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CONTENTS RESUME..........................................................................................................................03 MASTERS IN ARCHITECTURE Architectural Design (Majors)

“Unearthing Culture, History And Identity”, Rejuvenating a Heritage and Eco Sensitive Site, Case: Muziris, Kerela (Capstone Project/Thesis).................................................................................04 “Project S.m.i.l.e”, Maternity Home for Fisherwomen of Orissa (Architectural Design Studio-3)......16 “The Museum of Civilisations and Memorial for Human Spirit”, Museum and Memorial at Lothal (Architectural Design Studio-2)..............................................................................................19 ”The Oasis” Urban Historical Park, Restructuring The Bhikabhai Park and Karnavati Art Gallery, Ashram Road,Ahmedabad ..............................................................................................................................22 “The Monolith”, Residence Design for Indira Nooyi...........................................................................25 “The House of Small Things”, Residence Design for Arundhati Roy.................................................26

History, Theory And Criticism, Urban Conservation And Urban Design (Minors)

“Ideal Cities”, Conceptual Design for an Ideal City, Lutyens, Delhi, Guided by Prof. Rajiv Kadam...27 “Urban Conservation”, A Document on Urban Conservation of Pols of Old City, Ahmedabad, Case: Sankdi Sheri, Old City, Ahmedabad, Guided by Prof. Jigna Desai.............................................29 “Key Texts”, History, Theory And Criticism, Blogs On Architectural Movements...............................30 “Semiotics”, Introduction to Theory in Architecture, Timeline on Semiotics.......................................31

PROFESSIONAL WORK

“Spreading Edges”, Gandhinagar, Gujarat........................................................................................32 “Meandering Meadows”, Architecture and Landscape Design for Applewoods township, Ahmedabad, Gujarat............................................................................................................................................34 “Mondeal Square”, Landscape for Mondeal Square Commercial Park, Ahmedabad, Gujarat.................................................................................................................36 “Viverra and Tide N Turf”, Architecture and Landscape for Clubhouse and Temple Landscape, Vadodara, Gujarat..................................................................................................................................................38 “Cloud 9”, Lakefront Developement project, Vadodara, Gujarat........................................................42 “Play Court for Aura”, Wall Mural Deisgn, Ahmedabad, Gujarat........................................................44

BACHELORS IN ARCHITECTURE

“To Transform: Urban Fringe and Beyond”, Restructuring the Core, Old City, Hyderabad (Thesis Project)................................................................................................38


EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATIONS:

June 2007 to July 2012 Bachelors in Architecture- First class overall and Distinction in Thesis

India, Leh-Laddakh (Cept Summer School) “Urban conservation”- A document on Urban Conservation of Pols of Old City (Sankdi Sheri) Old City, Ahmedabad, Guided by: Prof. Jigna Desai

A.P.I.E.D, D.C.Patel School of Architecture, Vallabh Vidyanagar, Anand, Gujarat.

“Semiotics”- An Introduction to Theory in Architecture; Timeline on Semiotics, Guided by: Prof. Subjects: Architecture Design Studios, History, Advanced Structures, Building Constrcution Technology Sonal Mitthal Modi and Materials, Urban design, Landscape design, Housing, Conservation and Design workshops. Dissertation: “To Transform; Hyderabad. Guided by: Prof. Yatin Pandya

T.Shruti.P.Rao

Address: C-504, Satej Appartments, Gulab tower road, Opp Cambay grand hotel, Thaltej, Ahmedabad- 380052 , Gujarat, India. DOB: 16th October, 1089 Contact: (M)0-9898195875, (R) 079-27430015 E-Mail: ar.shrutirao@gmail.com

About Me

Urban Fringe and Beyond”, Restructuring the core, Old city,

June 2014 to July 2016 Masters in Architecture (Majors in Architectural Design and Minors in History Theory and Criticism) with Distinction CEPT University, Ahmedabad, Gujarat.

ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENTS/ COMPETITIONS: Bachelors in Architecture

Secured first class overall in bachelors of architecture, distinction in thesis and recieved scholarships in ninth and tenth semester in bachelors of architecture. Worked for Louis. I. Kahn trophy which won Special Mention in annuall NASA convention held in Bhopal, 2008. Headed the Annuall Nasa Design Competition 2009, which secured 13th position all over India.

Major Subjects: Architectural Design studios, Documenting and communicating architecture, Headed the Louis. I. Kahn Trophy and won special mention in 52nd Annuall NASA Convention Introduction to Architectural thinking, Form Making And Fabrication, Case Studies in Architectural held in SRM University, Chennai in 2009. Analysis, Urban conservation, Ideal cities (Urban design), Advanced Technology. Worked for the HUDCO trophy and won citation in annuall nasa convention 2011 held in Major Subjects: Contemporary Architectural Historiography, Meaning and Built Environement, Key Ahmedabad.

Texts in History Theory and Architecture, An Introduction to Theory in Architecture For me, Architecture and Landscape are inseparable. Masters in Architecture What we intervene in and build are all landscapes which Studio projects and research work published on CEPT Webiste, recorded for CEPT Archives and “UNEARTHING Culture, History and IDENTITY” , Rejuvenation of a Heritage and EcoDissertation: have to be dealt with very critically. I see architecture as displayed in the semester end exhibitions in all the four semesters during post graduate studies. Sensitive Precinct, Case: Muziris, Kerela. a wholesome entity which involves a creative cohesion Guided by: Prof. Yatin Pandya of academics, art, construction, environment and human Secured distinction in Capstone project/ Thesis in masters program. beings themselves. My academic and professional journey has taught and challenged me at every step to bring out the best in myself. The profession has taught me the importance of perseverance, punctuality and deliverance on time. It has made me realize that this profession needs oneself to be questioned at every stage and evolve through a creative process. It has taught me to be critical of my surroundings and how they have to be dealt with. It has given me the chance of seeing ones dreams and ideas being executed in the form usable spaces which bring joy to others.

WORK PROFILE:

October 2012 to June 2014 M/s. Beyond Green- Architecture and Landscape Architecture Ahmedabad, Gujarat.

Architectural Design and Details, Landscape Design, Site Planning, Design Presentations and Layout, Working Drawings and Construction Details and Site Handling .

TECHNICAL SKILLS:

Worked with Mr. Bobby Sujansinghani and Mrs. Rucha Nangare in the firm. The work profile included landscape and architecture porjects and environemntal planning. The nature of work included involvement in projects from conceptual stage to final stage, preparation of design presentations and Autocad working drawings, site visits, interaction with the engineers, consultants and other agencies involved Adobe Photoshop in the project, material specifications. Adobe Indesign Corel Draw Sketchup June 2101 to November 2010 Ms Office Burt Hill Designs Pvt. Ltd. Model Making Ahmedabad, Gujarat. Hand Drafting

It taught me the importance of minute details in architecture and how would they bring about a vast change in the project; which is why I pursued masters in architecture with majors in architectural design, since it involved the same. My desire to read and accquire the ability to write professionally, made me pursue minors in history theory The nature of work involved working on concepts, making process sketches, 3ds and design and criticism. presentations, design and working drawings and site visits. I see myself as an individual who possesses the knowledge of architecture, construction details where my post graduate studies have equipped me to think critically and more efficiently towards designs that are sustainable and “Decoration or Decorum”-Ornament and Crime, Adolf Loos would benefit the environment, with the knowledge about Link to the published blog: https://htcshruti.wordpress.com/2015/02/23/decoration-or-decorum/ the basics of landscape architecture as well.

PUBLICATIONS AND RESEARCH WORK:

I have a keen interest towards sketching and travelling as well which has shaped my perspective towards architecture and landscape to a great extent. With the above mentioned skills, I believe I would be able to contribute my bit to this profession and the environment in making it a sustainable and beautiful place to live. This document summarises my professional and academic works in architecture and landscape architecture.

CORE COMPETENCIES:

“Phenomenon of a Space”- Writings of Christian Noberg Schulz Link to the published blog: https://htcshruti.wordpress.com/2015/03/29/phenomenon-of-a-placewritings-of-christian-norberg-schulz/ “WE the creators”- Structure of the Ordinary, John Habraken Link to the published blog: https://htcshruti.wordpress.com/2015/04/20/we-the-creators-structureof-the-ordinary/ “Shelter Trek-2015”- Documentation of the Vernacular Architecture accross the Northen spine of

OTHER INTERESTS: Travelling, Painting and Sketching, Critical Writing and Research, Photography.


“UNEARTHING Culture, History and IDENTITY” Rejuvenation of a Heritage and Eco-Sensitive site, Case: Muziris, Kerala, Guide: Prof.Yatin Pandya

Capstone Project/ Post-Graduate Thesis ABSTRACT The ideas and thoughts on continuity of culture and conserving the heritage in our country have been very strong. In every settlement, we see the remnants of our past; a rich heritage which makes us wonders whether the things were really better in our past? The research aims at addressing the issue of the lost importance of cultural heritage, its continuity as an alarming concern and the design aims at revival of such sites. INTRODUCTION

The remnants of our History and Heritage; Intangible and tangible aspects of our culture. Source: Author

“Culture, Ecology, Heritage and the City” Source: Author

CULTURAL AND HISTORICAL HERITAGE- the fundamental aspects of our identity is the legacy of physical artifacts and intangible attributes of a group or society that are inherited from past generations, maintained in the present and bestowed for the benefit of future generations. It includes TANGIBLE CULTURE, INTANGIBLE CULTURE and NATURAL HERITAGE. These fundamental aspects of our identity must be transferred to the next generations in the best possible conditions. In order for it to be accessible to our future generations, it has to be conserved first. In this march towards urbanization, historical sites today are facing a constant threat from encroachment, illegal settlements around the site, commercialization, tourism industry etc. exploiting the site to its worst. CONSERVATION OF OUR CULTURAL HERITAGE; HERITAGE AT STAKE “India is a vast country; it contains multitudes.” All the heritage sites and monuments face the threat of improper care and maintenance and these problems are of high magnitude. In most places artefacts are moved into museums which are completely alien to the content being displayed. They are separated from the context in which they are unearthed. None of these approaches aim at preserving the vibrant life of the heritage; the way it was seen when the site was inhabited. As a result, the cultural aspect of the heritage; the traditions, rituals, ceremonies, lifestyle, buildings in use is lost.

“Heritage, Archeology and the SOCIETY;our cultral values in danger?”

