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shurid rahman selected works


schools and the urban fabric reinterpreting abandonment in detroit studio deines, spring 2011 (3-14)

learning evolution

the future of the american school studio resnick, thesis, fall 2011 (15-28)

recovery park

healing through urban agriculture detroit collaborative design center, summer 2011 to present (29-34)

akilah institute for women

empowering rwandan women through higher education architecture for humanity, 2008 to 2009 (35-50)

women’s hospital and patient tower INOVA Health; 2015 Capital Improvement Program wilmot sanz architects, 2007 to 2009 (51-56)

selected art (57-60)

resume (62)


a) A diagram tracing the abandoned housing stock in Detroit (1), the processes of government (2), and the outcomes of demolition and abandonment b) A diagram that follows the entropy produced by any mechanical process (the automotive engine) c) A diagram that suggests how to speciate the abandoned housing stock in Detroit, to find specific relations to the environment, culture and materials. The circular relations in the diagram suggest an ecology within the housing stock of Detroit, and challenges the notion of demolition and the metaphor of entropy. (Opposite Page) - The demolition of Cass Technical High School in Detroit during the summer of 2011. 3

reinterpreting abandonment in detroit

This project seeks to understand the cycle of use, disuse and abandonment in Detroit, and investigates how the abandoned school can be re-interpreted within the Detroit context, to find am alternative route to encourage sustained growth within the city.

schools and the urban fabric

In 2010, Detroit Public Schools decided to close over 200 elementary, middle and high schools over the city. Closures may offer a pragmatic solution to severe budget shortages faced by the school system, however for the built environment of Detroit, it will add to the imbalance of abandoned structures that continually destabilizes the urban fabric of Detroit.

a)

b)

c)


4






a) 5

b)

c)

d)

e)

f)

g)


$0.00 - $22,213.11 $0.00-$22,213.11 $22,213.12 - $27,833.33 $22,213.12 - $27,833.33 $27,833.34 - $33,723.40 $27,833.33 - $33,723.40 $33,723.41 - $41,785.71 $33,723.41 - $41,785.71 Fourth Quarter Housing (Weakest) Fourth Quarter Housing (Weakest) School Closure School Closure

$41,785.72 - $200,000.00 $41,785.72 - $200,000.00 School Closure School Closure

Selected Area

Target Site Selected Area

h)

i)

-100% to -18.75% (Greatest Population Loss) -100% to -18.75% (greatest lost)

00 - -20%20% 20.1% - 32.7% 20.1% - 32.7% 32.8% - 46.8% 32.8% - 46.8% 46.9% - 100% 46.9% - 100% School Closure School Closure

-18.74% to -13.53% -18.74 to -13.53%

Selected Area

Target Site Selected Area

-13.52% to 9.42% -13.52 to -9.42% -9.41% to -3.56% -9.41% to -3.56% -3.55% to 98.56% (Greatest Population Growth) -3.55% to 98.56 (greatest growth) School Closure School Closure

Target Site

j)

k)

a) Urban strategy in East Detroit to reactivate schools and find programs for each building according to neighborhood assets. b-g) A phased breakdown of the overall urban strategy. h-k) Analysis of Detroit in respect to 50 selected DPS Schools and East Detroit; h) Fourth Quarter Housing; i) Median Household Income; j) Percentage of Population with High School Diplomas; k) Population Loss

point, line, plane

Target Site

6


b)

a) 7

c)


[Appreciation]

[Depreciation]

- City is valued for density of physical environment, and access to resources - Business and industry provides major investment

- Structures age, land uses become outdated - Other markets become more competitive -Rent gap created

[Re-investment]

[Dis-investment]

- Land primed for ground rent to become capitalized - Existing residents/businesses out-priced and de-populated -Rent gap closed

- Disuse of old structures in inner city - Business andresidents leave for periphery markets

- Existing inner city residents and businesses out-priced - Suburban structures outdated and dis-invested

d)

Life and Death

Investment and Disinvestment between the City and Suburb

[Appreciation]

[Depreciation]

- City is valued for density of physical environment, and access to resources - Business and industry provides major investment

- Structures age, land uses become outdated - Other markets become more competitive -Rent gap created

[Exchange]

[Adaptation]

- Markets stabilized - Prevents housing displacement - Transportable architecture can be exchanged between environments, and produces dynamic, sustainable built environment

- Existing infrastructure maintained - Outdated and damaged materials properly disposed or recycled - Insertable and transportable architecture to respond to market needs

b,c) Views of former Cass Technical High School; b) library room; c) classroom

e)

Life and Rebirth

Exchange of needs between the City, Suburb and Neigborhood

d) Cycle of disinvestment, abandonment, and reinvestment in the urban environment e) An alternative cycle to prevent the stages of disinvestment cited above.

urban cycles

a) An installation created by salvaged books from the former Cass Technical High School

8


(Across) An aerial view of the proposed interventions for the site. (1) School as open park, with preserved public functions of the auditorium and theater; (2) Raised garden boxes, and open space where the addition of the school once stood would encourage utilization of vacant space; (3) Pedestrian friendly bicycle racks would create a active streetscape; (4) The new Cass Technical School would keep the area active and vibrant; (5) Seating elements within Cass Park would revive dormant public spaces (Opposite Page) View of seating element within Cass Park. Openings in elements set up views in the neighborhood. 9

cass neighborhood focus area

In the second phase of this project, the South Cass neighborhood was chosen as to test the urban strategy of school revitalization at a smaller scale. The site provided an interesting opportunity to address an abandoned school (the former Cass Technical School) alongside a thriving one (the new Cass Technical High School). The program defined for the former Cass Technical School was publicly oriented, as the theater and auditorium spaces were preserved within the building and other spaces allowed to open up to create dramatic, semi outdoor spaces within the building. Community engagement elements are also planned to direct future growth of the area. A system of urban street elements was developed, based on basic 2x4 construction, plywood. Elements were designed in three modalities; raised garden boxes, bicycle racks, and public seating. All of these elements would be finished in blackboard paint, to allow for public engagement of issues and future design processes.

1)

3)

2)

4)

5)


10


design elements 11

(Below) View of bicycle rack element along Second Avenue north of Cass Park. (Opposite) View of east facade treatment of former Cass Technical High School, exposing building elements, and creating unique public space.


12


design elements 13

(Below) View of southern facade of renovated Cass Techinical High School; large openings created within the school create dramatic lighting within the envelope, and set up views to the downtown. (Opposite) View north toward Cass Technical High School, showing interior treatment and restoration of theater and auditorium elements within the school.


14


composite

“I am entirely certain that 20 years from now we will look back at education as it is practiced in most schools today and wonder how we could have tolerated anything so primitive.”

movement

-1963, John W. Gardner, Secretary of Education under Lyndon B. Johnson

This research aims to study how the school typology can move past its industrial underpinnings, and find a new responsive environment. A site in East Detroit introduces an environment in which social need, open expanse and reference to abandoned schools can direct a unique design approach towards elementary education. The theory of multiple intelligences, and compositional influences of Wassily Kandinsky and Isamu Noguchi test new environment to reimagine how education can occur. 15

Noguchi Play Sculpture Analysis

the future of the american school

Gilles Deleuze wrote in Postscripts on Societies of Control of the old environments of enclosure, such as the school, hospital and factory, are “finished, whatever the length of their expiration periods.” Despite this indictment, the typology still remains a highly important social mechanism, especially for the children going through elementary school.

learning evolution

Spoken over 40 years ago, education and the school typology in the U.S. remains under heavy criticism as being unresponsive to the societal and economic context of the 21st century. Changes in market dynamics, new perspectives on how the human mind works, and ever changing demographics in our society demand new strategies in education.

exterior

interior

vertical

sculpture

a)

b)

c)


“I am entirely certain that 20 years from now we will look back at education as it is practiced in most schools today and wonder how we could have tolerated anything so primitive.”

-John W. Gardner, 1963 (the padmavyuha)

(john dewey)

[the concept] (school as an intersection) (maria montesorri)

(the panopticon) (sensory perception)

(uva mall)

[the reality] (tschumi and le fresnoy)

(the bauhaus)

(the monastery)

(koolhaas and biblioteca de seattle)

(arc et senans)

(information technologies)

spatiality in early education

intersections between concept, reality and context

(the industrial revolution)

(global recession)

f)

d)

e)

a) A study of how one moves through play sculptures designed by Isamu Noguchi. b, c, d, e) Images from Ferris Elementary School, an abandoned school near the New Center area in Detroit, Michigan. f) An analysis of the history of the elementary school typology. Roots in the monastery/seminary are traced to the school as a system of controlled enclosures as described by Henri Foucault. New interpretations by Bernard Tschumi are also delineated.

early research

(napolean’s army)

[the context]

16


a) 17


c)

point, line, plane

b)

The compositional theory delineated in Point and Line To Plane (1947), developed by Wassily Kandinsky is considered as a spatial strategy for learning environments. a) Three Sounds (Kandinsky, 1926) is diagrammed as learning environment is developed through relationships of the point as students, line as circulation, and spatial zones as planes. b) Three Sounds (Kandinsky, 1947) c) Three Sounds is modeled according to Kandinsky’s color theory relationships.

