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RESIDENTIAL

SELECTED PROJECTS PORTFOLIO


RESI DEN TI AL S E L ECT ED PR O J ECTS PORT FO L I O


R E V E LLO R ES I D E N C E | PAC I F I C PA L I SADES, CA


C ON TEN TS R E V E LLO

1- 8

A N GE LO

9-16

GL AS S PAVI L I O N

17-20

SA N TA BA R BA R A ESTATE

21-26

RIVIERA

27- 38

B E N TL E Y

39- 46

TOR O CA N YO N

47- 54

MO N TEC I TO

55- 60

E AST C H A N N E L

61- 66

WA L D E N

67-72

CL 20

73-78

UR BA N S PA

79- 84

A RT IST STU D I O

85- 88

CA R P I N TE R I A

89- 92

E AST C H A N N E L

93- 94

PACIF I C PA L I SA D ES

95-102

B E LL AG I O

103-110

R A N C H O STR E E T

111-114

HI LLC R EST

115-118

PA I N TE R

119-122


R EVELLO

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R E V E LLO R ES I D E N C E | PAC I F I C PA L I SADES, CA


SHUBIN + DONALDSON ARCHITECTS RESIDENTIAL Dear Reader, This pamphlet presents a selection of architectural custom homes designed by Shubin + Donaldson (S+D). We have attempted to design our homes with the best qualities of the modernist architectural ideals: natural ventilation, abundant daylight, orientation to natural views, indoor/outdoor living, and resource efficient technologies. We have also been inspired by the timeless monumental forms of iconic spiritual structures that transcend the zeitgeist of today’s high paced evolving world. We hope our homes can provide refuge from the stresses of busy productive lives and support the healthy lifestyles to which our clients aspire. Every home is a unique response to our clients’ varied needs, wants, and dreams. Thank you for taking the time to review this visual tour of a select group of S+D homes.

Robin Donaldson, AIA

Russell Shubin, AIA, LEED AP 2


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R E V E LLO R ES I D E N C E | PAC I F I C PA L I SADES, CA


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R E V E LLO R ES I D E N C E | PAC I F I C PA L I SADES, CA


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R E V E LLO R ES I D E N C E | PAC I F I C PA L I SADES, CA


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A N GELO

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AN GE LO R ES I D E N C E | LO S A N G E L ES, CA


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AN GE LO R ES I D E N C E | LO S A N G E L ES, CA


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AN GE LO R ES I D E N C E | LO S A N G E L ES, CA


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AN GE LO R ES I D E N C E | LO S A N G E L ES, CA


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GLAS S PAV I L I O N

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GLASS PAV I L I O N | SA N TA BA R BA R A , CA


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GLASS PAV I L I O N | SA N TA BA R BA R A , CA


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SA NTA BA R BA R A ESTATE

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SAN TA BAR BA RA ESTAT E | SA N TA BA RBARA , CA


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SAN TA BAR BA RA ESTAT E | SA N TA BA RBARA , CA


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SAN TA BAR BA RA ESTAT E | SA N TA BA RBARA , CA


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R I VIER A

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R IV IER A R ES I D E NC E | SA N TA BA R BA RA , CA


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R IV IER A R ES I D E NC E | SA N TA BA R BA RA , CA


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R IV IER A R ES I D E NC E | SA N TA BA R BA RA , CA


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R IV IER A R ES I D E NC E | SA N TA BA R BA RA , CA


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R IV IER A R ES I D E NC E | SA N TA BA R BA RA , CA


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R IV IER A R ES I D E NC E | SA N TA BA R BA RA , CA


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BENTLEY

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B EN T LEY R ES I D E NC E | B E L A I R , CA


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B EN T LEY R ES I D E NC E | B E L A I R , CA


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B EN T LEY R ES I D E NC E | B E L A I R , CA


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B EN T LEY R ES I D E NC E | B E L A I R , CA


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TO RO CANYO N

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TOR O CAN YO N RES I D E NC E | SA N TA BARBARA , CA


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TOR O CAN YO N RES I D E NC E | SA N TA BARBARA , CA


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TOR O CAN YO N RES I D E NC E | SA N TA BARBARA , CA


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TOR O CAN YO N RES I D E NC E | SA N TA BARBARA , CA