Conservation of Cultural Heritage should be looked upon as a holistic approach rather than an isolated one. The eco-system, local community, traditions and rituals, lifestyle; everything has to be conserved with a proactive contribution from the people. PRESENT STATUS HERITAGE SITES

Present Status and Upkeep of our Heritage Sites. Source: Author

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There are many other factors which determine the decay of these heritage sites/monuments out of which water, seasonal temperature variations, wind, animals, natural disaster, air pollution, human vandalism are few. UNESCO stresses that what India needs right now is a master plan for all its sites.

Unearthing the Culture, History and Identity., Source: Author

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“UNEARTHING Culture, History and IDENTITY” Rejuvenation of a Heritage and Eco-Sensitive site, Case: Muziris, Kerala, Guide: Prof.Yatin Pandya

Capstone Project/ Post-Graduate Thesis HYPOTHESIS Why is the culture, history and its constitution so important to the human race? What are the reasons for identity crisis of heritage sites in our country and why are they losing their importance? How can such sites be rejuvenated and what are the tools which can be used to do so? Is architecture and conservation a possible window to look at culture and heritage and to rejuvenate them? How far are they a possible solution to do so? AIM The study seeks to examine the status of heritage sites with huge cultural diversity and a rich history, and to understand the reasons for the death and declining importance of such sites in the present scenario. This thesis looks at the historical town of Pattanam as one of such cases where the town is on the verge of death due to loss of its cultural and historical importance even after having a rich and diverse history and heritage. Aim of this thesis is to Rejuvenate a dying heritage by integrating Heritage, Culture, History, Archeology, Traditions, Local Arts and Crafts, Ecology, Landscape, Architecture and Technology in the form of an intervention which engages the people with the heritage and provides the town with a reason for selfsustainence.

“Heritage Site; Its Composition and Constituents” Source: Author

SCOPE AND LIMITATIONS • The study would examine the reasons for death of heritage sites and look at rejuvenation strategies for the same. • The site studies, design demonstration and the rejuvenation strategies will be site specific but the issue will be generic. • The design intervention would be on a conceptual level providing design solutions at four levels; precinct level, site level, building level and detail level. • This thesis would involve design intervention and landscape solution as rejuvenation strategies and would not involve planning guidelines for the region. • This poject provided only the basic site studies; site area and conditions, number, nature and placement of trenches (excavations handled by the KCHR in collaboration with ASI), existing heritage structures on the site, sits sections, history of the town etc. • This project does not provide for techincal data regarding the urban structure of the place like- stakeholders, landowners, figues or numbers reltaed the land area etc. It provides for an anticipated image of how a historical town with significant archeological excavations looks and feels with an architectural intervention which adds cultural value and strengthens the economy of the town by increasing the number of foot-falls in the place (also an aniticipation).

“Pattanam; anticipating the development of development of historical town”, Source: Author

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“UNEARTHING Culture, History and IDENTITY” Rejuvenation of a Heritage and Eco-Sensitive site, Case: Muziris, Kerala, Guide: Prof.Yatin Pandya

Capstone Project/ Post-Graduate Thesis MUSEUMS AND MEUSEOLOGY Museums: Evolved from the Greek concept of Garden Of Muses. Both Museums and Museology are renewing themselves in terms of the social commitment they are offering while exhibiting a specific culture and its heritage. They are not just confined to a building, showcase or a site, but they connect to an entire territory. Museums in the modern times are getting rid of being inclusive as institutions or being confined to one built structure.

“Muziris; Histories and Cultural Crossings and Timelessness” . Source: Author

Museology: Not just concerned with museums and the science of exhibition, but it is also concerned with human involvement with the tangible and intangible culture, the place and its history and memory-making. MUSEUMS AND HERITAGE INTERPRETATION Indian Socio-Economic Scenario: • Interpretation of the natural as well cultural heritage should be properly analysed before conveying it to the visitors/viewers/tourists to analyse. • The rich diversity of this nation should be first properly managed, conserved, documented and then only should be made available to the interpreter. Involvement of the Local Community: Maintaining this heritage is of crucial importance since they are the people who realise the real value of this heritage and are the indigenous source of information Conserving The Cultural Heritage: Architecture and conservation should involve viewing this heritage in connection to the ecology, culture and time in collaboration with the local community and resources.

“Dialogue Between The Past And The Present; ” Hedmark Museum, Sverre Fehn

“Every man is an Architect” Source: Josh Mings. “The Story of Biuilding; The Museums of Sverre Fehn”, 2011 John William Lawrence Travel Fellowship.

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“UNEARTHING Culture, History and IDENTITY” Rejuvenation of a Heritage and Eco-Sensitive site, Case: Muziris, Kerala, Guide: Prof.Yatin Pandya

Capstone Project/ Post-Graduate Thesis MUZIRIS: AN EARLY HISTORIC EMPORIUM

“The Tabula Peutingeriana” The extreme right indicates Muziris and a lake “Lucus Muziris”. Temple of Augustus and Western Ghats can be seen close to it. The island marked on the map as “Taprobane” is Sri Lanka., Source: Muzirisheritage.org

Roma Alexandria Constantinopolis Pernicide Portum “Major ports of the World.”, Source: Unearthing Pattanam; Histories, Cultures, Crossings

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The significance of Pattanam is that it is an outstanding example of local settlers, who, with their technology, craftsmanship, architecture and immense natural wealth, made excellent use of both land and sea, contributing to trans-oceanic cultural crossings.” The research work done reveals some of the following interesting facts: • The architectural features and allied finds found ranged from burned bricks to toilet features, roofing tiles, ring wells, spatial organization of the spaces- all of which indicate the urban living of that era. • The terracotta and ceramic artifacts unearthed indicate industrial character of the site. • Ancient Wharf context with brick structures, wooden canoe, bollards, spices, a plethora of nonlocal ceramics etc. have been unearthed indicating presence of ancient port and spice trade route context.

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• Pattanam, an archaeological site on the Kerala coast; as suggested by the findings, indicates a life span of 3000 years and most significant finds range from 3rd century BCE to the 5th century CE. • First of its nature to be discovered on the Kerala coast prior to this discovery. • Excavated over for 8 years by Kerala Council for Historical Research (KCHR). • The discoveries indicate- trans-oceanic trade. connection with ports in western or the Greco-Roman world, Red Sea and Arabian Sea coast and other parts of the Indian subcontinent and South East Asia. • Muziris mentioned in Roman records or the Muciri of the Tamil texts and the Periplus Maris Erythraei. • The logic of the location ; a trading center carrying the spices of the southern Indian coast to the western world. There is also evidence for production of beads, cameos and other personal adornment items indicating presence of non-local markets. • HISTORIES, CULTURAL CROSSINGS AND RESEARCH

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Pattanam Heritage Precinct; master plan, sections and location of trenches, Source: KCHR(Kerela), Author

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Excavations at Pattanam, Source: Author

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“UNEARTHING Culture, History and IDENTITY” Rejuvenation of a Heritage and Eco-Sensitive site, Case: Muziris, Kerala, Guide: Prof.Yatin Pandya

Capstone Project/ Post-Graduate Thesis

REJUVENATING THE PATTANAM HERITAGE PRECINCT Beyond the trenches, the tools, the artifacts, the museums, the archeology, the publications and the research, history and culture are testimonies to the deep journey of our ancestors on this planet. For some people, such historical and culturally enabled journeys may seem pointless in the way they would shape their viewpoint about the past, present and future. Nonetheless, whoever has had the chance to witness such journeys and step into our heritage and archeology would admit to its power in shaping our thinking, our perceptions about identities and relationships, our texts, technologies, knowledge of science and medicine, politics, prejudices and life itself. MUZIRIS HERITAGE PROJECT- CONTEXT • The Muziris Heritage project (MHP) - initiative of the Kerala Government supported by the Government of India to conserve and promote the heritage sites and monuments linked to the ancient Indo-Roman port city of Muziris . • The Pattanam archaeological site, being excavated since 2007, confirms the trans-oceanic links of the site from GuangZhou and QuanZhou ports in South China to Rome and Catalan ports in the Mediterranean. • The excavations unearthed ancient Wharf context with brick structures, wooden canoe, bollards, spices, a plethora of nonlocal ceramics etc. which indicate the presence of ancient port and spice trade route context. DESIGN BRIEF

Pattanam Heritage Development project, Design Brief demonstration, Source: Author

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A. Master Planning for the precinct which includes spice plantation, trial design, Installation of art works along the route and curation of the journey through the precinct. B. Site Museum as an intervention which will take care of the unearthed specimens which need a controlled environment to be preserved and exhibited.

Legend

“The system”, Source: Author

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The Museum; Conceptuals, Source:Author

Muziris Development Project, Source:Author

Pattanam Development Project

Master Planning Strategy- diagrams Source: Author

C. Walkway Design- It will integrate all the archeological trenches, water bodies, important landmarks for ex. the old temples in the precinct and the restored vernacular houses in one loop. The walkway transverses between three levels; floating above the ground, laid on the ground (loose laid trails) and below the ground (ramps leading to the trenches). They have three elements: horizontal surface, vertical surface (walls, columns or supports at intervals) and the roof. These walkways become trails; trials transform into cul-de-sacs, plazas, pause points, across the route. 8 | T.Shruti.P.Rao


“UNEARTHING Culture, History and IDENTITY� Rejuvenation of a Heritage and Eco-Sensitive site, Case: Muziris, Kerala, Guide: Prof.Yatin Pandya

Capstone Project/ Post-Graduate Thesis

CASE STUDIES AND ANALYSIS (*All the sketches are interpretative and are based on Analysis. They are not the part of the actual plan they follow and are not to scale.)

Urban design of the Trashi Chhoe Dzong Precinct, Thimpu, Bhutan Christopher Charles Benninger

Extension of Open Plot of Alhambra Palace, Granada, Spain

Kolumba Museum, Cologne, Germany, Peter Zumthor

A. Scale Urban design of an entire region

A. Scale Building level intervention.

B. Site Condition (Before Intervention) A heritage precinct consisting of numerous heritage structures and vast open spaces.

B. Site Condition (Before Intervention) Ruins of st. Columbus church which were devastated in a blast. C. Type/Types Of Architectural Intervention museum which fuses with the ruins and houses religious art ; cultural rejuvenation.