18


site selection

a) Site in relation to overall map of Detroit. b) Site aerial c) Overall site plan. The site has a high incidence of abandoned lots and two abandoned Detroit Public Schools (1- Frederick Douglass High School, 2-Campbell Elementary). The dotted box outlines the immediate site for the project. c) The existing auditorium within Frederick Douglass. d) A stairwell within Frederick Douglass. e) The existing gymnasium within Frederick Douglass. f) A corridor within Frederick Douglass. g) An interior courtyard within Frederick Douglass h) Looking through a classroom window within Frederick Douglass.

East Forest Avenue

McDougall Avenue

Grandy Street

Chene Street

2.

1. a)

Mack Avenue

b) 19

c)


c)

d)

e)

f)

g)

h) 20


multiple intelligences

a) A graphic key of the multiple intelligences developed by Howard Gardner. b) A graphic representation of the multiple intelligences. c, d, e, f) The ground floor of Frederick Douglass analyzed in terms of multiple intelligence. The learning environment is divided into nodes specific to Gardner’s theory. User defined circulation overlaps learning zones, which lead to creative unexpected outcomes. (c) represents existing conditions. (d) diagrams movement between existing spaces. (e) proposes a new program with nodal intelligences. (f) represents ways moving through the proposal. g, h, i, j) The same diagrammatic progression as above for the second floor.

(naturalistic) na - (abilities concerned with nurturing and

relating information to one’s surrounding environment. examples include classifying natural forms such as animal and plant species, rocks and mountains.)

(interpersonal)

(linguistics)

ie - (abilities concerned with interaction with

li - (abilities concerned with word, spoken or written. those who tend to learn best by reading, taking notes, listening to lectures, discussing and debating verbally.)

others. characterized by sensitivity to other’s moods, feelings, temperments and motivations and ability to cooperate in a group.)

(logical)

(kinesthetic)

lg - (area has to do with logic,

ki - (talent in controlling one’s bodily motions and the capacity to handle objects skillfully. associated with a sense of timing a clear sense of the goal of physical action. ability exists to train responses so that become like reflexes.

abstractions, reasoning and numbers. capabilities include reasoning, recognizing abstract patterns, scientific thinking, investigation and ability to perform complex calculations. this ability is closely linked to fluid intelligence and general ability.

(naturalistic)

(linguistics)

mu - (area has to do with the sensitivity to sound, rhythms, tones and music. since there is a strong auditory component this intelligence. language skills are typically highly developed.

(logical)

ex - (spiritual or religious intelligence. ability to contemplate phenomena or questions beyond sensory data, such as the infinite and infinitesimal.)

(existential)

(musical)

(musical)

(interpersonal)

ia - (concerned with introspective and selfreflective capacities. those strong in this category are intuitive and typically introverted. associated is skill in deciphering their own feelings and motivations. this refers to a deep understanding of one’s self.

(kinesthetic)

sp - (concerned with the ability to visualize with

the mind’s eye. professions that deal with this kind of intelligence include artists, designers, and architects.)

(spatial)

(intrapersonal)

(spatial) pr - (childrens work as directed by cohersive community

(intrapersonal)

of teachers, parents, citizens and other students.)

(project) (existential)

a) 21

b)


c)

d)

e)

f)

g)

h)

i)

j) 22


a)

e)

b)

f)

c)

d) 23

g)


i)

landscape and form

h)

a-d) Digital model showing structure, partitions, and exterior envelope of Frederick Douglass High School. Red transparency represent valuable spaces within the school, including the gymnasium and courtyard. e-h) Conceptual partii for developing learning environment. The organization utilizes three pathways that each have three intelligence nodes (e) that intersect a rectangular volume of three stories (f). The intersections and overlaps between the paths within the building promote synergy between lesson plans. Landscape pathways also intersect the volume to extend the learning environment outdoors. (h) shows the composite. (i) Iterations exploring site topography

24


landscape and form

a-d) Analysis of Kodomo No Kuni playground (Isamu Noguchi, 1966); a) plan view of playground; b) diagram of nodal elements and their direct connections; c) interpretation of organic circulation between elements, according plan and topography d) application of multiple intelligences (coded by color in the prior page) within the identified nodes. Overlapping circulation patterns suggest unique and shifting learning environments. e-i) Iterations that take the Frederick Douglass site and explore how shifts in topography can create spaces for learning. Each iteration was based on a 20ft x 20ft grid, that was based off of the urban grid of the neighborhood. The diagrams above each rendering indicate planes developed by topography (lighter is higher, darker lower), compression points where circulation is directed, and different states of renovating the existing Frederick Douglass High School.

a)

e) b)

c)

d) 25

f)


h)

k)

g)

i) 26


sectional study 27

This section explore how different learning areas can be weave between enclosed building structures, landscape, and overlap each other sectionally. The colors are coded as per the multiple intelligence key in page.


28


Years 4-7 will focus on developing projects in the area surrounding the initial 200-acre footprint. Phase II projects will include continued expansion of food production and processing activities, renewable energy production, affordable and market rate housing development, commercial-retail development, along with need-based community projects that will likely arise. 29

Moran

1.25

Medbury

Grand 15.08

9.09

Palmer 5.47

8.28

4.55

Ferry

Callahan Playground

2.48

Phase 2 Productive Landscapes/Pasture

1.19

1.78

Apple Orchard Farm

2.84

Chene Ferry Equestrien Veterinarian Center

Phase 1 Chene/Ferry Equestrian Center Secure and Mothball Building

9.68

Phase 2 Residential, Recreational,Cultural and Productive Landscape Opportunities

Kirby 4.55

Chene St. Business Corridor

35.36

Frederick 10.10

5.92

Phase 2

7.30

0.90

Training Facility Perrien Pk. Landscaping

Industrial

Warren

7.90

3.58

Hancock

1.79

1.55

Dabrowski Playground

8.26

Phase 2 Residential, Recreational,Cultural and Productive Landscape Opportunities

0.98

1.19

5.45 2.00

2.64

1.06

18.64

38.96

Phase 3

1.19

1.37

Superior

Phase 1 Productive Landscapes/Urban Agriculture

4.27

1.19

4.71

.67

Phase 2 Urban Successional Ecological Landscape

0.78

Phase 2 Educational Campus/Productive Landscapes/Urban Agriculture

3.67

Recovery Aqua Farms Food Processing Distribution

Mt. Elliott Zender Park

1.27

Phase 2 Douglass Academy Site Educational Campus/ Experiential Center

4.17

1.19 8.26

DEPSA Campus

2.27

1.06

Elba Ellery Park

11.00

4.82

Phase 2 Productive Landscapes/Urban Agriculture Phase 2 Commercial Corridor Development

Heidelberg

1.58 Benson Elmwood Playlot

12.92

Phase 3 Residential, Recreational,Cultural and Productive Landscape Opportunities

7.89

1.43

2.58

1.21 2.64

7.53

11.02

11.24

1.38 1.19

N

SHAR RecoveryPark

TOTAL ACRES: 439.27

Detroit Collaborative Design Center University of Detroit Mercy School of Architecture July 13, 2011

PHASING

Phase 1 Douglass Academy Site Secure and Mothball Building

2.39

1.37

Chene St. Business Corridor

Phase 2 Residential, Recreational,Cultural and Productive Landscape Opportunities

Willis 5.74

0.98

Education and Research Campus Detroit Public Schools / MSU / Recov.Pk

Phase 2 Commercial Corridor Development

Canfield 1.21

5.25

1.08

14.46

Phase 3 Residential, Recreational,Cultural and Productive Landscape Opportunities

Garfield

Industrial

Phase 1 Center for Urban Agriculture Secure and Renovate Building

Phase 1 Productive Landscapes/Urban Agriculture 22 acre North Eastern Site

Forest

4.34

1.10

Residential

Chene St. Business Corridor

Phase 1 Perrien Park Landscape Construction Job Training Program with Green Biz

0.90 20.21

Urban Agriculture / Productive Landscape Recov.Pk

3.95

Theodore

3.22

Phase 1

18.37

0.78

2.15 1.79

2.27

Phase 2 Productive Landscapes/Urban Agriculture

Farnsworth

Mt. Elliott

Industrial

Phase 1 Recovery Aqua Farm

Phase 2 Commercial Corridor Development

1.19 Industrial

healing through urban agriculture

Years 1-3 focus on specific projects in the 200-acre pilot area footprint. This first phase will include developing detailed project plans, procuring funding and implementation of each of the projects outlined in the preceding pages. The overall goal of phase 1 is that each project be self-sustaining and generate enough revenue by the end of the third year to fund the planning and implementation of projects in phase 2.

Lucky Place

1.79

Phase 2 Productive Landscapes/Urban Agriculture

recovery park

While the long-term planning work envisions the regeneration of a 200acre district, there is an immediate effort to demonstrate the core objectives through a series of specific projects. As residents work with professionals to bring each project to life, the physical environment of the neighborhood will expand to include gardens, refurbished buildings, art installations, and green infrastructure systems. These cooperative development efforts will in turn, reinvigorate the public life of this community and the health of its residents.