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MONTECITO

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MO N T EC I TO RES I D E NC E | M O N TEC I TO, CA


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MO N T EC I TO RES I D E NC E | M O N TEC I TO, CA


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MO N T EC I TO RES I D E NC E | M O N TEC I TO, CA


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EAST CH A N N E L

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EAST C HAN N E L RES I D E N C E | SA N TA M O NICA , CA


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EAST C HAN N E L RES I D E N C E | SA N TA M O NICA , CA


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EAST C HAN N E L RES I D E N C E | SA N TA M O NICA , CA


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WALD EN

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WALDEN R ES I D E NC E | B E VE R LY H I LLS, CA


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WALDEN R ES I D E NC E | B E VE R LY H I LLS, CA


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WALDEN R ES I D E NC E | B E VE R LY H I LLS, CA


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C L20

CL2 0 | SA N TA BA R BA R A , CA 73


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CL2 0 | SA N TA BA R BA R A , CA 75


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CL2 0 | SA N TA BA R BA R A , CA 77


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U R BAN S PA

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UR BAN SPA | M A L I B U, CA


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UR BAN SPA | M A L I B U, CA


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UR BAN SPA | M A L I B U, CA


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A RTIST ST UDI O

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ARTIST STU D I O | SA N TA BA R BA R A , CA


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ARTIST STU D I O | SA N TA BA R BA R A , CA


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CA RPINTE R I A

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CAR P I N T ERI A RES I D E NC E | CA R P I N TERIA , CA


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CAR P I N T ERI A RES I D E NC E | CA R P I N TERIA , CA


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GREENTRE E

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GR EEN T R E E RES I D E N C E | PAC I F I C PA LISADES, CA


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PACIFIC PA L I SA DES

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PACI FIC PAL I SA D ES RES I D E NC E | PACIFIC PALISADES, CA


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PACI FIC PAL I SA D ES RES I D E NC E | PACIFIC PALISADES, CA


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PACI FIC PAL I SA D ES RES I D E NC E | PACIFIC PALISADES, CA


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PACI FIC PAL I SA D ES RES I D E NC E | PACIFIC PALISADES, CA


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BELLAG IO

B ELLAGIO | LO S A N G E L ES, CA 103


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B ELLAGIO | LO S A N G E L ES, CA 105


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B ELLAGIO | LO S A N G E L ES, CA 107


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B ELLAGIO | LO S A N G E L ES, CA 109


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R A NC H O ST R E E T

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R AN C HO ST RE E T | LO S A N G E L ES, CA


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R AN C HO ST RE E T | LO S A N G E L ES, CA


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HI LLC R EST

115 HILLC R EST | LO S A N G E L ES, CA


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HILLC R EST | LO S A N G E L ES, CA 117


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PA INTER

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PAIN T ER R ES I D E NC E | B E L A I R , CA


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PAIN T ER R ES I D E NC E | B E L A I R , CA


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Russell Shubin PARTNER, AIA, LEED A.P.

Robin Donaldson PARTNER, AIA

LOS ANGELES

SANTA BARBARA

3834 Willat Avenue CULVER CITY, CA 90232 T: 310.204.0688 rshubin@sandarc.com

3890 La Cumbre Plaza Lane, St 200 SANTA BARBARA, CA 93105 T: 805.682.7000 rdonaldson@sandarc.com

NEWPORT BEACH 888 San Clemente Drive, Suite 200 NEWPORT BEACH, CA 92660 T: 949.375.4964