A. Scale Urban plot/site amidst a heritage precinct.

C.Type/Types Of Architectural Intervention Urban design of the precinct with multiple interventions linking the existing.

B. Site Condition (Before Intervention) Last open plot in the albaicin city.

D. Aim linking and structuring the heritage precinct.

D. Aim reviving the place culturally by opening the space for publican open space yet controlled.

C. Type/Types Of Architectural Intervention Public open space and a terrace garden catering to need of public open spaces.

E. Site Sensitivity And Nature Of Intervention Balance, visual connections, linkages and planning.

E. Site Sensitivity And Nature Of Intervention fuses naturally with the ruins and yet exhibits them explicitly.

D. Aim sustaining the heritage precinct in terms usage, revenue generation, place making and identity.

F. Articultion Between Site And Intervention Structuring by planned interventions leading to a manmade system. G. Built Vs. Open Ratio more of open spaces. H. Placemaking And Memory Natural system framed by manmade interventions.

F. Articultion Between Site And Intervention The museum stands on the ruins, framing the pat and present together.

E. Site Sensitivity And Nature Of Intervention Appropriate response to the context .

G. Built Vs. Open Ratio Built except for backyard.

F. Articultion Between Site And Intervention Suits the function in terms of response to context.

H. Placemaking And Memory The heritage, ruins and museum signify importance of Cultural Art.

G. Built Vs. Open Ratio built exept for parking spaces. H. Placemaking And Memory framing of views, vistas, and a visual narrative to the heritage around.

Source: Author

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Source: Author

Source: Author

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“UNEARTHING Culture, History and IDENTITY” Rejuvenation of a Heritage and Eco-Sensitive site, Case: Muziris, Kerala, Guide: Prof.Yatin Pandya

Capstone Project/ Post-Graduate Thesis Regional Plan and its Characteristics- Elements their Characters The excavations carried out at Pattanam boosted the significance of an otherwise ordinary village in the Ernakulum district of Kerala and placed it on the global map. According to the research, the village is a mound which stores the history of some 3000 years from circa 1000 BCE. The Pattanam finds point to the presiding role of the Indian sub-continent in transforming the Indian Ocean into a trading lake. Existing Conditions: Grid structure: The existing road pattern of Pattanam resembles that of a grid structure .Main roads branch into secondary roads and the entire network leads to water bodies; lagoons, back waters and the lakes. Temple Centric Town: The ends of the roads and junctions are marked by the presence of religious institutions which constitute the major activity nodes. They structure the activity pattern and also indicate people’s faith, belief and lifestyle . Outer Zones-commercial, Inner Zones- Residential Major commercial and mixed use settlements are near the main roads, whereas the residential settlements occur in the internal areas. Natural Slope Profile The road network follows the natural slope and the water bodies are the catchment areas which are formed according the slope in this area.

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A. Water Bodies- Lagoons, Back Waters, Lakes and Catchment areas.

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B. Road Network- Grid structure; streets branching from main roads.

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F. Vegetation- trees with more foliage, coconut plantations, spices, paddy and banana.

Dense Vegetation Pattern: The vegetation consists the following crops: Coconut plantations Paddy plantations spice plantation; pepper, cardamom Banana plantation

Pattanam: The Temple Town Source: Author

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“UNEARTHING Culture, History and IDENTITY� Rejuvenation of a Heritage and Eco-Sensitive site, Case: Muziris, Kerala, Guide: Prof.Yatin Pandya

Capstone Project/ Post-Graduate Thesis Regional Plan and its Characteristics- Elements their Characters The heritage plots marked by KCHR are the plots where the excavations have been carried out and significant finds have been unearthed indicating the town to the legendary port town of Muziris. The site consists of old vernacular settlements, water bodies and wells, restored houses, excavations and dense vegetation. Existing Conditions: Religious Town: The existing temples indicates the town to be a religious town and the religious institutions being the activity markers main zones at important junctions. Importance Of Water Sources: The catchment areas, lakes, wells and their placement indicates the growth of the civilizations at the edges of the water body and also highlights the importance of this town a port town. Archeological Excavations and Old Restored Houses: The archeological excavation indicate the rich heritage and culture of the town. They indicate the ton the legendary port town of Muziris and the find also indicate the ties with the other important ancient ports in the world. The old restored houses add a more detailed proof to the finds that indicate the history of this town. The shelter to the archeological trenches are metal grid structures currently installed on the site, which indicates the need to protect these trenches from the external forces in order to preserve our heritage and history.

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B. water sources- the lakes, small water bodies and wells scattered in the site.

C. Vernacular house clusters present in the internal areas which are the oldest houses.

D. Archeological Excavations done by KCHR present on site with metal roofing.

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E. Old Houses restored by ASI are present on the site .

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F. Site museum- is an old restored house on the site where all the exhibits have kept presently.

Site Museum: The site museum is an old restored house on the site which houses all the unearthed artifacts during the excavation process. The presence of such a structure indicates the need of a structure which interacts with the visitor as well as houses the unearthed artifacts in order to preserve them, document them and then only present them to the visitors to interpret.

Pattanam: Linking The Elements Source: Author

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“UNEARTHING Culture, History and IDENTITY” Rejuvenation of a Heritage and Eco-Sensitive site, Case: Muziris, Kerala, Guide: Prof.Yatin Pandya

Capstone Project/ Post-Graduate Thesis SWOT ANALYSIS A. Present Condition Of The Site The site has all the elements a heritage site would have: old temples, restored vernacular houses, site museum, archeological excavations, cluster of vernacular settlements. Yet, there is no platform which knits these layers together, maps them, documents them and presents them to the visitor. These layers are left abandoned and hence are losing their importance since they have been left unnoticed.

Souce: Author

Conceptual Master Plan: 8 heritage sites, more than 66 trenches, site museum and old restored houses, dense vegetation, water bodies and old temples, old vernacular settlements; all these elements make the site a heritage town worth preserving. Souce: Author

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B. Need Of The Site; Scope Of The Problem The site and the town needs an intervention which weaves all the layers into one single intervention to interpret. Archeology and the context here; the unearthed artifacts reveal certain facts which need to conveyed to the visitors. Also the excavations need to be protected form the external forces like sun, wind, water, animals and the artifacts need a controlled environment to be preserved and exhibited to the visitors. C. Emergent Direction Each hint unfolds new facts about the history and its links which can not be understood by the visitors since they do not posses the required knowledge about history and archeology. Hence an intervention is required to translate the knowledge in simpler terms to the visitors. Can architecture and conservation be seen as catalysts to do so?

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Concern: Generic Yet Specific The project aims at solving a generic issue; the heritage sites today have become dead due to the lack of certain interventions which offer an interactive platform for the visitors and engage them in interpreting the history on their own. And yet, the demonstration of the project is context specific; it deals with the context and heritage of kerela. Souce: Author

Concept Plan: Precinct plan includes; Master Planning, Site Museum, Shelter for Trenches, Spice Plantation (Spice Route), re-use of Old Restored houses, Walkway design, trails amidst the plantation. Source: Author

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Concerns: photomontages indicating the areas and extent. Source: Author

Pattanam- Current State:The temple town has these layers of History, Culture and Archeology which have not been presented well to the visitors due to which they have been neglected. Due to the lack of such platforms, the town is loosing ita importance. Souce: Author

Strategy: “Can architecture and conservation be seen as catalysts to do so?”; demonstration of the strategy. Souce: Author

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“UNEARTHING Culture, History and IDENTITY� Rejuvenation of a Heritage and Eco-Sensitive site, Case: Muziris, Kerala, Guide: Prof.Yatin Pandya

Capstone Project/ Post-Graduate Thesis MASTER PLAN- CONNECTING THE LINKS THE MAIN STREET; The spice route Main street which connects the two Temples. This street will experience new developments like commercial establishments, infrastructure facilities like hospitals, hotels, restaurants, home-stays for strengthening the tourism of the place. This entire route being the strongest in terms of frequent travel, can become the spice trading route . THE MAIN STREET; The street edge activities The street edge becomes a live exhibition of culture, tradition, local arts, spices of this place for visitors to see and experience. Also strengthens the economy and tourism. CYCLE-ABLE ROUTES; Inner streets The inner cycle-able routes saves the area from vehicular interference. Also, it maintains the ecological balance, helps the visitors experience the architecture, structure, culture and ecology of the place . SPICE CULTIVATION AREA Spice Cultivation- this strategy is beneficial in maintaining the ecological balance of the area and also as a source of income for the local people. It also signifies the purpose of Muziris as an ancient port and Spice Trading Center. PEDESTRIANIZED TRIALS; New inner routes. These trails allows the visitors to experience spices growing, entrances to the heritage sites across the precinct and also the outdoor exhibiting spaces which can be the pause points in the entire route. CUL-DE-SACS Place of confluence of culture, vernacular architecture, ecology of the place. these areas offer an opportunity to experience the culture, tradition, daily lives of the people and the vernacular architecture there.

Master Planning Strategies: strategies for linking the layers of this historical town in one pattern. Source: Author

Portfolio

site photos. Source: Author

Precinct Plan Source: Author

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“UNEARTHING Culture, History and IDENTITY� Rejuvenation of a Heritage and Eco-Sensitive site, Case: Muziris, Kerala, Guide: Prof.Yatin Pandya

Capstone Project/ Post-Graduate Thesis

Walkway Design- Ramp showing the layers of the earth below. Source: Author

Form of the walkway; transversing between 3 levels. Source: Author

DESIGN DEMONSTRATION- MUSEUM DESIGN AND HERITAGE WALK Elements of the Museum Walkway Design Museum Design The museum aims at preserving the unearthed artifacts as well as establishing a connect between the visitors and the history.

Structure- The entire museum is raised above the ground till a certain height. Source: Author

CONCEPT PLAN: Concept For The Museum Design. Source: Author

Shelter For Trenches The trenches are needed to be protected against the external forces and hence the roof becomes a protecting as well as exhibiting element for the trenches. The roof can have mirrors on the inner edge which can reflect the trenches for the visitors and make viewing for easy. Also the roof dips till the ground and allows vegetation to climb up on the outer edge. Hence the structure would not look heavy and alien on the site. Walkway Design The walkway transverses at three levels ; raised and floating above the ground, laid on the ground in the form loose stones and trails and ramp (when it transverses below the ground). also, it becomes the binding element in the entire project.

