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Mixed Used Development on 8 Mile Road & Van Dyke Avenue

Jonathan Kay, Jeff Morden, Shun Cheung CE 7630 Urban Transportation Planning 12/10/12


Table of Contents Report INTRODUCTION EXISTING CONDITONS CRITICAL INTERSECTIONS AND EXISTING OPERATIONS SAFETY ANALYSIS PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT COMPARISON OF TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BACKGROUND AND PROPOSED TRAFFIC INTERNAL TRIPS PROPOSED TRIPS LEVEL OF SERVICE ANALYSIS CONCLUSIONS

3 4 5 8 9 11 13 14 15 16 17

Appendix EXISTING CONDITIONS Condition Diagrams – 8 Mile and Van Dyke Condition Diagrams - Outer and Van Dyke EXISTING TRAFFIC CONDITIONS 24-Hour Volume Counts A.M. Peak Hour Volume Diagram

A A1 A2 B B1 B2

P.M. Peak Hour Volume Diagram A.M. Cardinal Direction Distribution

B3 B4

P.M. Cardinal Direction Distribution A.M. Direction Distribution P.M. Direction Distribution SAFETY ANALYSIS 8 Mile and Van Dyke Collision Diagram Outer and Van Dyke Collision Diagram

B5 B6 B7 C C1 C2

8 Mile and Van Dyke Crash Data Outer and Van Dyke Crash Data

C3 C4

TRIP GENERATION Existing Developments – A.M. Existing Developments – P.M. Proposed Developments – A.M. Proposed Developments – P.M. TRAFFIC VOLUMES 2012 Level Traffic Volumes 2017 Level Traffic Volumes

D D1 D2 D3 D3 E E1 E2

SYNCHRO ANALYSIS Existing Synchro Analysis Proposed Synchro Analysis 11 X 17 OF SITE PLAN

F F1 F2 G

1


INTRODUCTION This project involved the design of a mixed-use development located in Detroit, Michigan. The assigned parcel was located along Van Dyke Avenue, in between 8 Mile Road and Outer Drive. The area for development, shown below in Figure 1, was bounded by Van Dyke Avenue on the east side and Rogge Street on the west side. Van Dyke Avenue at this location is a five lane undivided highway with parking on either side of the roadway. 8 Mile Road is an eight lane boulevard that carriers an exceptionally high number of vehicles despite the current occupancy of the surrounding area. Outer Drive is a four-lane boulevard along the southern end of this development.

FIGURE 1 – Development Area While, for the purposes of this project, the development area will be assumed “green”, it is worth noting that this is in the heart of a very dilapidated area of the city. As such, many of the homes and businesses are woefully underutilized, which will be reflected when considered the existing traffic generation. One of the major goals of the re-development of this parcel will be to provide

2


a design such that new individuals and families will consider living in this previously blighted area.

EXISTING CONDITIONS The existing area includes 410 single-family homes as well as 25 commercial developments. A current zoning map of the development area is shown in Figure 2:

FIGURE 2 – Current Zoning Map of Development Area The current commercial developments are primarily fast food restaurants, hair and beauty salons, as well as other office-type businesses. A complete list of the existing homes and businesses can be found in the existing details portion of the appendix. As previously mentioned many of these businesses are under-utilized and are therefore drawing significantly less traffic than under normal operating conditions. For the purposes of analyzing the current level of traffic, the 410 homes and the businesses that have available trip generation data available in the ITE Trip Generation manual will be considered as fully occupied. The remainder of the businesses will be assumed to be providing very little traffic to the current system (4 vehicles per hour in both the A.M. and P.M. peaks, with 2 entering trips and 2 exiting trips). This assumption was made in order to reduce the existing traffic to levels that were more indicative of the current traffic conditions for analysis. Further details of the trip generation for the existing traffic can be found in the appendix.