www.shubinanddonaldson.com

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C O M PA N Y BAC KG R O U N D Robin Donaldson, AIA and Russell Shubin, AIA, LEED AP began collaborating on projects in 1990. Russell Shubin’s background in managing large institutional and multi-unit residential projects combined with Robin Donaldson’s high profile design background have aligned to form a partnership for realizing projects of diverse complexity and scope. They maintain offices in Culver City and Santa Barbara, CA. Both partners are personally involved in each project that they take on, from initial programming through the administration of the construction contract. Besides the partners, the offices are staffed by 50 architects and draftspersons plus support personnel. Both offices are fully computerized for 3-Dimensional design, presentation and working drawing production with graphic design and a complete digital architectural rendering and modeling studio. Shubin + Donaldson does not approach projects with an assumed architectural style. Instead we listen for each clients needs and distinguish with the client ways of achieving the clients goals particular to each project. Responding to our clients needs and concerns is as important to us as the built result of our collaboration with the client. RUSSELL SHUBIN, AIA, LEED AP, was born in Los Angeles, CA, in 1960, and studied architecture at California Polytechnic University at San Luis Obispo, where he received his Bachelor of Architecture degree in 1985. He also studied at L’Ecole d’Art et d’Architecture at Fontainebleau, France, during 1984. Russell began practicing in 1985 with the Blurock Partnership in Newport Beach, CA, a nationally recognized firm that has received numerous AIA awards. Shortly after becoming an associate with the Blurock Partnership in 1989, Russell opened his own practice. Russell is LEED accredited and guides the design studio on environmentally sensitive design technology and knowledge. ROBIN DONALDSON, AIA, founding partner of Shubin and Donaldson Architects, Inc. (S+D) graduated UCSB and received Masters of Architecture at Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-ARC) in 1985. Prior to founding S+D in 1990, Donaldson worked for many years with Morphosis and Pritzker Prize winning architect Thom Mayne. Donaldson’s own firm S+D has become internationally recognized, extensively published, and has earned many professional accolades including 20 AIA design awards. In 2010 a monograph was published dedicated exclusively to S+D’s Creative Office designs and custom homes called LIVE + WORK, The Southern California Architecture of Shubin and Donaldson. S+D has an office in Culver City and Santa Barbara, CA where Donaldson is based. S+D currently has projects of all types around the US, Mexico, Asia, and Middle East.

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R E V E LLO R ES I D E N C E

ANGELO RES IDENCE

Pacific Palisades, California; 2011 Photographer: John Ellis Size: 3,875 square feet

Los Angeles, California; 2002 Photographer: John Ellis Size: 26,800 square feet

Though desirable ocean front/viewing properties are becoming increasingly limited, rare opportunities still exist as diamonds in the rough waiting to be discovered/transformed. This three-level hillside (4 bedroom, 4.5 bath) single family home exemplifies that pursuit and creative occupation of challenging topographical conditions rewarding unparalleled panoramic and private ocean views, while remaining nestled within close proximity of the city. An active family of four requested the re-visioning of their then nondescript 1980’s remodel which was taken apart, analyzed, then reassembled with critical concern for the preservation of this site’s most precious aspects: Location and view.

Shubin + Donaldson struck a balance between preserving the bold modern features of a 1957 designed home with the insertion of a new program and an expanded vision of the design’s outward expression. An open central living space was cleared through the home which identifies two wings of private spaces to either side containing four bedrooms and five bathrooms. A simple unifying element of wood slats threads itself from the exterior to the interior of the house, and reemerges again at the back of the house; adding to the permeable character of the design. The composition of horizontal Ipe wood slats serves as a shading device and an interior wall treatment/ shelving, before terminating as a privacy screen which separates the view from the rear terrace to the master bedroom. A raised terrace lifts from the back side of the zero-edge pool to create a large gathering space for outdoor entertaining.

Approach, orientation, and entry sequence are all overlaid to compound the open and bright experience culminating in the unmatched view. Fortification of the terrain also allowed for the conceptual overlaying of program, including an office/exercise room level, sleeping level, and living/entertaining level all conveniently organized against the hillside. Maintenance of a very open and connective relationship between interior and exterior spaces is supported by an elegant yet casual palette of natural materials, textures, and rich details.

9. Kitchen 10. Dining Room 11. Recreation Room 12. Garage 13. Zen Garden 14. Pool

1. Entry Vestibule 2. Living Room 3. Master Bedroom 4. Bedroom 5. Bathroom 6. Master Bath 7. Powder Room 8. Master Closet

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GL ASS PAV IL I O N /A RTI ST STU D I O

SANTA BARBARA ESTAT E

Santa Barbara, California; 2002 (studio), 2006 (addition) Photographer: Ciro Coelho Size: 1,700 square feet (studio), 200 square feet (addition)

Santa Barbara, California; 2003 Photographer: Ciro Coelho Size: 10,500 square feet A contextual arrangement of multiple orthogonal volumes gives a monumental feeling, yet in a refined way that reflects the Mexican heritage of the owner. Responding to the site, the architects created a constant interplay between indoor and outdoor space in a continual effort to frame ocean views. An indoor pool house is accessed through a deep-orange curving corridor. Public spaces are open and sprawling to accommodate various social events. The dramatic, open foyer and entry create a seamless experience for visitors as they journey from exterior to interior. Exterior limestone is repeated in the flooring, with contrasting darker limestone stripes echoing the ceiling articulation. Mexican Tzalam wood was used for the custommade doors, the spectacular interior bridge, and the interior wood floors.