CONCEPT PLAN AND SECTIONS- option 2 Source: Author

Viewing Option forthe Trenches. Source: Author

Space inside the Museum- Shelter for the trenches and walkways in the museum. Source: Author

CONCEPT PLAN AND SECTIONS- option 1; Museum Design and Shelter for Trenches. Source: Author

CONCEPT PLAN AND SECTIONS- option 1, Museum Design and Shelter for Trenches. Source: Author

Portfolio

Ramp moving along the edges of the excavated trenches. Source: Author

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“UNEARTHING Culture, History and IDENTITY� Rejuvenation of a Heritage and Eco-Sensitive site, Case: Muziris, Kerala, Guide: Prof.Yatin Pandya

Capstone Project/ Post-Graduate Thesis

The Synthesis: The culture, tradition, local art and craft, people, architecture contribute in making the place what it is. hence architectyre and conservation can be catalysts in conserving a heritage site. Source: Author

Sections. Source: Author

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A NARRATIVE FROM THE PRESENT TO THE PAST The wooden structure and the brick walls signify the vernacular character of the place- taking in clues from the local grammar and the architecture. The roof slopes down to the ground to accomodate vegetation on the upper face and reflectory mirrors on the inner end for the visitors to view the trenches easily. The metal joinery and the glass openings and railings signify the modern age. The gravel lining, landscaped pockets, water bodies and spice plantation gives a native feel to the intervention.

sloping roof wooden structure metal joinery glass opening wood and glass railing brick walls gravel lining

Precinct Plan. Source: Author

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Sectional Detail. Source: Author

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Project “S.M.I.L.E”

Maternity Home for Fisherwomen, Chandipur, Odisha

Architectural Design Studio- 3 PROJECT “S.M.I.L.E”- MATERNITY HOME FO FISHER WOMEN OF ODISHA Odisha (formerly Orissa), an eastern Indian state on the Bay of Bengal, is known for its tribal cultures and its many ancient Hindu temples. The capital, Bhubaneswar, is home to hundreds of temples, notably the Nagara-style Mukteswar and the Lingaraj, both built in the 11th century and set around sacred Bindusagar Lake. Chandipur is a small village near the coastal region if Balasore region. the coastal region near Mirzapur area has largest settlements of the fishermen community. the site is on the opposite side of Buddhabalanga river which passes from the region. WHY THE SITE? The site presently is devoid of any immediate medical facility. The site and the nearby villages are have a lot of rural population which is devoid of any medical attention. Connectivity with the nearby towns and districts through bridges and roads is good as well as small villages and communities residing who would find the site easily approachable. The sections show indicate the threats the site faces from the sea and also how these dangers could be avoided by desired design solutions. WHY MATERNITY HOMES? The diagrams give an explanation so as to why the site needs a maternity home. The demographics support the fact that the women in the remotest villages are uneducated and unaware of the basic medical assistance they require during pregnancy. Hence the site requires a place where the women can acquire medical assistance as well as post and pre natal care, which otherwise the remote villages and communities are devoid of. HOW WILL THIS INTERVENTION ADD VALUE TO THE SITE? The diagrams show that how should the design an the conclusions from the site analysis should be applied in a way that the design adds value to site and improves the basic living condition of the communities and people residing there. HOW SHOULD THIS INTERVENTION LOOK AND FEEL LIKE? The diagrams show that how should the intervention look and feel like so that it sustains the environment, fits into it in the best particular manner and is best accepted by the people. SUSTAINABILITY; SELF-SUSTAINABLE UNIT AND A PROTOTYPE The diagrams show how the unit can be made self sufficient by using simple techniques. They also show that how should the intervention look and feel like so that it sustains the environment, fits into it in the best particular manner and is best accepted by the people. The diagram depicts that the unit can become a region specific prototype and can be installed wherever there is need of such a structure.

Portfolio

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Project “S.M.I.L.E”

Maternity Home for Fisherwomen, Chandipur, Odisha

Architectural Design Studio- 3

BUILT ENVELOPE .... JUNCTIONS.... MATERIALS; Mud, Timber, Thatch, Stone And Brick

FLOOR....

ENVELOPE....

SKETCHES;

Material, Components and Envelope Study

ROOF....

MASSING.... SECTIONS;

MATERIALS AND COMPONENTS....

WATTLE AND DAUB....

BUILT FORM PATTERNS....

WALL SECTIONS

MODELS

Built Form, Culture and Hierarchy of Spaces

CONCEPTUAL SKETCHES- Studies and documentation showing the material, technique and built envelope for construction and vernacualr architecture of Orissa.

Portfolio

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Project “S.M.I.L.E”

Maternity Home for Fisherwomen, Chandipur, Odisha

Architectural Design Studio- 3

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Master Plan- Maternity Home for Fisher women of Odisha

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Legend: 1.driveway 2.frontyard and Entrance 3. Admin and Waiting Area 4.central Walkway with Seating, Bamboo Jallis and Landscaped Pockets 5. Central Courtyard with Play Area 6. Worship and Gathering Area 7. Private Courtyard 8. Maternity Home 9. Dining Area 10. Kitchen and Preparation Area 11. Washing Area 12. Gathering Area 13. Living Area for Midwives 14. Delivery Rooms, Child Care and Services 15. Child Care Area 16. Public Toilets 17. Multipurpose Area 18. Outdoor Gathering and Activity Area 19. Laundry, Drying, Stitching and Storage Area 20. Washing and Drying Area 21. Backyard with Wells and Pottery Area 22. Temporary Outdoor Storage Area for Vegetables and Harvest 23. Backyards and Activity Areas 24. Banana Plantation Area 25. Backyard with Space for Cattle 26. Vegetable Plantation Area

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PROJECT “S.M.I.L.E”- MATERNITY HOME FOR FISHER WOMEN OF ODISHA The region in which this structure is situated in nearby the sea and prone to cyclonic winds and heavy rainfall. The climate is hot and humid. The maternity home is panned in a manner which supports the wind flow and uses the local building materials so that the structure is sustainable. The maternity home is planned according to the planning principles of rural Orissa house. The house consists of front yard, living area, central courtyard, outdoor activity area, backyard with water bodies, worship area, cattle grazing, vegetable harvesting and firewood storage areas, kitchen, dining, outdoor cooking area and gathering areas. All these components have specific placement in accordance with each other. The maternity home with all its components has been planned in the same manner so that the arrangement, usage, look and feel of the place is not alien to the women here. Since the women hail from a backward class, they are more orthodox in terms of how often they come out of their homes and in what conditions. In such circumstances it is important to acknowledge the importance of context and a homely environment for the women who are expecting. Hence the maternity home with its wall art, outdoor spaces, courtyards, gathering areas gives the feel of a traditional Orissa settlement and hence makes the environment more homely and safe for the women to come and stay.

Section BB’

Portfolio

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The “MUSEUM OF CIVILIZATIONS AND MEMORIAL FOR HUMAN SPIRIT”

Museum and Memorial at Lothal

Architectural Design Studio- 2 LOTHAL; THE TALE OF A LOST CIVILIZATION Lothal; one of the most prominent cities of the ancient Indus valley civilization is located in Bhāl region of the modern state of Gujarāt and dating from 2400 BCE. Discovered in 1954, Lothal was excavated from 13 February 1955 to 19 May 1960 by the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI). Lothal›s dock—the world›s earliest known, connected the city to the Sabarmati river on the trade route between Harappan cities in Sindhand the peninsula of Saurashtra. It was a vital and thriving trade center in ancient times, with its trade of beads, gems and valuable ornaments reaching the far corners of West Asia and Africa. EXCAVATED LOTHAL On plan, Lothal stands 285 metres x 228 metres. At the height of its habitation, it covered a wider area since remains have been found 300 metres south of the mound. Due to the fragile nature of unbaked bricks and frequent floods, the superstructures of all buildings have receded. Dwarfed walls, platforms, wells, drains, baths and paved floors are still visible.

“The Conjecture”; The historical town of Lothal- as described in literature studies.

THE DOCKYARD The dockyard was located away from the main current to avoid deposition of silt. It possessed a lock-gate system—a wooden door could be lowered at the mouth of the outlet to retain a minimum column of water in the basin . The pedestal was high to provide maximum protection from floods. THE WAREHOUSE The warehouse was located close to the acropolis, to allow tight supervision by ruling authorities.

“The Conjecture”; The historical town of Lothal- as described in literature studies.

Lothal plan

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ACROPOLIS AND THE LOWER TOWN The acropolis was the town centre, its political and commercial heart. There were three streets and two lanes running east-west, and two streets running north-south. The houses had mud plinths. The baths were primarily located in the acropolis—mostly two-roomed houses with open courtyards. The Lower town marketplace was on the main north-south street 6–8 metres (20–26 ft) wide. Built in straight rows on either side of the street are residences and workshops. The street maintained a uniform width and did not undergo encroachment during the reconstructive periods after deluges. There are multiple two-roomed shops and workplaces of coppersmiths and blacksmiths THE BEAD FACTORY The bead factory, which performs a very important economic function, possesses a central courtyard and eleven rooms, a store and a guardhouse.

“Composition”, “the Built and the Void”; concept sketches

Portfolio

The Present Lothal: Dockyard, House Plinths and Wells Made Of Sundried Bricks, Lower Town, Acropolis and Community Bath, Raised Storage for granary.

“Resemblance”- Concept sketch

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The “MUSEUM OF CIVILIZATIONS AND MEMORIAL FOR HUMAN SPIRIT”

Museum and Memorial at Lothal

Architectural Design Studio- 2 VISUAL ANALOGY; THE CONCEPT The concept revolves around establishing a logical, meaningful, indicative and visual analogy between the old and the new, between what exists and what is to be established. The concept acknowledges the architectural elements of Lothal; as and where they existed namely the acropolis, the lower town, the market street, the warehouse, the bead factory, the cemetery and the unexcavated. It also acknowledges the culture and significance this civilization has adhered to.

“The Vision”- Concept Sketch for the Museum

The “unbuilt” or the open spaces are structured to portray the natural landscape of the place in the form of the vegetation, terrain etc. Whereas the built spaces are structured to preserve the excavated elements which indicate the age of this lost civilization as well as narrates the historical existence of this town in the visual narratives. These visual narratives with the help of architectural props make a visual time line along which the visitor moves. Hence the museum and the memorial together constitute a journey at different levels; where each level unravels and frames the existing archeological landscape on the other side of the dockyard. Hence the journey starts from the memorial, moves along the museum, ends at the gathering space and then moves forward towards the natural landscape of Lothal from where the visitor then chooses to either explore the natural landscape or return to the starting point.

