Page 1

ONLINE EDITION

/50


The world wide wall scrawl has been around for thousands of years. Relief art to me is the oldest form of mass media communications not requiring spoken word. From Australian Aboriginal hand stencil prints, to Egyptian tomb art and Lascaux (France). Less ‘authorised’ relief wall art such Viking graff on the Santa Sophia, Roman smut in Pompeii, scratchings on medieval cathedrals or even ANZAC graffiti on the Pyramids all brings the notion of street art even further back in time. Paste-ups themselves (the use of glue to attach paper to walls) is less ancient. Limited by the cost of being able to waste food (the wheat paste adhesive) and paper (not readily available as we know it today). Advertising and political propaganda are probably the most obvious notions of posters on walls. For me, as a teen in the 1980’s, reading the Village Voice newspaper and Face magazine introduced me to Jenny Holzer. Her quixotic slogan paste ups struck a chord in me. I discovered other paste projects with humorous hoaxes, and I fell in love with them. I especially enjoyed work with some implied content - not explicitly political, but more like French situationism and détournement, intended to create discomfort and questioning. Certainly I still find the better street art has some element of this. By the late 1980’s I was collecting work like this (and producing my own), mostly to the annoyance of student politicians on campus. I never considered it to be Art till much later. Stickers arrived much later on, and they have their own history and culture. They are the little brother of posters, but self-adhesive. A ‘bomber’s delight’,they are the stealth weapon of street art. Deployable in daylight, collectible, and easily given away. Adelaide in the 1990’s saw stenciling evolve out of a desire to make cheap stickers. Many of these artists, like ‘Sync’ and ‘James Dodd’ (Who engaged in stencil, paste and sticker mediums) moved to Melbourne, and helped create the scene that made that particular city the global capital of stencils for a time.


Paste-up art has it’s strength in being able to put the creator in charge, to compete with formal ‘approved’ advertising for very little money, and to utilise many media forms. Freehand aerosol/marker pens, stencil/silkscreen prints, collage, or (for those who can afford it) large scale photocopy prints, or even runs of your own posters. This gives the genre a huge diversity of style and mode, that to me makes it the most diverse form of street art, and by far the most accessible. When I first moved to Sydney, around 2007, I was lucky to run into ‘SMC(3)’ and ‘Striker Squid’ (now a respectable film maker). They were the most visible to me on the street, and soon there was a group of us working together. The Movement Crew (or ‘Non-Crew’ as we preferred) had over 30 members ‘bombing’ the inner western suburbs of Sydney, and many memorable missions had about a dozen members caning the walls of the inner west together. Most memorable was a time that we had ladders, and it had begun raining. As we climbed to the top rung, our paste-ups just disintegrated in our hands. It felt kind of heroic at the time. Like all good things, Movement began to break up as more and more artists came into their own and developed away from the ‘crew’. Some got into aerosol on walls, some got into writing, some became career artists, and left their brothers and sisters to sneak around litter strewn alleyways. ‘SMC(3)’ still pastes and paints, keeping it as real as ever. Of course In other cities, like Adelaide and Melbourne, artists crossed mediums all the time. More artists in those places wanted to try all mediums. But for Sydney, with guys still painting in the ‘New York’ style (as they had since the early 1980’s), this was a real breakthrough. From here, the scene gained a real boost with the ‘Paste Modernism’ series of paste shows, begining in 2008. The ‘Paste Modernism’series - the brain child of Bridge Stehli and Ben Frost - helped to change people’s minds about the legitimacy of this kind of work. Whilse ‘PM’ celebrated the scene globally, the ANYTHING GOES show is centered on a specifically local narrative...


