yet it’s arguable that produce is best when picked fresh for the farmers market. Just like our graduates who chose to stay and work here, our yield can continue to nourish the community it was grown in. From peas to potatoes, kindergarten to college, we can take pride in growth and success in all of its forms. Looking at this years crop, it’s a harvest worth celebrating!

PHOTO: KARI WILKINSON

Congratulations to the grads of 2020, and best of luck in your future endeavours, whether they are near or far, or right here in our beautiful back yard. 21


Pandemic has silver-lining for college:

more course choices O

kanagan College is proud to be an integral part of our communities — and they’re working hard to ensure they continue to be known for their high quality of instruction and caring approach. One silver lining for students during the pandemic is the greater choice of College courses this fall. “The shift to online learning for many courses this fall has opened up the array of offerings that students can tap into,” explains Joan Ragsdale, Regional Dean for ShuswapRevelstoke. “This gives recent high school grads and mature students the ability to stay local, learn from home and access courses without travelling to Vernon, Kelowna or Penticton.” One program of note offered for Salmon Arm this September is the Human Service Work Diploma, “This program is very timely as we know there is a strong demand for graduates locally,” says Ragsdale. “It’s a social services career that you can train for and find work in Salmon Arm — it provides great opportunities for students looking to step into that field.” While many courses have moved online in response to the pandemic, Ragsdale notes that the College will still offer physically-distanced, in-person instruction in a host of trades, science and health courses that rely on that handson, practical training. At the Salmon Arm campus students have access to Education Advising, Aboriginal Services, Library, Student Success Centre, Financial Aid and Awards, Personal, Emotional and Academic counselling, and OC Student Union. All of these services work together to ensure students meet success. And, don’t miss the Continuing Studies brochure which will be in a digital format this fall. It is full of new and exciting course offerings and learning opportunities. Through the Continuing Studies department you can increase your skills with certificates in Education Assistant, Geographical Information System (GIS), Basic Accounting, Bookkeeping and Landscape Horticulture. You can also take one or several part time vocational and general interest courses that support professional development as well as local community needs and interests. Whether you want to grow your career, upgrade your skills, learn a new trade or advance your education, enroll this fall at the Salmon Arm Campus. Get more info by emailing: sacampus@okanagan.bc.ca

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The shift to online learning for many courses this fall has opened up the array of offerings that students can tap into. ─ JOAN RAGSDALE, REGIONAL DEAN FOR SHUSWAP-REVELSTOKE


We are a Marketing Communications group, solving client’s brand needs. A collaborative made up of marketing, design and web professionals. Helping you Create, Grow, and Evolve.

Hucul Printing • Toliver Design • Otto Pfannschmidt FIND US AT 5TH STREET & 5TH AVENUE SW, SALMON ARM


WE ARE HERE FOR

YOU

Whether you want to grow your career, upgrade your skills, learn a new trade or advance your education, join us this fall at the Salmon Arm Campus. • • • • • •

Project Management Certificate Advanced GIS Certificate Education Assistant Certificate Landscape Horticulture Certificate Basic Accounting Certificate SAGE 50

• • • • • •

University transfer in Arts, Science & Business Human Service Work Diploma Health Care Assistant Certificate Office Administration Certificate Trades and Apprenticeship Adult Education (Upgrading) & Adult Special Education

CONTACT US:

Salmon Arm Campus

Continuing Studies Salmon Arm

Telephone: 250-832-2126 Toll-Free: 1-888-831-0341 sacampus@okanagan.bc.ca

Telephone: 250-804-8888 Toll-Free: 1-866-352-0103 csshuswap@okanagan.bc.ca