Concept Sketch- Museum of Civilizations

Concept Sketches for the Museum and its Spaces

Portfolio

“Vistas”- Concept Sketch for the Museum

Museum and the Memorial- Concept Sketch

“The Doorway”- Concept sketch for the Memorial

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The “MUSEUM OF CIVILIZATIONS AND MEMORIAL FOR HUMAN SPIRIT”

Museum and Memorial at Lothal

Architectural Design Studio- 2 MUSEUM OF CIVILIZATIONS AND MEMORIAL OF HUMAN SPIRIT The design is am amalgamation of old and the new, the dockyard being the dividing line. On one side of the dockyard exists the old historical landscape of Lothal. On the other side , the new design transverses in and out of the land and opens up at certain points where it frames the landmarks on the other side and responds to those landmarks with the help of artistic and architectural props on this side. Each landmark is framed through a deck which open up at a point from which the landmark on the other side is framed. the warehouse, the acropolis, the bead factory, the market street and the lower town and the cemetery are framed from the decks and he journey through these decks displays the setting in which these landmarks existed during the historical times.

Part Plan“A”

The paths transverse in and out of the earth keeping in mind the climatic conditions of this place. The building material used here is mud so that the structure stays cool even during summers. The decks open up near the dockyard framing the landmark on the other side. Also, to break the monotony, there are openings which lead to the landscape outside giving the visitor the chance to take a break and explore the surroundings. 0 5

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The design uses Water, Light, Landscape, Building Material, Openings, Wall Art and Murals etc. as props to narrate the journey for the visitor to understand the town and history. the journey knits it oath in and out, up and down though the new and old narrating the story of this historic civilization which fought against all olds and survived.

Master Plan- Museum of Civilizations and Memorial of Human Spirit

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Part Plan “C”

Part Plan“B”

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“Meandering”- Concept sketch for landscape design of museum.

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The “OASIS”

Urban Historical park, Restructuring of Bhikabhai Park and Karnavati Art Gallery, Ashram road, Ahmedabad ASHRAM ROAD; EVOLUTION AND NATURE Ahmedabad- Ashram Road Deriving its name from Sabarmati Ashram.Gandhi Ashram represents an important element of the city›s history. Ashram road and surrounding area serves as important tourist destination that could be a possible stimulus for economic development, addressing both city›s goals for development . Ashram Road : 1. Major regional connection and principal commercial corridor carries approximately 12,00015,000 cars during peak hours from its intersection with Nava Vadaj Road to Sardar Bridge. 2. Commercial land uses south of Nehru Bridge, encourages high level of activity in this area. 3. Uses at northern extent are influenced by Gandhi Ashram and are more residential with some emerging commercial industries. 4. On east bank of Sabarmati lays old city and west side is new city, which developed in late 1800›s .

Architectural Design Studio- 1 Development of Ashram Road 1935-2010

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1. Small scale buildings with low building heights on the main spine. 2. Mismatch of scale as height and footprints of the building. Development from 1935-1950

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1. Characterized by slightly lower density land uses, but is still starting to evolve as busy portion of the corridor. 2. Slight change in the character of the built form with increase in height and density. Development from 1950-1965

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1. Development of multistoried structures and drastic increase in the built from and heights of the buildings. 2. Evolution of the commercial structures on the stretch with dense activities. Development from 1965-1980 1. Evolution of mixed land use; majorly commercial . 2. Evolution of major and commercial landmarks generating heavy traffic and inflow of lots of activities. 3. Gradual increase in the skyline and density of the area.

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Figure Ground Map - Ashram Road

Road Network And Landmarks 1. Gujarat Vidyapeeth 2. Reserve Bank 3. Bank Of Baroda 4. All India Radio/ Income Tax Circle 5. Mount Carmel School 6. Reserve Bank Of India 7. Aatma- Mill Owners Association 8. City Gold Multiplex 9. Vallabh Sadan 10. Old Nataraj Theatre 11. Times Of India Office 12. Town Hall 13. Gujarat College

Central Business District Area on Ashram road that has been identified as central business district (CBD) is bounded by Ellis Bridge to south and Gandhi Bridge to north. It is currently characterized by commercial development. Commercial land uses south of Nehru Bridge encourage a high level of activity in this area. Highest densities in corridor study area are located here, particularly between Ellis Bridge and Gandhi Bridge. Despite this being a dense, active commercial area, building heights are generally less than 10 stories. The Transition District serves as an attractive residential area because of its close proximity to both the CBD and the Historic District. Land values in the transition district are slightly less than in the CBD and they continue decrease as one continues north. Portfolio

1. Full fledged development of the area into main commercial corridor of Ahmedabad. 2. Transforming into busiest corridor of the city with the major bridges being the sole connection between east and west banks of river Sabarmati. 0 200 400 600 800m

Development from 1995-2010

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1. Currently characterized by commercial development, small percentage of residential and public land. 2. The highest densities are located here, particularly between Ellis Bridge and Gandhi Bridge, small amount of residential development. 3. Despite this being a dense, active commercial area, building heights are generally less than 10 stories. Present Day Skyline Of Ashram Road

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The “OASIS”

Urban Historical park, Restructuring of Bhikabhai Park and Karnavati Art Gallery, Ashram road, Ahmedabad

Architectural Design Studio- 1

Restructuring the Public Park

Bhikhabhai Public Park- Why the Place?

The Site

Front Elevation

Back Elevation

Back Elevation

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Plan At -10› 91/2»

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3. Bhikabhai Public Park And The Riverfront

Plan- Bhikabhai Garden , Scale 1:2500

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Bhikabhai Public Park And Karnavati Art Gallery 1. Acts as a buffer space amidst the dense fabric and also benifits from its strategic location. 2. It is breathing space fro the people traversing both the ends of the city. 3. The site has the capability to be treated as a potential Urban Park as an insert coupled with the adjoining land of Sabarmati Riverfront, which provides a view of the river as well as access to the Riverfront, generating a wide variety of activities. 4. The present condition of the site remains in an untreated and ill maintained condition, leading to generation of unused spaces within the park which have a lot of potential to be turned as urban interactive spaces for the common public. 5. Since the site lies in between the old and the new city, it is easily accessible by the people coming from both the ends of the city as pause/relaxation point, hence creating a platform for interaction of all the generations. 6. Visible from all main surrounding landmarks of the city, the site offers a perfect platform for urban restructuring of the park and addition of other functions. 23 | T.Shruti.P.Rao


The “OASIS”

Urban Historical park, Restructuring of Bhikabhai Park and Karnavati Art Gallery, Ashram road, Ahmedabad

Architectural Design Studio- 1

Part Plans- Amphitheater

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“OASIS”- A Green Relief to the city... The urban park acts a cultural bridge between the old and the new city. It aims at reuniting the lost layers of culture, religion, architecture, people and their lifestyle along with the traditional landscape of the city. The architecture of the park; with a modern planning and landscape responds and looks towards the fort wall across the river. The park comprises of the entrance and exhibition gallery; keeping these old structures intact, follicles as the pause points which are the multi functional shelter places for the users of the city. The walkways pass through these follicles and the landscape around them engages the users with the green spaces.

Urban Park- First Level Plan

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The amenities like Amphitheater, Performance spaces, Public toilets, Skating rings, Jogging tracks, Parking and open air exhibition spaces, open and covered sit out spaces, paved areas for gatherings and multi functional activities for the civilians provides for a more planned infrastructure in the form of a breathing space for the city.

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The cultural wall; an audio-visiual wall, runs across the length of the park and faces the fort wall. It showcases the history and culture of the city, its evolution and screens the heritage of Ahmedabad which has recently completed hundred years of existence.

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The “MONOLITH”

Residence Design for Indira Nooyi

Architectural Design Studio- 1

Alloha Hills, Gandhinagar Gujarat, N.T.S Plot Area: 5000sqm Permissible Built Up- 500sqm

“THINK FLOW” The brief demanded a residence for Indra Krishnamurthy Nooyi ( India-born, naturalized American, business executive and the current Chairperson and Chief Executive Officer of PepsiCo, the second largest food and beverage business in the world by net revenue). She has consistently ranked among the World›s 100 Most Powerful Women. In 2014, she was ranked 13 in the list of Forbes World›s 100 most powerful women. The site is amidst the lush green surroundings of Alloha hills, Gandhinagar. The brief demanded a residence to signify “flow” for a powerful icon of our nation.

Site Grid: 10m x 10m N.T.S

CONCEPT: “THINK FLEXIBILITY” The concept signifies “flow” as a synonym to “flexibility”. The area chosen in the site area given is the highest point of the site. The structure is monolith residing at the highest point of the site reinforcing the idea of “power”. The conscious decision of choosing the highest point was to conserve the lush-green surroundings, making the surroundings more “view-able” and to make the residence more porous. DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS : 1. The design incorporates the essential grid structure with porous walls, large openings and flexible spaces; spaces which can alter their arrangement according to the use and according to what the situation demands. 2. The walls and the cantilevers jutt out of the structure providing for openings and verandahs. 3. The openings frame the nature in a subtle manner, making the outdoor spaces more peaceful. 4. The landscape involves only the natural settings and less interference with the serene settings amidst which the house is located. 5. The natural structure of the contour has been used to carve out outdoor seating and recreational spaces.

“The Monolith”; Residence For Indira Nooyi

Location: Highest Point of the Site

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The Site and the Structure

Porous Walls and “view-able” Outdoor Spaces.

The Site and the Structure

STUDIO 1:10

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The “HOUSE OF SMALL THINGS” Residence Design for Arundhati Roy

Architectural Design Studio- 1 “THINK LIGHT” The brief demanded a residence for Arundhati Roy; the famous novelist and political activist, in Dariyapur which is in old city of Ahmedabad. The site is an empty plot which shares walls with the adjacent old houses in Kika Bhat Ni Pol. The idea was to built the house on a site which is away from the hustle bustle of the city, in the traditional settings of the old city and amidst the traditional architecture of the old city.