1.19

Elmwood

An urban farming project that is based in East Detroit, Recovery Park seeks to have a transformative impact on the neighborhood and city at large. The vision is provide jobs for recovering addicts through urban agriculture, which catalyze development throughout the community

2.25

1.19

McDougall

3.67

Joseph Campau

James Vernor Playground

2.11

Grandy

SHAR RecoveryPark: Conceptual Opportunity Diagram

Phase 1

Primary Roads Secondary Roads

Business Corridor Education Green Space (Recov.Pk) Industry Residential

Feet

0

100

200

400

600

800

1-3 years

Phase 2

4-6 years

Phase 3

7-10 years

a)


c, developed by team)

b)

a) Overall site plan shows the available plots available through the city, and phasing/program strategy for the project. b) Initial masterplan, which includes hoophouses, public garden areas, and traditional agriculture, are linked by forest ways, pedestrian pathways, and water canals. c-d) Agricultural stations employed in the project will be of urban scale, and will encourage pedestrian interaction.

masterplan

d, developed by team)

30


a, developed by team)

b) 31


d)

a) View of the former Detroit Water and Sewerage Department Maintenance Facility as renovated and transformed into an aqua-farm. Once renovated, the building will house a large-scale fish production business, a food processing and distribution facility, and a production kitchen. b) Existing view of building. c) View of Campbell Elementary after re purposing. The program will further education in health, wellness, gardening and landscaping and act as a knowledge and learning center as well as an agriculture-based business incubator. d) Existing view of Campbell Elementary.

building revitilization

c)

32


current plan strategy

(opposite) Current development of master plan strategy for Recovery Park. The concept of three threads order the site, between a water canal, pedestrian pathway and forested parkway. These threads set up areas for hoophouses (white), agriculture and public spaces as with the prior iteration.

- Storage Facility - Proposed Commercial - Hoop Houses - DPS Site - Public Garden 33


n 34


35

empowering rwandan women through higher education

the akilah institute for women

In June 2008, Architecture for Humanity, Washington D.C. chapter (AfH-DC) was approached by Elizabeth Davis, Executive Director of the Akilah Institute for Women, to begin collaboration on the design of a learning campus in Bugesera, Rwanda to educate young Rwandan women in tourism and hospitality. Recent statistics have shown that only 10% of Rwandans graduate from high school, and that only 1% finish university. Only a third of these graduates are women. Many of these young women were orphaned from the 1994 genocide, and were placed as caretakers of their families. The Akilah Institute found the education of young women in Rwanda a vital issue for the country’s recovery from its dark past, and a key factor in its future progress. The Akilah Institute for Women has focused its curriculum on tourism and hospitality, the fastest growing sector in the country, due to its lush vegetation, temperate climate, and unique wildlife. The school opened its satellite Kigali campus in 2010, with an inaugural class of 50 women (see opposite). The following pages chronicle the work of a 10 person volunteer team that I managed from the July 2008 to September 2010. It follows our site visit in November 2008, our design development, and finally the culmination of a schematic design set, and narrative of sustainable systems submitted to Akilah in the fall of 2009. Currently the schematic design set is being handled by Pannotia Collaborative Design and Construction for the Akilah Institute, and a phased renovation has started in June 2011. Through the project’s strong vision, breathtaking site, wonderful community presence, and collaborative team dynamics, the Akilah Institute for Women has set itself to become an exceptional educational institution focused on the empowerment of women.


36


c)

a)

e) 37

b)

d)

f)


h)

l)

site visit and initial process

g)

The overall design of the campus was set to accommodate 200 students, with an initial phase accommodating 50 students. The site is located in the town of Mayenge in the district of Bugesera. The existing site is currently a defunct government vocational school, first established by a European organization in the 1960’s. The school is located on 85 acres on the edge of Lake Cyohoha, approximately 38 kilometers i) south of Kigali. a) The Akilah team posing on site. From left to right; Innocent Karangwa (Akilah), Josef Fuentes (AfH-DC), Vrunda Vaghela (AfH-DC), Michelle Bove (AfH-DC), Shurid Rahman (AfH-DC), Modeste Nsanbimana (Akilah), Elizabeth Davis (Akilah), Holly Ziskal (Akilah), Muhire Enock (Akilah), David Hughes (Akilah). b) Elizabeth Davis with a newborn in the existing k) community. c) Chong Le and assistant, environmental consultants on the site. d-h) The team looking at existing building conditions and studying the site. i) A new classroom in the current Kigali Campus. k-m) Images from group meetings after the site visit, throughout late 2008 to fall of m) 2009, in Washington D.C.

38


initial design 39

The Initial studies were directed at developing program, and adjacencies in concert with the development of curriculum by the Akilah Institute. a-c) study program adjacencies of the determined needs of a guesthouse, restaurant, dormitory, library, agriculture, classrooms, and support needs. After visiting the campus in Bugesera, collecting data, and keeping correspondence with contacts made in the country after the visit, site analysis diagrams could be made. d) Studies of the sun path within the site, and views within the site considering vegetation and building orientation. e) Diagram of canopy areas on site, with taller canopies in darker green. f) Diagram of existing vegetation on site. Using the initial diagrams and analysis diagrams, conceptual schemes were developed for the site. g) A scheme that studied minimal intervention, and development of the existing courtyard with additions in red. h) Development of a picturesque campus, with winding trails that allow for weaving movement throughout the learning environment. i) Study of a traditional mall based campus, with controlled circulation, and well defined public spaces. j) A scheme that studies overlapping mall spaces. k) A later rendition, identifying program within existing structures, and features such as green roofs. Consolidation of the existing mall was consistent in the design process.

a)

b)

c)

d)

e)

f)

g)

h)

i)


j)

j)

k)

n

40


final master plan



CHART 2: PHASE 1 PROGRAM 

 

EXISTING CAMPUS AREA CALCULATIONS BOYS' DORMITORY *

m2

TOTAL BOYS' DORM AREA

547

GIRLS' DORMITORY 1

m2

BED AREA

82

CLOSET

5

CLOSET

5

TOTAL

93

GIRLS' DORMITORY 2

m2

BED AREA

82

CLOSET

5

CLOSET

5

TOTAL

93

TOTAL GIRLS' DORMAREA

370

CLASSROOM 1

m2

CLASSROOM A

61

CLASSROOM B

61

TOTAL

122

CLASSROOM 2

m2

CLASSROOM A

61

CLASSROOM B

61

TOTAL

122

CLASSROOM 3

m2

CLASSROOM A

51

TOTAL CLASSROOM AREA

295

OUTDOOR WORKSHOP

m2

SPACE A

18

SPACE B

28

SPACE C

19

TOTAL WORKSHOP SPACE

65

CAFETERIA / KITCHEN

m2

CAFETERIA

101

KITCHEN

41

STORAGE TOTAL KITCHEN/CAFÉ

9 151

ADMINISTRATION BUILDING *

m2

TOTAL ADMINISTRATION BUILDING

120

GENERATOR BUILDING

m2

SPACE A

13

SPACE B

13

SPACE C

12

SPACE D

12

SPACE E

12

SPACE F

33

SPACE G

33

TOTAL GENERATOR BUILDING

128

TOTAL CAMPUS AREA

1676 m2

* = Individual room areas within the building are not available for these buildings. NOTE: The area for the existing staff housing on campus is not available.

41


27 26

28

23 24 25

29

20

21

15 16 17

18

2 3

19

13

9

13

5 1

8

11

13

7

4

10

13 12

14

1 Community Hall 2 Administrative/Security Office 3 Kitchen/Dining Facilities 4 Training Kitchen 5 Kitchen/Dining Expansion 6 Shared Parking 7 Toilet Facility 8 Storage 9 Admin/Library 10 Restaurant 11 Library / Classrooms 12 Ecolodge and Villas 13 Staff Housing 14 Ecolodge and Villas 15 Information/Greeting Offices

16 Classrooms 17 Classroom/Computer Lab 18 Student Center 19 Lecture Hall/Classrooms 20 Infirmary 21 Classroom 22 Toilet Facility 23 Phase 2 Dormitory 24 Performance Stage 25 Agricultural Storage 26 Phase 1 Dormitory 27 Toilet/Shower Facility 28 Cow Pen 29 Storage 30 Observation Deck

30

Existing to Remain Phase 1 - Academic Program for 50 students Phase 2 - Full Academic Program for 200 students

n

Phase 3 - Hospitality and Library Expansion 42


43


44


classrooms 45

(Preceding pages, in order) Analysis of program within the final design of the campus. The final design of the campus, in three phases, accommodating 50, 100, and then 200 students respectively. Careful attention was placed on developing a strong student public zone in the existing courtyard, and smaller study spaces between the landscape of the classroom buildings. A strong connection to the water was developed, and staff housing was placed adjacent to this path. Semi private zones were created to the north as the former boys dormitory was outfitted as the main residence hall. To the south, planned for later phases, a hotel and decentralized bungalows were planned to support and connect with the curriculum of the campus. (Opposite) Classrooms are designed to include the renovation of the two existing classroom buildings and the existing girl’s dormitory. Interior design will provide two seating arrangements; a traditional option and a group seating oriented arrangement. Floor treatment options include penetrating stains, top coating, and paint. Personal storage will be provided on interior partitions. Passive cooling will be promoted with the addition of clerestory windows. New construction will include a porch element for extension of the classroom. (a,b) Proposed plan of new classroom buildings. (c,d) Existing classrooms. (e) Proposed facade. (f-l) Proposed sections.

