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friend Enkindu passes. There are thirteen lunar cycles in one year, meaning that Enkindu’s illness could represent the course of one solar year. His death which compelled Gilgamesh’s journey, would thus be analogous with the annual death of the sun king.

2.8 The Selfish Pharaoh In ancient Egypt a remarkable development occurred that cast the first light to the monotheistic creeds that were to follow. Amun, with his main temple in Thebes, was considered ‘king of the Gods’. As Amun-Re he also became the national God of ancient Egypt. The son and successor of the Pharaoh Amenhotep, whose name means ‘Amen is satisfied’ after four years of assuming the crown, changed his name to Akhenaten which means ‘The glory of Aten’. Under the pretext of re-establishing the old tradition, this pharaoh, apparently jealous and threatened by the powerful temple orders, banished all other gods. He made Aten the only national god. (The sun displaces the stars.) “The Pharaoh was his only priest, and his cult was celebrated in a temple resembling the ancient temples of the Old Kingdom... All men, they proclaimed were equally the children of Aten... As long as the king lived, there was no other official god in Egypt but Aten. The other gods were proscribed and a bitter war declared against them, especially against Amun and his trinity. Their temples were despoiled and their riches given to the solar disk. Their statues were broken and the bas-reliefs on which they appeared were mutilated, while Amun’s name was harried from the most inaccessible places. It was even removed from the royal tablets of Amenhotep III, the Pharaoh’s own father.” 18 Shortly after the death of Akhenaten, his son denied his father’s name and restored the cult of Amun. He took the name, ‘Tut-ankhAmun’, which means ‘the Living image of Amun’. Whether or not the brief and zealous movement of Akhenaten spread into latter day Persia, is hard to say. But it is in Persia that the doctrine of monotheism took root under the form of Zoroastrianism. In his book ‘Zend-Avesta’, Zoroaster borrowed from both the ancient Babylonian and the Vedic traditions of India. So it is probable that he was also influenced by Egypt and the renegade Pharaoh Akhenaten. It is in the Zoroastrian religion that the myth of a redeemer in its present form is solidified. “According to that religion, which had a strong influence on later religions, a 45

The Flower of Bliss  

Part one of the Temple of Paradise Trilogy

The Flower of Bliss  

Part one of the Temple of Paradise Trilogy

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