Dariyapur, Old City, Ahmedabad, N.T.S Gujarat Plot Size: 16 X 8 M, Permissible Built Up- 200sqm, Permissible Height- 12m

Dariyapur, Old City, Ahmedabad

Kika Bhat Ni Pol;Dariyapur, Old City

CONCEPT: “THINK LIGHT” “I’m trained as an architect; writing is like architecture. In buildings, there are design motifs that occur again and again, that repeat -- patterns, curves. These motifs help us feel comfortable in a physical space. And the same works in writing, I›ve found. For me, the way words, punctuation and paragraphs fall on the page is important as well -- the graphic design of the language.” -Arundhati Roy

The old city has restrictions in space, all the houses in pols share walls and have restrictions in space inside and outside the house. Also, due to restrained spaces, there is a shortage of light in the houses. The concept was use the required space in the best possible way to obtain light in the house by using the given space in best possible manner to plan the residence. DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS : 1. Provision of light tunnels in the living and private spaces for sufficient light in all the spaces of the residence. 2. Since the residence shares walls with the adjacent houses, central courtyard has been provided for cross ventilation. 3. Jaalis have been used as design feature in the residence to give a native feel to the house. 4. All other vernacular architectural elements have been used which exist in the vernacular houses of the pols. 5. Bold elements like straight flight staircase, blank walls etc. Have been used as the minimalistic design features keeping in mind the nature of the client.

Drawings of the Residence; Section Aa’ and Section Bb’

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Site Section: Existing and with the residence as the intervention light diagram of the residence; Light to Dark

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Models of the Residence

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IDEAL CITIES

Conceptual Design for an Ideal City, Lutyens, Delhi, Guided By: Prof. Rajiv Kadam

Urban Design (Semester 2) IDEAL CITIES The subject was concerned with studying the aspects of an idela city an applying it to a real site which could be chosen anywhere in india. The aspects of an ideal city were to be applied to the chosen site and a model for an ideal city was to be developed with conceptuals and plans for the same. “IDEAL” CITY • “Ideal” nature encompasses the moral, spiritual and juridical qualities of citizenship as well as the ways in which these are realised through urban structures including buildings, street layout, etc. • It is an attempt to deploy utopian ideals at local level of urban configuration, living space and amenity rather than at the culture- or civilisation-wide level of the classical utopias. • A form of social and political organisation which allows its individuals and itself to maximise its potentials in accordance with the universal laws of truth; hence is ever changing and evolving. CONTEXT site: lutyens, delhi area: 2600 hectares population: 3,90,000 density: 150 ppl/hectare mobility: 30 mins(max.) speed: 12km/hr road width: max. 25 mt. work force participation: 33%, 1,28,000 WHAT DOES IDEAL MEAN IN THIS CONTEXT? A city ready for change; for the betterment of the city and its individuals, leaving scope for self sustenance. A city which includes the following physical aspects for an ideal life : socio cultural aspects; affordability, taxes, employment, opportunities, real estate, low crime rates, proximity in terms of friends and relatives, education system, culture, food options, proximity in terms of distances, commute time and public transport options town size shape and image of the city etc. A city which promotes mixed land use and development rather than disparate segregation . A city which promotes a pleasurable experience for the visitors in terms of strong visual characters, landmarks, street character, nodes and junctions, cul-de-sacs, neighbourhoods which at micro level. The project aims at adhering to all the above mentioned aspects of an ideal city and demonstrating the features by selecting a viable area in the chosen site.

Portfolio

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IDEAL CITIES

Portfolio

Conceptual Design for an Ideal City for Lutyens, Delhi, Guided By: Prof. Rajiv Kadam

Urban Design (Semester 2)

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URBAN CONSERVATION

A document on Urban Conservation of Pols of Old City (Sankdi Sheri) Old City, Ahmedabad, Guided by: Prof. Jigna Desai INTRODUCTION: Sankdi sheri is a narrow commercial street with entrances to other pols and variety of street edge activities. One end leads to manek chowkand the other end to the interiors of the pol. every pol has a small open spaces with clustered arrangement of houses; the open space different roles at various times of in a day. these open soaces are the buffer zones in densely packed areas. Rather than being “outside” they are the “inside” for the people. With the increase in the population and the inflow of migrants from different other states and the issue of space crunch the importance of such spaces is lost. unavailability of spaces for parking, movement, commercial activity and other daily activities makes people encorach on such open spaces which should actually be an important resource. This document deals with providing solutions for such problems and suggesting methodology to conserve these spaces using different approaches.

Manek Chowk and Pols around, Old City, Ahmedabad

The site deals with the central open spaces in devji saraia ni pol ; having diffrerent functions and utilities such as play court, parking spaces, seating spaces, spaces for the only tree in the neighbourhood etc. These spaces are rendered uslesss due to the unavailability of movement spaces, no spaces for parking sue to which they are using up the play court area and no play equipments available. These courtyards are surrounded by intricately carved houses which are no more to be found elsewhere in the old city. The facade has lost it charm due to encroachment of the immediate space by vehicles for parking. The platforms, the flooring, the masonary work are in a dilapidated state, broken benches and other street furniture is absent. Due to such problems, even the most beautifull spaces become useless due to the unavailability of resources.

Central courtyard and activities around the space in the pol.

Hence to summarize the problems pertaining to the site are: Lack of movement space, Lack of seating spaces, Space encroached by parking, Disrupted flooring, Unhygienic spaces, Lack of maintenance of the play area and the spaces around the tree and Facades of the houses surrounding the open spaces not maintained.

Street section: one house facing the blank wall of other tall house.

AIM : To restructure the open spaces which is more usable for the residents, provides for a more structured space for parking, facilitates organized movement, provides a common clean ground for occasions like festivals and common gatherings etc. Street section: front facade of two houses opposite each other.

Space ‘A’

Site Photos- Sankdi Sheri, Old City, Ahmedabad

Portfolio

Plan: street activities after interventions, sankdi sheri, old city, ahmedabad

Space ‘B’

Space ‘C’ Space ‘D’ Central Courtyards: design of open spaces for interactions.

Courtyard Design : illustration of the guidelines.

METHODOLOGY OF CONSERVATION : A. Protection and Restoration-What ?? Restoration would include the following: • Intricatelly carved houses and their elements of the facade which are years old. • Antique street furniture which are years old and are part of the identity of that particular pol, for ex. the chabutra. • Also, exisitng trees are to be conserved since they are imstrumental in maintaining the ecology of the surroundings. HOW ?? • Guidelines for their restoration can be: • No hoardings or signage to be put up on the facades of the houses facing the streets or the common open spaces. • No parking to be done near the facade of the house i.E atleast 1m near the house or its otla to avoid damages. • Spitting/urinating or other inhuman activities would incur fine. • Trees and plants no to be cut without prior permission. Permission to be granted only when it is absolutely necesary to remove in order

Urban Conservation to maintain the other sevices. RESTORATION - WHO ?? • Houses and Their Facades- ASI to take up the responsibility of protecting the facades of these ornamental houses. • Protection or Restoration of the Antique Street furnitureASI to take up the job of protecting the street furniture. • Fine on harming the facade elements or any other aspect of the open spaces - Can be partly taken up by the police authorities of the pertaining area of the old city and public participation by the local residents. B. RENOVATION AND RECONSTRUCTION -WHAT ?? • RENOVATION/RECONSTRUCTION of basic amenities like the ruptured flooring in the open spaces, masonary work of broken wall surfaces of play court, raised otlas for the tree etc. • Removal of old broken benches and provision for new ones in the open spaces and other gatheing areas/ courtyards. • Provision of basic street furniture like street lights, drain covers, gutters etc. • Cladding the walls, otlas and other damaged parts of the facade. • refurbishsing the damaged the services like play courts, play equipments, dust bins etc. • Provision for alternate parking spaces to free of these open spaces for other multipurpose activities. HOW?? • Guidelines for reconstruction and maintainence of the amenities • The cladding material should resemble the material of the existing facade to give a sense of belonging to the particlaur pol. • Provision of economic flooring material, no digging allowed without prior permission. • Conserving the street furniture and other amenities, cutting the electircity wires and other illegal activites to be fined. • Reconstruction of the otlas around the tree and other required places. The level of the otlas is not to be raised more than the level of the existing otlas of the houses. WHO ?? • The major renovation work which includes the masonary work or can also involve drainage work etc. will be handled and financed by the AMC and other local panchayat authorities. • The reinstallation of the benches, street furniture and other amenities to be done by the AMC and the Local Authorities. The cost for doing so will be bourne by these organizations.The installation of play equipemnets in the play area will be bourne together by all the local residents. • The provision of gutter covers and other street furniture will be done and all costs taken care of by the AMC. NOTE: Public Participation is a very important aspect in conserving a neighbourhood and hence active participation form all the residents will be necessary.

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KEY TEXTS

History, Theory and Criticism, Blogs on Historical Movements

History, Theory and Criticism

The writings are published blogs and articles based on important movements in the history of architecture.

DECORATION OR DECORUM ???

Lecture by Prof. A.Srivathsan

PHENOMENON OF A SPACE, Writings of Christiam Noberg Schulz

Adolf Loos, was an Austrian and Czechoslovak architect who was influential in European Modern architecture, and in his essay “Ornament and Crime”, he abandoned the aesthetic principles of the Vienna Secession. In this and many other essays he contributed to the elaboration of a body of theory and criticism of Modernism in architecture and design. He stressed on the idea that the progress of culture would be accelerated by the removal of ornament from everyday objects, and hence it was a crime to force craftsmen to waste their time on ornamentation that served to hasten the time when an object would become obsolete. Loos’s stripped-down buildings influenced the minimal massing of modern architecture, and stirred controversy. On the contrary, some of his architectural work were elaborately decorated, inside rather than the outside, and the ornamented interiors displayed abstract planes and shapes composed of richly figured materials, such as marble and exotic woods. The visual distinction was not between complicated and simple, but between “organic” and superfluous decoration.