The open, loft-like design of this auxiliary building sustains a subtle tension between light-industrial references and the refined details of a custom residence. Spirited tectonics and an efficient plan give the structure its distinct architectural identity—a utilitarian object that is in dialogue with its site and reflective of its function. The thin roof is supported by exposed, pre-fabricated truss joists and is attached to a tall shear wall wrapped in redwood shingles. The roof spans and shelters the stacked programmatic boxes of the groundfloor guest apartment and second-floor art studio. The main house on the property was altered with the addition of a “glass pavilion” that opens up the ocean-facing façade. The architects worked with the artist on selecting a color for the solid wall, which is punctured by a circle as an homage to furniture designer Paul Tuttle, whose work is collected by the owners.

11. 4 Car Garage 12. Hall 13. Pool Pavilion 14. Bar 15. Sauna 16. Office 17. Guest Bedroom 18. Master Bedroom 19. Master Bath

1. Living 2. Guest Suite 3. Reflecting Pool 4. Entry 5. Dining 6. Kitchen 7. Office 8. Informal Dining 9. Bar 10. Family Room

1. Guest Studio 2. Bath 3. Garage 4. Addition

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R I V I E R A R ES I D E N C E

BENT LEY RES IDENCE

Santa Barbara, California; 2006 Photographer: Ciro Coelho Size: 3,200 square feet

Bel Air, California; 2008 Photographer: Ciro Coelho Size: 6,400 square feet

Though not immediately obvious, this house embraces sustainable design in active and passive ways: solar orientation, efficient layout, re-use of foundation and caissons, photovoltaic power, passive solar heating, double-pane windows, UV-resistant glass, ample insulation, and energyefficient appliances. A monumental feeling is emphasized by the constant opening to the outdoors. A neutral color scheme complements the colors of nature that comprise the predominant palette. Throughout the house, walls intersect with glass in a play of solidity and transparency. An infinity pool just outside the living room leads the eye to the ocean and the Channel Islands beyond. Each room affords great vistas as well as stunning natural light throughout the day, and large windows create frames for nature.

This residence in Bel Air was designed on a site formerly occupied by the home in which the clients raised their family. Their intimate knowledge of the location and its sense of place guided the design of the new residence. A large tree that the clients planted when their children were small is at the heart and center of the design and shades a courtyard around which the new house is designed. The house turns its back towards the busy street with a solid formal faรงade, while the other side of the house opens up to the courtyard providing light, air, and views over the city. A series of volumes are focused around the tree in the central courtyard and allow for flow between the interior and exterior of the home. A gallery for showcasing the clients art collection ties these volumes together, and is bookended with a water feature wall and a fireplace. This design generously accommodates formal and informal entertaining as well as the archetypal california lifestyle of indoor-out-door living.

1. Entry 2. Living 3. Deck 4. Pool 5. Dining 6. Kitchen 7. Powder 8. Office 9. Garage 10. Master Bedroom 11. Master Bath 3 12. Closet 13. Bedroom 6 14. Bath 15. Laundry 9

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1. Entry 2. Study 3. Patio 4. Reflecting Pool 5. Living 6. Courtyard 7. Gallery 8. Laundry 9. Guest 10. Dining 11. Kitchen 12. Family Dining 13. Family 14. Pool 15 Spa 16. Master Bedroom 17. Closet 18. Master Bath 19. Bedroom 20. Bath 21. Laundry

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TOR O CA N YO N R ES I D E N C E

MO NT ECITO RES IDENCE

Santa Barbara, California, 2009 Photographer: Ciro Coelho Size: 7,500 square feet