a)

b)

 c)

d)

e)


f)

g)

h)

i)

k)

l) 46


a) 47


c)

dormitory

b)

The existing boy’s dormitory will be renovated to accommodate 100 students in phase one (an additional building will be planned for future phases). Each room accommodates up d) to 6 students. Renovations and new construction will introduce passive ventilation, increased natural light, and a revised interior plan. New exterior windows have been added for added visibility. The existing roof will be reconstructed with a central vent stack, elevated clerestory, and large overhangs on both the north and south sides. An overhang on the north side will create space for the new exterior patio and semi exterior room. New construction will also includes shower facility, composting toilet facility, and outdoor garden. Solar panels are planned to provide interior and exterior lighting, as well as power for other needs. Materials for interior partitions and new facilities seek to be sustainable options local to the Bugesera district. a) An axonometric drawing showing how water systems interact in the proposed design. b) Proposed plan of the dormitory building c) Proposed roof plan of the e) dormitory building

48


kitchen and waste facilities 49

The new toilet facilities (immediate right) aim to respond to the public health hazards that are present with the existing pit latrines on the campus. Composting toilet systems are proposed. Using the existing topography and strategic placement of access doors, the compost can be readily accessible and maintained through the revolving carousel allowing for the compost to be rotated in position from the collection to curing states. The facility also utilizes rainwater collection that is stored in a tank to be later used for hand sinks. A rainscreen wraps around two sides of the facility. The kitchen and cafeteria (far right) will double as a campus dining facility and a culinary training classroom promoting both modern and traditional means of cooking. The facility will be a renovation of the existing kitchen building. Major changes within the renovation include replacing the existing asbestos roofing material with sustainable clay tiles. Other sustainable materials, such as cob, recycled sails, natural plaster and recycled wood will be utilized. The trellis structure will serve as a shading device and herb wall. Rainwater will be collected, and bioswales will be employed to remove silt and pollution from surface runoff water. (a,b) axonometrics of the toilet facility. (c,d) proposed design of toilet facility. (e,f,g) existing pit latrines. (h,i) proposed plans for kitchen/ cafeteria. (j,k) proposed bioswale/sink station. (l) interior of kitchen. (m-o) existing

e)

a)

b)

c)

d)

f)

g)


h)

i)

j)

m)

k)

n)

l)

o) 50


51 5 1

2015 Capital Improvement Program - Wilmot Sanz Architects

INOVA Fairfax Campus

The INOVA Fairfax Campus Capital Improvement Program proposes to make major renovations and planning efforts by 2015. Facilities include Labor and Delivery, High Risk Pregnancy (HRP) beds, NICU wards, Internal Care Units (ICU), Outpatient services, and medical surgical beds for new construction. The project aimed to have 500 beds and totalled at 1 million square feet from 2007 to 2009. The project was focused on women’s health, and labor/delivery. Private patient rooms, designed with patient and family zones were a priority in the project. Decentralized nursing stations provided a quicker response and better visibility to the patient. In addition to this, older aging structures must be phased for demolition and or renovation in concert with phasing. My role in this project was to support the senior healthcare planners in development of the proposed Women’s Hospital and Patient Tower. This included on field measurements, assisting in doctor, nurse, and management meetings, and development of schematic drawings and graphics. The scale of the project shifted often between campus planning, to building/ massing development, to the design of patient rooms and surgery/technical spaces. Due to the economic conditions, the project also changed in scale throughout the months I was involved in it. The initial Women’s Hospital and Patient Tower changed from a single new construction tower into two smaller and phased buildings (the Women’s Hospital, and the South Patient Tower respectively).


52


5

LOCATED ON BED CONTROL PANEL

8' - 0"

4

CL OF BED

2' - 0"

SOFA BED

LOCATED ON BED CONTROL PANEL

7"

1' - 10 1/2"

8' - 8" 14' - 0" BY HEADWALL MANUF. BASED ON HILLROM ELEMENTS

SHOWN AT 45 DEGREE ANGLE 5"

2 A5-01

4

DRYWALL BULKHEAD

S

Med/Surg Patient Room - RCP SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

E E

E E

4' - 10"

3' - 0"

6

Y

MONITOR, KEYBOARD, & CPU

5'

WALL BASE

Toilet - Water Closet = 1'-0" SCALE: 7 3/8" Nurse Alcove A5-01 SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0" 5 A5-01

2' - 0"

11

8' - 0"

DRYWALL BULKHEAD

A5-01

4' - 6"

2' - 10" 10"

5' - 8"

6' - 8"

BUILDING NORTH

Toilet - Door SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

SHOWN AT 45 DEGREE ANGLE

PAPER TOWEL DISPENSER SOLID SURFACE COUNTER WITH INTGEGRAL SINK, BACK & SIDE SPLASHES

SOLID SURFACE WINDOW SILL

(2) DRAWERS W/ PUSH BUTTON LOCKS

BED PAN STORAGE

SOFA BED

10 A5-01

Toilet SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

SHOWN AT 45 DEGREE ANGLE

BY HEADWALL MANUF. BASED ON HILLROM ELEMENTS 7' - 0"

WILMOT SANZ

CUBICLE CURTAIN TRACK

CL OF BED

A R C H I T E C T U R DRYWALL E

3"

E E

6' - 8"

S

4' - 10"

3' - 0"

E E

18310 Montgomery Village Avenue Gaithersburg, Maryland 20879 301-590-2900 (Fax) 301-590-8150

Project Number Scale Date

CL OF BED

6 A5-01

NURSE CALL

BULKHEAD

P L A N N I N G

4' - 0"

6"

5

Toilet - Water Closet SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

MIRROR W/ SHELF

Med/Surg - Ext. Wall SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

9' - 0" 3 (2) DRAWERS W/ PUSH BUTTON LOCKS 6 A5-01 4

9

HEADWALL "CANOPY"

RECLINER

BENCH

8' - 0"

Nurse Alcove SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

A5-01

A5-01

8' - 8"

3' - 0"

Med/Surg - Headwall SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

Drawing No.:

9201.137 3/8" = 1'-0" JULY, 2009

A5-01

SHOWER CURTAIN TRACK CERAMIC TILE NICHE

FLIP-UP GRAB BAR

SHOWER SEAT

HC TOILET WITH BEDPAN WASHER & DIVERTER VALVE

11 A5-01

Toilet - Water Closet SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

LOCATED ON BED CONTROL PANEL

Y

CABINET, 15" DEEP

2' - 0"

X MONITOR, KEYBOARD, & CPU

8' - 0"

SOLID SURFACE COUNTER, BACK & SIDE SPLASHES, & MOUNTING CLEATS

A5-01

Med/Surg Patient Room - RCP SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

6"

2

9/21/2009 1:38:49 PM

3' - 0"

G:\Revit 2009\9201 Interior Elevations\29' Pat.Room (new).rvt

7

11

SHOWER SEAT

7' - 0"

A5-01

S

NIGHT LIGHT

CERAMIC TILE NICHE

SOLID SURFACE WINDOW SILL

POWER & DATA OUTLETS

SHOWER SEAT

HC TOILET WITH BEDPAN WASHER & DIVERTER VALVE

2' - 0"

KEY PLAN

8' - 0"

WALL BASE

CERAMIC TILE NICHE

FLIP-UP GRAB BAR LIGHT SWITCH

LIGHT FIXTURE

SOLID SURFACE COUNTER, CUBICLE CURTAIN TRACKBACK & SIDE SPLASHES, & MOUNTING CLEATS

RCP

EQ

NURSE CALL

SHOWER CURTAIN TRACK

7

10

9

DRAWER

EQ 5' - 0"

A5-01 8

d)

NURSE CALL

HC TOILET WITH BEDPAN WASHER & DIVERTER VALVE

Y

8 10 Toilet - Sink Toilet

A5-01 = 1'-0" A5-01 SCALE: SCALE:3/8"3/8" = 1'-0"

2' - 0"

11

CABINET, 15" DEEP

DRAWER

1' - 11 1/2"

TRASH

ROLLER SHADE & VALENCE MONITOR, KEYBOARD, ASSEMBLY & CPU

A5-01

SHOWER CURTAIN TRACK

SOLID SURFACE WINDOW SILL

Y

SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

FLIP-UP GRAB BAR

Med/Surg - Headwall SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

LINEN

1' - 7 3/4"

CABINET, DEEP Med/Surg15" Footwall

POWER & DATA OUTLETS

A5-01

BLUE

1' - 7 3/4"

BENCH

5' - 3"

SOLID SURFACE COUNTER, BACK & SIDE SPLASHES, & MOUNTING CLEATS

SOLID SURFACE WINDOW SILL

BY FURNITURE MANUF. BASED ON NURTURE OPUS

3"

A5-01

A5-01

8' - 0"

Med/Surg - Headwall SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

BED PAN STORAGE BED PAN STORAGE

SHOWER CURTAIN TRACK WARDROBE W/ SLIDING DOOR

OPEN

E E

SAFE

Toilet OPEN SINK SCALE: CABINET 3/8" = 1'-0"

CUBICLE CURTAIN TRACK

Y

CL OF BED

Med/Surg Patient Room - Plan SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

WALL BASE AS SCHEDULED (TYP.)