The ANYTHING GOES sticker and paste up show was an idea conceived by Shu of Urban Canvas Collective and developed in collaboration with Josh G of Art Whore. It is a brilliant snapshot of where paste-up and sticker work is at today, focusing exclusively on artists working within New South Wales. The ANYTHING GOES collection of work features a diverse range of style and medium that has to be seen to be believed. For fans of art on the street this show will be the ‘Rosetta Stone’, unlocking the many mysteries that shroud the who’s who on the walls of Sydney. Better yet - the availability of sticker packs will give any fan the means to collect this magic for themselves. little bit of the work from ANY THING GOES might adorn a few fridges or laptops or be hoarded in someone’s collection for years to come. While I enjoy keeping street art on the street more, bodies of work in shows like this are an important reflection and documentation of what is happening in public without any authorisation. What is ephemeral on the street can be given a second (and sometimes longer) life here. Importantly, ANY THING GOES is not a show of the self aggrandising work of a single street artist, selling their work as ‘fine’ or ‘pop’ art, it is a collaboration of many artists gathering for the mutual promotion and recognition of their shared medium. When I returned from my annual pilgrimage for xmas to Sydney this year I was delighted to see an explosion of new sticker and paste every year. 2015 is shaping up to be a memorable year for stickers and paste. You can come and engage in this for yourself and be a part of New South Wales street art history at ANYTHING GOES. Words by Chris Tamm (Konsumterra/ Crash Corporation) Edited by Nina Peters. March 2015.


CONTENT Alex Plota

KRISPE

Amy Bean

Leith Hamilton

AndrosOne

Manolo

Aticus Finch

Max Warlond

BAA TV

Mike Watt

Beak Foundry

NufInk

Bird Hat

Quirky Bones

Bize

Roland Barnett

Black Cat

Rujunko Pugh

BUNKWAA

Serial Killers Unite

BZAR Group

Shiroi Usagi

CAMO

Shu.

CRABLO

Skubz Mope

Crash Corporation

SKULL

CUPCO

SMC_3

Dogfight

SNAW

H-Foot

Trait

HINDER

West Objects

Ian Phenna

William Nghiem

John Paine

Yiscah.

JoMaPi

YOLKK

Julio

Young Pizza

KALIS

Y__T


ONLINE EDITION


Alex Plota alexplota

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Amy Bean amybean_

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Andrew Andros androsone

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Finch Atticus finchaticus

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


BAA TV / AWOL Monk baatv

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Beak Foundry beakfoundry

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Birdhat birdhat

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Bize bizes_art

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Blackcat thatblackcatart

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Bunkwaa bunkwaa

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


BZAR bzargroup

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


CAMO c_a_m_o

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Crablo crablo

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Crash Corporation

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


CUPCO cupco

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Dogfight theinfamousdogfight

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


H - Foot hfoot1

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Hinder hinderhinder

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Ian Fenna ianphenna67

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


John Paine johnroderickpaine

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


JoMaPi jomapi

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Hulio hules_

Hules

Hules

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


KALIS / Raw Inc. raw_inc

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


KRISPE cdigitydogg

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Leith Hamilton leithham

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Manolo manoloart

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Max Warlond warlond

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Mike Watt mike__watt

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


NufInk nuf_ink

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Quirky Bones quirky_bones

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Roland Barnett roll.doggie.doo

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Rujunko Pugh rujunko_pugh

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Serial Killers Unite sku.zine

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Shiroi Usagi shiroi_usagi

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Shu. monsteryandme

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Skubz Mope skubzmope

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Skull

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


SMC3 smc_thre_ethr_hret_reth

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


SNAW snawlax

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Trait traitism

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


West Objects / Joel Cameron joelcameron

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


William Nghiem williamnghiem

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Yiscah. yiscahspencilbox

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Yolkk cracked_yolkk

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Young Pizza / DUX duxie_boy

ONLINE EDITION


ONLINE EDITION


Y__T y_tww

#Y_T

ONLINE EDITION


PRESENTED BY

ONLINE EDITION


Art Whore artwhorecult Illuminating the art underground since 2012 www.artwhorecult.com

The Graff Caff thegraffcaff A street art inspired take away cafe, established in 2014. 495 Marrickville Road, Dulwich Hill

Urban Canvas Collective urbancanvascollective A blog focusing on street art in all its diversity in terms of content, motivation and messages. www.urbancanvascollective.com ONLINE EDITION


SPONSORS A huge thanks to the following local bussiness for their sponsorship and support with this project.

ONLINE EDITION


All layout and design by Shu. (Urban Canvas Collective / Monstery and Me) Logo created by Shu. Š 2015

ONLINE EDITION

Profile for Shu IsRad

ANYTHING GOES zine  

This zine catalogues the events and artists that brought together the ANYTHING GOES show, 2015. Introduction by Chris Tamm (Konsumterra/ Cr...

ANYTHING GOES zine  

This zine catalogues the events and artists that brought together the ANYTHING GOES show, 2015. Introduction by Chris Tamm (Konsumterra/ Cr...

Profile for shu.