Montecito, California; 2000 Photographer: Tom Bonner Size: 3,800 square feet

This house is on a 10 acre parcel in Toro Canyon among oak and eucalyptus trees, a seasonal creek to the east and Toro Canyon Creek to the west. The building site is approached via a narrow and well covered drive, ending at a small clearing and presenting the ocean and islands in the distance. The residence is sited on axis with the canyon and views beyond. The building parti presents three one story, wedge-shaped volumes, a garage volume to the north, a public living volume to the west and a private sleeping volume to the east. The main floor of 4,700 square feet includes guest rooms, exercise space, and mechanical space, a third volume enclosing the carport intersects the living volume and is offset to showcase the glass entry pavilion separating the volumes. Constructed of laminated glass beams and roof panels, with glass doors, this entry space is conceptualized as an exterior circulation connection between the private and public wings of the house. Exterior walls constructed of 12� thick insulated cast-inplace concrete and a metal roof provide maximum fire resistance. Doors and windows are all natural mahogany. 1. Entry 2. Living 3. Dining 22 20 21 4. Kitchen 5. Studio 6. Master Bedroom 7. Master Bath 8. Hot Tub 9. Patio 19 10. Pool 11. Office 12. Car Port

The clients desired a restrained and economical building in which to enjoy their substantial art collection and dynamic site, featuring mountain and ocean views. The three-bedroom residence is distinctly organized with one main axis, or circulation gallery, that runs along the whole structure. The center of the building features the public areas of living, dining, and kitchen, with circulation walls functioning as gallery space for the artwork. A sculptural glass-and-steel fireplace separates the living area from the dining room. A modern and inviting environment was achieved by layering the mix of building and finish materials, by maintaining a constant visual connection with the outdoors, and by flooding the spaces with light. The dwelling is covered by a shed roof built with Vulcraft steel trusses and metal decking. This structure is revealed at the dramatic entry and along the main axis to express its place within the overall design vocabulary.

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1. Entry 2. Office 3. Master Bedroom 4. Master Bath 5. Closet 6. Living 7. Terrace/Patio 8. Dining 9. Kitchen 10. Gallery 11. Bedroom 12. Laundry 13. Garage 14. Motor Court

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E AST CHA N NE L R ES I D E N C E

WALDEN RES IDENCE

Santa Monica, California, 2006 Photographer: Ciro Coehlo Size: 3,560 square feet

Beverly Hills, California, 2009 Photographer: Paul Jonason Size: 7,900 square feet

The architect used this sustainably-minded project to prove that a green home can have both beautiful design and rigorous environmental aspirations, without making compromises on either front. They saw this project as a template for designing and participating in a project where you actively engage with the house as you live in it; where the architecture is tuned to the changing environment, weather and sun position by its occupants.

This warm modern house in Beverly Hills reflects its complex site and context. The house sits on a corner site and is comprised of simple stone and stucco masses with refined mahogany details. The organization of these masses work to deemphasize the boundaries between interior and exterior living. The back side of the house is open to the pool, patios, cabana, and garden. The street sides of the house address the need for privacy with simple abutting surfaces which are softened by the detailing materials. This contemporary home also contains a full media room, gym, wine cellar, 5 bedrooms, 6 bathrooms, and gallery.

They harnessed both natural and technological forces to respond to the environment and to allow the house to perform properly; a photovoltaic array which generates more electricity than the house can consume to the strategic orientation of the building to capture prevailing winds and maximize day lighting.

1.Entry 2. Gallery 3. Office 4. Living Room 5. Dining Room 6. Kitchen 7. Family Room 8. Courtyard

A simpler way of life was desired by the clients and the house responds with a simple and direct parti that also instigated new forms of interaction and connectivity within their family; one large room for living, eating, making, and talking. No TV!

9. Garage 10. Reflecting Pool 11. Lap Pool 12. Bedroom 13. Bathroom 14. Closet 15. Master Bedroom 16. Master Bath

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CE DA R L A NE R ES I D E N C E

U RBAN S PA RENOVAT IO N

Santa Barbara, California; 2004 Photographer: Ciro Coelho Size: 2,200 square feet

Malibu, California; 2002 Photographer: Tom Bonner Size: 2,900 square feet

How do you add on to a suburban home with minimal cost but maximum design impact?