Lecture by Prof. Gauri Bharat

Design theories are often derived from larger cultural and philosophical movements where they drive their inspiration from. This was certainly the case with the use of phenomenology and its application in design as expressed in the writings of Christian Norberg-Schulz (1926-2000). He was a Norwegian architect, author, historian and an educator. He drew from the phenomenological works of Martin Heidegger which helped him develop a critique towards modern architecture and urban design and also expressed a strong urge for place-making design. His writings emphasized on the thought that each place has poetic quality and a spiritual sense of their own which should incorporated in the design as in important characteristic. The most influential works of Christian NorbergSchulz can be listed as- Intentions In Architecture(1963), Existence, Space And Architecture(1971), meaning in Western Architecture(1974) and Genius Loci(1980). All his works are a direct response to the perceived crisis in design profession. He suggests that designers should built visible, differentiate and “concretize” the physical character and the essence of the place. Works of Norberg Schulz parallels the works authors like Charles Jencks, Kevin Lynch, Aldo Rossi And Robert Venturi who talked about similar theories like text, imagibility, legibility in design. He witnessed the blight of architecture in his time, where modern architecture ignored the relationship between a man and his environment. The buildings were considered as machines and the spiritual quality of the spaces was being dismissed. This is time when he raised the question of why do human beings establish a certain sense

Today, I speak about his influential essay “ornament and crime” which attacked the position of ornament in art, written in 1908 but published on 21st January 1910 under the German title “Ornament und Verbrechen”. It was under this challenging title that in 1913 the essay was translated into French. This essay was written when art-nouveau was beginning to diminish in the 1900s and was leading to a new way towards modern art. The essay was influential in articulating one’s thoughts and inferences towards the arts and crafts movement and also fuelled the ideology of modernism in architecture. “Evolution of culture marches with the elimination of ornament from useful objects”. It was during this time that the industrialisation was at its peak, due to which most the labour class of Europe was rendered unemployed. During this time that Loos’s writings conveyed the fact that ornament was a hindrance in the evolution of the society and culture. He said that the pleasure of simplicity was the aesthetics of our culture. According to him it was a crime to spend exuberant amount of time just decorating the exterior, which would someday go out of style and become obsolete. He introduced a sense of “immorality” of ornament describing it as degenerate. He went to defend his arguments by giving an example of “tattooing” of the “Papuan”. He claimed that simple and pure forms gave rise to joy and satisfaction to the common man.

of attachment with their surroundings in which they “dwell”? What is it to “exist” in this world ? It was a whole new voice, a new beginning, where NorbergSchulz, with his first book Intentions In Architecture, displayed almost a structuralist attitude, where he tried to lay down a system which explained that how people engaged with their environments. He established the fact that meaning and experience are two different attributes of a space which should be incorporated in the design and gave rise to the concept of “schema” of a place. His major inspiration behind doing so was Human Psychology. This lead him to write his second book Existence Space and Architecture, where he said that architecture was just not a physical construct. When people build, they settle with a greater idea of cosmos. Ideas like “Centre” and “Periphery” started being clear through his writings, which is where his inspiration from Heidegger’s thoughts started becoming concrete. Heidegger’s writings like Being and Time and especially Building, Dwelling, Thinking acted as keystones in shaping up Norberg-Schulz’s thoughts while writing this book. Through this book, he tried to analyse and answer questions like – what is the meaning of dwelling? what does it mean to dwell? what does it mean to “be” in this world? what is the kind of connections a human being establishes while he starts to settle in his environment?

Loos concluded that “No ornament can any longer be made today by anyone who lives on our cultural level ... Freedom from ornament is a sign of spiritual strength”. He was a man of belief that it was not the static world of Banister where one could draw something with a stick and observe its beauty. There was a constant argument about how was it fair to have excess when there was so much of imbalance witnessed between the rich and poor. He believes that the people of the nineteenth century still believed that ornament was the essence of the building and made it look charming. In the absence of it, no other style could be visualised or developed. He disapproved the fact by saying that ornamented objects blocked a man’s vision towards the simple and pure forms, and hence he believed in stripping down his building to the minimal of everything to let the man see the “pure” form. On the contrary, the interior of his buildings displayed enormous decoration with abstract planes and rich materials. Also, he reviewed the importance of ornament saying that the amount of time, energy and skilled labour which was invested in achieving ornamentation of that elite level had to have a certain amount of importance. He respected that fact the labourer enjoyed the intimate involvement with the ornament he gave birth to, compared to modern labourer, who even though doing less amount of work earned the same.

Heidegger spoke about the dwelling being more about establishing a spiritual and fundamental connect with the environment rather than just a physical act of building, which is the poetic discussion from where Norberg-Schulz picked up his writings and took them further to integrate these thoughts with architecture. In his next book Meaning in Western Architecture, he speaks about schema and the gesture of people towards their environment. He discussed further that architecture can not be looked upon as pragmatic terms but also has deeper symbolic meaning. He carried forward the same idea in his next book called Genius Loci, where he further tried to study the intangible character of the spaces.

Hence the essay reviews the critical stance of the importance of removal of ornament from the society in view of the imbalance seen in the society. The essay stated the role of ornamentation in the destruction of culture and society in the late nineteenth and twentieth century architecture. He strongly argued that there was no place for ornamentation in the contemporary culture and hence he advocated for simplicity, because simplicity never goes out of style and hence the object would be cherished forever. His radical assertions were widely accepted during the post World-War 1 European scenario, and the essay was incorporated into the canons of the modern movement. His anti-ornamental arguments and position had a huge impact on the shape and the character of the world’s major metropolises, post World War -1.

Genius Loci is a roman concept which speaks about the spirit of the place. He said that all spaces have their spirit which structures the relations human beings establish with their environment. He categorised the architecture and classified them into categories like romantic, classic and cosmic landscapes. According to Norberg-Schulz, it was the architect who recognised this spirit and had to interpret it in the design. His writings, although being the path changer in the early post-modernist period, were criticised heavily. Some of them being that phenomenology was a concept as a whole and cannot be subdivided into entities. The idea of spirit of the place being different from the physical character, portrayed in his writings contrasted the concept of phenomenology. Also, the loci of a space already exists, architecture only gives it a form and concretizes, making it visible. Unlike other forms of art, the loci of a space is not a communicator, rather it is mediator through which the relations come in existence and start developing. One of the major critiques about his work was that he interpreted Heidegger’s idea of dwelling into a social utopia. His architectural phenomenology writings reflected a key turning point in the early phases of postmodernism and a legitimating source for those architects who first dared to confront history as an intellectual problem and not merely as a stylistic question. Initially, the concept that experience could be a timeless architectural language provided a unifying intellectual basis for the stylistic pluralism that characterized postmodernism. his writings helped give theory—especially the theory of architectural history—a new importance over practice.

Link to the published blog: https://htcshruti.wordpress.com/2015/02/23/decoration-or-decorum/

Link to the published blog: https://htcshruti.wordpress.com/2015/03/29/phenomenon-of-a-place-writings-of-christian-norberg-schulz/

Portfolio

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SEMIOTICS

Timeline for Semiotics

An Introduction to Theory in Architecture; Timeline on Semiotics

History, Theory and Criticism

AN INTORDUCTION TO THEORY IN ARCHITECTURE The subject dealt with detailed study of one of the major movements in architectural history, reasearch on the works/writings/books that gave a detailed insight about the topic, annotated bibliography of the writers/academicians/ scholars/poets/artisits related to the subject. All this data and the study was to be filtered and presented in the form of a timeline which indicated the starting period/important dates /periods, time span when the topic was researched nad written upon the most and then gradually the decline. SEMIOTICS Semiotics is the study of signs and sign processes (semiosis), indication, designation, likeness, analogy, metaphor, symbolism, signification, and communication. It is closely related to the field of linguistics, which, for its part, studies the structure and meaning of language more specifically. The semiotic tradition explores the study of signs and symbols as a significant part of communications. As different from linguistics, however, semiotics also studies non-linguistic sign systems. Semiotics may be divided into three branches: Semantics, Syntactics and Pragmatics. TIMELINE Each line in the grid of the timeline indicates 5 years. Hence the enitre span of the grid inidcates 114 years during which this topic was researched and written upon the most, during which the most phenomenal writings related to the topic were written. It also shows the annotated bibliography of the writers of the book and brief summaries of the book and the photos of the writers and covers of the book.

Portfolio

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M/s. Beyond Green (Architecture | Landscape Architecture)

“SPREADING EDGES” Architecture and Residential Landscape, Gandhinagar, Gujarat

“Spreading Edges” The project changes the visual axis of the garden from being linear to transverse towards the lobbies on both sides. Small projections from the lobby quietly nestle in garden to create spaces for passive recreation. Garden slices in between two buildings and slowly seeps in, fusing the boundaries of the hardscape and softscape. Handmade tiles, exposed brickwork around the existing neem tree and fine sand reinforces the earthy character of the space and allows the landscape to change along with seasons.

Landscape plan

Photographs after the completion of the project

Portfolio

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“SPREADING EDGES” Architecture and Residential Landscape, Gandhinagar, Gujarat

M/s. Beyond Green (Architecture | Landscape Architecture)

Working Drawings

Portfolio

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“MEANDERING MEADOWS” Landscape for Applewoods Township, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

M/s. Beyond Green (Architecture | Landscape Architecture) “Meandering Meadows” The project meanders in the form of a lake surrounding a lush green pathway that slices accross the open plot. The pathway overlooks the waterbody on both the sides with circular halt points being the lawns and the seating areas in between the pathways. The pathways starts and ends at two entrance plazas. This project acts as breather amidst the rows of houses in a township. The gentle slopes of the lake accomodatse lush green shrubs and tree groves on the edges of the landscapes plot, making it feel like a natural retreat amidst a dense livable area.

Working Drawings

Photographs after the completion of the project

Portfolio

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“MEANDERING MEADOWS” Landscape for Applewoods Township, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

M/s. Beyond Green (Architecture | Landscape Architecture)

Photographs after the completion of the project

Working Drawings

Portfolio

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M/s. Beyond Green (Architecture | Landscape Architecture)

“MONDEAL SQUARE” Landscape for Mondeal Square Commercial park, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

“Mondeal Square” The varying planters of different heights with lush green plantation amidst a busy highway in the city becomes stand point accross the stretch. The planters happen at different level on the entrance steps and have a flowy structure. The rear plaza acts a gathering point where the floor lines with the rectangular planters and the lit benches are oriented towards the entrance of the structure and look like jet grey lines moving towards the center. The lighting is the main feature of the landscape which compliments the lighting of the main building.