3


CRITICAL INTERSECTIONS AND EXISTING OPERATIONS The intersections of 8 Mile Road and Van Dyke Avenue as well as Outer Drive and Van Dyke Avenue will be considered the “critical” intersections for this analysis. It is these two intersections that will be analyzed for level of service changes after the proposed developments are considered to determine what improvements the hypothetical developers would be responsible for. Past traffic count data was gathered via the SEMCOG.org website, and these counts were adjusted to 2012 levels based on a 0.5% growth rate. This growth rate was assumed based on the consideration that the growth rate in this struggling area is likely negative and 0.5% represents a conservative assumption. A summary of the counts used in this analysis can be found in the appendix of this report. It should be noted that the majority of the counts were taken via pneumatic tubes very near the critical intersections, and as such no factors were applied to convert these to intersection counts – all of the counts taken from SEMCOG were considered as intersection counts for the purposes of this report. Once these volumes were brought to current day levels, the A.M. period peak and P.M. period peak were determined based on the total traffic at the critical intersections for these periods. After this analysis, it was determined that 8:00 to 9:00 A.M. would be the morning peak while 4:00 to 5:00 P.M. would be the afternoon peak. These volumes were tabulated in to Figures 3 and 4:

FIGURE 3

FIGURE 4

However, since traditional intersection counts complete with turning movement data was unavailable, assumptions about the current distribution of turning movements had to be made to convert these values to movement counts at the critical intersections for analysis. In order to make that conversion, 85% of the counts provided by SEMCOG were considered as through, with the remaining 15% being split to 10% right turning vehicles and 5% left turning vehicles. 4


An additional step had to be made for analysis purposes as both of these intersections have two phase signals and do not allow direct left turns in any direction. Instead, left turners are required to use the Michigan left turns nearby these intersections, and as such, an adjustment of volumes had to be made for analysis in Synchro SimTraffic. The existing traffic volumes used for the critical intersections in this analysis are shown in Table 1 below. It should be noted that the “raw� counts include in the right hand turn column: both the vehicles that intend to turn right as well as the vehicles that are turning right to utilize the Michigan left. These values are then added to the through volumes for analysis.

TABLE 1 - Existing 2012 Traffic Volumes 8 Mile and Van Dyke - A.M. Peak Left

North Thru

Left

South Thru

Right

Raw

28

482

Synchro

-

576

Left

East Thru

Right

57

36

605

85

-

748

Left

West Thru

Right

Right

71

94

1604

189

143

2422

285

107

-

1640

283

-

2450

428

Outer and Van Dyke - A.M. Peak Left

North Thru

Right

Left

South Thru

Right

Left

East Thru

Right

Left

West Thru

Right

Raw

21

355

42

40

681

80

19

321

38

27

450

53

Synchro

-

374

63

-

708

120

-

361

57

-

471

80

Left

North Thru

Right

Right

Raw

60

1011

Synchro

-

1166

8 Mile and Van Dyke - P.M. Peak Left

South Thru

Left

East Thru

Right

Left

West Thru

Right

119

40

667

80

115

2641

311

138

2341

278

179

-

805

120

-

2681

466

-

2401

414

Right

Outer and Van Dyke - P.M. Peak Left

North Thru

Left

South Thru

Right

Raw

47

803

Synchro

-

833

Left

East Thru

Right

Left

West Thru

Right

95

40

684

80

30

510

60

36

616

72

142

-

720

120

-

550

90

-

663

108

These volumes were converted to intersection volume diagrams shown below in Figures 5-8 below:

5


It should be noted that when comparing these existing traffic volumes to the proposed traffic volumes after development, a five year construction period will be used. As such, while these volumes reflect the current traffic conditions at these intersections, these volumes will be adjusted for this five year construction period later in the analysis. In this case, since all volumes have been adjusted to a 2012 level, the volumes used in the level of service analysis will be factored to 2017 levels to account for the construction period of this development. After this five year period, it will be assumed that the development will be at relatively full occupancy.

SAFETY ANALYSIS Traffic crash data was gathered from SEMCOG.org for two years (2010 and 2011) and analyzed. First, each crash report was reviewed to determine the true crash type (i.e. checking the officers original crash type coding) as well as verifying that the crash actually happened at the intersection of interest. Once this was completed, an analysis of the current level of safety at these intersections was preformed.