The concept for this beach-side modern house was an urban spa-like retreat. Perched along Malibu’s Pacific Coast Highway, the home exhibits a seamless union between interior and exterior spaces, with crisp linear architecture, an ambulating plan, and visual access throughout. A palette of natural woods, limestone, white fabrics, and frosted and clear glass creates a crisp and airy environment. The master suite faces a large terrace with pocket-glass doors leading to a sleeping porch. Themes of openness and transformation are most expressive in the master bath, where cool, oceanblue frosted glass lines the walls and windows and hides the toilet and shower. Three layers of floorto-ceiling glass form a translucent door that closes the space off from the bedroom or opens it up to the master suite, porch, and Pacific Ocean beyond.

This is a question that most American homeowners face at some point, especially owners of post-war built tract and “ranch style” homes. Our answer is the following: 1. Pre-fab or modularize the construction as much as possible 2. Minimize impact on existing home and yard as much as possible 3. Maximize floor plan and wall adaptability 4. Maximize energy and resource efficiency 5. Use reclaimed construction materials where possible The 14 ft. x 34 ft.CL20 minimally connects to the existing house with a glass box connecting space. It deploys “off the shelf” structural steel moment frames that bolt to a standard concrete slab on grade. These 4 frames support the flat roof thus providing all the vertical and lateral support necessary for the entire structure. This allows floor plan flexibility and eliminates exterior shear walls. The CL20 exterior walls are custom installed dual pane insulated glass and proprietary sliding doors. This transparent glass box minimizes visual impact on the yard while providing maximum interior day lighting.

1. Entry Court 2. Garage 3. Dining 4. Kitchen 5. Living 6. Deck 7. Master Bedroom 8. Master Bath 9. Bedroom 10. Media

Resource Efficiency: The flat roof provides an excellent platform for a photovoltaic array to service the CL20 and existing residence. The interior walls and ceiling are reclaimed clear Douglas fir. All lighting is LED, and heating/cooling is provided by a high efficiency Mitsubishi split system.

1. Master Bedroom 2. Master Bathroom 3. Closet/Office

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CA R P I N T E R IA R ES I D E N C E

GREENT REE RES IDENCE

Carpinteria, California; 2004 Photographer: Ciro Coelho Size: 1,900 square feet

Pacific Palisades, California; 2006 Photographer: Ciro Coelho Size: 2,350 square feet

The architects wanted to develop a relationship between the main house, which was designed in 1938 by a student at Frank Lloyd Wright. The architects aimed to relate the guest house to the natural surroundings, and nestled the structure within an existing stand of old oak trees. Shubin + Donaldson was interested in developing a contemporary interpretation of the ideas explored in the original design of the main house and wanted users to be able to distinguish the old from the new. The new structure is a glass pavilion with a solid sandstone fireplace wall. The abundance of glass creates the blurring of outdoor and indoor space, and opens up to mountains views to the north and ocean vistas to the south. The fireplace wall is anchored by a 35-foot-long poured-in-place concrete plinth that extends beyond the glass borders of the house on either side to the outdoors. The living room is lined with a built-in Douglas fir bench, which doubles as storage. Windows are framed in industrial Cherokee-red steel sash casements, similar to the main house. As with the main house, the roof is clad in copper, which is left to weather naturally.

Shubin + Donaldson was charged with renovating this 1949 Modernist house designed by the Los Angeles architect, Kenneth Lind. The original house was a long box elevated on steel columns and beams with one end set into the hillside with a garden underneath. The long south-facing side of the house was glazed floor to ceiling, opening up each room to the side yard and pool. The goals of the renovation were to add square footage to the house and to update its finishes. The ground floor was infilled with a kitchen, bathroom, and dining area, and the carport was transformed into the living room. This allowed the second floor to be dedicated to the master suite, bedrooms, and an informal lounge. In order to make a subtle connection between the interior and exterior of the house, many of the rooms were painted with colors derived from the surrounding Eucalyptus trees. The client describes the resulting renovation as a “connected house. It is intimate… you know where everyone is, and every room spills out to the exterior, either physically or visually.”