Conceptual sketches

Rearside plaza- plan

Mondeal Square Commercial Park- photgraphs of the completed project

Portfolio

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“MONDEAL SQUARE” Landscape for Mondeal Square Commercial park, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

M/s. Beyond Green (Architecture | Landscape Architecture)

Plan- Phases ‘A’ and ‘B’

Elevation- Phase ‘A’

Elevation- Phase ‘B’

Portfolio

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“VIVERRA AND TIDE AND TURF” Landscape and Architecture for Tide n Turf Clubhouse, Temple landscape and Viverra Township, Vadodara, Gujarat

M/s. Beyond Green (Architecture | Landscape Architecture)

“Viverra and Tide n Turf” The project involves landscape and architeure for this township in Vadodara. The entire landscape revolves around the halt points in the project; the entrance, Tide n Turf club and the temple being the main halt points. The entrance houses the grand water feature with landscape orienting itself to the direction of the entrance. The water feature becomes the attration point in the project which repeats itself at the entrance of the lanes to the houses in the township. The architecture and landscape of the clubhouse compliment each other where the landscaped spaces merge with the spaces being formed inside the clubhouse. The central spine joins the two wings of the clubhouse and the overlooks the pool on the other end.

Working Drawings- Temple Landscape

Entrance to the Township- Landscape Plan

Portfolio

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“VIVERRA AND TIDE AND TURF” Landscape and Architecture for Tide n Turf Clubhouse, Temple landscape and Viverra Township, Vadodara, Gujarat

M/s. Beyond Green (Architecture | Landscape Architecture)

Temple Landscape Plan

Portfolio

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“VIVERRA AND TIDE AND TURF” Landscape and Architecture for Tide n Turf Clubhouse, Temple landscape and Viverra Township, Vadodara, Gujarat

M/s. Beyond Green (Architecture | Landscape Architecture)

tide n turf clubhouse

working drawings- architecture of the clubhouse

Portfolio

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M/s. Beyond Green (Architecture | Landscape Architecture)

“VIVERRA AND TIDE AND TURF” Landscape and Architecture for Tide n Turf Clubhouse, Temple landscape and Viverra Township, Vadodara, Gujarat

pool drawings of the clubhouse

working drawings of the clubhouse

Portfolio

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“CLOUD 9”

M/s. Beyond Green (Architecture | Landscape Architecture)

Riverfront Development project and Residential Landscape, Vadodara, Gujarat

“Cloud 9” The riverfront happens at different levels sloping into each other and forming different courts; they being the halt points in the project. The project unravels itself in the form of different courts; each having a different theme. The architecture and landscape of each court depends upon its theme; each of them happening at different levels and the walkways slide onto different levels; giving a different view to the lake from different points. The landscape leads to the villas on the other side of the lake.

working drawings

Portfolio

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“CLOUD 9”

Riverfront Development project and Residential Landscape, Vadodara, Gujarat

M/s. Beyond Green (Architecture | Landscape Architecture)

working drawings

Portfolio

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“PEEPS..!”

Mural design for a play court for Residential Landscape of Aura, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

M/s. Beyond Green (Architecture | Landscape Architecture) “Peeps” This project is a blast of colours amidst a residential complex. The playcourt is a sunken court; almost 2 m from the ground level. The mural involes eyes with different expressions painted on the walls surrounding the court with a huge neem tree in the center; protecting it from harsh sunlight . The equipments also compliment the colour palette of the walls.

Play court-Aura

Portfolio

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THESIS PROJECT

To Transform : Urban Fringe and Beyond, Restructuring the Core, Old City, Hyderabad, Guided by: Prof. Yatin Pandya

Dissertation Thesis (Bachelors in Architecture) PROLOGUE Why Do We Study The City ? The city is a uniquely powerful form of human settlement: a physical and social environment with potential for both satisfying and frustrating the entire spectrum of human needs. But, the connection between city and a broader culture is no less evident today. Understanding the city is therefore, crucial in comprehending modern coexistence. Hence the main focus is on urbanism and qualities related to urban space and essential characteristics of an urban city. The problems faced by old city areas and people living in it today are the reasons behind the loss of life, vitality in old city areas. Hence justifying urban restructuring can be one of the potential solutions and Museums , Pedestrianization, Reuse of Voids and planning for better spaces can be proposed as means of doing so. The issues to be addressed are- Loss Of Identity And Vitality, Unused Voids And Unplanned Social Spaces, Cluttered Street Scape, Chaotic Edges.

North-South Spine of Hyderabad

The main aim is to create a place which could display the architecture of the city in all possible visible and documentary forms, giving an idea as to how, the physical characteristics of the hierarchy, the architecture, spatial organization, scale and the history of the city can be incorporated through the various elements in the design process.

Museums Of India

Street facades of the Pattergatti arcade and shaded walkway

Old Walled Cities of India: Old Walled City of Indore

Portfolio

Site Photis: Gateway to the main street

Old City of Ahmedabad

Site Photis: market streets and gates

Walled City of Jaipur

Old Walled City of Hyderabad, Master Plan, Scale 1:3000

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THESIS PROJECT

To Transform : Urban Fringe and Beyond, Restructuring the Core, Old City, Hyderabad, Guided by: Prof. Yatin Pandya

Dissertation Thesis (Bachelors in Architecture) AIMS AND INTENTIONS The problems faced by old city areas and people living in it today are the reasons behind the loss of life, vitality in old city areas. Hence justifying urban restructuring can be one of the potential solutions and Museums , Pedestrianization, Reuse of Voids and planning for better spaces can be proposed as means of doing so. The issues to be addressed are- Loss Of Identity And Vitality, Unused Voids And Unplanned Social Spaces, Cluttered Street Scape, Chaotic Edges. WHY MUSEUMS ?? Focuses on cultural image of the society Provide a base for “urban restructuring plans� to the city. Reaffirms image of the city. Generates revenue for economic sector of the city. Generates job for people of the city. DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS : 1. The built mass portrays role of edge or structures on the edge. 2. The main passages leading to built mass portray role of main streets. 3. The secondary passages leading to private courtyards portray the role of tertiary streets. 4. The open spaces/public plazas carved out due to intersection of passage ways which form foci for internal activities portray role of junctions/chowks.

Hyderabad - Old City- Analysis And Proposals

Master Plan - Old City, Hyderabad

Portfolio

Considerations - Relation and application between built and existing.

Old City - Pedestrianisation

Existing

THE MAIN IDEA IS: 1. To provide for a planned platform for hawkers, vendors and an unobstructed path of movement for pedestrians. 2. To clear off the clutter from Pattergatti arcade stretch by providing signages, street lamps and street furniture. 3. To provide for public amenities like kiosks, public toilets, bus stops, planned parking spaces, cafeterias, seating spaces, small eating joints etc. 4. To display history of city through small installations and facade treatment for pedestrians.

Proposed

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THESIS PROJECT

To Transform : Urban Fringe and Beyond, Restructuring the Core, Old City, Hyderabad, Guided by: Prof. Yatin Pandya

Dissertation Thesis (Bachelors in Architecture) The main aim is to create a place which could display architecture of city in all possible visible and documentary forms, giving an idea as to how, physical characteristics of hierarchy, architecture, spatial organisation, scale and history of city can be incorporated through various elements in design process. DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS : 1. The Dargah and masjid are important heritage structures on the site. 2. Since the site falls on the major junction that connects Old City and Secunderabad, two major axis are to be taken into consideration. These considerations would influence built and open in the design. 3. The open-built relationship is kept so as to form open spaces which are public as well as private. 4. They altogether form a loop which leads to open structures surrounding heritage structures, which are to be treated as public plazas . THE MAIN IDEA IS: 1. To provide for open spaces adjacent to existing structures, to be viewed as public plazas, replicating plazas in the old city; Jama Masjid plaza. 2. To provide for connections between built spaces acting as bridges and also covering plaza areas. 3 .To provide for shaded public plazas on edge of main junction forming spill over space. 4. To provide for connections between masses forming bridges and built mass altogether serving as gateway - an essential character of old city.

Concept Model - ‘1’

Concept Model - ‘2’

Concept Model - ‘3’

Concept Model - ‘4’

Concept Model - ‘5’

Model Photos

Portfolio

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THESIS PROJECT

To Transform : Urban Fringe and Beyond, Restructuring the Core, Old City, Hyderabad, Guided by: Prof. Yatin Pandya

Dissertation Thesis (Bachelors in Architecture) THE EXISITING OLD CITY OF HYDERABAD: PATTERGATTI STREET The Charmianr road, Pattergatti street arcade is the oldest arcade made up of stone and is completely commercial in nature. The paving extended out form the arcade acts as platform for the hawkers, vendors, pedestrians and the activities on the edge related to them. The pavement is too narrow to accommodate the huge amount of dense activities happening on the edge. THE PROPOSAL: PATTERGATTI STREET The idea is to extend the pavement by a margin of 5 m so that the hawkers and vendors as well as the pedestrians have a planned platform and the main road is cleared off the chaos . Hence the idea is to clear off the clutter and plan spaces in a such a way that they act as live installations to the people coming to visit the old city.

Master Plan, Old City of Hyderabad- Blown Up, Scale 1:2500

THE PROCESS The Dargah and the masjid are the existing structures on the site which are important heritage structures. Since the site falls on tot a major junction that connects the old city and Secunderabad, the two major axis, are to be taken into considerations, which would possibly influence the built and the open in the design.The open and built relationship is kept so as to form open spaces which are public as well as private. They altogether for a loop an also leads to the open spaces leading to the heritage structures, which are to be treated as plazas for public activity. THE DESIGN The idea is to have a planned platform for the pedestrians on the edge and for the traffic. The street is a living example of the architecture of the city and the clutter and visual hindrances prevent the following. Hence the idea is to clear off the clutter and plan spaces in a such a way that they act as live installations to the people coming to visit the old city, as well as enlighten them with the history of the city in the form of live examples.

City Museum- Ground Floor Plan, Scale 1:2000

City Museum- First Floor Plan, Scale 1:2000 Nodal Plans 1.-paved chowks with seating spaces 2.-parking niches 3.-permanant structures for hawkers and vendors 4.-kiosks(public toilets, telephone booths etc) 5.-planned niches for hawkers and vendors 6.-seating spaces with display pannels 7.-voids turned into planned parking spaces 8.-bus stop

Nodal Plans

conceptuals for street design

Portfolio

Model Photos

Master Plan- Old Walled City of Hyderabad Scale 1:3000

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Profile for shrutirao

Shruti Rao  

Masters in Architecture- CEPT University, Portfolio

Shruti Rao  

Masters in Architecture- CEPT University, Portfolio

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