6


8 Mile and Van Dyke This intersection, at the northeast corner of the development, experienced 62 crashes during this two year period for a yearly average of 31 crashes. From reviewing the collision diagrams, which were prepared and are available for both intersections in the appendix of this report, several trends were noticed in the crash history of this intersection. First, there have been several angle crashes inside the intersection. While this would normally be a strong point of emphasis from an engineering perspective, in this case many of these collisions were due to alcohol or police related activity. As such, it is difficult to address these crashes from typical engineering means. It could be asserted that after the development if socioeconomic conditions improve around this intersection that perhaps these crashes may decrease. It is worth noting that despite the high number of angle crashes no fatalities or A-level angle crashes occurred in the analysis period as this intersection. Further, the majority of crashes at this intersection were of the rear-end vareity. While these crashes are relatively minor in nature, they do need to be addressed in the new design of this parcel. One way in which this will be addressed is through the improvement of the clearance intervals for this signal, with proper clearance intervals tending to reduce this inordinate number of rear end crashes. Another issue that was prominent at this intersection was the fixed object crashes that were seen during this two year period. The majority of these were due to collisions with poles nearby the intersection, one of which resulted in an “A” level injury. It is recommended that these objects be removed or relocated in order to allievate this safety issue.

Outer and Van Dyke Similar issues are noticed at this intersection located at the southeastern corner of the parcel. However, most likely due to the reduced volumes and therefore reduced exposure for crashes at this intersection, the two year total was only 24 crashes for a yearly average of 12 crashes. Roadside objects are again an issue with several of these crashes involving poles around the intersection. Angle crashes inside the intersection were also present, however these issues were similar to those in the previously considered 8 Mile and Van Dyke. Proper design of the clearance intervals as well as removal of these hazardous roadside objects should improve the safety performance at this intersection.

PROSPOSED DEVELOPMENT As previously mentioned, for the purposes of this project the parcel was assumed to be “green”. The current background traffic characteristics were considered as existing. The new development can be seen in Figure 9 on the following page.

7


Commercial Developments A primary goal of the new development was to include businesses that not only people who live in the new mixed use development would utilize, but also people from the surrounding area. Therefore, new businesses in this development were based on avoiding including similar existing businesses in the surrounding area as well as businesses that would serve the new development well. Two fast food resturants with “drive-thrus� were included on Van Dyke Avenue in a convienent location for pass-by-trips along Van Dyke as well as the new homes in the development. Previously, the one Burger King location that previously existed was one of the few businesses that was being heavily used and it is assumed that two would be fully supported in this area. In addition, a more formal sit-down resturant was also provided near the two fast food resturants, providing an option for those in the development as well as the surrounding area. A new bar will also be added, which should help increase the foot traffic around the new development in the evening. A two-floor 50,00 square feet office building as included on the southeast corner of the development. This new office building will house specialty medical services, and it is hoped that a large majority of new residents in the mixed use development will be attracted there based on employment at this facility. The state of Michigan has been encouraging the development of the medical industry and this facility would continue that expansion. Two small convience stores were also included in the parcel, one near the medical office building as well as another near an entrance to the single family and multi-family homes on the west side of the development along Rogge Street. These convience stores will provide services to both the new residents as well as the large staff required at the medical office facility. Similarly, a new supermarket is included on the northeast corner of the development to service the new residents as well as those from the nearby homes. This supermarket would be unique to the surrounding area and therefore it is expected that it would be heavility utilized. Adjacent to the supermarket is a tire superstore, which would provide valuable auto services to the new residents and again those in the surrounding area.

Multi-Family Homes A new feature to this area is the multi-family homes located along 8 mile on the north end of the new development. These low-rise apartment buildings involve eight medium sized buildings with 16 units in each building for a total of 128 dwelling units. It is assumed that many of the new residents in these low-rise apartments would be employed by the new businesses, speficially the new medical facility.

8


Single Family Homes In addition to the multi-family homes, 94 new single family homes will be constructed within the development. While this is down significantly from the 410 existing homes, that number was previously unsustainable as evidenced by the fact that many of these were unoccupied. This difference is also offset by the 128 new multi-family units included in the low-rise apartments on the north end of the development. It is assumed that these single family homes would be utilized by new residents that work in the surrounding new businesses – again specifically the medical facility. It should be noted that the new lots are significantly larger than those of the previously existing homes and it is assumed this would encourage a higher occupancy rate of these homes, even in this depressed area.

Other Factors The single family homes are accessed by three driveways, one on Rogge Street, one on Outer Drive, and one on Van Dyke Avenue. These internal roadways are designed such that speeds would be relatively low and the number of vehicles using the subdivision “cut-through� would be minimal. There is also a new pinic or park area located in between the multi-family homes and the single family homes. There will be no direct access parking to this park, as it is hoped that this facility will be used by primarily the homeowners and residents of the low-rise apartments, as opposed to incurring outside traffic. This park is part of the overall increased green space within this new development, encouraging a less urban feel than what was previously existing.