1. Living Room 2. Patio 3. Kitchen 4. Bedroom 5. Bath 6. Storage 7. Garage 8. Office

1. Entry 2. Dining 3. Kitchen 4. Mechanical 5. Powder Bath 6. Laundry 7. Living 8. Master Bedroom 9. Master Bath 10. Hall 11. Bath 12. Bedroom 13. Lounge Area 14. Storage 15. Bath 16. Bedroom

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PACI F I C PA L I SA D ES R ES I D E N C E

BELLAGIO WAY RES IDENCE

Pacific Palisades, California Size: 17,000 square feet

Los Angeles, California; 2013 Size: 25,900 square feet

Diffusion of the built form into the landscape defines the approach for situating this 17,000 square foot single family residence (14,500 sqft main house and 2,500 sqft accessory building) on a coastal bluff overlooking a natural canyon and the Pacific Ocean. A balance between the negotiation and mitigation of a severe topography, integration into a diverse built context, and an attempt to preserve the natural beauty of a virgin site bordered by State park land was sought to inform the building’s siting/orientation and formal/material description.

Initially conceptualized as an overlaid grid of values founded in peripheral awareness and natural siting, the elegantly layered lines and simple bold geometries of this home have combined to create a choreographed composition of richly expressive volumes and details.

The building’s design is characterized by the appropriation and connection of two open terraces; one semi-public – related to the outward expression of the home as it addresses the landscape, and the other private – related to the inward relationships of the most discreet areas of the home. The building’s geometry is further organized by three principal axes: one directly oriented towards the view of the sea, the second constrained by the address of the adjacent property line, and the third responding to the curvature of the natural topography as it bends and moves up the canyon. The program is divided into two principal masses; a two story + partial basement main residence and a separate two story accessory building containing a gymnasium, guest quarters, and a recreation room overlooking a play court nestled into a natural grove of existing trees on the lower hillside.

An unfolding experience of apertured openings and warmly refined materials frame uncompromised views from this residential promontory that extend from downtown Los Angeles to the Pacific Ocean; taking best advantage of the difficult topography while smartly resolving challenging zoning requirements. A generous motor court arrives at an apex of building volumes which identifies the main entry. When open, the large auto gallery/ garage door extends the scale of the motor court, further supporting interior-exterior entertaining possibilities. A sunken double height living space off of the entry opens onto a large terrace and infinity-edged swimming pool. The private sleeping areas occupy the entire second level including the master suite which separately opens onto two private terraces and third planted tranquility garden. Accessible via two main stairways, the lowest basement level hosts a series of diverse entertainment options including a wellness spa, basketball/racquetball court, bowling alley, wine room, and home theater. The multileveled design and extent of hillside-interned area positively anchor the building volumes to the site and offer a myriad of both social and contemplative experiences.

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PA I N T E R R ES I D E N C E Malibu, California; 2002 Size: 26,800 square feet This home not only merges with its remarkable environment, but virtually disappears. Except for a few deft lines and angles – such as the ordered rows of the surrounding vineyard – there is very little perceivable ‘built’ presence. The entrance is marked by a single low wall, delicately cut into the land while sheltering a stairway that immediately begins the descent into the home. Located on a natural bluff atop Moraga Canyon in Los Angeles, the east-west promontory offers uninterrupted views to the north and south while overlooking the Getty Center to the West. Overlooking the vineyard terraces, floor-to-ceiling windows open onto an infinity-edged pool which skims the edge of the terrace merging with the distant horizon. Portions of the house take on the abstract character of the adjacent landscape becoming an architectonic extension of the natural topography. A concrete structure with planted roofs, this four-bedroom home is organized around a large central sunken living space, balancing the functional aspects as well as the phenomenon of living within the earth. 9. Bedroom 10. Wine Cellar 11. Media 12. Terrace 13. Pool 14. Outdoor Dining 15. Gym

1. Entry 2. Sunken Living Space 3. Informal Dining 4. Kitchen 5. Formal Dining 6. Study 7. Master Bedroom 8. Master Bath

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Residential | Spring 2015  

This book presents a selection of architectural custom homes designed by Shubin + Donaldson (S+D). We have attempted to design our homes wit...

Residential | Spring 2015  

This book presents a selection of architectural custom homes designed by Shubin + Donaldson (S+D). We have attempted to design our homes wit...

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