6 A5-01

8' - 8"

7' - 0"

1

X 10

Med/Surg - Ext. Wall SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

X A5-01

BED PAN STORAGE SOAP DISPENSER

CL OF BED

SOLID SURFACE SHOWERWITH SEAT COUNTER INTGEGRAL SINK, BACK & SIDE SPLASHES

10"

4

5

E E

4' - 0"

2' - 0"

OPEN

A5-01

1' - 1 1/2"

6 RECLINER

SOLID SURFACE WINDOW SILL

1' - 0" 1' - 0"

3

S S

SOLID SURFACE COUNTER WITH INTGEGRAL SINK, BACK & SIDE SPLASHESBACKSPLASH

PAPER TOWEL DISPENSER

SOAP DISPENSER

CUBICLE CURTAIN TRACK

CL OF T.V. S

4' - 10"

9' - 0"

SOLID SURFACE WINDOW SILL

6"

7' - 0"

PAPER TOWEL DISPENSER

PAPER TOWEL DISPENSER

DRYWALL BULKHEAD

2' - 0"

DRYWALL WHITE MARKER BULKHEAD BOARD (ON DOOR)

4' - 0"

CL OF BED

LIGHT SWITCHES & THERMOSTAT

3' - 8"

4

5

BENCH

LIGHT FIXTURE MIRROR W/ SHELF

CL OF BED CL OF BED

SHOWN AT 45 DEGREE ANGLE

OBSERVATION WINDOW

3' - 0"

12' - 3"

A5-01 -

5' - 0"

6

GLOVE BOXES

MIRROR WITH SHELF

SHOWN AT 45 DEGREE ANGLE

BY HEADWALL MANUF. BASED ON HILLROM ELEMENTS 12' - 3" 7' - 0" BY FOOTWALL FURNITURE MANUF. BASED ON NURTURE OPUS

CURVED DRYWALL BULKHEAD

HEADWALL "CANOPY"

LIGHT FIXTURE

SHOWER FIXTURE LIGHT FIXTURE NURSE CALL MIRROR W/ SHELF

SOFA BED

MED. SURGICAL TYPICAL PATIENT ROOM c)

2' - 8 1/2"

2' - 0"

8' - 0"

3

RECLINER

BENCH

3 5 Med/Surg - Entry Med/Surg - Ext.Wall Wall A5-01 SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0" ToiletA5-01 - DoorSCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0" SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

3' - 0"

8' - 0"

9

8' - 0"

7

4' - 4"

10

A5-01

BENCH FOOTWALL MANUF. SOLIDBY SURFACE WINDOW SILL C-SHAPED STRUCTURE FOR FOOTWALL FURNITURE SYSTEM BY MANUF.

8' - 8" BY FOOTWALL FURNITURE MFR BASED ON NURTURE OPUS

8 A5-01

7' - 0"

b)

5' - 3"

DRYWALL BULKHEAD

9

SOLID SURFACE COUNTERTOP & INTEGRAL SINK BY FOOTWALL MANUF.

10"

5" 1' - 10 1/2" 5"

T

8' - 8" 7' - 0"

WALL BASE AS SCHEDULED (TYP.)

A5-01

11

X 5

10"

1' - 1 1/2" 5' - 8"

Y

SOUTH PATIENT TOWER

4' - 0"

A5-01

5' - 0"

HEADWALL "CANOPY" PAPER TOWEL DISPENSER

S

NIGHT LIGHT

A5-01

2' - 0" 7

1' - 8"

3' - 6"

ROLLER SHADE & VALENCE ASSEMBLY

7' - 0"

6

EQ

9

8' - 0"

A5-01

1' - 0" 1' - 0"

2' - 10" FD

9' - 0"

3

A5-015' - 3"10

DRAWER

EQ

NIGHT LIGHT

7' - 0"

8' - 0"

11

LIGHT SWITCH

SOLID SURFACE WINDOW SILL

DRAWER

1' - 11 1/2"

Toilet - Door SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

SHOWER CURTAIN TRACK

BY FURNITURE MANUF. BASED ON NURTURE OPUS

9

LINEN

8 1' - 7 3/4"

BENCH

4' - 0"

8' - 0"

BLUE

1' - 7 3/4"

Med/Surg Footwall SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

CUBICLE CURTAIN TRACK

2' - 8 1/2"

4' 3' - 8"

7' - 1" OPEN SINK CABINET

A5-01 SHOWER CURTAIN TRACK

9 A5-01

MONITOR ON ARTICULATING ARM

3' - 4 1/2"

5"

3"

7

FD

5' - 4"

6' - 8"

DRYWALL BULKHEAD

10

2' - 8 1/2"

WALL BASE AS SCHEDULED (TYP.)

4

5' - 0"

5' - 3"

SHOWN AT 45 DEGREE ANGLE

4' - 0"

G:\Revit 2009\9201 Interior Elevations\29' Pat.Room (new).rvt

A5-01

3 3/4"

S

NIGHT LIGHT

2' - 0"

CERAMIC TILE

SAFE

BACKSPLASH

5"

EQ

DRYWALL INOVA HEALTH SYSTEMS BULKHEAD

WARDROBE W/ SLIDING DOOR

Y

OPEN

14' - 6" 6' - 4"

1' - 10 1/2"

14' - 0"

EQ

1' - 11 1/2"

CURTAIN TRACK ROLLER SHADE & VALENCE ASSEMBLY

DRYWALL BULKHEAD

CL OF T.V.

S S

SOAP DISPENSER

1' - 7 3/4"

DRAWER

Med/Surg Footwall SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

A5-01

2' - 0"

SOLID SURFACE WINDOW SILL

DRAWER

WHITE MARKER BOARD (ON DOOR)

LIGHT SWITCHES & THERMOSTAT

2' - 0"

1' - 1 1/2"

OPEN

CL OF BED

Med/SurgOBSERVATION Patient Room - Plan 3/8" = 1'-0" SCALE: WINDOW

7' - 0"

CL OF BED

4

5"

Y

1' - 7 3/4"

Toilet - Sink OPEN SINK = 1'-0" SCALE: 3/8" CABINET

12' - 3"

GLOVE BOXES

1

8

BENCH

BED PAN STORAGE LINEN

BLUE TRASH

WALL BASE AS SCHEDULED (TYP.)

X

1' - 10 1/2" 14' - 0"

BY FOOTWALL FURNITURE MANUF. BASED ON NURTURE OPUS

9/21/2009 1:38:49 PM

8' - 0"

4

5

8

A5-01

A5-01 -

5' - 0"

6

8' - 8" 7" CURVED DRYWALL BULKHEAD

A5-01

SOAP DISPENSER

A5-01

BY FURNITURE MANUF. BASED ON NURTURE OPUS

3

8' - 8"

11

12' - 3"

2' - 0"

BY HEADWALL MFR BASED ON HILLROM ELEMENTS

Plan

5' - 3"

4' - 4"

8' - 0"

7"

(a) The first floor of the Women’s Hospital and Patient Tower, during its first iteration as a single building. This floor included a C-Section Suite, a Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) and an Labor and Delivery Recovery (LDR)X wing. (b-d) shows interior elevation of the Medical Surgical rooms, planned for upper floors in Y the building. An internal roof courtyard was planned for increased sunlight. (e) The fourth floor of the building, which included High Risk Pregnancy beds, along with a mixture of centralized Y and satellite nurse stations. This provided the nurses with the ability to care and oversee in a larger ward. (f-h) Interior elevations of the Internal Care Unit (ICU) rooms. i) Plan of Internal Care Unit, with spacing and proper dimension allowed for surgical boom. l) Plan of typical medical surgical bed, with private patient bathroom.

C-SHAPED STRUCTURE FOR FOOTWALL FURNITURE SYSTEM BY MANUF.

Med/Surg - Entry Wall SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

0° 45.0

women’s hospital and patient tower

0° 45.0

3' - 6"

3 A5-01

1' - 8"

WALL BASE AS SCHEDULED (TYP.)