COMPARISON OF TRAFFIC OPERATIONS As a result of this new development, it is imparative to perform a traffic impact study. While the traffic analysis available in this report is indicative of the two critical intersections at 8 Mile and Outer Drive, in a more detailed analysis it would be required to consider additional intersections in the surrounding network that would also be effected. Similarly, traffic volumes were obtained via SEMCOG.org for the existing traffic, however, actual existing turning movement counts would be required to perform a more precise analysis. Existing intersection volumes were shown earlier in the analysis. However, these volumes for comparision purposes must be brought to the end of the five year construction period based on a 0.5% growth rate for the design area. This will be done by multiplying the existing volumes by (1.005)5 or 1.025251. The following Table 2 shows the existing traffic that will be used for comparison purposes:

9


TABLE 2 - Existing 2017 Traffic Volumes 8 Mile and Van Dyke - A.M. Peak

Synchro

Left

North Thru

Right

Left

South Thru

Right

Left

East Thru

Right

Left

West Thru

Right

-

591

87

-

767

110

-

1681

290

-

2512

439

Outer and Van Dyke - A.M. Peak

Synchro

Left

North Thru

Right

Left

South Thru

Right

Left

East Thru

Right

Left

West Thru

Right

-

383

65

-

726

123

-

370

58

-

483

82

Left

North Thru

Right

Right

-

1195

184

8 Mile and Van Dyke - P.M. Peak

Synchro

Left

South Thru

Right

-

825

123

Left

East Thru

Right

Left

West Thru

-

2749

478

-

2462

424

Right 0

Outer and Van Dyke - P.M. Peak

Synchro

Left

North Thru

Right

-

0

0

Left

South Thru

Right

-

0

0

Left

East Thru

Right

Left

West Thru

-

0

0

-

0

BACKGROUND AND PROPOSED TRAFFIC In order to compare the new development traffic, the traffic generated by the current developments must be subtracted as these trips will no longer be attracted or produced once the new developments are in place. A detailed calculation of the existing trips can be found in the appendix. These trips were distributed first based on the cardinal direction of trips leaving the system, then by the current distribution of traffic at the current intersections. First, based on the A.M. and P.M. peak hourly diagrams, available in the appendix, the relative percentages of vehicles leaving the analysis area in each cardinal direction was calculated. These diagrams are also available in the appendix. Once this was completed, the percentage of traffic using each turning movement at both critical intersections was also calculated, and can be found in the appendix. Based on this data, the entering and exiting trips of each development were applied to each roadway in the analysis (Van Dyke, 8 Mile and Outer Drive), and these direction of these trips was based on the existing volumes. Once it was determined the number and direction of the trips entering and exiting each facility, these trips were assigned to the intersections based on the previously calculated percentages of traffic using each turning movement. These turning movement volumes were then used to subtract from the existing movement volumes to determine the background traffic levels. The following Table 3 shows the background traffic turning movements for the critical intersections in 2017 levels.

10


TABLE 3 - Background 2017 Traffic Volumes 8 Mile and Van Dyke - A.M. Peak

Synchro

Left

North Thru

Right

Left

South Thru

Right

Left

East Thru

Right

Left

West Thru

Right

-

523

76

-

668

110

-

1654

278

-

2484

420

Outer and Van Dyke - A.M. Peak

Synchro

Left

North Thru

Right

Left

South Thru

Right

Left

East Thru

Right

Left

West Thru

Right

-

335

65

-

629

106

-

269

57

-

393

75

Left

North Thru

Right

Right

-

1009

158

8 Mile and Van Dyke - P.M. Peak

Synchro

Left

South Thru

Right

-

711

123

Left

East Thru

Right

Left

West Thru

-

2649

415

-

2370

408

Right 100

Outer and Van Dyke - P.M. Peak

Synchro

Left

North Thru

Right

-

734

146

Left

South Thru

Right

-

641

106

Left

East Thru

Right

Left

West Thru

-

527

87

-

635

It is these volumes that the proposed new traffic will be applied to in order to calculate the proposed level of service which the developer will be responsible for if it is significalty different from the existing level of service.