BY HEADWALL MFR BASED ON HILLROM ELEMENTS

T

9

X

BACKSPLASH

BENCH BY FOOTWALL MANUF. OPEN

10"

5" 1' - 10 1/2" 5"

10

BY FOOTWALL FURNITURE MFR BASED ON NURTURE OPUS

A5-01 FD

7

1' - 0" 1' - 0"

11

BY H

7' - 0"

A5-01 8

FD

POWER & DATA OUTLETS WALL BASE

7 A5-01

(2) DRAWERS W/ PUSH BUTTON LOCKS

Nurse Alcove SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

a) 53


f)

1' - 10" 14' - 0"

PAPER TOWEL DISPENSER

5"

3' - 6"

TYPICAL ICU - FOOTWALL SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

8' - 8"

SOUTH PATIENT TOWER

TYPICAL ICU - RCP SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

WASTE OVERBED TABLE

DOORCARE TRACK CRITICAL CART NURTURE WARDROBE W/

DOOR TRACK TYPICAL ICU PATIENT NURTURE ROOMS WARDROBE W/

OVERBED TABLE

A5-02

5' - 0" OPEN

RED TRASH

1' - 10"

14' - 0"

5"

3' - 11"

1

g)

SAFE STORAGE

SAFE STORAGE

TYPICAL ICU - FOOTWALL SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

2' - 0"

TYPICAL ICU PATIENT ROOMS 7"

2

SOLID SURFACE COUNTER & BACKSPLASH ON METAL WALL BRACKETS LINEN HAMPER

X PATIENT CARE MODULE W/ DIALYSIS CONNECTION

SHARPS CONTAINER

TYPICAL ICU - FLOOR PLAN A5-02 GLOVE TRIPLE SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

WALL MOUNTED BOOM

6 A5-02

Y

Y

5' - 0"

NURTURE WARDROBE

2' - 0"

DRYWALL BULKHEAD

7

BUILDING NORTH

SOLID SURFACE WINDOW SILL 8' - 0"

DRYWALL BULKHEAD

NURTURE WARDROBE 3' - 0"

5' - 0" 9' - 0"

A5-02

7

SOLID SURFACE SOFA WINDOW SILL

4 EXAM LIGHT

8' - 0"

DRYWALL BULKHEAD

15" DEEP CABINET W/ ADJUSTABLE SHELVES

SOLID SURFACE COUNTER & BACKSPLASH ON METAL WALL BRACKETS

A5-02

18310 Montgomery Village Avenue Gaithersburg, Maryland 20879 301-590-2900 (Fax) 301-590-8150

Y

9201.137 3/8" = 1'-0" 2009

Project Number Scale Date

14' - 6"

6'JULY, - 4"

3 3/4"

5' - 4"

5"

3' - 4 1/2"

A5-02

Drawing No.:

A5-01

8

FD

11

A5-01 FD

7 10

9

0째 45.0

1' - 8"

3' - 6" 4' - 4"

5' - 3"

TYPICAL ICU - HEADWALL SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

SUPPLY CART

SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

8' - 0"

12' - 3"

6 A5-02

TRIPLE GLOVE BOXES

2' - 4"

7' - 2"

i)

A R C H I T E C T U R E ICU - RCP P L 2A TYPICAL N N I N G

3' - 11"

WALL MOUNTED BOOM

8' - 8"

WILMOT SANZ

3 6

A5-01 -

4

CL OF BED

5

OPEN

1' - 1 1/2"

TYPICAL ICU - RCP SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

7' - 0"

4' - 3 1/2"

T

2' - 8"

PATIENT CARE MODULE W/ DIALYSIS CONNECTION

RED TRASH

2' - 10"

2' - 6"

LINEN HAMPER

X

2' - 0"

2' - 0"

4' - 6"

7' - 0"

8' - 8"

2

DRYWALL BULKHEAD

SHARPS CONTAINER

4' - 3 1/2"

A5-02

A5-02

7' - 1"

10' - 6"

Drawing No.:

CL OF BED

CUBICLE CURTAIN TRACK

4' - 6"

RIGHT ARM GASES SHOULD INCLUDE: (2) VACUUM (1) AIR (1) OXYGEN

NURSE CALL

X

9201.137 3/8" = 1'-0" JULY, 2009

Project Number Scale Date

10' - 6"

18310 Montgomery Village Avenue Gaithersburg, Maryland 20879 301-590-2900 (Fax) 301-590-8150

LEFT ARM GASES SHOULD INCLUDE: (2) VACUUM (2) AIR (3) OXYGEN

X

CUBICLE CURTAIN TRACK

P L A N N I N G

SUPPLY CART

TRIPLE GLOVE BOXES

TYPICAL ICU - HEADWALL SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

EXAM LIGHT

CL OF BED

A R C H I T E C T U R E

8' - 8"

3' - 11"

WALL MOUNTED BOOM

6 A5-02

RED TRASH

BY HEADWALL MFR BASED ON HILLROM ELEMENTS

TYPICAL ICU - RCP SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

TYPICAL ICU - EXTERIOR WALL SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

7' - 0"

5

G:\Revit 2009\9201 Interior Elevations\29' Pat.Room - ICU (mcw).rvt

2' - 0" PATIENT CARE MODULE W/ DIALYSIS CONNECTION

A5-02

9/21/2009 1:32:01 PM

2' - 4"

EXAM LIGHT

WILMOT SANZ

LINEN HAMPER

7' - 2"

8' - 8"

4

5

SOLID SURFACE COUNTER & BACKSPLASH ON METAL WALL BRACKETS

SOFA

5

2

A5-02

7' - 0"

4

2' - 10"

A5-02

2' - 6"

6

2' - 8"

4' - 3 1/2"

6

SHARPS CONTAINER

5" 1' - 10 1/2" 5"

9' - 0"

3

4' - 6"

X

9' - 0"

3

15" DEEP CABINET W/ ADJUSTABLE SHELVES

5' - 0"

CL OF BED

PATIENT CARE MODULE

X

8' - 8" 7"

e)

1

A5-01

X

1' - 10 1/2" 14' - 0"

5"

Y Med/Surg Patient Room - Plan SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

BY FOOTWALL FURNITURE MFR BASED ON NURTURE OPUS

10' - 6"

CUBICLE CURTAIN TRACK

RIGHT ARM GASES SHOULD INCLUDE: (2) VACUUM (1) AIR (1) OXYGEN

2' - 0"

LEFT ARM GASES SHOULD INCLUDE: (2) VACUUM (2) AIR (3) OXYGEN

X

NURSE CALL

A5-02

N

KEY PLAN

TYPICAL ICU - EXTERIOR WALL SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

BASE AS SCHEDULED (TYP.)

9/21/2009 1:32:01 PM

G:\Revit 2009\9201 Interior Elevations\29' Pat.Room - ICU (mcw).rvt

CL OF BED

A5-02

1' - 0" 1' - 0"

5

CL OF BED

CUBICLE CURTAIN TRACK

3' - 0"

5

7' - 0"

A5-02

8' - 0"

BUILDING NORTH

3 6

7

5' - 0" PATIENT CARE MODULE

2' - 0"

A5-02

KEY PLAN

7' - 0"

BASE AS SCHEDULED (TYP.)

h)

SUPPLY CART

BOXES

TYPICAL ICU - HEADWALL SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

Y

A5-02

1' - 1 1/2"

SOLID SURFACE WINDOW SILL

4' - 3 1/2"

DOOR TRACK

SOLID SURFACE WINDOW SILL

A5-02

4

13' - 1" 3' - 11"

INOVA HEALTH SYSTEMS

2' - 4"

4' - 6"

7' - 0"

WHITE MARKER BOARD

OPEN

15" DEEP CABINET W/ ADJUSTABLE SHELVES

SOUTH PATIENT TOWER

NURSE CALL

7' - 2"

2' - 0"

WHITE MARKER BOARD

2' - 10"

CL OF T.V.

DRYWALL BULKHEAD

2' - 6"

7' - 0" 2' - 0"

CLOCK

RIGHT ARM GASES SHOULD INCLUDE: (2) VACUUM (1) AIR (1) OXYGEN

CL OF BED

OPEN

DRYWALL BULKHEAD

LEFT ARM GASES SHOULD INCLUDE: (2) VACUUM (2) AIR (3) OXYGEN

1' - 0" 1' - 0"

2' - 0" 4" 3' - 0"

10' - 6"

2' - 10"

X

20' - 2"

CL OF BED

CART

4 A5-02

WHITE MARKER BOARD 1' - 4 1/4" (30" X 18")

X

CL OF BED

2' - 8"

2' - 0"

WHITE MARKER BOARD (30" X 18")

CARE STATION SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

4

INOVA HEALTH SYSTEMS

X

ICU ALUMINUM SLIDING DOOR W/ TEMPERED GLAZING

CL OF T.V.

SOLID SURFACE COUNTER, BACK & SIDE SPLASHES W/ CRITICAL CARE WASTE SINK INTEGRAL

SOLID SURFACE COUNTER, BACK & SIDE SPLASHES W/ INTEGRAL SINK

TYPICAL ICU - FLOOR PLAN SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

7

2' - 10"

7' - 0"

PAPER TOWEL DISPENSER

3' - 0"

1' - 1 1/2"

1' - 0" 1' - 0"

5" 7"

1 A5-02

6' - 7"

CLOCK

A5-02 5

BOOM/ HEADWALL SHOULD HAVE: 2 DUPLEX EMERGENCY POWER 2 DUPLEX NORMAL POWER 1 PILLOW SPEAKER OUTLET 1 SWITCH FOR EXAM LIGHT 1 21 PIN OUTLET 1 CODE BLUE

CL OF BED (2) DRAWERS W/ PUSH BUTTON LOCKS

6

BOOM ARMS SHOULD HAVE: 4 VACUUM 4 OXYGEN 3 AIR TYPICAL ICU - EXTERIOR 8 EMERGENCY OUTLETSWALL 1 NURSE CALL 3/8" = 1'-0" SCALE: 1 DATA OUTLET 1 PATIENT MONITOR 2 BOTTLE SLIDES 1 TELEPHONE

CUBICLE CURTAIN TRACK

DOOR TRACK

A5-02

9' - 8"

3' - 8"

1' - 1 1/2"

1' - 0" 1' - 0"

OPEN

3' - 11"

1' - 10" 14' - 0"

6' - 7"

DRYWALL BULKHEAD

1' - 4 1/4"

6' - 6"

OBSERVATION WINDOW SOAP & LOTION DISPENSERS

9/21/2009 1:32:01 PM

OPEN

13' - 1"

20' - 2"

CL OF BED

BOOM/ HEADWALL SHOULD HAVE: 2 DUPLEX EMERGENCY POWER 2 DUPLEX NORMAL POWER 1 PILLOW SPEAKER OUTLET 1 SWITCH FOR EXAM LIGHT 1 21 PIN OUTLET 1 CODE BLUE

BASE AS SCHEDULED (TYP.)

ICU ALUMINUM SLIDING DOORS W/ TEMPERED GLAZING

20' - 2"

6" WALL BASE AS SCHEDULED (TYP.)

9' - 8"

5' - 5"

TYPICAL ICU - ENTRY WALL SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

A5-02

X

2' - 10"

A5-02

4

5

X

A5-02

3

5' - 0"

A5-02

2' - 2 1/2"

3' - 8"

2' - 4" 5"

3' - 2" 9' - 8"

3 6

SOLID SURFACE COUNTER, BACK & SIDE SPLASHES AND MOUNTING CLEATS

CUBICLE CURTAIN TRACKCOUNTERTOP BRACKET

OBSERVATION WINDOW

SOAP & LOTION DISPENSERS

WALL MOUNTED BOOM

TYPICAL ICU - FLOOR PLAN SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

5

4' - 0"

3' - 6"

5"

S

5"

2' - 6"

3

ICU ALUMINUM SLIDING SOFA DOOR W/ TEMPERED WALL MOUNTED BOOM GLAZING

(2) MONITORS, (2)KEYBOARDS, & (2)CPU

3' - 0"

CL OF7 BED

5' - 0"

5"

T

1

A5-02

CARE STATION SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

6' - 6"

3 1/2"

LIGHT SWITCH & THERMOSTAT

5' - 5"

13' - 1"

9' - 0"

1' - 2 7/8"

3' - 11"

20' - 2"

A5-02

7"

7

CL OF BED

Y

BOOM ARMS SHOULD HAVE: 4 VACUUM 4 OXYGEN 3 AIR 8 EMERGENCY OUTLETS 1 NURSE CALL 1 DATA OUTLET 1 PATIENT MONITOR 2 BOTTLE SLIDES 1 TELEPHONE

EXAM Date LIGHT No.

Revisions

Y

P.LAM WALL CABINETS W/ ADJUSTABLE SHELVES

5

2' - 0"

(2) DRAWERS W/ PUSH BUTTON LOCKS

4

20' - 2"

A5-02

A5-02 5

4

G:\Revit 2009\9201 Interior Elevations\29' Pat.Room - ICU (mcw).rvt

A5-02

TYPICAL ICU - ENTRY WALL SCALE: 3/8" = 1'-0"

6

9' - 8"

5" 6

3

5' - 0"

9' - 8"

3

9' - 0"

3

BASE AS SCHEDULED (TYP.)

ICU ALUMINUM SLIDING DOORS W/ TEMPERED GLAZING

l) 54


F.12 2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

F.11 11

Revisions

1

ALCOVE PCD OFFICE TEAM STATION

PHYS. DICT.

PANTRY

SOIL

BREAK

OFFICE

MED.

CLEAN UNIT SEC'Y

OFFICE

OFFICE

A

A

H.3

B

B

C

C

INOVA HEALTH SYSTEM

D

D

E

E

WOMEN'S HOSPITAL FIT-OUT

STAFF LOUNGE

F.9

INOVA FAIRFAX HOSPITAL

DN UP

F.13

EXISTING TOWER BUILDING (ETB)

G

PANTRY

FAMILY WAITING

QUIET LOUNGE

STAFF LOUNGE

ELEC.

J

ELEC.

A

SHAFT

A

TRASH LINEN

F.9

G.9

J

2

3

4

K K.2

5 COURTYARD BELOW

1

PTNT. ELEV. LOBBY

L

24

1

23 FD FD

FD FD

2

TEAM STATION

3

FD FD

FD FD

ALCOVE

SCRUB

TEAM STATION

MEDS

CS

PROC.

F

FD FD

M

TEAM STATION

OFF.

I.T..

17

16

6

7

N

WILMOT SANZ 9

8

10

11

12

13

14

A R C H I T E C T U R E

15

P L A N N I N G 18310 Montgomery Village Avenue Gaithersburg, Maryland 20879 301-590-2900 (Fax) 301-590-8150

P

Project Number Scale Date

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

b)

FD FD

14

A.1-04

PRELIMINARY

Date

No.

BUILDING NORTH

B

KEY PLAN

C

AHU

INOVA HEALTH SYSTEM

E

ALT. BRIDGE TO EXISTING NICU

E

7

12 13

14

15

16

17

8

9

MEDS

SH

LACT

CS

ALCOVE

TEAM E

9

H

7

HORIZONTAL CIRCULATION J

MALE STAFF LOCKERS & TOILETS

6

5

4

3

2

1

ON-CALL

3

4

E.9

9

14

3

15

2

16

1

12

2ND FLOOR PLAN NICU

F.9

TEAM C 13

14 18

17

17

18

ALCOVE

G.9

15 MEDS

CS

STAFF TLT.

SH

MEDS

LACT

SH

CS

STAFF TLT.

ALCOVE

16

J

RT EQUIP. CLEAN-UP

VEST/ LKRS

IMAGING

EQUIP

FAM T/S

PUMP

ELEC.

EQUIP. BUILDING NORTH

ELEC.

PHYS. WORK

OPEN TO BELOW

LACTATION NUTRITIONAL CONSULTING

FAM T/S

RT CLEAN EQUIP. STORAGE

TRASH/ LINEN

2

8

2

EQUIP

RT OFFICE

STAFF LOUNGE

7

I.T.

T/S

ON-CALL

VERTICAL CIRCULATION

6

4

3

LACT

JAN.

5

13

4

PROCEDURE

8

FEMALE STAFF LOCKERS & TOILETS

1

12

11

1

H

11

5

TLT.

TEAM D

G

MECHANICAL / ELECTRICAL

15

10

6

10

UPPER PORTION OF C-SECTION PREP & PACU

10

18

11

SUPPORT

G

WOMEN'S HOSPITAL FIT-OUT

D

ON-CALL SUITE

FD FD

13

Drawing No.:

9201.138 1/16" = 1'-0" SEPTEMBER 18, 2009

A

PUBLIC AREASF

16

12

OFF.

FAMILY WAITING

SHAFT

11

PHY. DICT.

BREAK

MEDS

O

ALCOVE

10

JAN.

STAFF TLT.

W

5

SPT - 24 BED -DONCOLOGY

FD FD

PHYS. DICT.

TEAM STATION

FD FD

18

ALCOVE

32 BED FCC NURSING UNIT

M

19

UPPER PORTION OF CAFE SEATING

ALCV.

FD FD

EQUIP.

VISIT VISIT. MOTHER MOTHER

OFF.

20

ALCOVE

OFF.

CS

ALCOVE

VENDING

21

PANTRY CONF.

PT

WELL BABY NURSERY (16)

22

OFF.

SH

PASSAGE

I.T.

23

ALCOVE

SUPPORT

C

FD FD

FD FD

9

24

ALCOVE

JAN

PHY.

SH BREAK PCD

ETB - 30 BED - ONCOLOGY

FD FD

FD FD

BREAK ROOM

PANTRY

OFF-UNIT CARE GIVER

TEAM STATION STAFF LOUNGE

B

17

OFFICE

4

URG. DEPARTMENT LEGEND

18

MEDS.

8 OFFICE

25

E

19

STOR.

PANTRY

26

Revisions

FD FD

I.T. CLOS.

FD FD

7

27

ALCOVE

A

STAIR

STAFF TLT.

28

STROKE

20 ELEC.

29

D

FD FD

FD FD FD FD

SHAFT

5 6

30

21

SOILED HOLD

EQUIP. STOR.

Tenth Floor - Complete

31

22

CLEAN SUPPLY

4

C

FD FD

FD FD

PCD OFFICE

32

3

9/17/2009 5:37:10 PM

UNIT SEC'Y

7

ALCOVE

B

6

ALCOVE

C:\Revit2010\IHS-WH-Fit-Out-Arch-ARB\IHS-WH-Fit-Out-Arch-ARB.rvt

2

SHAFT

SHAFT

BUILDING NORTH

KEY PLAN

STAFF LOCKERS

1

VISIT. ELEV. LOBBY

4TH FLOOR PLAN - FCC TYPICAL FLOOR

E.9

F

H

OFFICE

No.