INTERNAL TRIPS Once the results for the trip generation of the land uses are established using the ITE Trip Generation, the results would be used to decide on the internal capture rate for the multi-use development. Since some of the trips are made internally, the capture rate is a factor for estimating the percentage reduction of the actual trip generation for the forecast. For this project, two scenarios during the weekday have been chosen for the calculations of the internal capture rate, the A.M. peak hour and the P.M. peak hour. With the types of development identified from the initial stage of the project, the internal and external trips within the multi-use site could be determined using the given percentages from Table 7.1 and Table 7.2 of the ITE Trip Generation Handbook with the results of the raw data. Once the total external trips of the land uses have been computed, the next step would be to calculate the net external volume. In order to do that, all the external trips of the land uses will be combined to form the sum. Then the division of net external volume by the total single-use trip generation estimate with the subtraction from 100 percent would be the internal capture rate. From the calculations, the internal capture rates for A.M. and P.M. peak hour are 12% and 13%. Table 7.1 and Table 7.2 for this analysis can be found in the appendix.

11


PROPOSED TRAFFIC In order to determine the load the proposed developments will put on the surrounding traffic network, a similar process to the calculation of background traffic was applied (In this case, traffic was added as opposed to being subtracted). Based on the existing traffic distribution, it was first determined which roadway the generated traffic would utilize. Once this was completed, the traffic was applied to the critical intersections based on the current distribution in the same manner as the background traffic application. It should be noted that not only do the volumes change for the morning and afternoon peaks, but also the current distribution of traffic changes as well. As such, the analysis for these two periods is completely sperate. Diagrams of both the current distribution of traffic and the cardinal direction of traffic leaving the analysis system are available in the appendix. These values were adjusted to 2017 levels for use in the level of service analysis based on a 0.5% growth rate, similar to the previous calculations. Table 4 below shows the proposed volumes at the 2017 level: TABLE 4 - Proposed 2017 Traffic Volumes 8 Mile and Van Dyke - A.M. Peak

Synchro

Left

North Thru

Right

-

617

92

Left

South Thru

Right

-

841

110

Left

East Thru

Right

-

1698

299

Left

West Thru

Right

-

2551

453

Right

Outer and Van Dyke - A.M. Peak

Synchro

Left

North Thru

Right

-

420

65

Left

South Thru

Right

-

764

130

Left

East Thru

Right

Left

West Thru

-

389

60

-

622

87

8 Mile and Van Dyke - P.M. Peak

Synchro

Left

North Thru

Right

Left

South Thru

Right

Left

East Thru

Right

Left

West Thru

Right

-

1112

176

-

824

123

-

2751

437

-

2488

426

Outer and Van Dyke - P.M. Peak

Synchro

Left

North Thru

Right

Left

South Thru

Right

Left

East Thru

Right

Left

West Thru

Right

-

853

146

-

710

118

-

712

92

-

738

111

It is these volumes that will be compared to the 2017 level existing development volumes to determine the difference in the level of service that the developer would be responsible for. It should be noted that based on simple inspection of these volumes they are slightly higher than the existing volumes. This will be a result of a much higher occupancy rate of businesses and higher generation then the previously existing developments. Conversely, the single family home traffic is significantly reduced in the proposed development, however this is outweighed by the increase in the commercial traffic. Diagrams of all analysis levels of critical intersection volumes are available in the appendix.

12


LEVEL OF SERVICE ANALYSIS The next step was to determine the relative change in the level of service provided by the two critical intersections near this development. Again, in a more expansive traffic impact study, the effect these new developments have not only on these two intersections but also surrounding intersections would have to be considered. In addition, it will be assumed that the access points to the new developments will be two-way stop controled as the exiting volumes are relatively low. This again differs from a larger scale traffic impact study were a full signal warrant analysis would have to be completed to determine if a signal was necessary at any of these driveways. One note is that existing signal timings were available for Outer Drive and Van Dyke Avenue. However, no existing signal timings were available for 8 Mile Road and Van Dyke Avenue. Therefore, in order to perform the analysis, it was assumed these signals were on equal cycle lengths (Outer Drive and Van Dyke Avenue currently has an 80 second cycle length), and then Synchro was used to optimize the splits for 8 Mile and Van Dyke. This assumption was made in order to maintain a relatively equal comparison between the existing volumes and the proposed volumes, as it will again be assumed that the two crtical intersections employ an equal cycle length. Four synchro models of the two critical intersections were then created, including a design for the A.M. and P.M. peaks for both the existing 2017 level traffic volumes as well as the proposed 2017 level traffic volumes. Synchro reports and output are available in the appendix that give more explicit details of this analysis. For the proposed level of service analysis, the two critical intersections were set to have equal cycle lengths and then were optimized, resulting in 70 second cycle lengths in the morning and 90 second cycle lengths in the afternoon. The following Tables 5 and 6 show the changes in level of service from the existing to the proposed traffic levels: TABLE 5- Existing vs. Proposed - 2017 Level of Service Analysis - A.M. Peak 8 Mile and Van Dyke Comparison Existing Proposed

North

South

East

West

L.O.S.