H.6

OFFICE

OFFICE

BREAK

STAFF I.T. TLT. CLOS.

FAM TLT.

JAN.

PHYS. DICT.

STAFF TLT.

CHUTES

TEAM STATION

1.6

C

ELEC. ALCOVE

CONF.

ALCOVE

ELEC.

Date

D

PANTRY

K.2

LAUNDRY

5 PHYS. LOUNGE

CLEAN EQUIP. STORAGE

LAB

EQUIP CLEAN-UP

KEY PLAN

K

FORMULA PREP & STORAGE

FAMILY LOUNGE

LVOLT

ELEC.

EQUIP.

L

I.T.

2

55

3

4

5

a)

9/17/2009 5:36:44 PM

C:\Revit2010\IHS-WH-Fit-Out-Arch-ARB\IHS-WH-Fit-Out-Arch-ARB.rvt

STORAGE

6

VEST.

7 CONFERENCE

WORK

RECEPTION

METABOLIC/ HEARING/ EYE

NEW HI COORD.

WK ASST.

PCD

1

PCD

ADMIN ASST.

CUN

2

CLIN SPEC

3

CLIN SPEC

4

HEARING EXAM

DEVELOP. SPECIALIST

CS

SH

LACT

MEDS

STAFF TLT.

STAFF TLT.

16

1

SH

CS

MEDS

LACT 15

18

17

ALCOVE

15

2

14

3

18

17

FAMILY COORD

CLIN PHARM

13

CASE MGR

TEAM B 13

CASE MGR

N

4

5

12

WILMOT SANZ M

6

W

VEND.

8

9

10

11

12

5

WILMOT SANZ

11 6

7

8

9

7

FAMILY WAITING

M

ALCOVE 14

TEAM A

FAMILY CONSULT

16

10

O

P L A N N I N G

P

A R C H I T E C T U R E 8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

P L A N N I N G 18310 Montgomery Village Avenue Gaithersburg, Maryland 20879 301-590-2900 (Fax) 301-590-8150 Project Number Scale Date

9201 1/16" = 1'-0" MAY 1, 2009

A R C H I T E C T U R E

16

17

18310 Montgomery Village Avenue Gaithersburg, Maryland 20879 301-590-2900 (Fax) 301-590-8150 Project Number Scale Date

18

c)

Drawing No.:

9201.138 1/16" = 1'-0" SEPTEMBER 18, 2009

A.1-2.1

PRELIMINARY


e)

f)

h)

a) Renovations to the Existing Patient Tower in concert with the South Patient Tower. Many of these beds served Oncology. b,c) Ground and upper floors of the South Patient Tower, which was mainly comprised of medical surgical beds. (d,e,h) Sections through ductwork associated with renovations of the Existing Patient Tower. (f) Detail plan of ductwork in Existing Patient Tower

g)

g) Mechanical roof plan of Existing Patient Tower.

south patient tower

d)

56


d) Watercolor study, 20x30� (2008) e) Self Portrait, 24x36�, charcoal on paper (2005) 57

Selected Art

a-c) An art installation of umbrellas, meant to symbolize the movement of the nomadic groups. The umbrellas were placed around Cass Park, in Detroit, Michigan, in various formations and documented throughout the day (2010)

a)


d)

b)

c)

e) 58


c)

a) 59

b)


d)

f)

a,b) Poster for call for entries, Dichotomy Student Journal. (2011) c) Bruges Train Station. Black and White, 35mm. (2009) d) Archway in Brussels. Black and White, 35mm. (2009) e) Interior of Reichstag Dome. Black and White, 35mm. (2009) f) Children playing in Sculpture, Bruges. Black and White, 35mm. (2009)

selected art

e)

60


61


education Master of Architecture, Master of Architecture Candidate (MSpring Arch), 2012 University of Detroit Mercy; Detroit, MI Bachelor of Science in Architecture (BS), 2007 with Honors and Gemstone Citations University of Maryland; College Park, MD

work experience Intern Architect: Smithgroup JJR Intern: Detroit Collaborative Design Center San Francisco, CA; Healthcare Planning Studio; - Present Detroit, MI:6/12 09/10 - 12/11 Emory University Hospital Expansion WorkSim/Revit Feasability Recovery Park Project: 09/10 - Study 12/11 Assisted in programming Bed, 500,000 SF hospital Studying the168 use of WorkSim planning tool research in urban agriculture Utilized WorkSim Project Programming Software with Revit Integration Implementation in conceptual Revit Model development of marketing materials Worked under of studio principals, andtemplate with Office Development healthcare space Revit Model on site assessment andChicago field research Working with corporate IT team (Smithgroup, Ann Arbor) programmatic development WorkSim and FlexSim development and phasing of overall Research master plan Studied and developed software implementation strategy for planning studio Emergency Department Design Research WorkSim development as programming tool Mapping differentand ED planning design flows Architectural Consultant: Rahman Construction FlexSim development as an operational, based simulation tool Studying past Smithgroup ProjectsSpring, to event catalogue design decisions Silver MD: 10/09 - 08/10 Produced presentations for both software tools Producing Emergency Department design manual, under direction of studio principals on site coordination for residential construction production of construction drawing sets coordination Architectural Consultant: Rahmanclient Construction Silver Spring, MD: 10/09 - 08/10 Architect: Wilmot Sanz Architecture and Planning coordinated residential construction on site Gaithersburg, MD: 1/07 - 02/07; 07/07 - 09/09 produced construction drawing sets Campus Improvement Program 2015 client coordination INOVA Fairfax Campus; Fairfax, VA Women’sWilmot HospitalSanz and Patient Tower:and 07/07 - 07/08 Architect: Architecture Planning developed proposals and user07/07 group meetings Gaithersburg, MD:graphics 1/07 - for 2/07; - 09/09 produced schematic design documents INOVA Fairfax Campus; Fairfax,2008 VA development in AutoCad Women’s Hospital and Patient Tower Life with Cancer Home: 07/08 - 09/08 developed proposals and graphics for user group meetings construction administrator on site measurements of existing conditions coordinated with various contractors for finishing phases analysis of departmental migration Women’s Hospital and South Tower: 09/08 developed projectPatient CAD naming standards development SD and CD drawings in Revit 2008 2009 produced schematicofdesign documents in AutoCAD produced construction designBuilding drawingsRenovation in Revit 2009 Central Tower produced schematic drawings Life with Cancer Home 07/08 - 09/08 modelling in Revit 2008 construction administrator analysis of departmental migration coordinated with various contractors for finishing phases development of conceptual design set

Project Project Manager: Manager: Architecture Architecture for for Humanity Humanity Akilah Akilah Institute Institute for for Women Women Washington D.C., USA and Mboye, Rwanda: Washington D.C., USA and Mboye, Rwanda: 07/08 07/08 -- 09/10 09/10 lead and organized team of ten architects developed schematic design set for vocational school campus organized and conducted site visit in Rwanda, fall 2008 lecturedWashington at Catholic University lectured at Catholic University and George

202.365.1286 http://issuu.com/shuridr/docs/sr-portfolio-022012 shuridr@gmail.com http://www.linkedin.com/pub/shurid-rahman/4b/2bb/167

1033 shattuck avenue berkeley, california, 94707 1705 6th street 202.365.1286 detroit, michigan, 48226 shuridr@gmail.com

trained in Revit 2008 and 2009 by CADwith Micro-Systems Institute (CMI) able express ideas quickly and clearly hand sketches trainedininRevit Autodesk 2008 and 2009 skilled and AutoCad proficient in Sketchup, 3ds3ds Max, andand Rhino modeling software experienced in Sketchup, Max, Rhino modeling software proficient in in Adobe Adobe Creative Creative Suite Suite proficient

skills

Bethesda-Chevy Chase Rescue Squad Bethesda, Maryland; 10/03 - 10/04 Emergency Medical Technician (EMT-B) with the Roving Crew

Gemstone Thesis Project: Phosphorus Agricultural Resource Management University of Maryland, College Park; 09/02 - 06/06 research in Cheasapeake Bay phosphorus pollution

Newsletter Chair: Architecture for Humanity-DC Board Member responsible for leading team of three to produce monthly newsletter part of overseeing organizational board

Copy Editor: Dichotomy Architectural Journal University of Detroit Mercy, Detroit, MI- School of Architecture responsible for editing and formatting for annual journal

opportunities

Maryland State Emergency Technician (EMT-B) Exam passed under Maryland Rescue Institute (MRI) June 2004

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) P3 Grant awarded fall 2005, to UMD Gemstone team received $10,000 to research Cheasapeake Bay phosphorus pollution

Bannekar Key Full Academic Scholarship University of Maryland, College Park, MD; 09/02 - 06/06 one of 40 students in incoming 2002 class received a full four year academic scholarship

DeMattia Annual Academic Scholarship University of Detroit Mercy, Detroit, MI; awarded fall 2011

honors

shurid rahman

62


Sr portfolio