C

C

B

C

Delay

25.4

29.8

12.7

20.9

L.O.S.

B

C

B

C

Delay

18.9

30.2

12.5

25.7

North

South

East

West

L.O.S.

A

C

C

C

Delay

8.2

23.4

22.2

22.7

L.O.S.

A

A

B

B

Delay

9.1

4.6

18.4

20.0

Outer Drive and Van Dyke Comparison Existing Proposed

TABLE 6- Existing vs. Proposed - 2017 Level of Service Analysis - P.M. Peak 8 Mile and Van Dyke

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Comparison Existing Proposed

North

South

East

West

L.O.S.

D

C

E

D

Delay

54.5

24.9

73.8

35.1

L.O.S.

D

C

D

C

Delay

38.3

28.6

49.9

29.2

North

South

East

West

L.O.S.

B

B

C

C

Delay

11.5

18.5

23.4

24.5

L.O.S.

B

A

C

C

Delay

14.1

5.5

25.1

24.9

Outer Drive and Van Dyke Comparison Existing Proposed

CONCLUSION As can be seen from Tables 5 and 6, the level of service for the proposed development traffic levels is not significantly worse than the level of service for the current existing developments traffic levels. While the signal optimization done in Synchro for these two intersections ignores the negative effect, coordinating these signals with other cooridors may have and therefore may overestimate the level of service provided, this comparision is still appropriate as a similar method was used for both the existing and proposed developments. At 8 Mile Road and Van Dyke Avenue, during the morning peak period, the level of service values are very similar, with the north bound traffic seeing an improvement from “C” to “B”. The delays for each approach are very similar for both the existing and the proposed traffic, despite the proposed traffic being slightly higher for each approach. The optimized 70 second cycle lengths for this period contributed to this improvement despite the higher loading. In the afternoon peak, delays went down for each approach at 8 Mile and Van Dyke. This is due to the fact that while the proposed traffic levels were increased throughout the system, this intersection during this peak actually saw lighter loading. This is due to the large reduction in single family home traffic as a result of the new development. Outer Drive and Van Dyke Avenue saw similar differences in both the morning and peak periods, despite seeing incremental increases in traffic volumes on each approach. This again is due to the optimization of the signal timing to 70 seconds in the A.M. peak and 90 seconds in the P.M. peak. It should be once again noted that these levels of service may be overpredicted as it is likely in a full scale traffic impact study that additional intersections would also be considered, as well as optimizing an entire cooridor of intersections as opposed to these two alone. However, since a similar process was completed for both existing and proposed, this comparision should still be appropriate despite likely differences in real world implementation. As a result of this analysis, it is shown that the hypothetical developer of this parcel would not likely be responsible for large scale infrastructure improvements. Appropriate retiming of the signals, coordinated with others in the coordior would provide acceptable levels of service for 14


both of the critical intersections. It is worth noting that no level’s of service below “D” were seen in the proposed levels of service, despite this occuring with the existing traffic. In fact, only in the morning peak at 8 Mile and Van Dyke Avenue does level of service “D” occur, as the east and westbound traffic very high compared to the north and southbound traffic. However, several small scale changes would be recommended to be considered while construction of this new development is taking place. First, it was apparent from the collision diagrams that there were several poles and small objects near the roadway that resulted in an overabundance of fixed object crashes. It is recommended that not only are these poles removed, but an engineering walkthrough to remove all hazardous roadside objects from this area as this appears to be a significant problem. Another issue is the pavement markings have deterioriated to an unsafe point at both critical intersections as well as some other areas around the development. It is recommended that these markings be updated and compliant with the MUTCD in order to improve safety. These recommended changes would provide a large benefit to some of the repeated safety issues displayed in the crash history near this development at a relatively minor cost that could be completed concurrent with the construction of the new development. The details available both in this report and the appendix show a mixed-use development ready for implementation at the parcel located just west of Van Dyke Avenue in between 8 Mile Road and Outer Drive. This new development, located in Detroit, MI., would provide an area for new residents to live in both a renovated single family home subdivision as well as a new 128 dwelling unit, multi-family, low-rise apartment. In addition, a new set of commercial developments located along Van Dyke Avenue within this development should provide employment for not only some of these new residents, but also some in the surrounding areas. These new commercial developments should see substantial traffic from the residents within the parcel, as well as outside its borders. As a result of this analysis, it has been shown that the developer would be responsible for very little infrastructure improvements as the nearby traffic system is ready to carry the relatively small increases these new facilities would place on that system.

15


SINGLE-FAMILY HOUSING

COMMERCIAL

TRAFFIC IMPACT STUDY - STUDY AREA

FIGURE 1


107 120 123 107 110 120 820 693 711 824 767 668 825 651 804 841

N 426 453 439 424 408 420 416 441 398 410 2488 2512 2462 2551 2370 2484 2426 2488 2312 2423

8 MILE ROAD 2683 1656 2751 1681 2749 1698 1654 2649 2584 1613 426 437 478 299 290 278 415 292 405 272 172 92 74 184 87 76 176 158 154 90 1084 617 510 1195 591 523 1112 1009 985 602

SUPERMARKET

TIRE SUPERSTORE

MULTI-FAMILY HOMES

SAVAGE AVENUE FAST FOOD RESTAURANT

PICNIC AREA

ROGGE STREET

VAN DYKE AVENUE

CONVENIENCE STORE

SIT-DOWN RESTAURANT

DRINKING PLACE

FAST FOOD RESTAURANT

MEDICAL OFFICE BUILDING

118 115 123 130 103 106 103 127 641 726 738 710 692 629 764 626 614 746

CONVENIENCE STORE

73 85 108 98 100 111 87 75 82 383 607 720 619 680 635 738 622 393 483

OUTER DRIVE 262 380 694 564 527 712 389 514 370 269 58 55 90 92 87 60 85 57 58 63 142 65 142 146 326 409 335 832 716 383 420 854 734 853

SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING

MULTI-FAMILY HOUSING

TRAFFIC IMPACT STUDY - PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT

COMMERCIAL

GREEN SPACE FIGURE 2


N

CONVENIENCE STORE

ROGGE STREET

PICNIC AREA

8 MILE ROAD

OUTER DRIVE

CONVENIENCE STORE

MULTI-FAMILY HOMES MEDICAL OFFICE BUILDING TIRE SUPERSTORE FAST FOOD RESTAURANT

DRINKING PLACE

SIT-DOWN RESTAURANT

FAST FOOD RESTAURANT SUPERMARKET

VAN DYKE AVENUE

SAVAGE AVENUE

SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING

MULTI-FAMILY HOUSING

TRAFFIC IMPACT STUDY - PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT

COMMERCIAL

GREEN SPACE DESIGNED & DRAWN BY: JON K., JEFF M., SHUN C. DATE: DEC. 10, 2012


CONDITION DIAGRAM OF 8 MILE & VAN DYKE

FIGURE 27

VAN DYKE AVENUE

N 8 Mile Pawn Brokers

Parking Lot

Parking Lot

8 MILE ROAD

Parking Lot

Parking Lot

Intelligent Comm.

L.A. Insurance/ Lee Beauty Supply

Check Cashing

SYMBOLS LIGHT POLE

TRAFFIC SIGNAL HEAD

CROSSWALK

TRAFFIC SIGNAL POLE

PED SIGNAL HEAD

TREE

POWER POLE

SIGN

ROAD LANE

OVERHEAD SIGN

RIGHT OF WAY

BUILDING

FENCE LINE


CONDITION DIAGRAM OF OUTER DRIVE & VAN DYKE

FIGURE 28

VAN DYKE AVENUE

N

Burger King

Parking Lot

Parking Lot

OUTER DRIVE

Parking Lot

Parking Lot

McDonald's Restaurant

DJ Quick Lube #2

SYMBOLS LIGHT POLE

TRAFFIC SIGNAL HEAD

CROSSWALK

TRAFFIC SIGNAL POLE

PED SIGNAL HEAD

TREE

POWER POLE

SIGN

ROAD LANE

OVERHEAD SIGN

RIGHT OF WAY

BUILDING

FENCE LINE


Mixed used development on 8 mile rd & van dyke ave shun cheung